Press Releases

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Showing releases 176-200 out of 1449.

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Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Deep Sea Research II
Dispersant used to clean Deepwater Horizon spill more toxic to corals than the oil
The dispersant used to remediate the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is more toxic to cold-water corals in lower concentrations than the spilled oil.
Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative

Contact: Preston M. Moretz
pmoretz@temple.edu
215-204-4380
Temple University

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Environmental Science & Technology
Road salt guidelines need review to protect food chain in lakes: York U study
The study, conducted in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, suggests that lake and highway authorities consider adjusting road salt use protocols to protect aquatic life such as the water flea, by taking the nutritional status of the lakes into account. In particular, the study suggests revising the Water Quality Guideline for chloride, especially for lakes near winter-maintained roads on the Canadian Shield that tend to have very low nutrient levels.

Contact: Gloria Suhasini
suhasini@yorku.ca
416-736-4354
York University

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Global Solutions to Regional Problems: Collecting Global Expertise to Address the Problem of Harmful
U-M researchers track the toxicity of Lake Erie cyanobacterial blooms
Efforts to reduce the amount of phosphorus and other nutrients washing off farm fields and into Lake Erie shifted into overdrive after high levels of a bacterial toxin shut down the drinking water supply to more than 400,000 Toledo-area residents last August.
University of Michigan Water Center

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Science
Greatest mass extinction driven by acidic oceans, study finds
Changes to the Earth's oceans, caused by extreme volcanic activity, triggered the greatest extinction of all time, a study suggests.
International Centre for Carbonate Reservoirs, Natural Environment Research Council, Leverhulme Trust, German Research Foundation, Marsden Fund

Contact: Corin Campbell
corin.campbell@ed.ac.uk
44-131-650-6382
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Current Biology
Ocean myth busted: 'Toddler' sea turtles are very active swimmers
It turns out sea turtles, even at a tender 6-18 months of age, are very active swimmers. They don't just passively drift in ocean currents as researchers once thought. NOAA and University of Central Florida researchers say it's an important new clue in the sea turtle 'lost years' mystery. Where exactly turtles travel in their first years of life, before returning to coastal areas as adults to forage and reproduce, has puzzled scientists for decades.

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Cell
In the sea, a deadly form of leukemia is catching
Outbreaks of leukemia that have devastated some populations of soft-shell clams along the east coast of North America for decades can be explained by the spread of cancerous tumor cells from one clam to another. Researchers call the discovery, reported in the Cell Press journal Cell on April 9, 2015, 'beyond surprising.'
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Nature
Recovery potential for the world's coral reef fish
A simple test of the number of fish living on a coral reef can be used as a road map to restore degraded reefs and fishers' livelihoods according to a global study published in the journal Nature.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Mysteries of the deep
Scientists who have spent much of their careers in deep-sea submersibles observing coral and sponges are sharing their experiences and expertise through innovative online seminars.

Contact: Michael Milstein
Michael.Milstein@noaa.gov
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
NASA analyzes rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Joalane
NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's GPM satellite provided scientists with a look 'under the hood' of Tropical Cyclone Joalane's clouds at the rate in which rain was falling throughout the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Nature
Recipe for saving coral reefs: Add more fish
Fish are the key ingredients in a new recipe to diagnose and restore degraded coral reef ecosystems, according to scientists from the Australian Institute of Marine Science, the Wildlife Conservation Society, James Cook University and other organizations in a new study in the journal Nature.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
NASA-NOAA satellite sees the end of Tropical Cyclone Ikola
Strong vertical wind shear has taken a toll on Tropical Cyclone Ikola and that was pretty clear in a visible-light image from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite today, April 8.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Palaeontology
Newly discovered ancient arthropod lived hundreds of millions of years ago
The Burgess Shale Formation, in the Canadian Rockies of British Columbia, is one of the most famous fossil locations in the world. A recent Palaeontology study introduces a 508 million year old (middle Cambrian) arthropod -- called Yawunik kootenayi -- from exceptionally preserved specimens of the new Marble Canyon locality within the Burgess Shale Formation.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Paleobiology
X-raying the past: New insights into the life of extinct marine creatures
Using state-of-the-art imaging techniques, palaeontologists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have been examining extinct marine creatures. Quantitative analyses provide new evidence that ammonites were able to swim using their shell -- very much like the recent nautilus. For the purpose of the study, the researchers, together with partners from the industry, developed an evaluation process for high-res CT images. The science magazine 'RUBIN' reports about the results.

