Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 151-175 out of 1734.

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Public Release: 22-Mar-2016
Lake Erie phosphorus-reduction targets challenging but achievable
Large-scale changes to agricultural practices will be required to meet the goal of reducing levels of algae-promoting phosphorus in Lake Erie by 40 percent, a new University of Michigan-led, multi-institution computer modeling study concludes.
Fred A. and Barbara M. Erb Family Foundation

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
University of Michigan

Public Release: 22-Mar-2016
Nature Communications
Nitrogen factories in the Cretaceous oceans
Researchers have discovered a 'bizarre' microorganism which plays a key role in the food web of Earth's oceans.

Contact: Philippa Walker
philippa.walker@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-7777
University of Bristol

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite sees Emeraude weakening
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Emeraude on March 21 as it continued weakening in the Southern Indian Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
Conservation Letters
Protecting 30 percent of the ocean has many benefits, study suggests
Protecting large stretches of the ocean from human influence may well be good for conservation. But a new study by University of York scientists Professor Callum Roberts and Dr Bethan O'Leary suggests that setting aside at least 30 percent of it would also benefit fishermen and other stakeholders.
The Pew Charitable Trusts

Contact: Alistair Keely
alistair.keely@york.ac.uk
44-019-043-22153
University of York

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
Bioinvasion ecology: 'Biological Invasions in Aquatic and Terrestrial Systems'
New book presents a clear and accessible understanding of biological invasions, its impacts, patterns and mechanisms in both aquatic and terrestrial systems. It demonstrates the latest theories and models, including data and examples of the most influential vectors of invasions in marine invertebrates, vascular plants, freshwater fishes, insects, amphibians and reptiles.

Contact: Maria Hrynkiewicz
maria.hrynkiewicz@degruyteropen.com
48-660-476-421
De Gruyter Open

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tiny water flea, big cost: Scientists say invasive species impacts much worse than thought
A new study shows the economic and ecological impact of invasive species in the Great Lakes has been dramatically underestimated. In fact, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a single non-native species in a single inland lake has racked up $80 million to $163 million in damage.

Contact: Jake Walsh
jransom.walsh@gmail.com
651-717-5883
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
Nature Geoscience
Human carbon release rate is unprecedented in the past 66 million years of Earth's history
New research published today in Nature Geoscience by Richard Zeebe, professor at the University of Hawai'i - Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), and colleagues looks at changes of Earth's temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) since the end of the age of the dinosaurs. Their findings suggest humans are releasing carbon about 10 times faster than during any event in the past 66 million years.
National Science Foundation and European Union

Contact: Richard Zeebe
zeebe@soest.hawaii.edu
808-956-6473
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
Current Biology
Old tourist photos show seabird's rise over the last century
Researchers reporting in Current Biology on March 21 have used tourist photos from Stora Karlsö to reconstruct the rise and fall of common guillemots, one of the largest auk species. Those data show that the guillemots suffered early in the 20th century, but their numbers have now risen to a historically high level. They also demonstrate the power of amateur photos and other unconventional sources of evidence to help fill gaps in the scientific record.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 20-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Hot larvae: Calculating dispersal from unique submarine hot spring ecosystems
Larval dispersal from hydrothermal vent fields quantified in order to understand and protect the creatures found there.

Contact: Kaoru Natori
kaoru.natori@oist.jp
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University

Public Release: 18-Mar-2016
NASA sees heavy rain in Tropical Cyclone Emeraude
Heavy rainfall was occurring Tropical Cyclone Emeraude when the Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and measured the rainfall rate.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Mar-2016
Scientific Reports
Ocean acidification takes a toll on California's coastline at nighttime
A new study, based on the most-extensive set of measurements ever made in tide pools, suggests that ocean acidification will increasingly put many marine organisms at risk by exacerbating normal changes in ocean chemistry that occur overnight. Conducted along California's rocky coastline, the study shows that the most-vulnerable organisms are likely to be those with calcium carbonate shells or skeletons.

Contact: Ken Caldeira
kcaldeira@carnegiescience.edu
650-704-7212
Carnegie Institution for Science

Public Release: 17-Mar-2016
Science of the Total Environment
Mercury rising?
Researchers at UCSB's Earth Research Institute study potential mercury methylation in two California rivers.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 17-Mar-2016
BioScience
Biological field stations: Keeping a pulse on our planet
A recent BioScience paper provides the first comprehensive inventory of the world's biological field stations. Its authors report 1,268 stations are operating in 120 countries -- from the tropics to the tundra, monitoring terrestrial, freshwater, and marine ecosystems. Long-term data collected by biological field stations are essential for underpinning environmental research, assessing environmental policies, and advancing conservation goals.

