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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 201-225 out of 1306.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
New study links dredging to diseased corals
In a world-first study published today, researchers say dredging activity near coral reefs can increase the frequency of diseases affecting corals. 'At dredging sites, we found more than twice as much coral disease than at our control sites,' says the lead author of the study, Joe Pollock, a PhD candidate from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and the Australian Institute of Marine Science. 'Corals require both light and food to survive.'
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Joe Pollock
Frederic.Pollock1@jcu.edu.au
61-756-412-342
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Nature
New view of Rainier's volcanic plumbing
By measuring how fast Earth conducts electricity and seismic waves, a University of Utah researcher and colleagues made a detailed picture of Mount Rainier's deep volcanic plumbing and partly molten rock that will erupt again someday.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Indus river dolphin's declining range
Removal of river water for irrigation and habitat fragmentation by irrigation dams were shown to be the principal factors contributing to the decline of the Indus river dolphin.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Whale shark fringe migration
At the fringe of the whale shark range, the volcanic Azore islands may play an increasing role for the north Atlantic population as sea surface temperatures rise.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Dust models, Arctic Ocean waves, floods and climate change
Global climate models fail to simulate key dust characteristics.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
2014 Mycological Society of America Annual Meeting
Scientists gear up to fight deadly snake fungal disease
Researchers have developed a faster and more accurate way to test for infection with Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola, a fungus that is killing snakes in the Midwest and eastern United States. The test also allows scientists to monitor the progression of the infection in living snakes.
Illinois Wildlife Preservation Fund Grant Program

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
NASA sees Typhoon Rammasun's eye staring at Visayas, Philippines
Early on July 15, Typhoon Rammasun began making landfall in the eastern part of the central Philippines and NASA's Aqua and TRMM satellites spotted the 20 nautical-mile-wide (23 mile/37 km) eye of the storm close to landfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Researchers find organic pollutants not factor in turtle tumor disease
A new study by a team at the Hollings Marine Laboratory casts doubt on long-held suspicions that persistent organic pollutants in the environment make green turtle more susceptible to the virus that causes fibropapilomatosis, a disease that forms large benign tumors that can inhibit the animal's sight, mobility and feeding ability.

Contact: Michael E. Newman
michael.newman@nist.gov
301-975-3025
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 14-Jul-2014
EARTH Magazine: Parasites spread across the Arctic under the 'new normal'
The last several decades have seen Arctic sea-ice minimums drop by more than half in area and more than three-quarters in volume. With current models predicting further reductions, scientists are calling it the 'new normal' and are trying to grasp its implications -- one of which is the occurrence of pathogens never before seen in the Arctic.

Contact: Megan Sever
msever@earthmagazine.org
703-379-2480
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 14-Jul-2014
Suomi NPP satellite sees Typhoon Rammasun approaching Philippines
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite passed over Typhoon Rammasun early on July 14 and captured a visible image of the storm that showed large bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the center as it approached the central Philippines.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Jul-2014
NASA adds up Tropical Storm Neoguri's deluge from space
The once-powerful Super Typhoon Neoguri weakened to a tropical storm when it dropped heavy rainfall over southern Japan during the week of July 7, 2014. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite measured that soaking from its orbit in space and data was used to create a maps showing the rainfall totals.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Jul-2014
Belize's lobster, conch, and fish populations rebuild in no-take zones
A new report from the Wildlife Conservation Society shows that no-take zones in Belize can not only help economically valuable species such as lobster, conch, and fish recover from overfishing, but may also help re-colonize nearby reef areas.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 11-Jul-2014
New professorship in tissue engineering links molecular engineering, marine biology
The University of Chicago is creating a new professorship in tissue engineering to promote innovative work at the University's Institute for Molecular Engineering and the Marine Biological Laboratory, supported by a $3.5 million donation from the Millicent and Eugene Bell Foundation.
Millicent and Eugene Bell Foundation

