Press Releases

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Showing releases 176-200 out of 1746.

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Public Release: 18-Dec-2015
NASA sees remnants of Tropical Depression 29W over Southern Philippines
Tropical Depression 29W was being battered by vertical wind shear from the day it formed and just two days later it dissipated as it reached the southern Philippines. NASA's Aqua satellite captured temperature data on the storms within the remnant low pressure area after it made landfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Dec-2015
NASA finds huge rainfall totals from Typhoon Melor over Philippines
NASA'S Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM data collected from Dec. 12-17, 2015, were used to update Typhoon Melor's rainfall totals. The central Philippines received the largest amount of rainfall that measured almost three feet.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Dec-2015
Biomacromolecules
POSTECH team creates a more durable protein hydrogel based on elastic silk-like protein
Dr. Hyung Joon Cha's research team at POSTECH, Korea, examined the behavior of sea anemone to create a mechanically durable hydrogel. Their creation of an aneroin hydrogel provides significantly stronger properties than those of collagen, gelatin, and elastin. The mechanically durable and biologically favorable aneroin hydrogel shows clear advantages and could be used in various biomedical applications, especially for cell-containing biomaterials, cell-carrier patches, bio-artificial grafts, and burn dressing materials. Their research was published in Biomacromolecules.
Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries of Korea

Contact: YunMee Jung
ymjung@postech.ac.kr
82-542-792-417
Pohang University of Science & Technology (POSTECH)

Public Release: 18-Dec-2015
Nature Communications
Life exploded on Earth after slow rise of oxygen
It took 100 million years for oxygen levels in the oceans and atmosphere to increase to the level that allowed the explosion of animal life on Earth about 600 million years ago, according to a UCL-led study funded by the Natural Environment Research Council.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Rebecca Caygill
r.caygill@ucl.ac.uk
44-020-310-83846
University College London

Public Release: 17-Dec-2015
Researcher studies fish populations at world's second largest freshwater lake
Catherine Wagner, a University of Wyoming assistant professor in the Department of Botany and the UW Biodiversity Institute, is studying interactions between the biodiversity of East Africa's Lake Tanganyika and the human communities that live around the lake.

Contact: Catherine Wagner
cwagne22@uwyo.edu
307-766-4393
University of Wyoming

Public Release: 17-Dec-2015
NASA sees Tropical Depression 29W affected by wind shear
After Tropical Depression 29W formed west of Palau, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image that showed wind shear is affecting the storm. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that Tropical depression 29W formed on Dec. 16 at 2100 UTC (4 p.m. EST) west of Palau and is not expected to strengthen into a tropical storm. Tropical Depression 29W (TD29W) is known in the Philippines as Onyok.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Dec-2015
AGU 2015 Fall Meeting
Spread of algal toxin through marine food web broke records in 2015
Researchers monitoring the unprecedented bloom of toxic algae along the west coast of North America in 2015 found record levels of the algal toxin domoic acid in samples from a wide range of marine organisms. The toxin was also detected for the first time in the muscle tissue or filet of several commercial fish species.

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 17-Dec-2015
NASA looks at Tropical Cyclone Melor's rainfall and dissipation
When Tropical Storm Melor was raining on Luzon in the northern Philippines, the GPM satellite analyzed the rainfall rate. The next day, NASA's Terra satellite caught a look at Melor after it moved off-shore and weakened into a trough of low pressure.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Dec-2015
International Journal of Ecology
Early warning system to save species.
Managers of wildlife conservation programs are being helped by a method commonly encountered in industrial and service industries. Dr Simon Black, of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology, has developed a number of techniques that are more commonly seen in business settings to encourage improvements in conservation management.

Contact: Sandy Fleming
S.Fleming@kent.ac.uk
44-012-278-23581
University of Kent

Public Release: 17-Dec-2015
Oceanographers use super-computers to help farmers in Bangladesh
A computer model that aims to provide physical information on the Bangladesh delta to policy makers there, has received the 'impact' award from the national super-computing facility, ARCHER. Future scenarios forecast by the model show the tidal range increasing by up to half a meter in places, which could see a large area of the delta flooded during high tide; affecting farmland, and the Sundarbans mangrove forests (a UNESCO world heritage site).
The Natural Environmental Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council, Department for International Development

Contact: Holly Peacock
holly.peacock@noc.ac.uk
0238-059-6388
National Oceanography Centre, UK

Public Release: 17-Dec-2015
PLOS ONE
102 new species described by the California Academy of Sciences in 2015
From unknown African frogs to electric rays and animal viruses, spanning five continents and three oceans, the Academy's 102 new species discoveries add to Earth's tree of life.

