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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 151-175 out of 1315.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Astrobiology
UEA research shows oceans vital for possibility for alien life
Researchers at the University of East Anglia have made an important step in the race to discover whether other planets could develop and sustain life. New research published today in the journal Astrobiology shows the vital role of oceans in moderating climate on Earth-like planets. Until now, computer simulations of habitable climates on Earth-like planets have focused on their atmospheres. But the presence of oceans is vital for optimal climate stability and habitability.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
NASA sees powerful thunderstorms in Tropical Storm Matmo
Strong thunderstorms reaching toward the top of the troposphere circled Tropical Storm Matmo's center and appeared in a band of thunderstorms on the storm's southwestern quadrant. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed very cold temperatures that indicated the high cloud tops in the powerful storms.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Ecological Indicators
UM-led research team contributes to the management of South Florida coastal environments
A Florida-based marine research team has developed a unique formal process and modeling framework to help manage South Florida's economically important coastal marine environments.
NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
786-256-4446
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
NASA sees super typhoon Rammasun eyeing landfall
Imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite captured a wide-eyed Typhoon Rammasun as it was making landfall in northern Hainan Island, China early on July 18. A rainfall analysis using another NASA satellite showed the flooding potential of the storm as it left the Philippines and headed for China. Now, Rammasun is headed for a final landfall near the northeastern border of Vietnam and China.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
NASA satellite catches birth of Tropical Storm Wali near Hawaii
The first tropical cyclone of the season has formed in the Central Pacific Ocean as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead. Tropical Storm Wali formed southeast of the Big Island of Hawaii, and now that it's nearing, a Flash Flood Watch has been posted for all of the islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Microplastics worse for crabs and other marine life than previously thought, study shows
The tiny plastic particles polluting our seas are not only orally ingested by marine creatures, but also enter their systems through their gills, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter.
CleanSeas

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
44-078-273-09332
University of Exeter

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
GSA Bulletin
Catastrophic debris avalanches -- a second volcanic hazard
Volcanic hazards aren't limited to eruptions. Debris avalanche landslides can also cause a great deal of damage and loss of life. Stratovolcanoes, with their steep, conical shapes made up of lava and unconsolidated mixed materials, can reach a critical point of instability when they overgrow their flanks. This leads to partial collapse, and the product of this slope failure is a large-scale, rapid mass movement known as a catastrophic landslide or debris avalanche.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Nature
Tiniest catch: University of Arizona scientists' fishing expedition reveals viral diversity in the sea
Using bacteria as bait, University of Arizona scientists caught wild ocean viruses and then deciphered their genomes. They learned that the genetic lines between virus types in nature are less blurred than previously thought.
Department of Energy, University of Arizona/Biosphere 2, University of Arizona/BIO5 Institute, National Science Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Daniel Stolte
stolte@email.arizona.edu
520-626-4402
University of Arizona

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Atlantic salmon also show capacity to adapt to warmer waters
Populations of Atlantic salmon have a surprisingly good capacity to adjust to warmer temperatures that are being seen with climate change, a group of scientists at the University of Oslo and University of British Columbia have discovered. The finding about Atlantic species adds to recent University of British Columbia-supported research on heat tolerance of Pacific salmon.

Contact: Nick Lewis
nick.lewis@ubc.ca
604-822-2234
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees birth of Tropical Depression 10W
The tenth tropical depression of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean was born as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite adds up Typhoon Rammasun's Philippines deluge
Typhoon Rammasun dropped large amounts of rainfall over the Philippines, and the TRMM satellite was used to measure it from space. Rammasun is now making its way toward Hainan Island, China.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Ecology and Society
Study led by indigenous people uncovers grizzly bear 'highway'
A novel, First Nations-led research collaboration has revealed a previously undocumented grizzly bear aggregation in coastal British Columbia, one of the most southerly aggregations of salmon-feeding grizzlies in North America. Using non-invasive DNA analysis, the authors describe a grizzly bear 'highway,' identifying nearly 60 individual bears, many who travelled hundreds of miles from surrounding areas to feed on autumn-spawning salmon in the Koeye River.
The Nature Conservancy, Wilburforce Foundation, Disney Worldwide Conservation Foundation, American Museum of Natural History

