Press Releases

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Showing releases 226-250 out of 1445.

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Public Release: 1-Apr-2015
Global Change Biology
NOAA study provides detailed projections of coral bleaching
New NOAA research shows that while nearly all coral reefs in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico will experience bleaching by mid-century, there will be great variety in the timing and location of these harmful effects.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Monica Allen
monica.allen@noaa.gov
301-734-1123
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 1-Apr-2015
Journal of Geophysical Research
Forecasting future flooding
David Hill, a researcher at Oregon State University, studies future levels of flooding in Tillamook Bay. His work was recently published in the Journal of Geophysical Research.

Contact: Faith Singer-Villalobos
faith@tacc.utexas.edu
512-232-5771
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

Public Release: 1-Apr-2015
NASA covers Super Typhoon Maysak's rainfall, winds, clouds, eye
NASA's fleet of satellites and instruments in space have covered Super Typhoon Maysak's rainfall, winds, clouds and an astronaut about the International Space Station captured a close-up photo of the storm's eye.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Apr-2015
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, April 2015
By studying fish and invertebrates in a creek with known mercury contamination, researchers are gaining a better understanding of the relationship between the toxin in the stream and bioaccumulation in organisms. While mercury concentrations in East Fork Poplar Creek in Oak Ridge, Tenn., have decreased significantly over the last 30 years, levels in tissue from fish have remained the same or increased. To understand why, a team led by Monica Poteat of Oak Ridge National Laboratory is examining the intricacies of the food chain and the biodiversity of the stream at locations about 10 kilometers apart.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Apr-2015
Geology
Oxygen-depleted toxic oceans had key role in mass extinction over 200 million years ago
Changes in the biochemical balance of the ocean were a crucial factor in the end-Triassic mass extinction, during which half of all plant, animal and marine life on Earth perished, according to new research involving the University of Southampton.

Contact: Steven Williams
s.williams@soton.ac.uk
0238-059-2128
University of Southampton

Public Release: 1-Apr-2015
Hormones and Behavior
Agricultural contaminant impacts fish reproductive behavior
A common growth-promoting hormone used worldwide in the cattle industry has been found to affect the sexual behaviors of fish at a very low concentration in waterways -- with potentially serious ecological and evolutionary consequences.

Contact: Rachael Fergusson
rachael.fergusson@monash.edu
61-399-034-841
Monash University

Public Release: 1-Apr-2015
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Polar bears unlikely to thrive on land-based foods
Polar bears, increasingly forced on shore due to sea ice loss, may be eating terrestrial foods including berries, birds and eggs, but any nutritional gains are limited to a few individuals and likely cannot compensate for lost opportunities to consume their traditional, lipid-rich prey -- ice seals.

Contact: Karyn Rode
krode@usgs.gov
907-786-7106
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Marine Policy
New study highlights the value of local knowledge in recovering endangered species
The study, co-authored by NOAA Fisheries, the University of Washington, and researchers from the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, explores how recreational anglers' understanding of the ecosystem and fishing practices influence their views of conserving bocaccio, canary rockfish, and yelloweye rockfish in Puget Sound.

Contact: Megan Morlock
Megan.Morlock@noaa.gov
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Weather and Forecasting
Better method for forecasting hurricane season
A better method for predicting the number of hurricanes in an upcoming season has been developed by a team of University of Arizona atmospheric scientists. The UA team's new model improves the accuracy of seasonal hurricane forecasts for the North Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico by 23 percent. The team's research paper was published online in the journal Weather and Forecasting on March 25.
National Science Foundation, NASA, Science Foundation Arizona

Contact: Mari N. Jensen
mnjensen@email.arizona.edu
520-626-9635
University of Arizona

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Bacteria play an important role in the long term storage of carbon in the ocean
The ocean is a large reservoir of dissolved organic molecules, and many of these molecules are stable against microbial utilization for hundreds to thousands of years. They contain a similar amount of carbon as compared to carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Researchers at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, the University of South Carolina and the Helmholtz Centre Munich found answers to questions about the origin of these persistent molecules in a study published in Nature Communications.

Contact: Dr. Oliver Lechtenfeld
oliver.lechtenfeld@ufz.de
49-341-235-1020
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
NASA sees Maysak become a super typhoon
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Typhoon Maysak as it strengthened into a super typhoon on March 31, reaching Category 5 hurricane status on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Nature
The 'intraterrestrials': New viruses discovered in ocean depths
The intraterrestrials, they might be called. Strange creatures live in the deep sea, but few are odder than the viruses that inhabit deep ocean methane seeps and prey on single-celled microorganisms called archaea.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Nature Geoscience
Scientists discover elusive secret of how continents formed
An international research team, led by a Virginia Tech geoscientist, has revealed information about how continents were generated on Earth more than 2.5 billion years ago -- and how those processes have continued within the last 70 million years to profoundly affect the planet's life and climate.

Contact: John Pastor
jdpastor@vt.edu
540-231-5646
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society
Discovery of 2 new species of primitive fishes
Working with an international team, paleontologists at the University of Zurich have discovered two new species of Saurichthys. The ~242 million year old predatory fishes were found in the fossil Lagerstätte Monte San Giorgio, in Ticino. They are distinct from previously known Saurichthys species in the shape of the head and body, suggesting different habitats and diet.

