Press Releases

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Showing releases 1301-1325 out of 1409.

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Public Release: 21-May-2014
NASA sees developing tropical cyclone in Bay of Bengal
A tropical low pressure area known as System 92B has been organizing in the Northern Indian Ocean's Bay of Bengal and NASA's TRMM satellite has shown strong thunderstorms and heavy rainfall in the developing storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-May-2014
Transactions of the American Fisheries Society
Dam removal improves shad spawning grounds, may boost survival rate
Research from North Carolina State University finds that dam removal improves spawning grounds for American shad and seems likely to improve survival rates for adult fish, juveniles and eggs -- but for different reasons.
US Fish and Wildlife Service

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 21-May-2014
EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing
New tide gauge uses GPS signals to measure sea level change
A new way of measuring sea level using satellite navigation system signals, for instance GPS, has been implemented by scientists at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. Sea level and its variation can easily be monitored using existing coastal GPS stations, the scientists have shown.

Contact: Robert Cumming
robert.cumming@chalmers.se
46-704-933-114
Chalmers University of Technology

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Humpback whale subspecies revealed by genetic study
A new genetic study has revealed that populations of humpback whales in the oceans of the North Pacific, North Atlantic and Southern Hemisphere are much more distinct from each other than previously thought, and should be recognized as separate subspecies. Understanding how connected these populations are has important implications for the recovery of these charismatic animals that were once devastated by hunting.
New Zealand Royal Society, Lenfest Ocean Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Rachel Law
raclaw@bas.ac.uk
44-012-232-21437
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bottom trawling causes deep-sea biological desertification
A study led by scientists from the Polytechnic University of Marche -- Ancona, Italy -- involving researchers from the Institute of Marine Sciences and the Autonomous University of Barcelona, has determined that fishing trawling causes intensive, long-term biological desertification of the sedimentary seabed ecosystems, diminishing their content in organic carbon and threatening their biodiversity.

Contact: Maria Jesus Delgado
MariaJesus.Delgado@uab.cat
34-935-814-049
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Public Release: 19-May-2014
Geology
Mars mineral could be linked to microbes
Scientists have discovered that living organisms on Earth were capable of making a mineral that may also be found on Mars.

Contact: Press Office
media@anu.edu.au
61-261-257-979
Australian National University

Public Release: 19-May-2014
Reviews in Fish­eries Sci­ence & Aqua­cul­ture
Better science for better fisheries management
Northeastern University researchers are studying, in the first of a series of research articles, how various types of fishing gear can impact the Northeast region's fisheries.

Contact: Casey Bayer
c.bayer@neu.edu
617-373-2592
Northeastern University

Public Release: 19-May-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Brain steroids make good dads
Insights from a highly social fish can help understand how other androgenic steroids, like testosterone, can shape a male's parenting skills, according to a recent Georgia State University research study.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, National Science Foundation, Georgia State University

Contact: LaTina Emerson
lemerson1@gsu.edu
404-413-1353
Georgia State University

Public Release: 19-May-2014
Report finds site of mega-development project in Mexico is a biodiversity hotspot
Cabo Pulmo is a close-knit community in Baja California Sur, Mexico, and the best preserved coral reef in the Gulf of California. But the lands adjacent to the reef are under threat from a mega-development project, 'Cabo Dorado,' should construction go ahead. Scientists at the University of California, Riverside have published a report on the terrestrial biodiversity of the Cabo Pulmo region that shows the project is situated in an area of extreme conservation value.
Ocean Foundation, David & Lucile Packard Foundation, Moebius Partners LLC

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 19-May-2014
ZooKeys
The spot-tail golden bass: A new fish species from deep reefs of the southern Caribbean
Smithsonian scientists describe a new species of small coral reef sea bass from underexplored deep-reef depths of Curaçao, southern Caribbean. With predominantly yellow body and fins, the new species, Liopropoma santi, more closely resembles the other two 'golden basses' found together with it at Curaçao, L. aberrans and L. olneyi, than the striped species that occur on shallower reefs. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Carole C. Baldwin
baldwinc@si.edu
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 19-May-2014
Current Biology
How octopuses don't tie themselves in knots revealed by Hebrew University scientists
Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers have discovered how octopuses avoid getting tangled up in themselves. Their results suggest that a chemical signal in octopus' skin inhibits sucker grabbing so that octopuses don't grab onto themselves. The researchers hope their findings will lead to new classes of robots and control systems, and are sharing their findings with European Commission project STIFF-FLOP, which aims to develop a flexible surgical manipulator in the shape of an octopus arm.
European Commission EP-7 projects STIFF-FLOP and OCTOPUS

Contact: Dov Smith
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82844
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Public Release: 19-May-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Antarctica's ice losses on the rise
Three years of observations show that the Antarctic ice sheet is now losing 159 billion tonnes of ice each year -- twice as much as when it was last surveyed.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Chris Bunting
c.j.bunting@leeds.ac.uk
44-011-334-32049
University of Leeds

Public Release: 18-May-2014
Nature Geoscience
Cutoff switch may limit spread, duration of oxygen minimum zones
A new study examining the impact of iron released from continental margin sediments has documented a natural limiting switch that may keep these ocean systems from developing a runaway feedback loop that could lead to unchecked hypoxic areas, or persistent 'dead zones.'
National Science Foundation

Contact: Florian Scholz
fscholz@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-1429
Oregon State University

Public Release: 18-May-2014
Nature Geoscience
Greenland will be far greater contributor to sea rise than expected
Greenland's icy reaches are far more vulnerable to warm ocean waters from climate change than had been thought, according to new research by UC Irvine and NASA glaciologists. The work, published today in Nature Geoscience, shows previously uncharted deep valleys stretching for dozens of miles under the Greenland Ice Sheet.

