Press Releases

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Showing releases 26-50 out of 1539.

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Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
NASA's GPM sees dry air affecting Typhoon Halola
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission core observatory passed over Typhoon Halola and saw that the northern side of the storm lacked rainfall. Dry air moving into the storm from the north was sapping the development of thunderstorms on that side of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
Journal of Mammalogy
SeaWorld's killer whales live as long as their wild counterparts
A new peer-reviewed study published in the Journal of Mammalogy by the Oxford University Press adds important insights to the debate over how long killer whales in human care live. The study found no difference in life expectancy between killer whales born at SeaWorld and a well-studied population of wild killer whales.

Contact: Fred Jacobs
fred.jacobs@seaworld.com
SeaWorld Entertainment, Inc.

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Missoula's Sunburst sensors wins XPRIZE for ocean device
Sunburst Sensors LLC, a company resulting from University of Montana research, won $1.5 million in XPRIZE funding on July 20 for producing the best device to affordably, accurately and efficiently measure ocean chemistry.
Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE

Contact: Mike DeGrandpre
michael.degrandpre@mso.umt.edu
406-243-4118
The University of Montana

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Satellite sees birth of Tropical Storm Felicia in Eastern Pacific Ocean
Tropical Storm Felicia was born early on July 23 in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, over 400 miles southwest of Baja California's southern tip. NOAA's GOES-West satellite provided an infrared image of the newborn storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
NASA sees newborn Tropical Depression 12W near northeastern tip of Philippines
When Tropical Depression 12W formed on the northeastern tip of the Philippines in the Luzon Region, NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on the newborn storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
NASA looks inside Typhoon Halola
Satellite technology has the ability to see things we could never imagine, like how hard the rain is falling in storms, and how high cloud tops stretch into the atmosphere.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Nature
Small oxygen jump helped enable early animals take first breaths
Measurements of iron speciation in ancient rocks were used to construct the chemistry of ancient oceans. Analysis suggests that it took less oxygen than previously thought to trigger the appearance of complicated life forms.

Contact: Lindsay Taylor Key
ltkey@vt.edu
540-231-6594
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Keep Tahoe blue? Less algae, not clarity, key for lake's blueness
The assumption that Lake Tahoe's blueness is tied to clarity has driven advocacy and management efforts in the Lake Tahoe Basin for decades. But the report's findings show that at times of the year when clarity increases, blueness decreases, and vice versa.
California Tahoe Conservancy, IVGID Waste Not Program, League to Save Lake Tahoe, Parasol Tahoe Community Foundation, Tahoe Area Sierra Club, Tahoe Fund, Tahoe Lakefront Owners Association, Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, Tahoe Water Suppliers Association

Contact: Geoffrey Schladow
gschladow@ucdavis.edu
530-902-2272
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
The Condor
Reintroduced Channel Islands eagles thrive on a diet of seabirds and fish
Reintroducing a species into an area where it has vanished can be a great tool for conservation, but for reintroduction to be successful it's crucial to understand how the habitat has changed in the interim. A recent study examined the diet of reintroduced Bald Eagles in California's Channel Islands and compared it to the diet of the historical population, and the results show evidence of a healthy ecosystem bolstered by recent seabird conservation efforts.

Contact: Seth Newsome
newsome@unm.edu
Central Ornithology Publication Office

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
ONR-sponsored technology aids recovery of Alaska plane wreck
Recently, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, US Air Force, Alaska Army National Guard and Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency used a portable weather station, developed with support from the Office of Naval Research, to monitor conditions at a 1952 crash site of a military transport aircraft.

Contact: Bob Freeman
onrpublicaffairs@navy.mil
703-696-5031
Office of Naval Research

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Climate change reduces coral reefs' ability to protect coasts
Climate change reduces coral reefs' ability to protect coasts.

Contact: Leigh Cooper
lcooper@agu.org
202-777-7324
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
NASA's RapidScat identifies Typhoon Halola's strongest side
Typhoon Halola's strongest typhoon-force winds were located on the northern half of the storm, as identified from the RapidScat instrument that flies aboard the International Space Station.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
Royal Society Open Science
New study from Florida Tech finds Pacific reef growth can match rising sea
The coral reefs that have protected Pacific Islanders from storm waves for thousands of years could grow rapidly enough to keep up with escalating sea levels if ocean temperatures do not rise too quickly, according to a new study from Florida Institute of Technology.