Contact: Kendra Snyder
ksnyder@amnh.org
212-496-3419
American Museum of Natural History

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Water Resources Research
The rate at which groundwater reservoirs are being depleted is increasing
In what parts of the world and to what degree have groundwater reservoirs been depleted over the past 50 years? The Frankfurt hydrologist Prof. Petra Döll has been researching this using the global water model WaterGAP. Her conclusion: The rate at which groundwater reservoirs are being depleted is increasing, but that the rate is not as high as previously estimated.
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Contact: Anke Sauter
sauter@pvw.uni-frankfurt.de
0049-069-798-12498
Goethe University Frankfurt

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Biological Conservation
Duck migration study reveals importance of conserving wetlands, MU researchers find
During the 2011 and 2012 migration seasons, University of Missouri researchers monitored mallard ducks with new remote satellite tracking technology, marking the first time ducks have been tracked closely during the entirety of their migration from Canada to the American Midwest and back. The research revealed that mallards use public and private wetland conservation areas extensively as they travel hundreds of miles across the continent.

Contact: Nathan Hurst
hurstn@missouri.edu
573-882-6217
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
NASA sees Typhoon Rammasun exit the Philippines
Typhoon Rammasun passed through the central Philippines overnight and NASA satellite imagery showed that the storm's center moved into the South China Sea. NASA's TRMM satellite showed the soaking rains that Rammasun brought to the Philippines as it tracked from east to west.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Environmental Science & Technology Letters
Dispersant from Deepwater Horizon spill found to persist in the environment
A new study has found that the dispersant compound DOSS, which decreases the size of oil droplets and hampers the formation of large oil slicks, remains associated with oil and can persist in the environment for up to four years.

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Tracking the breakup of Arctic summer sea ice
An international team has placed sensors on and under Arctic sea ice to monitor this season's retreat. Scientists hope to understand the physics of the ice edge in order to predict summer conditions in the Arctic Ocean.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
New study links dredging to diseased corals
In a world-first study published today, researchers say dredging activity near coral reefs can increase the frequency of diseases affecting corals. 'At dredging sites, we found more than twice as much coral disease than at our control sites,' says the lead author of the study, Joe Pollock, a PhD candidate from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and the Australian Institute of Marine Science. 'Corals require both light and food to survive.'
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Joe Pollock
Frederic.Pollock1@jcu.edu.au
61-756-412-342
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Nature
New view of Rainier's volcanic plumbing
By measuring how fast Earth conducts electricity and seismic waves, a University of Utah researcher and colleagues made a detailed picture of Mount Rainier's deep volcanic plumbing and partly molten rock that will erupt again someday.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Indus river dolphin's declining range
Removal of river water for irrigation and habitat fragmentation by irrigation dams were shown to be the principal factors contributing to the decline of the Indus river dolphin.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Whale shark fringe migration
At the fringe of the whale shark range, the volcanic Azore islands may play an increasing role for the north Atlantic population as sea surface temperatures rise.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Dust models, Arctic Ocean waves, floods and climate change
Global climate models fail to simulate key dust characteristics.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
2014 Mycological Society of America Annual Meeting
Scientists gear up to fight deadly snake fungal disease
Researchers have developed a faster and more accurate way to test for infection with Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola, a fungus that is killing snakes in the Midwest and eastern United States. The test also allows scientists to monitor the progression of the infection in living snakes.
Illinois Wildlife Preservation Fund Grant Program

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
NASA sees Typhoon Rammasun's eye staring at Visayas, Philippines
Early on July 15, Typhoon Rammasun began making landfall in the eastern part of the central Philippines and NASA's Aqua and TRMM satellites spotted the 20 nautical-mile-wide (23 mile/37 km) eye of the storm close to landfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Researchers find organic pollutants not factor in turtle tumor disease
A new study by a team at the Hollings Marine Laboratory casts doubt on long-held suspicions that persistent organic pollutants in the environment make green turtle more susceptible to the virus that causes fibropapilomatosis, a disease that forms large benign tumors that can inhibit the animal's sight, mobility and feeding ability.

Contact: Michael E. Newman
michael.newman@nist.gov
301-975-3025
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Showing releases 151-175 out of 1315.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>


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