Press Releases

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Showing releases 26-50 out of 1422.

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Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
Science
Fossils help identify marine life at high risk of extinction today
A study of marine animals that went extinct over the past 23 million years found commonalities that can tell biologists which taxa and ecosystems are most at risk of extinction today. When overlaid with human impacts of overfishing, pollution, habitat destruction and ocean acidification, these risk maps may help pinpoint hotspots of future extinction. The study, led by Seth Finnegan of UC Berkeley, found that mammals are 10 times more vulnerable to extinction than clams.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Two NASA views of newborn Tropical Cyclone Quang
The tropical low pressure area formerly known as System 98S has organized and developed into Tropical Cyclone Quang in the Southern Indian Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Science academies hand over statements for G7 summit to German Chancellor Merkel
Today the national science academies of the G7 countries handed three statements to their respective heads of government for discussion during the G7 summit at Schloss Elmau in early June 2015. The papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected and poverty-related diseases, and the future of the ocean were drawn up by the seven national academies under the aegis of the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina.

Contact: Caroline Wichmann
presse@leopoldina.org
49-151-156-49436
Leopoldina

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Erosion, landslides and monsoon across the Himalayas
Scientists from Nepal, Switzerland and Germany were able to show how erosion processes caused by the monsoon are mirrored in the sediment load of a river crossing the Himalayas.

Contact: F.Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
American Antiquity
Study finds ancient clam beaches not so natural
In their second study to be published in just over a year, an SFU led team of scientists has discovered that ancient coastal Indigenous people were more than hunter-gatherers. 'We think that many Indigenous peoples worldwide had some kind of sophisticated marine management, but the Pacific Northwest is likely one of the few places in the world where this can be documented,' says SFU professor Dana Lepofsky.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Nature
Ice core reveals ocean currents transmitted climate changes from Arctic to Antarctic
A new highly detailed ice core from West Antarctica has revealed a consistent pattern of climate changes that started in the Arctic and spread across the globe to the Antarctic during planet Earth's last glacial period. Representing more than 68,000 years of climate history, data extracted from this extraordinary ice core is helping scientists understand past, rapid climate fluctuations between warm and cool periods that are known as Dansgaard-Oeschger events.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Justin Broglio
jbroglio@dri.edu
775-762-8320
Desert Research Institute

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Nature
Researchers find 200-year lag between climate events in Greenland, Antarctica
A new study using evidence from a highly detailed ice core from West Antarctica shows a consistent link between abrupt temperature changes on Greenland and Antarctica during the last ice age, giving scientists a clearer picture of the link between climate in the northern and southern hemispheres.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Christo Buizert
buizertc@science.oregonstate.edu
541-737-1209
Oregon State University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
New fossil rattles Moby Dick's family tree
An international team of scientists, led by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County's Curator of Marine Mammals Dr. Jorge Velez-Juarbe, has discovered a new species of an extinct pigmy sperm whale from Panama that clarifies key aspects of the evolution of the sperm whale.

Contact: Kristin Friedrich
kfriedrich@nhm.org
213-763-3532
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
Rare sperm whale fossils discovered in Panama
Rare fossils from extinct pygmy sperm whales found in Panama indicate the bone involved in sound generation and echolocation, the spermaceti organ, reduced in size throughout the whales' evolution.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Dive discovers missing aircraft hangar of sunken WW II-era Japanese submarine
A recent survey of newly discovered submarine wreck successfully located, mapped and captured on video for the first time not only the submarine's hangar and conning tower (navigation platform), and the submarine's bell. The massive aircraft hangar, large enough to launch three float-plane bombers, was the defining feature of the I-400.

Contact: Talia S. Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bigger bang for your buck: Restoring fish habitat by removing barriers
A new study from a multidisciplinary team, published April 27 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, describes a powerful new model to help decision makers maximize the cost-effectiveness of barrier removal projects that also restore migratory fish habitat.

Contact: Tom Neeson
neeson@wisc.edu
608-262-3088
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Animal Biotelemetry
Burmese python habitat use patterns may help control efforts
The largest and longest Burmese python tracking study of its kind -- here or in its native range -- is providing researchers and resource managers new information that may help target control efforts of this invasive snake, according to a new study led by the US Geological Survey.

Contact: Christian Quintero
cquintero@usgs.gov
813-352-3487
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Geology
New study shows parrotfish are critical to coral reef island building
As well as being a beautiful species capable of changing its colour, shape and even gender, new research published today shows that parrotfish, commonly found on healthy coral reefs, can also play a pivotal role in providing the sands necessary to build and maintain coral reef islands.

