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Showing releases 201-225 out of 1360.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Science
Stanford-led study says China's aquaculture sector can tip the balance in world fish supplies
China's booming aquaculture industry relies increasingly on fishmeal made from wild-caught fish. This practice depletes wild fish stocks and strains fragile ocean ecosystems, but a new Stanford-led study offers a more sustainable path.

Contact: Laura Seaman
lseaman@stanford.edu
650-723-4920
Stanford University

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Surprise discovery off California exposes loggerhead 'lost years'
North Pacific loggerhead turtles hatch in Japan, with many later reappearing 6,000 miles away off southern Baja California to forage. The sighting late last year of numerous young turtles far off the Southern California Coast provides new insight into their their epic migration across the Pacific Ocean.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
PeerJ
Sizing up giants under the sea
Researchers sifted through multiple datasets and historical records to produce more accurate and comprehensive measurements for 25 species including the blue whale, giant squid, and great white shark. The team, comprised of a mix of scientists and students, also utilized social media to promote the research and reach potential collaborators from across the world.
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, National Science Foundation

Contact: Nicole Duncan
nicole.duncan@nescent.org
919-668-7993
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Greenland meltwater contributes to rising sea levels
As the largest single chunk of melting snow and ice in the world, the massive ice sheet that covers about 80 percent of Greenland is recognized as the biggest potential contributor to rising sea levels due to glacial meltwater.
NASA Cryospheric Sciences program

Contact: Jay Mwamba
jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-7580
City College of New York

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
NASA's Aqua satellite spots Tropical Cyclone Bansi intensifying quickly
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Bansi on January 12 as it was intensifying rapidly and saw a cloud-covered eye in the storm's center. Bansi has triggered warnings for the island of Mauritius and is expected to continue intensifying while passing it.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Pharmacological Reviews
Fish peptide could help in battle against cardiovascular disease
A major international review of a peptide originally found in fish that could be used in the battle against cardiovascular disease has been published. Professor David Lambert from the University of Leicester's Department of Cardiovascular Sciences contributed to the review.

Contact: David Lambert
dgl3@leicester.ac.uk
01-162-523-161
University of Leicester

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Physical Review Letters
They see flow signals: Researchers identify nature of fish's 'sixth sense'
A team of scientists has identified how a 'sixth sense' in fish allows them to detect flows of water, which helps resolve a long-standing mystery about how these aquatic creatures respond to their environment.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
China's water stress set to worsen with transfer initiatives
New research paints a grim picture for the future of China's water supply, as its booming economy continues to heap pressure on its natural resources, according to scientists at the University of East Anglia, the University of Leeds and other international institutions. The findings are published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal.
Economic and Social Research Council, Philip Leverhulme Prize, University of Leeds Cheney Fellowship, Worldwide Universities Network

Contact: Laura Potts
press@uea.ac.uk
44-160-359-3007
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UCLA-led study shows how meltwater on Greenland's ice sheet contribute to rising sea levels
Using satellite and field work after an extreme melt event in Greenland, a UCLA-led study finds that melt-prone areas on its ice sheet develop a remarkably efficient drainage system of stunning blue streams and rivers that carry meltwater into moulins (sinkholes) and ultimately the ocean. However, the team's measurements at the ice's edge show that climate models alone can overestimate the volume of meltwater flowing to the ocean if they fail to account for water storage beneath the ice.

Contact: Meg Sullivan
msullivan@support.ucla.edu
310-825-1046
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 9-Jan-2015
Reviews in Fish­eries Sci­ence & Aqua­cul­ture
Recreational fishing in the Mediterranean is more harmful than previously thought
A total of 10 percent of adults living in developed countries practice recreational fishing, which in the Mediterranean Sea represents around 10 percent of the total production of fisheries. Despite its importance, this fishing is not as controlled or studied as professional fishing. For the first time, a study examines this activity, whose effects are increasingly more similar to traditional fishing. For this reason, scientists demand greater control.

Contact: SINC Team
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Journal of Evolutionary Biology
The devil is in the detail
Researchers have looked at a species of fish to help unravel one of the biggest mysteries in evolutionary biology.

Contact: Rachael Fergusson
rachael.fergusson@monash.edu
61-399-034-841
Monash University

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Journal of Oceanography
Surviving typhoons
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology researcher Mary Grossmann studied micro-organisms during three typhoons to figure out what happened to the ocean's tiny creatures when the waters churn.

Contact: Kaoru Natori
kaoru.natori@oist.jp
81-989-662-389
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Journal of Fish Biology
Scientists document longest-ever case of sperm storage in sharks
Steinhart Aquarium biologists at the California Academy of Sciences were taken aback when a shark egg case dropped by an adult bamboo shark, who spent nearly 4 years isolated from males, showed signs of healthy development. Their results, published in the Journal of Fish Biology, mark the longest documented case of sperm storage in any species of shark, and highlight a bright bit of news for the future of wild sharks threatened by overfishing and habitat loss.

