Press Releases

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Showing releases 226-250 out of 1738.

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Public Release: 15-Dec-2015
Dissertations
Increased spread rate of the fish round goby in the Baltic Sea
The invasive fish species round goby is spreading at an incredible rate in the Baltic Sea. In his doctoral dissertation, Magnus Thorlacius at Umeå University in Sweden, presents evidence of asocial behaviour, higher risk tolerance and high activity levels in new populations correlating to the spread. Already three to five years, the fish starts to spread in large numbers to surrounding areas leaving a short window for measures to prevent further spread.

Contact: Ingrid Söderbergh
ingrid.soderbergh@umu.se
46-706-040-334
Umea University

Public Release: 15-Dec-2015
NASA's GPM measured Super Typhoon Melor's heavy rainfall
Super-Typhoon Melor moved through the central and northern Philippines and dropped heavy rainfall on Dec. 14, 2015 and Dec. 15, 2015. The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite measured the rainfall within Typhoon Melor as it affected the Philippines on Dec. 14, 2015. Early on Dec. 15, 2015, Melor reached the South China Sea still maintaining typhoon status.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Dec-2015
eLifeSciences
Light pollution a threat to annual coral spawning
University of Queensland research has pinpointed artificial light as a threat to coral reproduction, in a discovery that will help guide reef and marine ecosystem protection plans.

Contact: Paulina Kaniewska
p.kaniewska@uq.edu.au
61-405-386-766
University of Queensland

Public Release: 15-Dec-2015
2015 AGU Fall Meeting
NOAA Technical Report
Warmer air and sea, declining ice continue to trigger Arctic change
A new NOAA-sponsored report shows that air temperature in 2015 across the Arctic was well above average with temperature anomalies over land more than 2 degrees Fahrenheit above average, the highest since records began in 1900. Increasing air and sea surface temperatures, decreasing sea ice extent and Greenland ice sheet mass, and changing behavior of fish and walrus are among key observations released today in the Arctic Report Card 2015.

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 15-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
'Freak' ocean waves hit without warning, new research shows
New research demonstrates that rogue waves in deep oceans emerge suddenly and have long crests, backing up anecdotal evidence from mariners who speak of 'walls of water'.

Contact: Stuart Gillespie
stuart.gillespie@admin.ox.ac.uk
44-018-652-83877
University of Oxford

Public Release: 15-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Baby fish will be lost at sea in acidified oceans
The ability of baby fish to find a home, or other safe haven, to grow into adulthood will be severely impacted under predicted ocean acidification, University of Adelaide research has found.

Contact: Ivan Nagelkerken
ivan.nagelkerken@adelaide.edu.au
61-477-320-551
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 15-Dec-2015
Conservation Physiology
Hot water puts crocs at risk
Australia's saltwater crocodiles appear to be in hot water, with a University of Queensland study linking climate warming to shorter dives, putting the crocs' survival at risk. Professor Craig Franklin of the UQ School of Biological Sciences said saltwater crocodiles exposed to long-term elevated water temperature spent less time submerged once water temperature exceeded 31.5 degrees Celsius.

Contact: Essie Rodgers
essie.rodgers@uqconnect.edu.au
61-043-378-7605
University of Queensland

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
NOAA awards $23.7 million for coastal restoration project in Louisiana
As part of its efforts to support coastal communities looking to build more resilient futures, NOAA today announced the funding of a $23.7 million award for the construction of the Oyster Bayou Marsh Restoration project.

Contact: Kate Brogan
katherine.brogan@noaa.gov
301-427-8030
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
Nature
Missing water mystery solved in comprehensive survey of exoplanets
A survey of 10 hot, Jupiter-sized exoplanets conducted with NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes has led a team to solve a long-standing mystery -- why some of these worlds seem to have less water than expected. The findings offer new insights into the wide range of planetary atmospheres in our galaxy and how planets are assembled.
NASA, European Space Agency, University of Exeter

Contact: Ray Villard
villard@stsci.org
410-338-4514
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
eLife
Scientists warn light pollution can stop coral from spawning
Sexual reproduction is one of the most important processes for the persistence of coral reefs and disrupting it could threaten their long-term health and the marine life they support.

Contact: Zoe Dunford
z.dunford@elifesciences.org
44-778-630-3597
eLife

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
NASA sees Typhoon Melor make landfall in Philippines
As Typhoon Melor approached a landfall in the central Philippines, NASA's RapidScat instrument identified the strongest winds north of the center. As the storm was making landfall in the eastern Visayas and Bicol regions of the Philippines early on Dec. 14, 2015 NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image that showed the extend of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
Nature Climate Change
Enhanced rock weathering could counter fossil-fuel emissions and protect our oceans
Scientists have discovered enhanced weathering of rock could counter man-made fossil fuel CO2 emissions and help to protect our oceans.

