Press Releases

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Showing releases 226-250 out of 1534.

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Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
Barnacles go with the flow to find a home on dolphin fins
Highly specialized coronulid barnacles may be able to identify and attach to the fins of quick-swimming dolphins, locating areas suited for finding food and developing larvae.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Science
Hi-tech tracking tags expand aquatic animal research opportunities, collaborations
Advances in acoustic and satellite technologies are allowing researchers to track animals large and small across great distances, even in challenging ocean environments, leading to significant new knowledge about the behavior, interactions, movements, and migrations of many species, from tiny fish to sea turtles and whales.
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Bill making landfall in Texas
Tropical Storm Bill was making landfall at 11 a.m. CDT on Matagorda Island, Texas, on June 16 as NASA and NOAA satellites gathered data on the storm. At NASA a movie of Bill's landfall was created using data from NOAA's GOES-East satellite. The center of Bill is expected to move inland over south-central Texas during the afternoon and night of June 16.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Harmful Algae
Toxic algal blooms behind Klamath River dams create health risks far downstream
A new study has found that toxic algal blooms in reservoirs on the Klamath River can travel more than 180 miles downriver in a few days, survive passage through hydroelectric turbines and create unsafe water conditions on lower parts of the river in northern California. They can accumulate to concentrations that can pose health risks to people, pets and wildlife, and improved monitoring and public health outreach is needed to address this issue.
Pacificorp

Contact: Theo Dreher
theo.dreher@oregonstate.edu
541-737-1795
Oregon State University

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
NASA sees Hurricane Carlos causing coastal complications
Hurricane Carlos has been crawling up the coast of southwestern Mexico, weakening and re-strengthening to hurricane force. NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the hurricane as it continued to cause coastal complications for the residents of western Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Chemical Physics Letters
Unravelling the mysteries of carbonic acid
Berkeley Lab researchers report the first detailed characterization of the hydration structure of carbonic dioxide gas as it dissolves in water to form carbonic acid. Though carbonic acid exists for only a fraction of a second, it imparts a lasting impact on Earth's atmosphere and geology, and on the human body.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Transboundary and Emerging Diseases
First incidence of koi sleepy disease in Austria
Carp edema virus, also known as koi sleepy disease (CEV/KSD), affects koi and common carp. Long known only in Japan, the disease was recently detected in Europe. An infection with the virus causes lethargic and sleepy behavior in the fish. In up to 80 percent of the cases, the infection is fatal. Researchers at the Vetmeduni Vienna, recently identified the disease in Austria, publishing their results in the journal Transboundary and Emerging Diseases.

Contact: Susanna Kautschitsch
susanna.kautschitsch@vetmeduni.ac.at
43-125-077-1153
University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
The Biological Bulletin
Starfish have a surprising talent for squeezing foreign bodies out through the skin
Starfish have strange talents. Two biology students from University of Southern Denmark have revealed that starfish are able to squeeze foreign bodies along the length of their body cavities and out through their arm tips. This newly discovered talent gives insight into how certain animals are able to quickly heal themselves.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
birs@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Scientific Reports
Sediment makes it harder for baby Nemo to breathe easy
Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have discovered that suspended sediment damages fish gills and can increase the rate of disease in fish.
Australian Research Council

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Injured jellyfish seek to regain symmetry
Self-repair is extremely important for living things. Get a cut on your finger and your skin can make new cells to heal the wound; lose your tail -- if you are a particular kind of lizard -- and tissue regeneration may produce a new one. Now, Caltech researchers have discovered a previously unknown self-repair mechanism -- the reorganization of existing anatomy to regain symmetry -- in a certain species of jellyfish.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Ecology Letters
University of Alberta scientists help public avoid health risks of toxic blue-green algae
As the hot summer season approaches, University of Alberta scientists are working to mitigate the human health risks of blue-green algae blooms, using a technique they've been refining for the past three years.