Contact: Haley Bowling
hbowling@calacademy.org
415-379-5123
California Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Nature Plants
Algae use same molecular machinery as land plants to respond to a plant hormone
Land-based plants -- including the fruits and vegetables in your kitchen -- produce and respond to hormones in order to survive. Scientists once believed that hormone signaling machinery only existed in these relatively complex plants. But new research from the University of Maryland shows that some types of freshwater algae can also detect ethylene gas -- the same stress hormone found in land plants -- and might use these signals to adapt to changing environmental conditions.
National Science Foundation, Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, Belgian American Educational Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, American Society of Plant Biologists

Contact: Matthew Wright
mewright@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Ecosphere
Algae blooms create their own favorable conditions, new study finds
Fertilizers are known to promote the growth of toxic cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater and oceans worldwide, but a new multi-institution study shows the aquatic microbes themselves can drive nitrogen and phosphorus cycling in a combined one-two punch in lakes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
Renewable Energy Journal
Wave energy integration costs should compare favorably to other energy sources
A new analysis suggests that large-scale wave energy systems developed in the Pacific Northwest should be comparatively steady, dependable and able to be integrated into the overall energy grid at lower costs than some other forms of alternative energy, including wind power.

Contact: Ted Brekken
brekken@eecs.oregonstate.edu
541-737-2995
Oregon State University

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
Geology
Coral reefs threatened by a deadly combination of changing ocean conditions
The lowering of the ocean's pH is making it harder for corals to grow their skeletons and easier for bioeroding organisms to tear them down. Erosion rates increase tenfold in areas where corals are also exposed to high levels of nutrients, according to a study published January 2015 in the journal Geology. As sea level rises, these reefs may have a harder time growing toward the ocean surface, where they get sunlight they need to survive.
National Science Foundation, Nature Conservancy, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Coral Reef Conservation Program.

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Cool deep-water protects coral reefs against heat stress
Cool currents from the deep ocean could save tropical corals from lethal heat stress. Researchers from Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and Phuket Marine Biological Center observed internal waves preserving corals in the Andaman Sea.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-043-160-02807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Transactions of the American Fisheries Society
New model identifies eastern stream sections holding wild brook trout
A new model that can accurately identify stream sections that still hold suitable habitat for wild brook trout will help fisheries managers from Maine to Georgia find and protect habitat for this fish, which is an economically, socially and ecologically important species.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Interface
Has car manufacturer taken the corner too fast with the boxfish design?
Billions of years of evolution have provided solutions for countless technical problems, while teaching designers and engineers a thing or two along the way. But now a car manufacturer has designed a concept model based on the supposed characteristics of the boxfish. Researchers at the University of Groningen have shown that their design is actually based on an incorrect interpretation of the characteristics of this fish.

Contact: E.J. Stamhuis
e.j.stamhuis@rug.nl
31-503-632-078
University of Groningen

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Marine Pollution Bulletin
Marine litter education boosts children's understanding and actions
A study by Plymouth University finds children could play an important role in solutions to reduce marine litter with some already helping to educate parents and peers about the scale of the issue.

Contact: Alan Williams
alan.williams@plymouth.ac.uk
01-752-588-004
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Environmental Science & Technology
Drought led to massive 'dead zone' in Lake Erie
Lake Erie just can't catch a break. The lake has experienced harmful algal blooms and severe oxygen-depleted 'dead zones' for years, but now a team of researchers led by Carnegie's Anna Michalak and Yuntao Zhou has shown that the widespread drought in 2012 was associated with the largest dead zone since at least the mid-1980s.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anna Michalak
michalak@carnegiescience.edu
650-201-2667
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
Current Biology
Current Biology reviews the biology of fun
Current Biology celebrates its 25th birthday with a special issue on Jan. 5, 2015, on the biology of fun (and the fun of biology). In a collection of essays and review articles, the journal presents what we know about playfulness in dogs, dolphins, frogs, and octopuses. It provides insights on whether birds can have fun and how experiences in infancy affect a person's unique sense of humor.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
Terra Nova
Why is Greenland covered in ice?
The ice on Greenland could only form due to processes in the deep Earth interior. Scientists now explain why the conditions for the glaciation of Greenland developed only so recently on a geological time scale.

Contact: F.Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
Underwater drones map ice algae in Antarctica
New robot technology leads Antarctic exploration into a new epoch. It is now possible to study the underside of sea ice across large distances and explore a world previously restricted to specially trained divers only.

Contact: Lars Chresten Lund Hansen
lund-hansen@bios.au.dk
45-21-12-53-22
Aarhus University

Showing releases 201-225 out of 1360.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>


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