Contact: Amy Pullan
a.l.pullan@sheffield.ac.uk
01-142-229-859
University of Sheffield

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
21st Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals: Bridging the Past Toward the Future
Whale, dolphin, sea lion experts meet in San Francisco
From Dec. 13-18, 2015 in San Francisco, California, USA up to 3,000 scientists engaged in marine mammal research, policy makers, government regulators, and educators will gather together at the world's largest conference of its kind, sponsored by the Society For Marine Mammalogy. The '21st Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals: Bridging the Past Toward the Future' will take place at the Hilton San Francisco Union Square.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
971-313-1466
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature gets $1.35 million boost
The International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature, the organisation overseeing the naming rules for animal species, together with the National University of Singapore, has set up an endowment fund to protect the long-term viability of the ICZN.
Lee Foundation, American Association for Zoological Nomenclature, and others

Contact: Carolyn Fong
carolyn@nus.edu.sg
65-651-65399
National University of Singapore

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
21st Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals
Rapid Arctic warming drives shifts in marine mammals, new research shows
New hydrophone surveys of migration gateways to the Arctic show that recent extremes in sea ice loss has opened new waters to humpback and fin whales that once ranged through the far north only in summer. And as climate change drives the ice into further retreat, such 'summer' species may begin competing with bowhead whales that once had the habitat to themselves, according to research presented at a major marine mammal conference this week.

Contact: Michael Milstein
mmilstein@msn.com
971-313-1466
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Small fish species evolved rapidly following 1964 Alaska earthquake
Evolution can happen quickly. Consider a tiny fish species that evolved within decades -- both in its genome and external phenotypic traits -- after the 1964 Alaskan earthquake as discovered by University of Oregon scientists.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
21st Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals: Bridging the Past Toward the Future
Science
First brain scans of sea lions give clues to strandings
Brain scans and behavioral tests of California sea lions that stranded on shore show how an algal toxin disrupts brain networks, leading to deficits in spatial memory.
National Science Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
Nature Geoscience
Mountain growth helped spawn fish diversity in New Zealand
The growth of mountain ranges on New Zealand's South Island directly influenced the evolution of different freshwater fish species in the region, according to new University of Otago-led research. The findings are published online this week in Nature Geoscience. The study provides an example of how natural changes in the Earth's landscape and topography can help shape and increase local biodiversity.
Marsden Fund of New Zealand

Contact: Dave Craw
dave.craw@otago.ac.nz
University of Otago

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
21st Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals: Bridging the Past Toward the Future
Science
Sea lions exposed to algal toxin show impaired spatial memory
California sea lions exposed to the algal toxin domoic acid can suffer brain damage that leads to significant deficits in spatial memory. The new findings suggest that chronic exposure to the toxin, produced by naturally occurring marine algae, causes impairments that are likely to affect sea lions' ability to navigate in their ocean habitat and survive in the wild.
National Science Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 13-Dec-2015
21st Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals
Bycatch threatens marine mammals, but new protections hold promise for Mexican vaquita
Gillnetting around the world is ensnaring hundreds of thousands of small cetaceans every year, threatening several species of dolphins and porpoises with extinction, according to research presented at the Society of Marine Mammalogy's 21st biennial conference in San Francisco this week. But there is one bright spot in the Gulf of California, where Mexican authorities earlier this year instituted an emergency two-year ban on gillnetting to help save the critically endangered vaquita.

Contact: Michael Milstein
mmilstein@msn.com
971-313-1466
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
NASA sees formation of Tropical Depression Melor in northwestern Pacific Ocean
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image as Tropical Depression Melor formed in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean close to the island of Yap.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
NASA measures rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Bohale
NASA analyzed the rainfall rates occurring in Tropical Cyclone 05S, now renamed Tropical Cyclone Bohale.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Dec-2015
Geology
Mapping downgoing plate topography: The 2005 Sumatra earthquake
New geophysical data show that fault slip during the March 2005 magnitude 8.7 (Mw) earthquake off the west coast of northern Sumatra, Indonesia (also referred to as the Simeulue-Nias earthquake), was stopped by the topography on the downgoing plate.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 10-Dec-2015
Science
Functions of global ocean microbiome key to understanding environmental changes
The billions of marine microorganisms present in every liter of seawater represent a structured ecological community that regulates how the Earth functions in practically every way, from energy consumption to respiration. The function and behavior of this community will determine how the global ocean responds to broader environmental changes, according to a new review article published in the journal Science by University of Georgia marine scientist Mary Ann Moran.

Contact: Stephanie Schupska
schupska@uga.edu
706-542-6927
University of Georgia

Public Release: 10-Dec-2015
Current Biology
CRISPR-Cas9 helps uncover genetics of exotic organisms
A revolutionary gene-editing tool is transforming the study of standard lab animals like the fruit fly, but could have even greater impact in genetic studies of more exotic animals, like the octopus or sea anemone. UC Berkeley scientists used CRISRP-Cas9 to quickly and efficiently knock out six Hox genes in the amphipod, revealing one example of how segmented animals deploy different limbs on different segments, like tools in a Swiss army knife.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-915-3097
University of California - Berkeley

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1738.

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