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Showing releases 201-225 out of 1338.

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Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
NOAA team reveals forgotten ghost ships off Golden Gate
A team of NOAA researchers today confirmed the discovery just outside San Francisco's Golden Gate strait of the 1910 shipwreck SS Selja and an unidentified early steam tugboat wreck tagged the 'mystery wreck.' The researchers also located the 1863 wreck of the clipper ship Noonday, currently obscured by mud and silt on the ocean floor.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Park Service

Contact: Mary Jane Schramm
maryjane.schramm@noaa.gov
415-561-6622 x205
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
Sharks' skin has teeth in the fight against hospital superbugs
Transmission of bacterial infections, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus could be curbed by coating hospital surfaces with microscopic bumps that mimic the scaly surface of shark skin, according to research published in the open access journal Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control.

Contact: Anna Perman
Anna.Perman@biomedcentral.com
44-020-319-22429
BioMed Central

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
International Society for Microbial Ecology Journal
Researchers discover new producer of crucial vitamin
New research has determined that a single group of microorganisms may be responsible for much of the world's vitamin B12 production in the oceans, with implications for the global carbon cycle and climate change. Professors Andew Doxey and Josh Neufeld, from the Faculty of Science at the University of Waterloo, led a study that discovered that Thaumarchaeota are likely dominant vitamin B12 producers.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Pamela Smyth
psmyth@uwaterloo.ca
519-888-4777
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite sees Hurricane Odile strike Baja California
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM captured data on powerful Hurricane Odile revealing heavy rainfall from powerful thunderstorms as it made landfall in Baja California. Odile tied a record for strongest hurricane to hit the Baja in over 40 years.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
NASA sees Typhoon Kalmaegi as a whirlpool of clouds in the South China Sea
NASA's Aqua satellite observed Typhoon Kalmaegi crossing the South China Sea and a satellite image from the MODIS instrument aboard made it look like a whirlpool of clouds.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Satellites show Edouard's transition into an Atlantic Hurricane
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Edouard each day from Sept. 12-14 and captured imagery of the storm as it grew into a hurricane. NOAA's GOES-East satellite covers the Atlantic Ocean and takes visible images during the day and infrared images at night to show the movement of weather systems. Those images were compiled into a movie from Sept. 13 through 15 showing movement and intensification of Edouard into a hurricane. NASA's HS3 Mission also investigated the storm.
nasa

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Satellite sees Tropical Depression 16-E remnants scooped by Hurricane Odile
At 11 p.m. EDT on Sunday, Sept. 14, Tropical Depression 16-E was officially a remnant low pressure area. NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed the clouds associated with the remnants being drawn into the massive circulation of nearby Hurricane Odile.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
eLife
Decoding virus-host interactions in the oxygen-starved ocean
In certain coastal areas, severe reductions in oxygen levels in the water destroy food web structure. Over the past 50 years, such oxygen minimum zones have expanded due to climate change and increased waste run-off. Reported in the journal eLife, a collaboration between researchers from the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, the University of British Columbia, and University of Arizona studied how viral infection influences a microbial community in one such OMZ.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Nature Climate Change
Small algae with great potential
The single most important calcifying algae of the world's oceans is able to simultaneously adapt to rising water temperatures and ocean acidification through evolution. A unique long-term experiment with the species Emiliania huxleyi at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel shows that the evolutionary potential of the algae is much greater than previously thought. In their laboratory evolution experiment, the scientists have shown for the first time that evolutionary adaptations to multiple stress factors do not necessarily interfere with each other.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-431-600-2807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Lethaia
If hippopotamuses can't swim, how can some be living on islands?
There is no published account where hippopotamuses are demonstrably shown swimming or floating at the surface of any body of water. But if they can't swim, how did they reach and colonize islands?

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Monthly Weather Review
Research offers new way to predict hurricane strength, destruction
A new study by Florida State University researchers demonstrates a different way of projecting a hurricane's strength and intensity that could give the public a better idea of a storm's potential for destruction.