Contact: Haley Bowling
hbowling@calacademy.org
415-379-5123
California Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Dec-2015
Current Biology
Burgess Shale fossil site gives up oldest evidence of brood care
Researchers have discovered the oldest direct evidence of brood care, with the identification of eggs containing preserved embryos in fossils of the 508-million-year-old Waptia fieldensis. Recent analysis of specimens of the shrimp-like creature found in the renowned Canadian Burgess Shale fossil deposit more than a century ago, revealed clusters of egg-shaped objects located on the underside of a bivalved carapace alongside the anterior third of the body.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Agence Nationale de la Recherche, University of Lyon

Contact: Sean Bettam
s.bettam@utoronto.ca
416-946-7950
University of Toronto

Public Release: 17-Dec-2015
PLOS Biology
Phytoplankton like it hot: Warming boosts biodiversity and photosynthesis in phytoplankton
Globally, phytoplankton -- microscopic water-borne plants -- absorb as much carbon dioxide as tropical rainforests and so understanding the way they respond to a warming climate is crucial.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Louise Vennells
l.vennells@exeter.ac.uk
University of Exeter

Public Release: 17-Dec-2015
PLOS Computational Biology
Ancient 4-flippered reptile flapped like a penguin
The puzzle of the plesiosaur has been revealed by computer simulations showing how the ancient animals used their unusual four-flippered body to swim through the ocean.

Contact: Greg Turk
turk@cc.gatech.edu
770-492-1219
PLOS

Public Release: 16-Dec-2015
University of Hawaii's data visualization expert to build the top system in the nation
The University of Hawai'i at Mānoa will be home to the best data visualization system in the United States, thanks to a major research infrastructure grant from the National Science Foundation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kelli Abe Trifonovitch
kellit2@hawaii.edu
808-228-8108
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 16-Dec-2015
AGU Fall Meeting 2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Lakes warming at alarming rates, York U-led global study warns
The study predicts that at the current rate, algal blooms, which can ultimately rob water of oxygen, will increase 20 percent in lakes over the next century. Algal blooms that are toxic to fish and animals would increase by five per cent. These rates also imply that emissions of methane, a greenhouse gas 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide, will increase four per cent over the next decade.

Contact: suhasini@yorku.ca
suhasini@gmail.com
416-736-2100 x22094
York University

Public Release: 16-Dec-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Study: Climate change rapidly warming world's lakes
Climate change is rapidly warming lakes around the world, threatening freshwater supplies and ecosystems, according to a study spanning six continents. The study is the largest of its kind and the first to use a combination of satellite temperature data and long-term ground measurements. A total of 235 lakes, representing more than half of the world's freshwater supply, were monitored for at least 25 years.
NASA/Earth Science Division, NASA/Science of Terra, NASA/Aqua, NASA/ROSES, National Science Foundation

Contact: Eric Sorensen
eric.sorensen@wsu.edu
509-335-8734
Washington State University

Public Release: 16-Dec-2015
AGU 2015 Fall Meeting
This week from AGU: Icequakes, the Arctic, origins of life, ocean drilling, & 3 new papers
Nestled in the Arctic is a glacier like no other. This glacier quakes once a minute creating seismic events that rattle the earth -- more frequently than scientists have ever seen. Understanding why these icequakes are so common may help researchers predict future ice flow, a process that propels climate-driven sea level rise.

Contact: Lillian Steenblik Hwang
lhwang@agu.org
202-777-7318
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 16-Dec-2015
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical Storm Melor affecting northern Philippines
As Typhoon Melor weakened to a tropical storm as it moved through the islands of the Philippines, NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the storm on Dec. 16.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Dec-2015
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Vessel discovery a major step toward growing kidneys
Researchers have identified the cells that give rise to the blood vessels within the kidney. It's a discovery of critical importance, as efforts to grow kidneys have long been frustrated by the inability to create the vasculature necessary for a functional organ.

Contact: Josh Barney
jdb9a@virginia.edu
434-906-8864
University of Virginia Health System

Public Release: 16-Dec-2015
Nature
How to see a mass extinction if it's right in front of you
A Yale-led study urges scientists to move their focus from species extinction to species rarity in order to recognize, and avoid, a mass extinction in the modern world.

Contact: Jim Shelton
james.shelton@yale.edu
203-432-3881
Yale University

Public Release: 16-Dec-2015
Biogeosciences
Tiny phytoplankton have big influence on climate change
University of Pennsylvania researchers have investigated what climate models have to say about how phytoplankton and ocean ecosystems will respond to the profound changes the Earth is undergoing.
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, University of Pennsylvania

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 16-Dec-2015
21st Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals: Bridging the Past Toward the Future
West Coast marine mammals respond to shifting conditions, new research shows
Humpback whales off the West Coast consume thousands of pounds of krill, plankton and small fish each day. Research shows that humpback diets reflect their surroundings, with the truck-sized whales filter-feeding on vast amounts of krill when cold upwelling waters prevail, but switching to schooling fish such as anchovies when warmer waters take over and the fish grow abundant.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
971-313-1466
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 16-Dec-2015
PLOS ONE
Researchers discover six new African frog species, uncover far more diversity
Researchers have discovered half a dozen new species of the African clawed frog, and added back another to the list of known species, in the process uncovering striking new characteristics of one of the most widely studied amphibians in the world.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Michelle Donovan
donovam@mcmaster.ca
905-525-9140 x22869
McMaster University

Public Release: 16-Dec-2015
Scientific Reports
Growth potential remains at risk on even the most remote coral reefs
Coral reefs in the Indian Ocean that were severely damaged by a global warming event 17 years ago have bounced back to optimum health and have the potential to keep pace with rising sea levels, but only if they escape the impacts of future warming events, researchers from the University of Exeter have found.

Contact: Louise Vennells
l.vennells@exeter.ac.uk
07-768-511-866
University of Exeter

Showing releases 176-200 out of 1746.

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