Contact: Dr. Heinz Furrer
heinz.furrer-paleo@bluewin.ch
41-793-282-666
University of Zurich

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Geology
UNH geologist identifies new source of methane for gas hydrates in Arctic
Researchers have identified a new source of methane for gas hydrates -- ice-like substances found in sediment that trap methane within the crystal structure of frozen water -- in the Arctic Ocean. The findings, published online now in the May 2015 journal Geology, point to a previously undiscovered, stable reservoir for methane that is 'locked' away from the atmosphere, where it could impact global climate change.
Research Council of Norway, US Department of Energy

Contact: Beth Potier
beth.potier@unh.edu
603-862-1566
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Massive study is first to explore historical ocean response to abrupt climate change
A new study reports that marine ecosystems can take thousands, rather than hundreds, of years to recover from climate-related upheavals. The study's authors -- including Peter Roopnarine, Ph.D., of the California Academy of Sciences -- analyzed thousands of invertebrate fossils to show that ecosystem recovery from climate change and seawater deoxygenation might take place on a millennial scale.
National Science Foundation, UC Multicampus Research Programs and Initiatives, UC Davis REACH IGERT, Mia Tegner Historical Ecology Grant, EPA STAR Fellowship, Switzer Environmental Fellowship

Contact: Haley Bowling
hbowling@calacademy.org
415-379-5123
California Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
NASA's ISS-RapidScat sees Typhoon Maysak's stronger winds become more uniform
A tropical cyclone does not always have consistently strong winds all the way around it, and NASA's ISS-RapidScat instrument confirmed that was the case with Typhoon Maysak as it was strengthening in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Over the course of three days, As the tropical cyclone strengthened, RapidScat saw strongest sustained winds around Typhoon Maysak expand and spread from the northern quadrant to other quadrants of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Equatorial fish babies in hot water
Scientists have discovered that rising ocean temperatures slow the development of baby fish around the equator, raising concerns about the impact of global warming on fish and fisheries in the tropics.
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
GeoBiology
New research identifies diverse sources of methane in shallow Arctic lakes
New research into the changing ecology of thousands of shallow lakes on the North Slope of Alaska suggests that in scenarios of increasing global temperatures, methane-generating microbes, found in thawing lake sediments, may ramp up production of the potent greenhouse gas -- which has a global warming potential 25 times greater than carbon dioxide.
NASA/Astrobiology Institute, Astrobiology of Icy Worlds Program, NASA/Astrobiology Science and Technology for Exploring Planets Award

Contact: Justin Broglio
justin.broglio@dri.edu
775-673-7610
Desert Research Institute

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sea change: What took decades to destroy in oceans took millennia to recover
While climate change and the deoxygenation of seawater can alter ocean ecology very quickly, recovery can be on a 1,000-year scale, not the 100-year scale previously thought.
National Science Foundation, EPA STAR Fellowship, Switzer Environmental Fellowship

Contact: Sarah Moffitt
semoffitt@ucdavis.edu
808-381-9177
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Water and Environment Journal
Glow in the dark tampons identify sewage pollution in rivers
Tampons may not be an obvious scientific tool, but engineers from the University of Sheffield in the UK have been using them to identify where waste water from baths, washing machines, sinks and showers is polluting our rivers and streams.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Abigail Chard
abigail@campuspr.co.uk
44-113-258-9880
University of Sheffield

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Spring plankton bloom hitches ride to sea's depths on ocean eddies
Just as crocus and daffodil blossoms signal the start of a warmer season on land, a similar 'greening' event --a massive bloom of microscopic plants, or phytoplankton -- unfolds each spring in the North Atlantic Ocean from Bermuda to the Arctic.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Fisheries Research
Pacific-wide study reveals striped marlins' preferred habitat, may help avoid overfishing
Using the largest tagging data set to date, lead author Chi Hin 'Tim' Lam of UMass Amherst's Large Pelagics Research Center in Gloucester, Mass., with colleagues at USC Los Angeles and the Marine Conservation Science Institute of Waikoloa, Hawaii, show that across the Pacific Ocean the vertical habitat of striped marlin is defined by the light-penetrated, uppermost part of the ocean known as the epipelagic layer, within eight degrees Celsius of sea surface temperature.

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Biology Letters
Coorong fish hedge their bets for survival
Analysis of the ear bones of the River Murray estuarine fish black bream has revealed how these fish 'hedge their bets' for population survival.

Contact: Bronwyn Gillanders
bronwyn.gillanders@adelaide.edu.au
61-417-036-235
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Current Biology
Twice the coral trout in Great Barrier Reef protected zones
Twice the coral trout in Great Barrier Reef protected zones Coral trout in protected 'green zones' are not only bigger and more abundant than those in fished 'blue zones' of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, but they are also better able to cope with cyclone damage, according to a long-term study published today in Current Biology.

Contact: Niall Byrne
niall@scienceinpublic.com.au
61-417-131-977
Australian Institute of Marine Science

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1445.

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