Contact: Kathleen Haughney
khaughney@fsu.edu
850-644-1489
Florida State University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Study finds warming Atlantic temperatures could increase range of invasive species
Warming water temperatures due to climate change could expand the range of many native species of tropical fish, including the invasive and poisonous lionfish, according to a study of 40 species along rocky and artificial reefs off North Carolina by researchers from NOAA and the University of North Carolina-Wilmington. The findings, reported for the first time, were published in the September issue of Marine Ecology Progress Series.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, University of North Carolina - Wilmington

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
301-713-3066
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Specialized species critical for reefs
Coral reef ecologists fear that reef biodiversity may not provide the level of insurance for ecosystem survival that we once thought. This study found that even in high-diversity systems, such as tropical reefs, functional biodiversity remains highly vulnerable to species loss.
Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship, Foundation pour la Recherche sur la Biodiversite, Australian Research Council

Contact: David Bellwood
david.bellwood@jcu.edu.au
61-407-175-007
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Project prepares collection for 21st-century challenge of invasive species
At the Wisconsin State Herbarium, director Kenneth Cameron is spearheading a new, three-year project to 'digitize' images and data on aquatic and wetland plants, mollusks and fish from the Great Lakes basin. The $2.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation will also be disbursed to natural history museums at other UW campuses, and in every other Great Lakes state. Together, these institutions expect to digitize 1.73 million specimens related to Great Lakes invasives.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kenneth Cameron
kmcameron@wisc.edu
608-265-9237
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Ahoy, offshore wind: Research buoys bring vital data to untapped energy resource
Starting in November, two 20,000-pound buoys decked out with the latest in meteorological and oceanographic equipment will be deployed for a year at two offshore wind demonstration projects: one near Coos Bay, Ore., and another near Virginia Beach, Va. The bright yellow buoys -- each worth $1.3 million -- are being commissioned by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and will enable more accurate predictions of the power-producing potential of winds that blow off US shores.
Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Tropical Storm Odile expected to 'eat' Tropical Depression 16E
An infrared picture of Tropical Depression 16E from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows the tiny storm dwarfed by nearby Tropical Storm Odile. Odile is expected to draw the depression into its circulation and 'eat' it in the next few days.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP sees formation of Tropical Storm Edouard
The sixth tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season formed in the central Atlantic Ocean yesterday, and today, Sept. 12, it strengthened into Tropical Storm Edouard. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over Edouard and provided forecasters with an infrared view of what's happening within the strengthening storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Tropical Storm Odile taken on by 2 NASA satellites
As Tropical Storm Odile continues to affect Mexico's west coast and stir up dangerous surf, NASA's TRMM and Aqua satellites provided forecasters information on clouds and rainfall in the coast-hugging storm. On Sept. 12, a Tropical Storm Watch remained in effect from Manzanillo to Cabo Corrientes, Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kalmaegi swirl toward the Philippines
Tropical Depression 15W intensified during the early morning hours of Sept. 12 and became a tropical storm re-named 'Kalmaegi.' NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead as the storm intensified.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Science
From worm muscle to spinal discs
Thoughts of the family tree may not be uppermost in the mind of a person suffering from a slipped disc, but those spinal discs provide a window into our evolutionary past. They are remnants of the first vertebrate skeleton, whose origins now appear to be older than had been assumed. Scientists at EMBL Heidelberg have found that, unexpectedly, this skeleton most likely evolved from a muscle.

Contact: Sonia Furtado Neves
sonia.furtado@embl.de
European Molecular Biology Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Southern Ocean's role in climate regulation, goal of $21 million federal grant
Researchers for the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science are part of a $21 million collaborative research program led by Princeton University to create a biogeochemical and physical portrait of the Southern Ocean using hundreds of robotic floats deployed around Antarctica and an expanded computational capacity.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NASA

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Science
Microbes evolve faster than ocean can disperse them
Ferdi Hellweger, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Northeastern University, and his research colleagues have created an advanced model aimed at exploring the role of neutral evolution in the biogeographic distribution of ocean microbes.

Contact: Casey Bayer
c.bayer@neu.edu
617-373-2592
Northeastern University

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Environmental Science and Technology
NJIT researchers working to safeguard the shoreline
An NJIT research team has estimated the total mass of oil that reached the Gulf of Mexico shore in the wake of the BP Deepwater Horizon blowout. It's the first time such an estimate was reported, and the study is published in the August issue of Environmental Science and Technology.

Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Satellite view of newborn Atlantic Tropical Depression 6
The sixth tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean Hurricane Season formed in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean and NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured it.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
NASA catches birth of Tropical Storm Odile
The Eastern Pacific Ocean continues to turn out tropical cyclones and NASA's Aqua satellite caught the birth of the fifteenth tropical depression on Sept. 10 and shortly afterward, it strengthened into a tropical storm and was renamed Odile.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 201-225 out of 1338.

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