Contact: Dr René Hoffmann
Rene.Hoffmann@rub.de
49-234-322-7769
Ruhr-University Bochum

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Complex bacterial challenge in fight against deadly amphibian disease
New research from The University of Manchester and the Institute of Zoology has shed light on the complex challenge facing scientists battling one of the world's most devastating animal diseases.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Morwenna Grills
Morwenna.Grills@manchester.ac.uk
44-016-127-52111
University of Manchester

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
New study hints at spontaneous appearance of primordial DNA
The self-organization properties of DNA-like molecular fragments four billion years ago may have guided their own growth into repeating chemical chains long enough to act as a basis for primitive life, says a new study by the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Milan.
Italian Ministries of Education, Universities and Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Noel Clark
noel.clark@colorado.edu
303-492-6420
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Expedition will sample crater left by dinosaur-killing asteroid
An international research team is formalizing plans to drill nearly 5,000 feet below the seabed to take core samples from the crater of the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs. The group met last week in Merida, Mexico, a city within the nearly 125-mile-wide impact site, to explain the research plans and put out a call for scientists to join the expedition planned for spring 2016.
European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling, International Ocean Discovery Program, International Continental Scientific Drilling Program

Contact: Monica Kortsha
mkortsha@jsg.utexas.edu
512-471-2241
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
EARTH: Kamikaze typhoons spared Japan from Kublai Kahn
In a small lake along the Japanese coast, scientists have found evidence of turbulent waters centuries ago. These telltale signs of severe weather in the geologic record support the legend of the two kamikaze typhoons that protected Japan from Mongol invasion.

Contact: Maureen Moses
mmoses@americangeosciences.org
703-379-2480
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Optics Express
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, US Navy develop next-gen temperature sensor to measure ocean dynamics
Temperature is one of the key variables in studying the ocean. A fiber-optic sensor developed by University of Nebraska-Lincoln engineers and the US Naval Research Laboratory can register significantly smaller temperature changes, roughly 30 times faster than existing commercial sensors.

Contact: Ming Han
mhan@unl.edu
402-472-9618
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Ecology Letters
Northern coastal marshes more vulnerable to nutrient pollution
Salt marshes at higher latitudes, including those in densely populated coastal regions of New England and Europe, are more vulnerable to the effects of eutrophication, which, if left unchecked, can trigger intense overgrazing by marsh herbivores that can destabilize marshes and reduce their ability to defend shorelines from erosion. Geography and evolution both play roles in making these marshes more susceptible to nutrient loading and overgrazing than their counterparts in the tropics.
National Science Foundation, Edward S. Stolarz Foundation

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
How many organisms do live in this aquatic habitat?
A new measurement method has been developed at Hiroshima University, Japan. The aim of this method is to estimate the distribution of aquatic animals using droplet digital polymerase chain reaction in order to quantify the number of target DNA copies present. This technique can be applied for habitat research on rare or non-native species in the field.
Japan Ministry of the Environment, Hiroshima University

Contact: Norifumi Miyokawa
pr-research@office.hiroshima-u.ac.jp
Hiroshima University

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Nature Geoscience
Western Canada to lose 70 percent of glaciers by 2100
Seventy percent of glacier ice in British Columbia and Alberta could disappear by the end of the 21st century, creating major problems for local ecosystems, power supplies, and water quality, according to a new study.

Contact: Garry Clarke
clarke@eos.ubc.ca
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Fishing amplifies forage fish collapses
A new study implicates fishing in the collapse of forage fish stocks and recommends risk-based management tools that would track a fishery's numbers and suspend fishing when necessary.
Pew Charitable Trusts

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Nature Climate Change
We can fix the Great Barrier Reef
Leading coral reef scientists say Australia could restore the Great Barrier Reef to its former glory through better policies that focus on science, protection and conservation.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 3-Apr-2015
International Geology Review
New evidence shows carbon's importance to ocean life's survival 252 million years ago
A new study led by UT Arlington Earth & Environmental Scientists shows for the first time how carbon offered a mode of survival for some ocean life after one of the greatest mass extinctions in the history of Earth.

Contact: Bridget Lewis
blewis@uta.edu
817-272-3317
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 3-Apr-2015
NASA catches a tropical cyclone's birth in 3-D
Tropical Cyclone 05W was born in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on April 3 west of the island of Pohnpei when the GPM satellite passed over it and analyzed its rainfall rates. That GPM data was made into a 3-D image that showed some high thunderstorms northwest of its center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 176-200 out of 1449.

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