{TOPLEFTPHOTOALTTEXT}
 
Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 176-200 out of 1322.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Stunning finds from ancient Greek shipwreck
A Greek and international team of divers and archaeologists has retrieved stunning new finds from an ancient Greek ship that sank more than 2,000 years ago off the remote island of Antikythera. The rescued antiquities include tableware, ship components, and a giant bronze spear that would have belonged to a life-sized warrior statue.

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
NASA's Aqua Satellite tracking Super Typhoon Vongfong in the Philippine Sea
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Super Typhoon Vongfong as it tracked through the Philippine Sea on Oct. 9. Instrument aboard Aqua captured visible and infrared images of the now Category 4 Super Typhoon.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Satellite movie shows Hurricane Simon's remnants moving through US
NOAA's GOES-East satellite has captured visible and infrared images of Hurricane Simon since birth, and a new animation of the data created by NASA shows Simon's landfall in Mexico and movement into the US Southwest.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
NASA eyes Tropical Cyclone Hudhud as Warnings posted for East-Central India
NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Tropical Cyclone Hudhud on Oct. 9 and took a picture of the storm that showed it was still somewhat elongated, but more organized than the previous day.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
EurOcean 2014
Human health, wealth require expanded marine science, experts say
Toxic nanoparticles, micro-plastic pollution and the potential of rising seawater temperatures to transform chemicals at a molecular level into 'substances able to stimulate / participate in tumour genesis' are among concerns behind a collective call by 340 scientists and other experts for greater scrutiny of the close connections between the oceans and human health.   A program on oceans and human health is the first of 18 priorities cited in a declaration ending the three-day EurOcean 2014 meeting in Rome.

Contact: Terry Collins
tc@tca.tc
416-538-8712
European Marine Board

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Designing rivers: Environmental flows for ecosystem services in rivers natural and novel
Authors discuss different approaches to achieving 'environmental flows' of water to sustain river ecosystems, from controlled releases designed with specific objectives for ecology and ecosystem services in mind, like the recent experiment on the Colorado River, to hands-off policies that minimize or reverse alterations to the natural flow of the river, like the recent demolition of dams on the Elwha River in Washington State.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
NASA sees newborn Tropical Storm Hudhud in Northern Indian Ocean
The Northern Indian Ocean has awakened after a tropical slumber and created Tropical Storm Hudhud on Oct. 8 and NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
Two NASA satellites get data on category 5 Super Typhoon Vongfong
Two NASA satellites provided data on clouds, rainfall and the diameter of the eye of Super Typhoon Vongfong as it turned north in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Rivers recover natural conditions quickly following dam removal
A study of the removal of two dams in Oregon suggests that rivers can return surprisingly fast to a condition close to their natural state, both physically and biologically, and that the biological recovery might outpace the physical recovery. In the end, the large pulse of sediment from dam removal simply isn't that big a problem.
Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, National Marine Fisheries Service

Contact: Desirée Tullos
tullosd@engr.orst.edu
541-737-2038
Oregon State University

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
NASA sees Simon spreading over US Southwest
The remnants of Hurricane Simon were fanning out over the desert Southwestern US on Oct. 8 and NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on the thunderstorms expected to bring flash flooding.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Fine-tuning of bitter taste receptors may be key to animal survival
Authors Behrens et al, showed that chicken taste receptors are 'broadly tuned' for bitter taste, whereas six frog taste receptors are mixed, consisting of broadly as well as narrowly tuned receptors. In general, individual substances activated different receptors in clearly separated concentration ranges, which may also provide a clue to the role of bitter taste diversity in enhancing the chance of survival.