Contact: Janet Wilson
janet.wilson@uci.edu
213-880-8948
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 16-May-2014
Science
Researchers call for better ocean stewardship
NSU researcher Tracey Sutton, Ph.D., joins colleagues from organizations around the world who specialize in studying and exploring the deepest regions of our oceans to pen a cautionary tale that urges we take a critical look at how we're treating our seas.

Contact: Joe Donzelli
jdonzelli@nova.edu
954-262-2159
Nova Southeastern University

Public Release: 15-May-2014
Geological Society of America Bulletin
On the shoulder of a giant: Precursor volcano to the island of O'ahu discovered
Researchers recently discovered that O'ahu, Hawai'i, actually consists of three major Hawaiian shield volcanoes, not two, as previously thought. Extending almost 100 km WNW from the western tip of the island of O'ahu is the submarine Ka'ena Ridge, a region that has now been recognized to represent a precursor volcano to the island of O'ahu, and on whose flanks the Wai'anae and Ko'olau Volcanoes later formed.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 15-May-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
The color of blood: Pigment helps stage symbiosis in squid
The relationship between the Hawaiian bobtail squid and the bacterium Vibrio fischeri is well chronicled, but writing in the current issue of the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, a group led by University of Wisconsin-Madison microbiologists Margaret McFall-Ngai, Edward Ruby and their colleagues adds a new wrinkle to the story.
Marie Curie Actions, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Margaret McFall-Ngai
mjmcfallngai@wisc.edu
608-262-2393
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 15-May-2014
Journal of African Earth Sciences
Richest marine reptile fossil bed along Africa's South Atlantic coast is dated at 71.5 million years ago
New research at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, is the first to tie the stable carbon isotope record of Africa's South Atlantic coast to global records. This record clarifies the age of rocks at Bentiaba, Angola. The work provides a 71.5 million year age for the richest marine reptile fossil bed along the South Atlantic. The new record of time represents nearly 30 million years of Cretaceous fossils and environments in the ancient South Atlantic Ocean.
National Geographic Society, Petroleum Research Fund

Contact: Margaret Allen
mallen@smu.edu
214-768-7664
Southern Methodist University

Public Release: 15-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Learning from sharks
Genetically engineered antibodies are deployed successfully in cancer diagnostics and therapy. Therapeutic antibodies against Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis are currently under development. An important criterion when designing suitable antibody fragments is their stability. Comparing the antibodies of sharks with those of humans, a team of researchers at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen and the Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen discovered stabilizing mechanisms that can also be applied to optimize custom-tailored antibodies for medical applications.
German Research Foundation, European Molecular Biology Organization, Swedish Research Council, National Institute of Health, German National Academic Foundation

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 15-May-2014
Global Ecology and Biogeography
Marine scientists use JeDI to create world's first global jellyfish database
An international study, led by the University of Southampton, has led to the creation of the world's first global database of jellyfish records to map jellyfish populations in the oceans.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 15-May-2014
Science
West Antarctic Ice Sheet collapse is under way
Models using detailed topographic maps show that the collapse of the West Antarctic ice sheet has begun. Fast-moving Thwaites Glacier, which acts as a linchpin on the rest of the ice sheet, will likely disappear in a matter of centuries.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 15-May-2014
Current Biology
How octopuses don't tie themselves in knots
An octopus's arms are covered in hundreds of suckers that will stick to just about anything, with one important exception. Those suckers generally won't grab onto the octopus itself; otherwise, the impressively flexible animals would quickly find themselves all tangled up.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Scientists test hearing in Bristol Bay beluga whale population
How well do marine mammals hear in the wild? WHOI biologist Aran Mooney and his colleagues are the first to publish a study of hearing in a population of wild marine mammals.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Ecology
Turtle migration directly influenced by ocean drift experiences as hatchlings
New research has found that adult sea-turtle migrations and their selection of feeding sites are directly influenced by their past experiences as little hatchlings adrift in ocean currents.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Research reveals New Zealand sea lion is a relative newcomer
The modern New Zealand sea lion is a relative newcomer to our mainland, replacing a now-extinct, unique prehistoric New Zealand sea-lion that once lived here, according to a new study.
Marsden Fund

Contact: Dr. Catherine Collins
catherine.collins01@gmail.com
University of Otago

Showing releases 1301-1325 out of 1409.

<< < 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 > >>