Contact: Jeremy Manier
jmanier@uchicago.edu
773-702-8187
University of Chicago

Public Release: 11-Jul-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite maps Tropical Storm Neoguri's soggy path through Japan
Southern Japan received a soaking from Tropical Storm Neoguri on July 9 and 10 and data from the The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite was used to create a map that shows how much rain fell in Kyushu.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Jul-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm 9 over Guam
Guam and surrounding areas were under a Tropical Storm Warning and Watch on July 11 as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead. During the early morning hours on July 11, Tropical Depression 09W strengthened into a tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite sees power within newborn Tropical Depression 09W
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Depression 09W and captured infrared data on the storm indicating some powerful thunderstorms within.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Science
Leading scientists express rising concern about 'microplastics' in the ocean
Microplastics -- microscopic particles of plastic debris -- are of increasing concern because of their widespread presence in the oceans and the potential physical and toxicological risks they pose to organisms.

Contact: Kara Lavender Law
klavender@sea.edu
508-444-1935
Sea Education Association

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Neoguri losing punch along southern Japan's coast
Once a powerful super typhoon, now a weakening tropical storm, NASA's Terra satellite saw a much weaker Tropical Storm Neoguri moving along the southern coast of Japan.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
NOAA, partners predict significant harmful algal bloom in western Lake Erie this summer
NOAA and its research partners predict that western Lake Erie will have a significant bloom of cyanobacteria, a toxic blue-green algae, during the 2014 bloom season in late summer. However, the predicted bloom is expected to be smaller than last year's intense bloom, and considerably less than the record-setting 2011 bloom. Bloom impacts will vary across the lake's western basin and are classified by an estimate of both its concentration and how far it spreads.
NOAA, NASA

Contact: Keeley Belva
keeley.belva@noaa.gov
301-643-6463
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Overfishing in the English Channel leaves fisherman scraping the bottom of the barrel
Decades of overfishing in the English Channel has resulted in the removal of many top predators from the sea and left fishermen 'scraping the barrel' for increasing amounts of shellfish to make up their catch.

Contact: Andrew Merrington
andrew.merrington@plymouth.ac.uk
01-752-588-003
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Science
New research finds ocean's most abundant organisms have clear daily cycles
Researchers working at Station ALOHA, a deep ocean study site 100 km north of Oahu, observed different species of free-living, heterotrophic bacteria turning on diel cycling genes at slightly different times -- suggesting a wave of transcriptional activity that passes through the ocean microbial community each day.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Talia S. Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Current Biology
Mediterranean fish stocks show steady decline
While careful management has helped stabilize or even improve the state of fisheries resources in some parts of Europe, the situation in the Mediterranean has deteriorated over the past 20 years. In a new report evaluating nine fish species reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on July 10, scientists call for stringent monitoring of Mediterranean fishing activities, better enforcement of fisheries regulations, and advanced management plans in Mediterranean waters.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
NASA, NOAA satellites help confirm Tropical Storm Fausto as a remnant low
NOAA's GOES-West and NASA-JAXA's Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission satellite helped forecasters at the National Hurricane Center determine that what was once Tropical Storm Fausto is now a remnant area of low pressure in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Journal of Biogeography
Not at home on the range
Do parasites accompany their hosts into neighboring territory? Not necessarily.

Contact: Sonia Fernandez
sonia.fernandez@ia.ucsb.edu
805-893-4765
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Nature
USF study: Amphibians can acquire resistance to deadly fungus
Emerging fungal pathogens pose a greater threat to biodiversity than any other parasitic group, causing population declines of amphibians, bats, corals, bees and snakes. New research from the University of South Florida published in the prestigious journal Nature reveals that amphibians can acquire behavioral or immunological resistance to a deadly chytrid fungus implicated in global amphibian population declines.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Vickie Chachere
vchachere@usf.edu
813-974-6251
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Showing releases 201-225 out of 1306.

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