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Showing releases 26-50 out of 1335.

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Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Global Change Biology
Ocean acidification changes balance of biofouling communities
A new study of marine organisms that make up the 'biofouling community' -- tiny creatures that attach themselves to ships' hulls and rocks in the ocean around the world -- shows how they adapt to changing ocean acidification. Reporting in the journal Global Change Biology, the authors examine how these communities may respond to future change.

Contact: Athena Dinar
amdi@bas.ac.uk
44-012-232-21441
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Environmental Research Letters
Satellite study identifies water bodies important for biodiversity conservation
Using satellite images to study changing patterns of surface water is a powerful tool for identifying conservationally important 'stepping stone' water bodies that could help aquatic species survive in a drying climate, a UNSW Australia-led study shows. The approach has been applied to the Swan Coastal Plain near Perth in Western Australia, which has more than 1,500 water bodies and is one of 25 designated biodiversity hotspots on the globe.

Contact: Deborah Smith
deborah.smith@unsw.edu.au
61-293-857-307
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Royal Society Open Science
Blind beetles show extraordinary signs of sight
University of Adelaide researchers have made a surprising discovery in the aquifers beneath the Western Australian desert, which challenges the traditional Darwinian view of evolution.

Contact: Dr. Simon Tierney
simon.tierney@adelaide.edu.au
61-040-737-0741
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
From Tar Sands to Ring of Fire -- forewarning changes to Canada's watersheds
Ecologists have found the conservation of aquatic ecosystems in Canada has not kept pace with the country's changing landscape, and a prioritization of protection is needed. This new assessment of environmental, human census and business pattern data shows climate warming and northward expansion of human activities over a decade, and can be used to guide strategies for managing freshwater resources by highlighting the regions where humans are now having the greatest impact.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Sean Bettam
s.bettam@utoronto.ca
416-946-7950
University of Toronto

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
NASA spots heavy rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Diamondra
The eighth tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season has formed far from land, and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite saw some heavy rain east of the storm's center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Global Inland Fisheries Conference
Fish catch break on world stage at global conference
Freshwater fish provide the food, sport and economic power across the globe. Inland fishing is often about individuals, families and small cooperatives. More than 60 million people in low-income nations are estimated to rely on inland fisheries for their livelihood. Its small-but-many base has in modern times across the globe been shy of strong data to document its impact. That has left the inland fishery industry a poor competitor for water against agriculture, energy, commercial development and industry.

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-432-2026
Michigan State University

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Nature Climate Change
Climate change redistributes fish species at high latitudes
For millions of years, large parts of the marine biotas of the North Atlantic and North Pacific have been separated by harsh climate conditions in the Arctic. A new study published in Nature Climate Change underlines that climate change has begun to weaken this natural barrier promoting the interchange of fishes between the two oceans along with many ecological and economic consequences.

Contact: Peter Gr&ostroke;nkjær
peter.groenkjaer@bios.au.dk
45-23-38-21-77
Aarhus University

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
'Women in Oceanography: A Decade Later' published by The Oceanography Society
The Oceanography Society is pleased to announce publication of 'Women in Oceanography: A Decade Later.' This supplement to the December issue of Oceanography magazine reviews the progress that has been made over the last 10 years in addressing barriers to career advancement for women oceanographers and where further attention to this issue might still be needed. TOS published its first 'Women in Oceanography' volume in March 2005.

Contact: Dr. Ellen Kappel
ekappel@geo-prose.com
301-229-2709
The Oceanography Society

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Fisheries
MSU-led research finds cause for decline of Missouri River pallid sturgeon
Oxygen-depleted dead zones between dams in the upper Missouri River have been directly linked with the failure of endangered pallid sturgeon embryos to survive according to a study published today in the journal Fisheries.

Contact: Sepp Jannotta
seppjannotta@montana.edu
406-994-7371
Montana State University

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Fisheries
Culprit identified in decline of endangered Missouri River pallid sturgeon
Oxygen-depleted dead zones between dams in the upper Missouri River have been directly linked with the failure of endangered pallid sturgeon hatched embryos to survive, according to a study published today in the journal Fisheries.
US Geological Survey

Contact: Catherine Puckett
cpuckett@usgs.gov
352-377-2469
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Biology Letters
Warming seas decrease sea turtle basking
Green sea turtles may stop basking on beaches around the world within a century due to rising sea temperatures, a new study suggests. Basking helps the turtles regulate body temperature and may aid their immune system and digestion. By analyzing six years of turtle surveys and 24 years of satellite data, researchers have found the turtles bask more often when sea surface temperatures are lower. This vital behavior may cease globally by 2102 if global warming trends continue.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Arctic ice cap slides into the ocean
Satellite images have revealed that a remote Arctic ice cap has thinned by more than 50 meters since 2012 -- about one sixth of its original thickness -- and that it is now flowing 25 times faster.

