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Showing releases 226-250 out of 1301.

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Public Release: 4-Aug-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Bertha leaving the Bahamas
Tropical Storm Bertha took a 'vacation' in the Bahamas on Aug. 3 and NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the storm that appeared be centered over 'Crooked Island.'
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Aug-2014
Nature Climate Change
Atlantic origin of recent Pacific trade wind, sea level and temperature trends
Climate models predict that the equatorial Pacific trades should weaken with increasing greenhouse gases; yet since the 1990s, satellites and climate stations show they have strengthened, resulting in accelerated sea level rise in the western Pacific and in both Pacific and global climate change. According to work published by an Australian-US team of climate researchers in this week's Nature Climate Change, these Pacific trends stem from a rapid warming of the Atlantic Ocean.
Australian Research Council, National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association

Contact: Gisela Speidel
gspeidel@hawaii.edu
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 3-Aug-2014
Nature Climate Change
Atlantic warming turbocharges Pacific trade winds
Rapid warming of the Atlantic Ocean, likely caused by global warming, has turbocharged Pacific Equatorial trade winds. This has caused eastern tropical Pacific cooling, amplified the Californian drought, accelerated sea level rise three times faster than the global average in the Western Pacific and has slowed the rise of global average surface temperatures since 2001.

Contact: Alvin Stone
alvin.stone@unsw.edu.au
61-418-617-366
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Halong's 'best side'
NASA satellite data showed Tropical Storm Halong's 'best side' or most powerful side was east of its center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
NASA finds heavy rainfall and wind shear in newborn Tropical Storm Bertha
The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM found rain was falling heavily in the Atlantic Ocean's second tropical storm of the hurricane season. Bertha was close to the Lesser Antilles, prompting warnings and watches.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
A train of 5 tropical cyclones in the Central and Eastern Pacific
A train of developing tropical low pressure areas stretch from the Eastern Pacific Ocean into the Central Pacific and they were captured in an image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on Aug. 1. The train of five tropical lows include the remnants of Tropical Storm Genevieve and newly developed Tropical Storm Iselle.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
NASA eyes powerful bands of thunderstorms in newborn Tropical Storm Iselle
Tropical Storm Iselle was born in the Eastern Pacific Ocean soon after NASA's Aqua satellite gathered infrared imagery on the storm that showed powerful thunderstorms wrapping into developing storm's center. Iselle is not close enough to land to cause any watches or warnings.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Scientists warn time to stop drilling in the dark
The co-authors of a new study, including two Simon Fraser University research associates, cite new reasons why scientists, industry representatives and policymakers must collaborate closely on minimizing damage to the natural world from shale gas development. Viorel Popescu and Maureen Ryan, David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellows in SFU's Biological Sciences department, are among eight international co-authors of the newly published research in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Geology
Symbiotic survival
One of the most diverse families in the ocean today -- marine bivalve mollusks known as Lucinidae (or lucinids) -- originated more than 400 million years ago in the Silurian period, with adaptations and life habits like those of its modern members. This Geology study by Steven Stanley of the University of Hawaii, published online on July 25, 2014, tracks the remarkable evolutionary expansion of the lucinids through significant symbiotic relationships.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Study of bigeye tuna in Northwest Atlantic uses new tracking methods
This NOAA-funded research, which used a new approach to study one of the most important commercial tuna species in the Atlantic, provides the longest available fishery-independent record of bigeye tuna movements to date. Data should help researchers to further characterize habitat use and assess the need for more monitoring in high-catch areas.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
NASA sees Genevieve squeezed between 3 tropical systems
The resurrected Tropical Depression Genevieve appears squeezed between three other developing areas of low pressure. Satellite data from NOAA and NASA continue to show a lot of tropical activity in the Eastern and Central Pacific Oceans on July 31.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Halong move northwest of Guam
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM Satellite passed over Guam as heavy rain fell over the island while Tropical Storm Halong's center passed just to the north of the island.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Frontiers in Microbiology
Gulf oil spill researcher: Bacteria ate some toxins, but worst remain
A Florida State University researcher found that bacteria in the Gulf of Mexico consumed many of the toxic components of the oil released during the Deepwater Horizon spill in the months after the spill, but not the most toxic contaminants.

Contact: Kathleen Haughney
khaughney@fsu.edu
850-644-1489
Florida State University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Scientific Reports
Boat noise impacts development and survival of sea hares
The development and survival of an important group of marine invertebrates known as sea hares is under threat from increasing boat noise in the world's oceans, according to a new study by researchers from the UK and France.

Contact: Hannah Johnson
hannah.johnson@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8896
University of Bristol

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
NASA catches 2 tropical troublemakers in Northwestern Pacific: Halong and 96W
There are two tropical low pressure areas in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean today and they're close enough to each other to be captured in one image generated from data gathered by NASA's Aqua satellite.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
NASA sees zombie Tropical Depression Genevieve reborn
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite helped confirm that the remnant low pressure area of former Tropical Storm Genevieve has become a zombie storm, and has been reborn as a tropical depression on July 30.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Study: Marine pest provides advances in maritime anti-fouling and biomedicine
A team of biologists, led by Clemson University associate professor Andrew S. Mount, performed cutting-edge research on a marine pest that will pave the way for novel anti-fouling paint for ships and boats and also improve bio-adhesives for medical and industrial applications. The team's findings, published in Nature Communications, examined the last larval stage of barnacles that attaches to a wide variety of surfaces using highly versatile, natural, possibly polymeric material that acts as an underwater heavy-duty adhesive.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Andrew S. Mount
mount@clemson.edu
864-656-3597
Clemson University

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Deep-sea octopus has longest-known egg-brooding period
A deep-sea octopus protected and tended her eggs until they hatched 4.5 years later.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Deep-sea octopus broods eggs for over 4 years -- longer than any known animal
Researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute have observed a deep-sea octopus brooding its eggs for four and one half years -- longer than any other known animal. This amazing feat represents an evolutionary balancing act between the benefits to the young octopuses of having plenty of time to develop within their eggs, and their mother's ability to survive for years with little or no food.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Meilina Dalit
mdalit@mbari.org
831-775-1716
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Biogeosciences
Scientists caution against exploitation of deep ocean
The world's oceans are vast and deep, yet rapidly advancing technology and the quest for extracting resources from previously unreachable depths is beginning to put the deep seas on the cusp of peril, an international team of scientists warned this week.

Contact: Andrew Thurber
athurber@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-4500
Oregon State University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
NASA sees developing Tropical Storm Halong causing warning
NASA infrared satellite data revealed that Tropical Storm Halong is surrounded by strong thunderstorms and an eye appears to be developing.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Conservation Biology
Underwater elephants
Douglas McCauley got back to basics in order to discover the positive and negative effects that bumphead parrotfish exert on coral reef ecosystems.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Huge waves measured for first time in Arctic Ocean
The first measurements of waves in the middle of the Arctic Ocean recorded house-sized waves during a September 2012 storm. More sensors are going out this summer to study waves in newly ice-free Arctic waters.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
NASA sees warmer cloud tops as Tropical Storm Hernan degenerates
Tropical Storm Hernan degenerated into a remnant low pressure area on July 29. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed cloud tops were warming as the storm weakened.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Biodiversity and Conservation
Major turtle nesting beaches protected in 1 of the UK's far flung overseas territories
Sea turtles are not a species one would normally associate with the United Kingdom. But on the remote UK overseas territory of Ascension Island, one of the world's largest green turtle populations is undergoing something of a renaissance.

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
44-782-730-9332
University of Exeter

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1301.

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