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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 201-225 out of 1289.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Asymmetric continental margins and the slow birth of an ocean
When South America split from Africa 150 to 120 million years ago, the South Atlantic formed and separated Brazil from Angola. The continental margins formed through this separation are surprisingly different.

Contact: F.Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
Science
LSU biologist John Caprio, Japanese colleagues identify unique way catfish locate prey
John Caprio, George C. Kent Professor of Biological Sciences at LSU, and colleagues from Kagoshima University in Japan have identified that these fish are equipped with sensors that can locate prey by detecting slight changes in the water's pH level.

Contact: Aaron Looney
alooney@lsu.edu
225-578-3871
Louisiana State University

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How do phytoplankton survive a scarcity of a critical nutrient?
How do phytoplankton survive when the critical element phosphorus is difficult to find? Researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences conducted the most comprehensive survey of the content and distribution of a form of phosphorus called polyphosphate, or poly-P in the western North Atlantic. What they found was surprising.
National Science Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
NASA sees remnants of Tropical Storm Boris merging with Gulf low
The remnants of former Tropical Storm Boris moved over southern Mexico and NASA and NOAA satellite data showed that they were merging with a low pressure area in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Report supports shutdown of all high seas fisheries
Fish and aquatic life living in the high seas are more valuable as a carbon sink than as food and should be better protected, according to research from the University of British Columbia.
Global Ocean Commission

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-828-3867
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Sea star disease epidemic surges in Oregon, local extinctions expected
Just in the past two weeks, the incidence of sea star wasting syndrome has exploded along the Oregon Coast and created an epidemic of historic magnitude, one that threatens to decimate Oregon's entire population of purple ochre sea stars. Prior to this, Oregon had been the only part of the West Coast that had been largely spared this devastating disease.
Oregon Sea Grant

Contact: Kristen Milligan
milligak@science.oregonstate.edu
541-737-8862
Oregon State University

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
A professor's plan to protect the environment wins $125 million
An NJIT professor is the leader of a design team that won $125 million from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development to protect Nassau County's South Shore from storm surges and rising sea levels.
US Department of Housing and Urban Development

Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
PALAIOS
Scientist uses fossils to prove historic Ohio millstones have French origins
A geologist studied fossils to confirm that stones used in 19th century Ohio grain mills originated from France. Fossils embedded in these millstones were analyzed to determine that stones known as French buhr were imported from regions near Paris, France, to Ohio in the United States. Dr. Joseph Hannibal, curator of invertebrate paleontology at The Cleveland Museum of Natural History, was lead author on research published in the Society for Sedimentary Geology journal PALAIOS.

Contact: Glenda Bogar
gbogar@cmnh.org
216-231-2071
Cleveland Museum of Natural History

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
NASA sees Depression Boris mOVING over Mexico with heavy rainfall
Tropical Depression 2E strengthened into Tropical Storm Boris briefly on June 3 before making landfall in southern Mexico and weakening into a depression.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How red tide knocks out its competition
New research reveals how the algae behind red tide thoroughly disables -- but doesn't kill -- other species of algae. The study shows how chemical signaling between algae can trigger big changes in the marine ecosystem.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Journal of Zoology
Crooning in the concrete jungle: Taiwan's frogs use drains to amplify mating calls
As our cities continue to grow many animal species have to choose to abandon their changing habitats or adapt to their new setting. In Taiwan the tiny mientien tree frog (Kurixalus diootocus) is making the most of its new situation by using city storm drains to amplify mating calls.

Contact: Ben Norman
Sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
44-012-437-70375
Wiley

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Feeding increases coral transplant survival
Feeding juvenile corals prior to transplantation into a new reef may increase their survival.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Curtin researchers in search for acoustic evidence of MH370
Curtin University researchers have been examining a low-frequency underwater sound signal that could have resulted from Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370. The signal, which was picked up by underwater sound recorders off Rottnest Island just after 1:30 am UTC on the 8th March, could have resulted from Flight MH370 crashing into the Indian Ocean but could also have originated from a natural event, such as a small earth tremor.