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
UT research uncovers lakes, signs of life under Antarctica's dry valleys
Many view Antarctica as a frozen wasteland. Turns out there are hidden interconnected lakes underneath its dry valleys that could sustain life and shed light on ancient climate change. Jill Mikucki, a University of Tennessee, Knoxville, microbiology assistant professor, was part of a team that detected extensive salty groundwater networks in Antarctica using a novel airborne electromagnetic mapping sensor system called SkyTEM.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lola Alapo
lalapo@utk.edu
865-974-3993
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Environmental Research Letters
Whitening the Arctic Ocean: May restore sea ice, but not climate
Some scientists have suggested that global warming could melt frozen ground in the Arctic, releasing vast amounts of the potent greenhouse gas methane into the atmosphere, greatly amplifying global warming. It has been proposed that such disastrous climate effects could be offset by technological approaches. One such proposal is to artificially whiten the surface of the Arctic Ocean in order to increase the reflection of the sun's energy into space and restore sea ice.

Contact: Ken Caldeira
kcaldeira@carnegiescience.edu
650-704-7212
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Biology Letters
Coastal light pollution disturbs marine animals, new study shows
Marine ecosystems can be changed by night-time artificial lighting according to new research published in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters. The results indicate that light pollution from coastal communities, shipping and offshore infrastructure could be changing the composition of marine invertebrate communities.

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
PeerJ
Endangered corals smothered by sponges on overfished Caribbean reefs
For reef-building corals, sponges do not make good neighbors. Aggressive competitors for space, sponges use toxins, mucus, shading, and smothering to kill adjacent coral colonies and then grow on their skeletons. A recent survey of coral reefs across the Caribbean shows that overfishing removes the predators of sponges, greatly increasing the threat of fast-growing sponges to an already diminished population of corals.

Contact: Joseph Pawlik
pawlikj@uncw.edu
910-962-2377
PeerJ

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Nature Geoscience
How cracking explains underwater volcanoes and the Hawaiian bend
University of Sydney geoscientists have helped prove that some of the ocean's underwater volcanoes did not erupt from hot spots in the Earth's mantle but instead formed from cracks or fractures in the oceanic crust.

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
verity.leatherdale@sydney.edu.au
61-403-067-342
University of Sydney

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ocean bacteria get 'pumped up'
Scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and their Rutgers University colleague discovered a surprising new short-circuit to the biological pump. They found that sinking particles of stressed and dying phytoplankton release chemicals that have a steroid-like effect on marine bacteria feeding on the particles. The chemicals juice up the bacteria's metabolism causing them to more rapidly convert organic carbon in the particles back into CO2 before they can sink to the deep ocean.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
ZooKeys
A new coral-inhabiting gall crab species discovered from Indonesia and Malaysia
Fieldwork in Indonesia and Malaysia by researcher Sancia van der Meij from Naturalis Biodiversity Center in the Netherlands lead to the discovery of a new coral-dwelling gall crab. The new gall crab, named Lithoscaptus semperi, was discovered inhabiting free-living corals of the species Trachyphyllia geoffroyi on sandy bottoms near coral reefs. The study was published in the 500th issue of the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Sancia E.T. van der Meij
Sancia.vanderMeij@naturalis.nl
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Combining ecology and human needs, researchers assess sustainability of Baja fisheries
The waters of Baja California Sur are both ecosystems and fisheries where human needs meet nature. In a new study, researchers assessed the capacity to achieve sustainability by applying a framework that accounts for both ecological and human dimensions of environmental stewardship.
National Science Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Brown University, Walton Family Foundation, World Wildlife Fund Fuller Fellowship Program

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Chemosphere
Diabetes drug found in freshwater is a potential cause of intersex fish
A medication commonly taken for type II diabetes, which is being found in freshwater systems worldwide, has been shown to cause intersex in fish -- male fish that produce eggs, according to a study done at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Contact: Rebecca Klaper
rklaper@uwm.edu
414-382-1713
University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
Biodiversity promotes multitasking in ecosystems
A worldwide study of the interplay between organisms and their environment bolsters the idea that greater biodiversity helps maintain more stable and productive ecosystems.
National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California -- Santa Barbara, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Malmquist
davem@vims.edu
804-684-7011
Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Zootaxa
NOAA, Tulane identify second possible specimen of 'pocket shark' ever found
An extraordinarily rare ocean discovery of an inches-long 'pocket shark' has been made. Sharks come in all shapes and sizes and are best known as a dominant predator in the marine food web. Understanding their movements, behaviors and anatomies gives fishery managers a better idea of their diets and relationships with other species.

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Animal Biotelemetry
Many Dry Tortugas loggerheads actually Bahamas residents
Many loggerhead sea turtles that nest in Dry Tortugas National Park head to rich feeding sites in the Bahamas after nesting, a discovery that may help those working to protect this threatened species.

Contact: Christian Quintero
cquintero@usgs.gov
813-352-3487
United States Geological Survey

Showing releases 26-50 out of 1422.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>