Contact: Sarah Reed
s.j.reed@leeds.ac.uk
44-011-334-34196
University of Leeds

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Oecologia
Sisters act together
A team of researchers from the Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology at the Vetmeduni Vienna studied cichlid fishes in Lake Tanganyika in central Africa. The researchers observed that female fish dispersed longer distances from their natal grounds than males. To minimize risks and to secure the spread of their genetic information, females often swim together in a shoal with female siblings. Males prefer shoaling with non-siblings. The results were recently published in the journal Oecologia.

Contact: Heike Hochhauser
heike.hochhauser@vetmeduni.ac.at
43-125-077-1151
University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Geosphere
Alamo impact crater: New study could double its size
Carbonate rock deposits found within the mountain ranges of south-central Nevada, USA, record evidence of a catastrophic impact event known as the Alamo impact. This event occurred roughly 382 million years ago when the ancient seafloor was struck and a submarine crater was formed. The crater was filled-in with fragmented rock, and later with more typical ocean deposits, as the energy from the impact lessened and the environment returned to normal.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Niko's romp through society
After making its social debut in the Southern Pacific Ocean, NASA's Aqua satellite spotted Tropical Cyclone Niko moving through the Society Islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Using less fish to test chemicals safety
The JRC has released a new strategy on how to replace, reduce and refine the use of fish in testing of chemicals' effect on flora and fauna in water and chemicals' uptake and concentration in living organisms. Out of the 11.5 million animals used for experimental purposes in the EU (2011 data), cold blooded animals, namely reptiles, amphibians and fish represent 12.4 percent.

Contact: Elena Gonzalez Verdesoto
Elena.GONZALEZ-VERDESOTO@ec.europa.eu
European Commission Joint Research Centre

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Journal of Environmental Quality
Soils could keep contaminants in wastewater from reaching groundwater, streams
With endocrine-disrupting compounds affecting fish populations in rivers as close as Pennsylvania's Susquehanna and as far away as Israel's Jordan, a new research study shows that soils can filter out and break down at least some of these emerging contaminants. The results suggest that water pollution can be diminished by spraying treated wastewater on land rather than discharging it directly into streams, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Ecology
Study projects unprecedented loss of corals in Great Barrier Reef due to warming
The coverage of living corals on Australia's Great Barrier Reef could decline to less than 10 percent if ocean warming continues, according to a new study that explores the short- and long-term consequences of environmental changes to the reef.
NIH/National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis

Contact: Catherine Crawley
ccrawley@nimbiosonline.org
865-974-9350
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS)

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Scientific Reports
Fossils survive volcanic eruption to tell us about the origin of the Canary Islands
The most recent eruption on the Canary Islands -- at El Hierro in 2011 -- produced spectacularly enigmatic white 'floating rocks' that originated from the layers of oceanic sedimentary rock underneath the island. An international team of researchers, led from Uppsala University, use microscopic fossils found in the rocks to shed new light on the long-standing puzzle about the origin of the Canary Islands.
The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Center for Natural Disaster Sciences at Uppsala University, The Swedish Research Council

Contact: Valentin R. Troll
valentin.troll@geo.uu.se
46-184-712-570
Uppsala University

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Geology
Small drop in sea level had big impact on southern Great Barrier Reef
Research led by the University of Sydney's School of Geosciences has found that small drop in sea level 2000 years ago on the southern Greater Barrier Reef led to a dramatic slowdown in the coral reef's growth.
Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Australian Research Council

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
verity.leatherdale@sydney.edu.au
61-403-067-342
University of Sydney

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Current Biology
These jellyfish aren't just drifters
Jellyfish might look like mere drifters, but some of them have a remarkable ability to detect the direction of ocean currents and to swim strongly against them, according to new evidence in free-ranging barrel-jellyfish reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Jan. 22.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Annals of Glaciology
UNL drillers help make new Antarctic discoveries
Expedition to Antarctica yields new information about how climate change affects Antarctic glaciers; new ecosystem discovered in estuary beneath the ice.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Frank Rack
frack2@unl.edu
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
GOES-West captures birth of Tropical Cyclone Niko in Southern Pacific
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured the birth of Tropical Cyclone Niko in the Southern Pacific Ocean near French Polynesia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Freshwater Science
Researchers introduce macrosystems approach to study stream ecology
Kansas State University researchers have collaborated to create the Stream Biome Gradient Concept, which is a way to compare streams in different climates and different continents. The concept can improve how researchers study streams worldwide.
National Science Foundation, Konza Long-Term Ecological Research program, International Grasslands Center

Contact: Walter Dodds
wkdodds@k-state.edu
785-532-6998
Kansas State University

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
NASA adds up Tropical Storm Mekkhala's drenching rainfall in the Philippines
NASA/JAXA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission can measure rainfall rates from space and its data combined with other satellite data provides are used to calculate rainfall totals. After Tropical Storm Mekkhala drenched the eastern Philippines, a rainfall map was created showing almost two feet of rainfall in an isolated area.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 26-50 out of 1335.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>


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