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Showing releases 176-200 out of 1358.

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Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Nature
Atmospheric warming heats the bottom of ice sheets, as well as the top
New research shows for the first time that meltwater from the surface of an ice cap in northeastern Greenland can make its way beneath the ice and become trapped, refilling a subglacial lake. This meltwater provides heat to the bottom of the ice sheet and could make the ice sheet move faster and alter how it responds to the changing climate. These groundbreaking findings provide new information about atmospheric warming and its affect on the critical zone at the base of the ice.

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Chemosphere
Simple soil mixture reverses toxic stormwater effects
A simple column of common soil can reverse the toxic effects of urban runoff that otherwise quickly kills young coho salmon and their insect prey, according to new research by Washington State University, NOAA Fisheries and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The affordable and remarkably effective treatment offers new promise for controlling toxic pollutants that collect on paved surfaces and wash off as stormwater into rivers, streams and the ocean.
US Environmental Protection Agency, NOAA/Coastal Storms Program, The Russell Family Foundation

Contact: Jenifer McIntyre
jen.mcintyre@wsu.edu
206-369-1832
Washington State University

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Scientists drilling first deep ice core at the South Pole
The 40,000-year record will be the first deep core from this part of Antarctica, and the first record longer than 3,000 years collected south of 82 degrees latitude. The exceptional cold at the South Pole preserves trace gases better than at other locations.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP sees remnants of Mekkhala
After Tropical Storm Mekkhala made landfall in the central Philippines and tracked north, it weakened to a depression. By Jan. 20, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite saw that it was a remnant circulation northeast of the Philippines, over the northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
The once-powerful Tropical Cyclone Bansi stirred up ocean sediment
Tropical Cyclone Bansi reached a Category 4 status on the Saffir-Simpson Scale on Jan. 15 and 16 as it moved through the Southern Indian Ocean. By Jan. 19 as the storm was weakening over open ocean, NASA's Aqua satellite captured a picture of sediment stirred up from the storm around the Cargados Carajos Shoals.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Climate change does not bode well for picky eaters
In a part of the world that is experiencing the most dramatic increase in temperature and climate change, two very similar species of animals are responding very differently. New research published today suggests that how these species have adapted to co-exist with one another might be to blame.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Alison Satake
asatake@lsu.edu
225-578-3870
Louisiana State University

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
PeerJ
'Citizen science' reveals positive news for Puget Sound seabirds
Many seabird species are thought to have declined around Puget Sound since the 1960s and 1970s but the new results indicate the trends have turned up for many species. The Puget Sound Partnership lists some of the species as barometers of the health of Puget Sound.
Boeing, Sustainable Path Foundation, Russell Family Foundation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Patagonia.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Biggest fish in the ocean receives international protection
Tuna and other fish species may congregate around whale sharks, but new rule reduces the chance that the giant sea creatures could get caught in nets targeting those species.

Contact: Jim Milbury
jim.milbury@noaa.gov
562-980-4006
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 19-Jan-2015
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology
Paleontologist names 9-foot-long 'predator croc' that preceded dinosaurs
Virginia Tech paleontologist Sterling Nesbitt's latest addition to the paleontological vernacular is Nundasuchus, a 9-foot-long carnivorous reptile with steak knife-like teeth and bony plates on the back.

Contact: Rosaire Bushey
busheyr@vt.edu
540-231-5035
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 19-Jan-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Giant atmospheric rivers add mass to Antarctica's ice sheet
Extreme weather phenomena called atmospheric rivers were behind intense snowstorms recorded in 2009 and 2011 in East Antarctica. The resulting snow accumulation partly offset recent ice loss from the Antarctic ice sheet, report researchers from KU Leuven.

Contact: Irina Gorodetskaya
irina.gorodetskaya@ees.kuleuven.be
32-163-72169
KU Leuven

Public Release: 19-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Predatory sea snails produce weaponized insulin
The venom of a tropical cone snail contains large amounts of specialized insulin that rapidly disables fish. Discoverers at the University of Utah say this stripped-down version of the hormone may prove useful in studying insulin function and energy metabolism in people.
National Institutes of Health, European Commission