Contact: Megan Meates
megan.meates@curtin.edu.au
61-892-664-241
Curtin University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Climate engineering can't erase climate change
Tinkering with climate change through climate engineering isn't going to help us get around what we have to do says a new report authored by researchers at six universities, including Simon Fraser University. After evaluating a range of possible climate-altering approaches to dissipating greenhouse gases and reducing warming, the interdisciplinary team concluded there's no way around it. We have to reduce the amount of carbon being released into the atmosphere.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Limnology & Oceanography
UGA ecologists provide close-up of coral bleaching event
New research by University of Georgia ecologists sheds light on exactly what happens to coral during periods of excessively high water temperatures. Their study, published in the journal Limnology and Oceanography, documents a coral bleaching event in the Caribbean in minute detail and sheds light on how it changed a coral's community of algae -- a change that could have long-term consequences for coral health, as bleaching is predicted to occur more frequently in the future.
National Science Foundation, World Bank

Contact: Dustin Kemp
dkemp1@uga.edu
University of Georgia

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
NASA infrared imagery sees heavy rain potential in Tropical Depression 2E
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Depression 2E that revealed high, very cold cloud top temperatures.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Deep sea fish remove 1 million tonnes of CO2 every year from UK and Irish waters
Deep sea fishes remove and store more than one million tonnes of CO2 from UK and Irish surface waters every year, according to a new study led by the University of Southampton.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Biology Letters
Iron, steel in hatcheries may distort magnetic 'map sense' of steelhead
Exposure to iron pipes and steel rebar, such as the materials found in most hatcheries, affects the navigation ability of young steelhead trout by altering the important magnetic 'map sense' they need for migration.
Oregon Sea Grant

Contact: Nathan Putman
Nathan.putman@gmail.com
205-218-5276
Oregon State University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
PeerJ
Notifying speeding mariners lowers ship speeds in areas with North Atlantic right whales
There are only around 500 North Atlantic right whales alive today. In an effort to further protect these critically endangered animals, a recent NOAA regulation required large vessels to reduce speed in areas seasonally occupied by the whales. The policy of notifying -- but not necessarily citing -- speeding vessels in protected areas was effective in lowering their speeds, helping to protect these magnificent creatures from ship collisions, while keeping punitive fines to mariners to a minimum.

Contact: Jerry Slaff
jerry.slaff@noaa.gov
202-236-6662
PeerJ

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
GSA Bulletin
New Ichthyosaur graveyard found
In a new study published in the Geological Society of America Bulletin, geoscientists Wolfgang Stinnesbeck of the University of Heidelberg and colleagues document the discovery of forty-six ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaurs (marine reptiles). These specimens were discovered in the vicinity of the Tyndall Glacier in the Torres del Paine National Park of southern Chile. Among them are numerous articulated and virtually complete skeletons of adults, pregnant females, and juveniles.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Paleoceanography
Modern ocean acidification is outpacing ancient upheaval, study suggests
In a new study published in the latest issue of Paleoceanography, scientists estimate that surface ocean acidity increased by about 100 percent during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum in a few thousand years or more, and stayed that way for the next 70,000 years.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kim Martineau
kmartine@ldeo.columbia.edu
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Solving the puzzle of ice age climates
Researchers look to the Southern Ocean for an explanation of the 'Last Glacial Maximum.'
National Science Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite sees Eastern Pacific tropical cyclone forming
There's a new tropical low pressure area brewing in the Eastern Pacific and NASA's TRMM satellite flew overhead and got a read on its rainfall rates and cloud heights.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Global Change Biology
Britain's urban rivers cleanest in 20 years
Scientists from Cardiff University have found that Britain's urban rivers are the cleanest they've been in over two decades.

Contact: Steve Ormerod
ormerod@cardiff.ac.uk
029-208-75871
Cardiff University

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
BioScience
Rolling old river is indeed changing
A team of ecologists has documented and summarized far-reaching changes in the Hudson since 1987, most as a result of human activity. Invasive species, pollution reductions, increased flow, and higher temperatures are among the most pronounced causes, but other changes are mysterious. Rivers must be understood over a decadal timescale, the researchers argue.
Hudson River Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jennifer Williams
jwilliams@aibs.org
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Showing releases 201-225 out of 1289.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>


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