EurekAlert! - Marine Science Portal
  EurekAlert! Login | Main Page | Press Releases | Press Release Archive | Multimedia Gallery | Resources | Calendar | EurekAlert!
{TOPLEFTPHOTOALTTEXT}

Main Page
Press Releases
Multimedia Gallery
Resources
Calendar
EurekAlert! Home
EurekAlert! Login

 Search News Archive:
   
 Advanced Search
Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 151-175 out of 1348.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Breezy science, plant studies and more head to space station on SpaceX-4
Plant science, wind monitors, 3-D printers and more head to the space station on SpaceX-4. The SpaceX Dragon cargo resupply vehicle is scheduled to launch to the orbiting laboratory in the early morning of Sept. 20.

Contact: Laura Niles
Laura.E.Niles@nasa.gov
281-244-7069
NASA/Johnson Space Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
NASA eyes Tropical Storm Fung-Wong move through Northwestern Pacific
Tropical Storm Fung-Wong continued to affect the Philippines while moving north through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared data on the storm's clouds that showed some high, strong thunderstorms with the potential for heavy rainfall over the northern and central regions of the country. The storm is now expected to affect three more countries over the next several days.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm playing polo with western Mexico
Tropical Storm Polo is riding along the coast of western Mexico like horses in the game of his namesake. NASA's Aqua satellite saw Polo about 300 miles south-southeast of Baja California on its track north.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
NASA, NOAA satellites show Odile's remnant romp through southern US
Former Hurricane Odile may be a bad memory for Baja California, but the remnants have moved over New Mexico and Texas where they are expected to bring rainfall there. NASA's TRMM satellite measured Odile's heavy rainfall rates on Sept. 18, and NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw the clouds associated with the former storm continue to linger over the US Southwest on Sept. 19.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
NASA catches a weaker Edouard, headed toward Azores
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Atlantic Ocean and captured a picture of Tropical Storm Edouard as it continues to weaken.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
GSA Bulletin
Tree rings and arroyos
A new GSA Bulletin study uses tree rings to document arroyo evolution along the lower Rio Puerco and Chaco Wash in northern New Mexico, USA. By determining burial dates in tree rings from salt cedar and willow, investigators were able to precisely date arroyo sedimentary beds 30 cm thick or greater. They then combined this data with aerial imagery, LiDAR, longitudinal profiles, and repeat surveys to reconstruct the history of these arroyos.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Microplastic pollution discovered in St. Lawrence River sediments
A team of researchers from McGill University and the Quebec government have discovered microplastics widely distributed across the bottom of the St. Lawrence River, the first time such pollutants have been found in freshwater sediments. Their research was published this month in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences.

Contact: Jenny Ryan
jenny.ryan@nrcresearchpress.com
Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
NASA sees western edge of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong affecting Philippines
The NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite saw the western edge of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong over the central Philippines on Sept. 18. Fung-Wong developed on Sept. 17 as Tropical Depression 16W, and strengthened into a tropical storm by 5 p.m. EDT on Sept. 17.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
NASA marks Polo for a hurricane
Hurricane Polo still appears rounded in imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite, but forecasters at the National Hurricane Center expect that to change.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Edouard enter cooler waters
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite and Aqua satellite gathered data on Hurricane Edouard's rainfall, clouds and waning power is it continued moving northward in the Atlantic into cooler waters. On Sept. 18, NASA's Global Hawk #872 set out to investigate Edouard again as the storm is expected to weaken to a tropical storm
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Journal of Ecology
Tropical fish a threat to Mediterranean Sea ecosystems
The tropical rabbitfish which have devastated algal forests in the eastern Mediterranean Sea pose a major threat to the entire Mediterranean basin if their distribution continues to expand as the climate warms, a new study warns. Researchers surveyed more than 1000 kilometers of coastline in Turkey and Greece, where two species of plant-eating rabbitfish have become dominant, and found regions with abundant rabbitfish had become rocky barrens.

Contact: Deborah Smith
deborah.smith@unsw.edu.au
61-047-849-2060
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Science
Changes in coastal upwelling linked to temporary declines in marine ecosystem
In findings of relevance to both conservationists and the fishing industry, new research links short-term reductions in growth and reproduction of marine animals off the California Coast to increasing variability in the strength of coastal upwelling currents -- currents which historically supply nutrients to the region's diverse ecosystem.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
2014 AGU Fall Meeting
AGU Fall Meeting: Press registration open, book hotel now
Discover the latest Earth and space science news at the 47th annual AGU Fall Meeting this December, when about 22,000 scientists from around the globe are expected to assemble for the largest worldwide conference in the Earth and space sciences. This year, the meeting runs from Monday through Friday, Dec. 15-19, at the Moscone Center, 747 Howard St., San Francisco, Calif.