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
480-258-8972
Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Slime-producing molecules help spread disease from cats to sea otters
Sticky polymers that form slimy biofilms and large, waterborne particles speed the transmission of a parasitic disease from cats to marine snails to endangered sea otters in California's coastal waters, this study finds.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Pat Bailey
pjbailey@ucdavis.edu
530-752-9843
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Mid-Atlantic states release course of action, convene experts on deep sea canyon science
The Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean has recently adopteda course of action to consider and develop recommendations to strengthen federal protection of submarine canyon habitats. The Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean recommendations to federal agencies will be based on synthesis of existing data.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Arlo Hemphill
ahemphill@midatlanticocean.org
202-746-3484
Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Satellite sees Tropical Storm Simon over Baja California
NOAA's GOES-West satellite took a picture of Tropical Storm Simon weakening over Mexico's Baja California.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
NASA eyes Super typhoon Vongfong
Typhoon Vongfong strengthened into a Super typhoon on Tuesday, Oct. 7, as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
ZooKeys
The unexamined diversity in the 'Coral Triangle'
Research on zoantharians, a group of animals related to corals and anemones, by researchers James Reimer of the University of the Ryukyus in Okinawa, Japan, Angelo Poliseno of Universita Politecna delle Marche in Italy, and Bert Hoeksema from Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Netherlands, has demonstrated how little we know about marine diversity in the so-called 'center of marine biodiversity' located in the central Indo-Pacific Ocean. The study was published in the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: James D. Reimer
jreimer@sci.u-ryukyu.ac.jp
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
NASA adds up Japan's soaking rains from Typhoon Phanfone
Typhoon Phanfone packed heavy rainfall as it brushed over Japan and NASA's TRMM satellite identified where the rain fell. That data was used to make a map of rainfall totals.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Oct-2014
Nature Climate Change
Livermore scientists suggest Southern Hemisphere ocean warming underestimated
Using satellite observations and a large suite of climate models, Lawrence Livermore scientists have found that long-term ocean warming in the upper 700 meters has likely been underestimated.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Oct-2014
North American Journal of Fisheries Management
Are Montana's invasive fish in for a shock?
A new paper from the Wildlife Conservation Society, Montana State University, Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, and the US Geological Survey looks at the feasibility of electrofishing to selectively remove invasive trout species from Montana streams as an alternative to using fish toxicants known as piscicides that effect all gill-breathing organisms.

Contact: Scott Smith
ssmith@wcs.org
718-220-3698
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 6-Oct-2014
Tracing our ancestors at the bottom of the sea
A new European Marine Board report recommends exploration of sea-submerged settlements abandoned by our ancestors.

Contact: Nan-Chin Chu
nchu@esf.org
32-059-340-154
European Science Foundation

Public Release: 2-Oct-2014
Science
New map uncovers thousands of unseen seamounts on ocean floor
Scientists have created a new map of the world's seafloor, offering a more vivid picture of the structures that make up the deepest, least-explored parts of the ocean.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 2-Oct-2014
Science
New map exposes previously unseen details of seafloor
Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and their colleagues have created a new map of the world's seafloor. Twice as accurate as the previous version, the new map features a much more vivid picture of seafloor structures, including thousands of previously uncharted mountains.
National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, ConocoPhillips

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 2-Oct-2014
Global Ecology and Biogeography
On invasive species, Darwin had it right all along, study shows
Based on insights first articulated by Charles Darwin, professors at Brown University and Syracuse University have developed and tested the 'evolutionary imbalance hypothesis' to help predict species invasiveness in ecosystems. The results suggest the importance of accounting for the evolutionary histories of the donor and recipient regions in invasions.

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Biology Letters
New study first to document the voices of fish larvae
A new study from researchers at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science is the first to document that fish larvae produce sound. These 'knock' and 'growl' sounds may help small larvae maintain group cohesion in the dark.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Udel
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
NASA sees intensifying typhoon Phanfone heading toward Japan
An intensifying typhoon called Phanfone that originated east of Guam on Sept. 28, 2014 is headed toward southern Japan. The TRMM satellite crossed above Typhoon Phanfone on Oct. 1, 2014 at 1039 UTC and gathered data about rainfall rates occurring in the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 176-200 out of 1322.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>