Press Releases

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Showing releases 26-50 out of 1500.

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Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
Location isn't everything but timing is for certain spawning fish
The larvae of some species of reef fish appear to survive better depending on the timing of when they were spawned, according to new research from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis.
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis

Contact: Catherine Crawley
ccrawley@nimbios.org
802-253-2308
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS)

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
A win-win-win-win
With $1.5 million in NSF funding, a group of researchers will study the effects of a novel way of eradicating schistosomiasis.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sonia Fernandez
sonia.fernandez@ucsb.edu
805-893-4765
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Suomi-NPP satellite sees formation of Tropical Depression Chan-Hom
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite passed over the newborn ninth tropical depression of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean typhoon season on June 30.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
NASA sees new depression forms near Solomon Islands
The Southern Pacific Ocean Tropical Cyclone Season just got an extension with the birth of a new tropical depression near the Solomon Islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
International Journal of Water
Water: The province of provinces
In a paper recently published in the International Journal of Water, civil engineering graduate Ryan Calder evaluates claims that more centralized US-style regulation of drinking water would improve outcomes for Canadians. The paper finds limited support for these claims but suggests they reflect deeply held Canadian political and cultural values.

Contact: Clea Desjardins
clea.desjardins@concordia.ca
514-848-2424
Concordia University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Water Resources Research
Water used for hydraulic fracturing varies widely across United States
The amount of water required to hydraulically fracture oil and gas wells varies widely across the country, according to the first national-scale analysis and map of hydraulic fracturing water usage detailed in a new study accepted for publication in Water Resources Research, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

Contact: Leigh Cooper
lcooper@agu.org
202-777-7324
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
ERC Advanced Grant: University of Southern Denmark sets out to explore deep ocean trenches
A team led by Professor Ronnie N. Glud from University of Southern Denmark has received an ERC Advanced Grant of 3,185,000 euros to carry out a series of ambitious explorations of the deepest parts of the oceans. Previous expeditions led by Professor Glud have revealed surprisingly high levels of biological activity at nearly 11 km deep. Now the aim is to investigate how life can exist at these depths and how its activity affects the biogeochemical functioning of the oceans and the Earth.
European Research Council

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
nyviden@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Ecological Applications
Restored streams take 25 years or longer to recover
New research has found that the number of plant species growing just next to restored streams can take up to 25 years to increase above those channelized during the timber floating era. This is according to doctoral student, Eliza Maher Hasselquist, and other researchers from Umeå University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
Formas-funded RESTORE Project, Björkman's Foundation

Contact: Eliza Maher Hasselquist
eliza.hasselquist@umu.se
46-703-769-515
Umea University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
ISME Journal
Ocean algae will cope well in varying climates, study shows
Tiny marine algae that play a critical role in supporting life on Earth may be better equipped to deal with future climate change than previously expected, research shows.
Royal Society, European Commission, Scottish Universities Life Sciences Alliance

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
New study reveals mechanism regulating methane emissions in freshwater wetlands
Though they occupy a small fraction of the Earth's surface, freshwater wetlands are the largest natural source of methane going into the atmosphere. New research from the University of Georgia identifies an unexpected process that acts as a key gatekeeper regulating methane emissions from these freshwater environments. The study, published in Nature Communications by Samantha Joye and colleagues, describes how high rates of anaerobic methane oxidation substantially reduce atmospheric emissions of methane from freshwater wetlands.
National Science Foundation, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Research Center/Cluster of Excellence at the MARUM Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen

Contact: Samantha Joye
mjoye@uga.edu
706-542-5893
University of Georgia

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Toxicological Sciences
Flatworms could replace mammals for some toxicology tests
Laboratories that test chemicals for neurological toxicity could reduce their use of laboratory mice and rats by replacing these animal models with tiny aquatic flatworms known as freshwater planarians.
National Institutes of Health, Hellman Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Young Researchers Award winner to help advance biodiversity informatics in South Africa
Fatima Parker-Allie, a South African Ph.D. student, is a recipient of the GBIF Young Researchers' Award for 2015. Parker-Allie seeks to advance the biodiversity informatics in South Africa in three complementary areas: The development of a national BSc (honors) curriculum for biodiversity informatics; data quality improvements that make biodiversity data more fit for use in research applications; and distribution models of commercially important fish species in southern African waters under different climate scenarios.

