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Showing releases 201-225 out of 1292.

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Public Release: 29-May-2014
Science
When eradicating invasive species threatens endangered species recovery
Efforts to eradicate invasive species increasingly occur side by side with programs focused on recovery of endangered ones. But what should resource managers do when the eradication of an invasive species threatens an endangered species? In a new study, UC Davis scientists examine that conundrum now taking place in the San Francisco Bay.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Alan Hastings
amhastings@ucdavis.edu
530-752-8116
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Lithosphere
What shaped it, how old is it, and are they connected?
Two articles recently published online for the journal LITHOSPHERE investigate the influence of climate, erosion, and tectonics on the lay of the land in the Bolivian Andes. Nicole Gasparini of Tulane University and Kelin Whipple of Arizona State University tackle rainfall patterns, rock uplift, and the distribution of crustal deformation caused by tectonics. In both studies, they conclude that tectonics win out over rainfall when it comes to shaping Earth' surface in the area.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Wild coho may seek genetic diversity in mate choice
A new study suggests that wild coho salmon that choose mates with disease-resistant genes different from their own are more likely to produce greater numbers of adult offspring returning to the river some three years later.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board

Contact: Michael Banks
Michael.banks@oregonstate.edu
541-867-0420
Oregon State University

Public Release: 28-May-2014
NASA's TRMM and Aqua satellites peer into Tropical Storm Amanda
Hurricane Amanda has weakened to a tropical storm, but not before NASA's TRMM satellite took a look under its clouds at the rate of heavy rainfall it was generating.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-May-2014
NASA sees northern Indian Ocean System 92B's end
The tropical low pressure area known as System 92B finally dissipated on the east central coast of India on May 27 after six days of struggling to develop.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Natural History
NUS researchers discover unusual parenting behavior by a Southeast Asian treefrog
Researchers from the Department of Biological Sciences at the National University of Singapore Faculty of Science have discovered that a Southeast Asian species of treefrog practices parental care to increase the likelihood of survival of its offspring. Chiromantis hansenae, is currently the only species in the treefrog family in Southeast Asia that is known to exhibit such behavior.

Contact: Kimberley Wang
kimberley.wang@nus.edu.sg
National University of Singapore

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Biology Letters
Fish more inclined to crash than bees
Swimming fish do not appear to use their collision warning system in the same way as flying insects, according to new research from Lund University in Sweden that has compared how zebra fish and bumblebees avoid collisions. The fish surprised the researchers.

Contact: Christine Scholtyssek
christine.scholtyssek@biol.lu.se
46-462-223-193
Lund University

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Ecology Letters
Variety in diet can hamper microbial diversity in the gut
Scientists from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions discovered that the more diverse the diet of a fish, the less diverse are the microbes living in its gut. If the effect is confirmed in humans, it could mean that the combinations of foods people eat can influence their gut microbe diversity. The research could impact how probiotics and diet are used to treat diseases associated with bacteria in human digestive systems.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, David and Lucille Packard Foundation, Swedish Research Council

Contact: Steve Franklin
sefranklin@mail.utexas.edu
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Nature Climate Change
Melting Arctic opens new passages for invasive species
For the first time in roughly 2 million years, melting Arctic sea ice is connecting the north Pacific and north Atlantic oceans. The newly opened passages leave both coasts and Arctic waters vulnerable to a large wave of invasive species, biologists from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center assert in a commentary published May 28 in Nature Climate Change.

Contact: Kristen Minogue
minoguek@si.edu
443-482-2325
Smithsonian

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Nature
New study finds Antarctic Ice Sheet unstable at end of last ice age
A new study has found that the Antarctic Ice Sheet began melting about 5,000 years earlier than previously thought coming out of the last ice age -- and that shrinkage of the vast ice sheet accelerated during eight distinct episodes, causing rapid sea level rise.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Clark
clarkp@geo.oregonstate.edu
541-740-5237
Oregon State University

Public Release: 28-May-2014
PLOS ONE
Large muskies lured by the moon
The lunar cycle may synchronize with feeding activity, luring large muskies to take angler bait.
US Geological Survey, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 27-May-2014
Marine Mammal Science
Panama saves whales and protects world trade
A new scheme to separate boat traffic coming into the Panama Canal from humpback whales migrating through tropical waters based on two research papers by Smithsonian scientists, was approved by the International Maritime Organization on May 23.
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Contact: Beth King
kingb@si.edu
202-633-4700 x28216
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Public Release: 27-May-2014
Nature Climate Change
Study finds climate change accelerates hybridization between native, invasive trout
New research suggests that climate warming is increasing the hybridization of trout -- interbreeding between native and non-native species -- in the interior western United States.