Contact: Mary Catherine Adams
mcadams@agu.org
202-777-7530
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Edouard far from US, but creating rough surf
Although NASA's Aqua satellite showed that Hurricane Edouard is far from US soil, it is powerful enough that it is creating dangerous swells along the US East Coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Polo intensifying
Tropical storm warnings now issued for a portion of the Southwestern coast of Mexico as Polo continues to strengthen. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed powerful thunderstorms around the center of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA sees Odile soaking Mexico and southwestern US
Tropical Storm Odile continues to spread moisture and generate strong thunderstorms with heavy rainfall over northern Mexico's mainland and the Baja California as well as the southwestern US. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite measured rainfall rates from space as it passed over Odile.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Coral growth rate plummets in 30-year comparison
A team of researchers working on a Carnegie expedition in Australia's Great Barrier Reef has documented that coral growth rates have plummeted 40 percent since the mid-1970s. The scientists suggest that ocean acidification may be playing an important role in this perilous slowdown.
Moore Foundation

Contact: Ken Caldeira
kcaldeira@carnegiescience.edu
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kalmaegi weakening over Vietnam
Tropical Storm Kalmaegi made landfall on Sept. 17 near the border of Vietnam and China and moved inland. Soon after the landfall as a typhoon, NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and captured an image of the weaker tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Biological Conservation
Cape Cod saltmarsh recovery looks good, falls short
In some places Cape Cod's imperiled saltmarsh grasses have been making a comeback, but a new study reports that their ability to protect the coast has not returned nearly as fast as their healthy appearance would suggest.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Coral Reefs
Study finds Great Barrier Reef is an effective wave absorber
New research has found that the Great Barrier Reef, as a whole, is a remarkably effective wave absorber, despite large gaps between the reefs. This means that landward of the reefs, waves are mostly related to local winds rather than offshore wave conditions.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
PLOS ONE
Expedition finds Nemo can travel great distances to connect populations
Clownfish spend their entire lives nestling in the protective tentacles of host anemones, but new research shows that as babies they sometimes travel hundreds of kilometres across the open ocean. Although the process of long-distance dispersal by reef fish has been predicted, this is the first time that the high level exchange of offspring between distant populations has been observed.

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Nature
What set the Earth's plates in motion?
Professor Patrice Rey, from the University of Sydney's School of Geoscience, and his colleagues have a new explanation for the origin of plate tectonics.

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
verity.leatherdale@sydney.edu.au
61-042-529-6802
University of Sydney

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
PLOS ONE
Nemo's epic journey to find a new home
New research has found clownfish larvae can swim up to 400 kilometres in search of a home, which makes them better able to cope with environmental change. It's the furthest distance they've been able to track the dispersal of any coral reef fish and the findings show how connected the marine environment can be.
Natural Environment Research Council, Royal Society, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Études, Davis Trust, University of Edinburgh Development Trust, Carnegie Trust, BS-AC Jubilee Trust, Weir Trust

Contact: Hugo Harrison
hugo.harrison@my.jcu.edu.au
61-049-952-3939
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Transparent larvae hide opaque eyes behind reflections
Transparency is almost the perfect form of camouflage, however, transparent animals with compound eyes have a problem. Each eye unit is shielded from the next with opaque pigment to prevent light leakage, making the opaque eyes conspicuous. However, scientists from the University of Maryland Baltimore County have discovered that mantis shrimp larvae camouflage their opaque eyes with reflections that color match the light in their surroundings.
US Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Kathryn Knight
kathryn@biologists.com
44-012-234-25525
The Company of Biologists

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Counting fish teeth reveals regulatory DNA changes behind rapid evolution, adaptation
Threespine sticklebacks, small fish found around the globe, undergo rapid evolutionary change when they move from the ocean to freshwater lakes, losing their armor and gaining more teeth in as little as 10 years. UC Berkeley biologist Craig Miller shows that this rapid change results not from mutations in functional genes, but changes in regulatory DNA. He pinpoints a gene that could be responsible for teeth, bone or jaw deformities in humans, including cleft palate.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Showing releases 151-175 out of 1348.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>


HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US    TOP
Copyright ©2014 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science