Contact: Sampreethi Aipanjiguly
saipanjiguly@gbif.org
Global Biodiversity Information Facility

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Nature Climate Change
Freshwater and ocean acidification stunts growth of developing pink salmon
Pink salmon that begin life in freshwater with high concentrations of carbon dioxide, which causes acidification, are smaller and may be less likely to survive, according to a new study from UBC.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Nature Climate Change
Retreating sea ice linked to changes in ocean circulation, could affect European climate
Retreating sea ice in the Iceland and Greenland Seas may be changing the circulation of warm and cold water in the Atlantic Ocean, and could ultimately impact the climate in Europe, says a new study by an atmospheric physicist from the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) and his colleagues in Great Britain, Norway and the United States.

Contact: Nicolle Wahl
nicolle.wahl@utoronto.ca
905-569-4656
University of Toronto

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science
Orange is the new red
Berkeley Lab researchers discovered that a photoprotective mechanism in cyanobacteria is triggered by an unprecedented, large-scale movement from one location to another of the carotenoid pigment within the Orange Carotenoid Protein.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science Advances
CCNY researchers develop eco-friendly oil spill solution
City College of New York researchers led by chemist George John have developed an eco-friendly biodegradable green 'herding' agent that can be used to clean up light crude oil spills on water.

Contact: Jay Mwamba
jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-7580
City College of New York

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science Advances
Why are seabirds abandoning their ancestral nesting grounds in the Gulf of California?
A group of researchers from Mexico and the United States has found that warming oceanographic conditions and fishing pressure are driving nesting seabirds away from their ancestral breeding ground in Mexico into California harbors.

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
A 'hydrothermal siphon' drives water circulation through the seafloor
Vast quantities of ocean water circulate through the seafloor, flowing through the volcanic rock of the upper oceanic crust. A new study by scientists at UC Santa Cruz, published June 26 in Nature Communications, explains what drives this global process and how the flow is sustained.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Endangered Species Research
A tale of two whales
A new study led by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego indicates a steady population trend for blue whales and an upward population trend for fin whales in Southern California.
Office of Naval Research, Chief of Naval Operations N45, US Pacific Fleet

Contact: Brittany Hook or Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Heredity
Starfish that clone themselves live longer
Starfish that reproduce through cloning avoid ageing to a greater extent than those that propagate through sexual reproduction. This is shown by a new research study in which researchers from the University of Gothenburg participated. The study has recently been published in the highly respected journal Heredity.

Contact: Carina Eliasson
carina.eliasson@gu.se
46-317-869-873
University of Gothenburg

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Science
Heat-tolerant genes may rescue corals from increasing temperatures
The reef-building coral, Acropora millepora, can pass its tolerance for heat on to the next generation via its DNA, according to a new study.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Science
Corals are already adapting to global warming, scientists say
Some coral populations already have genetic variants necessary to tolerate warm ocean waters, and humans can help to spread these genes, a team of scientists from The University of Texas at Austin, the Australian Institute of Marine Science and Oregon State University have found.
National Science Foundation, Australian Institute of Marine Science

Contact: Christine Sinatra
christine.sinatra@austin.utexas.edu
512-471-4641
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
NASA's Aqua Satellite sees Tropical Depression Kujira at landfall
Tropical Depression Kujira made landfall in northeastern Vietnam early on June 24 as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
Nature Conservation
To the rescue: Helping threatened Mediterranean sea turtles
With all sea turtles being currently on the list of endangered species, authors Ullmann and Stachowitsch offer a critical review of what is being done towards saving injured Mediterranean loggerhead and green turtles. In their report, published in Nature Conservation, they also call for further development and implementation of rescue centres, first-aid stations and awareness campaigns.

Contact: Judith Ullmann
jul007@post.uit.no
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
Biology Letters
Forgotten fossil indicates earlier origin of teeth
A tiny tooth plate of the 410 million year old fossil fish Romundina stellina indicates that teeth evolved earlier in the tree of life than recently thought.
EU Framework Programme 7, Natural Environment Research Council, Paul Scherrer Institut

Contact: Astrid Kromhout
astrid.kromhout@naturalis.nl
31-637-040-842
Naturalis Biodiversity Center

Showing releases 26-50 out of 1500.

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