Contact: Clint Muhlfeld
cmuhlfeld@usgs.gov
406-600-9686
The University of Montana

Public Release: 27-May-2014
Geology
Where have all the craters gone?
Impact craters reveal one of the most spectacular geologic process known to man. During the past 3.5 billion years, it is estimated that more than 80 bodies, larger than the dinosaur-killing asteroid that struck the Yucatan Peninsula 66 million years ago, have bombarded Earth. However, tectonic processes, weathering, and burial quickly obscure or destroy craters. For example, if Earth weren't so dynamic, its surface would be heavily cratered like the moon or Mercury.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 27-May-2014
Eastern Pacific season off with a bang: Amanda is first major hurricane
The first tropical cyclone of the Eastern Pacific hurricane season grew into a major hurricane as Hurricane Amanda reached Category 4 status on the Saffir-Simpson scale over the Memorial Day holiday weekend.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-May-2014
Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union
AGU: Experts publish new view of zone where Malaysia Airlines flight 370 might lie
A new illustration of the seafloor, created by two of the world's leading ocean floor mapping experts that details underwater terrain where the missing Malaysia Airlines flight might be located, could shed additional light on what type of underwater vehicles might be used to find the missing airplane and where any debris from the crash might lie.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 26-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New biodiversity study throws out controversial scientific theory
A research team led by Sean Connolly, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, has today released ground-breaking findings that dismiss the 'Neutral Theory of Biodiversity'. The theory has dominated biodiversity research for the past decade, and been advocated as a tool for conservation and management efforts. The study, the largest of its kind, covers a broad range of marine ecosystems on Earth and has important implications for how marine conservation areas are managed.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Sean Connolly
sean.connolly@jcu.edu.au
61-747-814-242
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 25-May-2014
Nature Climate Change
Climate change accelerates hybridization between native and invasive species of trout
Scientists have discovered that the rapid spread of hybridization between a native species and an invasive species of trout in the wild is strongly linked to changes in climate. Experts have long predicted that climate change could decrease worldwide biodiversity through cross-breeding between invasive and native species, but this study is the first to directly and scientifically support this assumption.
US Geological Survey

Contact: Clint Muhlfeld
cmuhlfeld@usgs.gov
406-600-9686
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 23-May-2014
Dawn breaks on Tropical Storm Amanda in Eastern Pacific
Shortly after dawn broke in the Eastern Pacific Ocean this morning, May 23, Tropical Depression 1E organized and strengthened into the first tropical storm of the season: Amanda.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-May-2014
An infrared NASA eye sees a weaker System 92B
System 92B appears to have weakened in the last day as an infrared look at the tropical low pressure area's cloud temperatures have shown.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-May-2014
NASA sees first tropical depression of Eastern Pacific hurricane season
One week after the official start of hurricane season in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, the first tropical depression was born hundreds of miles southwest of Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-May-2014
Two NASA Satellites see System 92b headed north in Bay of Bengal
NASA's Aqua and TRMM satellites captured radar and infrared data on developing tropical low pressure area System 92B as it now makes it way north through the Bay of Bengal.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-May-2014
Scientists announce top 10 new species for 2014
An appealing carnivorous mammal, a 12-meter-tall tree that has been hiding in plain sight and a sea anemone that lives under an Antarctic glacier are among the species identified by the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry's International Institute for Species Exploration as the top 10 species discovered last year.

Contact: Claire B. Dunn
cbdunn@esf.edu
315-470-6650
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Public Release: 21-May-2014
GSA Bulletin
Ka'ena Volcano: First building block for O'ahu discovered
Researcher John Sinton of the University of Hawai'i along with colleagues from the Monterrey Bay Aquarium and the French National Center for Scientific Research have announced the discovery of an ancient Hawaiian volcano. Now located in a region of shallow bathymetry extending about 100 km WNW from Ka'ena Point at the western tip of O'ahu, this volcano, which they have named Ka'ena, would have risen about 1,000 meters above sea level 3.5 million years ago.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 21-May-2014
Trends in Parasitology
Scientist uncovers links connecting environmental changes with spike in infectious disease
Smithsonian scientist Bert Van Bocxlaer and a team of researchers revealed that anthropogenic changes in Africa's Lake Malaŵi are a driving force behind the increase of urogenital schistosomiasis, a debilitating disease caused by parasitic flatworms. In some villages along Lake Malaŵi, 73 percent of people and up to 94 percent of schoolchildren are infected. The research suggests the spike in infection is linked to an increase in human populations and agricultural activities near Lake Malaŵi.

Contact: Kathryn Sabella
sabellak@si.edu
202-633-2950
Smithsonian

Showing releases 201-225 out of 1292.

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