Contact: Jennifer Pascoe
jennifer.pascoe@ualberta.ca
780-492-8813
University of Alberta

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
NOAA Fisheries mobilizes to gauge unprecedented West Coast toxic algal bloom
NOAA Fisheries' Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle has mobilized extra scientists to join a fisheries survey along the West Coast to chart an extensive harmful algal bloom that spans much of the West Coast and has triggered numerous closures of important shellfish fisheries in Washington, Oregon and California.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Journal of Geophysical Research
Accelerated warming of the continental shelf off northeast coast
A new study by physical oceanographers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, published in the Journal of Geophysical Research, shows that water temperatures off the northeast coast of the US have been trending upward, with unprecedented warming occurring over the last 13 years. The study also suggests a connection between sea level anomalies and water temperature along the continental shelf.

Contact: WHOI Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Oceanography
New study shows Arctic Ocean rapidly becoming more corrosive to marine species
New research by NOAA, University of Alaska, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the journal Oceanography shows that surface waters of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas could reach levels of acidity that threaten the ability of animals to build and maintain their shells by 2030, with the Bering Sea reaching this level of acidity by 2044.

Contact: Monica Allen
monica.allen@noaa.gov
301-734-1123
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Palaeontology
Research reveals insights on how ancient reptiles adapted to life in water
The world's first study into the brain anatomy of a marine reptile that lived at the same time as the dinosaurs sheds light on how the reptilian brain adapted to life in the oceans.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Journal of Zoology
How an animal's biochemistry may support aggressive behavior
Researchers who paired Siamese fighting fish in mock fights found that winning fish could supply more energy to their muscles during fights than losing fish.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Satellite animation shows System 91L developing in the Gulf of Mexico
The National Hurricane Center is keeping a close eye on a developing tropical low pressure area in the south-central Gulf of Mexico. NOAA's GOES-East satellite provided imagery of the system, and an animation was created at NASA showing the development over two days. The system has a high chance for development into a tropical depression.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Carlos hugging Mexico's west coast
Tropical Storm Carlos approached the southwestern coast of Mexico over the past weekend of June 13-14, and satellite imagery shows the storm continues to hug the coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Methods in Ecology and Evolution
What fish ears can tell us about sex, surveillance and sustainability
Scientists at the University of Southampton have found a way to pry into the private lives of fish -- by looking in their ears.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-3212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
ChemSusChem
A new method of converting algal oil to transportation fuels
A new method of converting squalene, which is produced by microalgae, to gasoline or jet fuel, has been developed. This study is part of a research project titled 'Next-generation energies for Tohoku recovery. Task 2: R&D on using algae biofuels.' The project attempts to make use of oil-producing algae in wastewater treatment. The result will help to expand the utilization of oil that is produced from wastewater.
Next-generation Energies for Tohoku Recovery

Contact: Keiichi Tomishige
tomi@erec.che.tohoku.ac.jp
81-227-957-214
Tohoku University

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
View of 'nature as capital' uses economic value to help achieve a sustainable future
Researchers today outlined in a series of reports how governments, organizations and corporations are successfully moving away from short-term exploitation of the natural world and embracing a long-term vision of 'nature as capital' -- the ultimate world bank upon which the health and prosperity of both the human race and the planet depend. The number of success stories is increasing.

Contact: Jane Lubchenco
Lubchenco@oregonstate.edu
541-737-5337
Oregon State University

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Nature Climate Change
Genetic switch lets marine diatoms do less work at higher CO2
Rising CO2 lets diatoms return to their evolutionary roots, by skipping steps that concentrate CO2. Over time, the drifting algae adjust by slowing down their metabolism.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Toothed whales have survived millions of years without key antiviral proteins
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have determined that toothed whales lack functional Mx genes -- a surprising discovery, since all 56 other sequenced mammals in the study possess these genes to fight off viruses like HIV, measles and flu.
Stanford Center for Computational, Evolutionary and Human Genomics, Stanford School of Medicine, PhRMA Foundation, Microsoft

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
650-725-5371
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 12-Jun-2015
Tropical Storm Carlos lingering off Mexico's southwestern coast
NOAA's GOES-West satellite is keeping an eye on slowly developing Tropical Storm Carlos as it lingers of the southwestern coast of Mexico. Carlos became the third tropical storm of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season on June 11 when Tropical Depression 03E intensified.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Jun-2015
NASA's Terra Satellite Sees tropical cyclone Ashobaa landfall in Oman
Tropical cyclone Ashobaa made landfall along Oman's eastern coast early on June 12, 2015 (EDT), as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1534.

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