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Showing releases 151-175 out of 1409.

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Public Release: 13-Mar-2015
NASA sees major Tropical Cyclone Pam near Vanuatu
The Southern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Cyclone Pam was a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead. Aqua saw the eye of the major hurricane just to the east of Vanuatu.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Mar-2015
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
River algae affecting mercury pollution at Superfund site, Dartmouth-led study shows
Dartmouth scientists and their colleagues have found that periphyton -- a community of algae, bacteria and other natural material living on submerged surfaces -- is helping to transform mercury pollution from a Superfund site along a New Hampshire river into a more toxic form of the metal.

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 13-Mar-2015
Tropical Cyclone Olwyn landfalls as NASA's Terra satellite flies overhead
Shortly after Tropical Cyclone Olwyn made landfall near Cape Cuvier in Western Australia early on March 13, NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Mar-2015
Environmental Sciences Europe
Novel monitoring tools tackle chemical surface waters pollution
In the context of the Water Framework Directive, a European report on aquatic effect-based monitoring tools has been published with the aim of supporting the Directive's monitoring programs: surveillance, operational and investigative. Published in Springer's journal Environmental Sciences Europe, the paper 'The European technical report on aquatic effect-based monitoring tools under the water framework directive' summarizes the technical contents and findings of the report with the aim of strengthening the link between science and regulation.

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 12-Mar-2015
Limnology & Oceanography
Naturally acidic waters of Puget Sound surround UW's Friday Harbor Labs
Two years of measurements in Puget Sound show that these waters naturally tend to be more acidic, with 13 to 22 percent of the unusual acidity due to human-driven climate change.
Education Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 12-Mar-2015
Satellite sees rare subtropical storm 90Q in southern Atlantic
The Brazilian Navy Hydrographic Centre reported that a sub-tropical storm had formed on March 11 near east of the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, the southeastern most state in Brazil.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Mar-2015
Tropical Cyclone Pam gives NASA an eye-opening view
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Pam as it continued intensifying in the Southern Pacific Ocean and captured an image of the storm's 20 nautical mile-wide, cloud-filled eye. Pam is a strong Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale and is strengthening.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Mar-2015
NASA measures Tropical Cyclone Nathan's winds near Queensland Coast
The RapidScat instrument aboard the International Space Station analyzed Tropical Cyclone Nathan's winds while NASA's Terra satellite provided an overall look at the extent of the storm along Queensland, Australia's Cape York Peninsula.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Mar-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Olwyn nearing landfall in Australia
Tropical Cyclone Olwyn was close to making landfall in the northern region of Western Australia when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead. The Australian Bureau of Meteorology has posted several warnings.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Mar-2015
TRMM satellite finds heavy rain in Tropical Storm Bavi
After Tropical Storm Bavi formed in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's TRMM satellite passed overhead and found heavy rain occurring in the western quadrant of the storm. A tropical storm watch is in effect for Ujae and Enewetakin in the western Marshall Islands as Bavi nears.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Mar-2015
Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences
Ponds are disappearing in the Arctic
Ponds in the Arctic tundra are shrinking and slowly disappearing, according to a new study by University of Texas at El Paso researchers.

Contact: Veronique Masterson
news@utep.edu
915-747-5526
The University of Texas at El Paso

Public Release: 12-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Tracking marine plankton provides new information to reconstruct past climate
A new study from an international team of scientists uncovered new information about the tiny, globetrotting organisms commonly used to reconstruct past climate conditions. The findings can aid in improving our understanding of past global climate conditions.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 12-Mar-2015
NOAA expands Cordell Bank, Gulf of the Farallones marine sanctuaries off California
Cordell Bank and Gulf of the Farallones national marine sanctuaries off northern California will both more than double in size following a final rule released today by NOAA. The expansion will help to protect the region's marine and coastal habitats, biological resources and special ecological features.

Contact: Keeley Belva
keeley.belva@noaa.gov
301-643-6463
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 12-Mar-2015
Inspiring Geology for 50 Years: Geoscientists to Meet in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, USA
Inspiring geology for 50 years: Geoscientists to meet in Bretton Woods, N.H., USA
Geoscientists from the Northeastern US and beyond will convene in Bretton Woods, N.H., on 23-25 March to discuss hot-topic science, expand on current findings, and explore the region's unique geologic features. This event is expected to draw more than 1,000 attendees from a variety of geoscience disciplines. Topics include climate change, coastal and glacial processes, paleo-archaeology, eco-hydrology, and the life cycle of water produced via hydraulic fracturing of the Marcellus and Utica shales.