Contact: Joe Rojas-Burke
joe.rojas@utah.edu
801-585-6861
University of Utah

Public Release: 16-Jan-2015
NASA spots newborn Tropical Storm Chedza making landfall
Tropical Storm Chedza rapidly intensified from a tropical low pressure area to a tropical storm during the morning hours on Jan. 16 near Madagascar's southwestern coast. NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and captured an image of the newborn storm's quick landfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Jan-2015
NASA sees a smaller eye in a stronger Tropical Cyclone Bansi
Tropical Cyclone Bansi's eye was wide open as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead on Jan. 15. As Bansi strengthened on Jan. 16, the eye decreased in size.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Jan-2015
Satellite sees heavy rain in Tropical Storm Mekkhala on its approach to Philippines
The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite analyzed Tropical Storm Mekkhala and identified areas of heavy rainfall as the storm drew closer to the Philippines.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
Heart arrhythmias detected in deep-diving marine mammals
A new study of dolphins and seals shows that despite their remarkable adaptations to aquatic life, exercising while holding their breath remains a physiological challenge for marine mammals. The study, published Jan. 15 in Nature Communications, found a surprisingly high frequency of heart arrhythmias in bottlenose dolphins and Weddell seals during the deepest dives.
US Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Genetics Society of America names John Postlethwait as recipient of George W. Beadle Award
The Genetics Society of America is pleased to announce that John H. Postlethwait, Ph.D., has been selected to receive the Society's George W. Beadle Award for outstanding contributions to the community of genetics researchers. The award, whose namesake was a Nobel laureate and geneticist, recognizes Dr. Postlethwait's seminal contributions to the zebrafish community. Dr. Postlethwait will receive the honor next week at GSA's 6th Strategic Conference of Zebrafish Investigators, Jan. 17-21, in Pacific Grove, Calif.

Contact: Raeka Aiyar
raiyar@genetics-gsa.org
202-412-1120
Genetics Society of America

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Science
Nearly half the systems crucial to stability of planet compromised
Almost half of the processes that are crucial to maintaining the stability of the planet have become dangerously compromised by human activity. That is the view of an international team of 18 researchers who provide new evidence of significant changes in four of the nine systems which regulate the resilience of the Earth.

Contact: Elena Bennett
Elena.Bennett@mcgill.ca
McGill University

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Bansi's eye almost quadruple in area
Tropical Cyclone Bansi reached Category 4 hurricane status earlier this week and developed an eye. As the storm weakened to a Category 2 storm on Jan. 14 the eye became cloud-filled. When NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over on Jan. 15, the storm re-strengthened back to a Category 4 and the eye was again visible and almost quadrupled in width.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
NASA's GPM satellite sees Tropical Storm mekkhala organizing
Tropical Depression Mekkhala strengthened and organized on Jan. 14 and overnight into Jan. 15 when it reached tropical storm status. As the storm was consolidating, NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite captured rainfall data of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Current Biology
For sea turtles, there's no place like magnetic home
Adult sea turtles find their way back to the beaches where they hatched by seeking out unique magnetic signatures along the coast, according to new evidence from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Contact: Thania Benios
thania_benios@unc.edu
919-962-8596
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Science
Wildlife loss in the global ocean
Over the past 500 years, approximately 500 land-based animal species have gone the way of the dodo, becoming extinct as a result of human activity. In the ocean, where scientists count only 15 or so such losses, the numbers currently aren't nearly as dire.

Contact: Julie Cohen
media@bren.ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Science
Tiny plant fossils a window into Earth's landscape millions of years ago
A team led by the University of Washington has discovered a way to determine the tree cover and density of trees, shrubs and bushes in locations over time based on clues in the cells of plant fossils preserved in rocks and soil. Quantifying vegetation structure throughout time could shed light on how the Earth's ecosystems changed over millions of years.
National Science Foundation, Geological Society of America, University of Washington, Burke Museum

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Current Biology
For sea turtles, there's no place like magnetic home
Adult sea turtles find their way back to the beaches where they hatched by seeking out unique magnetic signatures along the coast, according to new evidence reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Jan. 15.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
Frontiers in Microbiology
New species discovered beneath ocean crust
Researchers have found a new species of sulfate-breathing microbes locked away in an aquifer that flows underneath the ocean floor.
National Science Foundation, NASA Astrobiology Institute

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
Mark A. Cane selected as fellow of the Oceanography Society
The Oceanography Society would like to congratulate Professor Mark A. Cane on being selected as the newest Fellow of The Oceanography Society. The citation on Professor Cane's certificate recognizes him for contributions to the understanding and prediction of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation and the tropical oceans and their effects on climate and society. Professor Cane will be formally recognized during the Ocean Sciences Meeting, Feb. 21-26, 2016, in New Orleans, La.

Contact: Jennifer Ramarui
jenny@tos.org
301-251-7708
The Oceanography Society

Showing releases 176-200 out of 1358.

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