Contact: Adam Lowenstein
adam@fit.edu
321-674-8964
Florida Institute of Technology

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
Geology
Predicting the shape of river deltas
Now researchers from MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution have devised a simple way to predict a river delta's shape, given two competing factors: its river's force in depositing sediment into the ocean, and ocean waves' strength in pushing that sediment back along the coast. Depending on the balance of the two, the coastline of a river delta may take on a smooth 'cuspate' shape, or a more pointed 'crenulated' outline, resembling a bird's foot.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
Ecological Applications
Mowing dry detention basins makes mosquito problems worse, team finds
A study of the West Nile virus risk associated with 'dry' water-detention basins in Central Illinois took an unexpected turn when land managers started mowing the basins. The mowing of wetland plants in basins that failed to drain properly led to a boom in populations of Culex pipiens mosquitoes, which can carry and transmit the deadly virus, researchers report.
Illinois Used Tire Management Fund

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Banned chemical pollutant lowers fertility in UK porpoises
A collaborative study led by international conservation charity the Zoological Society of London has found that harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) are struggling to successfully reproduce as a result of chemical pollutants found in European waters.

Contact: Nicola Manomaiudom
Nicola.Manomaiudom@zsl.org
44-020-744-96246
Zoological Society of London

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Research with dolphins provides hope for prevention of diabetes in humans
Can butter help prevent diabetes? By comparing 55 fatty acids in blood levels of dolphins and their diets, scientists at the National Marine Mammal Foundation have discovered a specific dietary saturated fat, called heptadecanoic acid, that may help alleviate what's known as 'pre-diabetes' in humans. This new study supports a growing body of nutritional science showing that perhaps not all dietary saturated fats are bad, and -- in fact -- that some may be good.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Jennifer Cull
jennifer.cull@nmmf.org
619-840-5366
National Marine Mammal Foundation

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
Nature
Scientists track monster waves below the ocean surface
A scientific research team spent seven years tracking the movements of skyscraper-high waves in the South China Sea. University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science scientists were part of the collaborative international field study trying to understand how these waves, which rarely break the ocean surface, develop, move and dissipate underwater.
The US Office of Naval Research, Taiwan National Science Council

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4061
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
Journal of Animal Science
Going green: Microalgae as a feedstuff for grower steers
Engineers across the country have developed biofuels, food additives and skincare products using the adaptive power of microalgae. Livestock scientists see its potential as a sustainable, high-energy feedstuff as well as a protein supplement.
Solazyme

Contact: Kim Schoonmaker
kims@asas.org
American Society of Animal Science

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
A handy field guide to the nearshore marine fishes of Alaska
Even experienced biologists can have difficulty identifying the juvenile phases of many species of fish. This new handy field guide will help solve that problem with taxonomic photos of more than 100 species of fish in their juvenile phase, including the conventional, the cute, and the totally bizarre.

Contact: Maggie Mooney-Seus
Marjorie.Mooney-Seus@noaa.gov
206-526-4348
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
Exploring evolution via electric fish hybrid zone
Michigan State University is using a $700,000 National Science Foundation grant to study how electric fish signals evolve, research that could offer insights into the evolution of new species.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
Biomaterials
New mussel-inspired surgical protein glue: Close wounds, open medical possibilities
Inspired by nature's wonders, Korean scientists have developed new light-activated adhesive hydrogel that is mussel protein-based. The innovative surgical protein glue, called LAMBA, not only closes an open wound on a wet bleeding site within less than 60 seconds but also effectively facilitates the healing process without inflammation or a scar.
Marine Biotechnology Program of Korean Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries, Global Ph.D Fellowship Program of Korean Ministry of Education

Contact: Ms. YunMee Jung
ymjung@postech.ac.kr
82-054-279-2417
Pohang University of Science & Technology (POSTECH)

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Ecology Letters
Study sheds light on the ability of different marine species to respond to climate warming
In Eastern Australia, the ocean has been warming at a rate that's four times that of the global average. Many marine species have been appearing further south than they ever have before, while others have stayed put.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Science and technology help Navy prepare for future Arctic operations
Last week, Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Mat Winter was the Navy keynote speaker at the Sixth Symposium on the Impacts of an Ice-Diminishing Arctic on Maritime and Naval Operations. He discussed how naval assets could operate safely in an increasingly accessible Arctic.

Contact: Bob Freeman
onrpublicaffairs@navy.mil
703-696-5031
Office of Naval Research

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Satellite data shows Tropical Cyclone Halola getting stronger
NASA data pinpointed the area of strongest sustained winds on July 19 and the extent of those winds expanded on July 20 as Halola became a tropical storm again.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 26-50 out of 1539.

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