Contact: Christa Stratton
cstratton@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
NASA-JAXA's GPM sees birth of Tropical Depression 3W in northwestern Pacific
The third tropical depression of the northwestern Pacific Ocean typhoon season has formed in eastern Micronesia as NASA-JAXA's GPM satellite gathered rainfall data on the developing storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
NASA captures birth of Tropical Cyclone Olwyn headed for northwestern Australia
NASA's Aqua satellite saw newly formed Tropical Cyclone Olwyn nearing northwestern Australia on March 11 when it passed overhead. Meanwhile, Tropical Cyclone Nathan was threatening northeastern Australia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Nathan begin circling near Queensland coast
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of Tropical Cyclone Nathan as it was beginning to make a cyclonic loop near the eastern coast of Queensland's Cape York Peninsula on March 11.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Fisheries Oceanography
New research reveals low-oxygen impacts on West Coast groundfish
New research by NOAA Fisheries and Oregon State University finds that low-oxygen waters projected to expand with climate change create winners and losers among deep-dwelling groundfish. Some species are adapted to handle low-oxygen conditions such as those increasingly documented off the West Coast, while the same conditions drive other species away.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Bigelow Laboratory's Shimmield recognized for contributions to oceanography
Graham Shimmield, executive director of Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean received the Society for Underwater Technology's President's Award 2014, given annually to a member of the international ocean community. The Society for Underwater Technology focuses on underwater technology, ocean science, and offshore engineering. Shimmield was recognized for bridging the space between science, industry, and academia. He serves as Chair of INSITE, providing independent scientific, evidence-based information on the impact of man-made structures in the North Sea.

Contact: Darlene Trew Crist
dtcrist@bigelow.org
207-315-2567 x103
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
TRMM sees large and more powerful Cyclone Pam, warnings posted
The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite saw powerful towering thunderstorms in Tropical Cyclone Pam, indicating the storm was strengthening as it moved through the Solomon Islands. Pam has now triggered warnings in the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and New Zealand.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
PLOS ONE
Scientists reconstruct evolutionary history of whale hearing
Changes in ear bone development in the womb paralleled changes observed throughout whale evolution, providing new insight about how whales adapted to hearing underwater.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
PLOS ONE
Rapid coastal population growth may leave many exposed to sea-level rise
The number of people potentially exposed to future sea level rise and associated storm surge flooding may be highest in low-elevation coastal zones in Asia and Africa.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
PLOS ONE
Iron-oxidizing bacteria found along Mid-Atlantic Ridge
Bacteria that live on iron were found for the first time at three well-known vent sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. These bacteria likely play an important role in deep-ocean iron cycling, and are dominant members of communities near and adjacent to sulfur-rich hydrothermal vents prevalent along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This group of iron-oxidizing bacteria, Zetaproteobacteria, appears to be restricted to environments where iron is plentiful, suggesting they are highly evolved to utilize iron for energy.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Darlene Trew Crist
dtcrist@bigelow.org
207-315-2567 x103
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
BioScience
A sea change for ocean resource management
Ocean ecosystems around the world are threatened by overfishing, extensive shipping routes, energy exploration, pollution and other consequences of ocean-based industry. Data exist that could help protect these vulnerable ecosystems, but current management strategies often can't react quickly enough to new information. San Diego State University biologist Rebecca Lewison and colleagues from several other academic, governmental and non-governmental organizations endorse a new approach called 'dynamic ocean management' in a paper published today in BioScience.

Contact: Beth Chee
bchee@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-4563
San Diego State University

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
PLOS ONE
Scientists reconstruct evolutionary history of whale hearing with rare museum collection
The National Museum of Natural History's research team CT scanned fetal whale specimens from the museum's marine mammal collection to trace the development of fetal ear bones in 56 specimens from 10 different whale families. Their findings confirmed that changes in the development of ear bones in the womb paralleled changes observed throughout whale evolution, providing new insight about how whales made the dramatic evolutionary shift from land to sea and adapted to hearing underwater.
Peter Buck Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Katie Sabella
sabellak@si.edu
202-633-2950
Smithsonian

Showing releases 151-175 out of 1409.

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