Contact: Lori Quillen
quillenl@caryinstitute.org
845-677-7600 x121
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Public Release: 17-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Galapagos lakes reveal tropical Pacific climate since Biblical times
Sediments track 2,000 years of El Niño and tropical rain band history, showing the strength can vary over centuries.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 17-Mar-2016
NASA examines powerful Tropical Cyclone Emeraude's winds, clouds
Tropical Cyclone Emeraude continued to strengthen in the Southern Indian Ocean as NASA captured infrared temperature data of the storm's clouds and measured its surface wind speed.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Mar-2016
Science
Green Gitmo
Following President Obama's plans to close the military prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, a conservation biologist and a professor of law are proposing to transform the naval base into a marine research center and international peace park.

Contact: Joshua Brown
joshua.e.brown@uvm.edu
802-656-3039
University of Vermont

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
Bronze bell recovered from World War II aircraft-carrying submarine off Oahu coast
During a test dive last week, the Hawai'i Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL) recovered the bronze bell from the I-400 -- a World War II-era Imperial Japanese Navy mega-submarine, lost since 1946 when it was intentionally sunk by US forces after its capture.
Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory, University of Hawaii

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
Nature
Viruses 'piggyback' on host microbes' success
It has generally been assumed that in a growing population of microbes, viruses also multiply and kill their hosts, keeping the microbial population in check. A recent study of virus-host dynamics near coral reefs led by SDSU virologists suggests that, under certain conditions, viruses can change their infection strategy. As potential host microbes become more numerous, some viruses forego rapid replication and opt instead to reside peaceably inside their host, thereby reducing their the viruses' numbers.
Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, National Science Foundation, Brazilian National Research Council, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Michael Price
mprice@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-0389
San Diego State University

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
Ecological Engineering
Wetland enhancement in Midwest could help reduce catastrophic floods of the future
Restoration of wetlands in the Midwest could significantly reduce peak river flows during floods -- not only now, but also in the future if heavy rains continue to increase in intensity, as climate models predict. New financial models and flood management policies may be needed to actually accomplish this.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency

Contact: Meghna Babbar-Sebens
meghna@oregonstate.edu
541-737-8536
Oregon State University

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
Remote Sensing of Environment
New technique tracks 'heartbeat' of hundreds of wetlands
University of Washington researchers have developed a new method to track how wetlands in Eastern Washington behave seasonally, which will also help monitor how they change as the climate warms.
US Geological Survey, DOI/Northwest Climate Science Center, University of Washington/Precision Forestry Cooperative

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
NASA's Aqua Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone 16P form in Gulf of Carpentaria
The sixteenth tropical cyclone of the Southern Pacific Ocean season was forming in the southern Gulf of Carpentaria on March 16 as NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible picture of the storm. The storm is already headed for landfall in Queensland, Australia, and is not expected to strengthen.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
Nature Communications
Coral on a chip cracks coral mysteries
Growing corals in the lab reveals their complex lives.

Contact: Yael Edelman
yael.edelman@weizmann.ac.il
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
NASA's GPM spots Tropical Cyclone Emeraude developing
Tropical Cyclone Emeraude developed early on March 16 in the Southern Indian Ocean, but NASA's GPM core satellite saw the storm coming together the day before.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
ZooKeys
Free database shows where to find some of the world's most toxic snakes
To find banded sea kraits, ask a guy in Cleveland. Or at least look up his work. Iulian Gherghel, who is earning a Ph.D. in biology at Case Western Reserve University, teamed with researchers in Oklahoma and Europe to create a database of the snakes' distribution.

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
Geophysical Research Letters
Winter storms of 2013-14 the most energetic to hit western Europe since 1948, study shows
The repeated storms which battered Europe's Atlantic coastline during the winter of 2013-14 were the most energetic in almost seven decades, new research has shown. They were part of a growing trend in stormy conditions which scientists say has the potential to dramatically change the equilibrium state of beaches along the western side of the continent, leading to permanent changes in beach gradient, coastal alignment and nearshore bar position.

Contact: Lauren Lipuma
llipuma@agu.org
202-777-7396
American Geophysical Union

Showing releases 151-175 out of 1734.

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