Press Releases

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Showing releases 251-275 out of 1413.

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Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Science
Embrace unknowns, opt for flexibility in environmental policies
Two University of Washington researchers argue in a Science perspectives piece that conservation managers must learn to make decisions about managing ecosystems and natural resources based on an uncertain future.
National Science Foundation, University of Washington

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
mBio
Sewage provides insight into human microbiome
A new study demonstrates that sewage is an effective means to sample the fecal bacteria from millions of people. Researchers say the information gleaned from the work provides a unique opportunity to monitor, through gut microbes, the public health of a large population without compromising the privacy of individuals.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gina Hebert
ghebert@mbl.edu
508-289-7725
Marine Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Journal of Great Lakes Research
Causes of Great Lakes smelt population decline are complex
The reasons for the dwindling population of smelt prey fish in the Great Lakes to near historic lows are more complicated than previously believed, new research from Purdue University and collaborators suggests.
U.S. Geological Survey

Contact: Keith Robinson
robins89@purdue.edu
765-494-2722
Purdue University

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Glenda may be developing an eye
Tropical Cyclone Glenda is strengthening in the Southern Indian Ocean and NASA's Aqua satellite saw a potential eye developing when it passed overhead on Feb. 25.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Oikos
Climate-warmed leaves change lake ecosystems, Dartmouth-led study finds
Rising soil temperatures significantly affect autumn leaves and consequently the food web, appearance and biochemical makeup of the lakes and ponds those leaves fall into, a Dartmouth College-led study finds.

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Environmental Pollution
Agricultural insecticides pose a global risk to surface water bodies
Streams within approximately 40 percent of the global land surface are at risk from the application of insecticides. These were the results from the first global map to be modeled on insecticide runoff to surface waters, which has just been published in the journal Environmental Pollution by researchers from the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research and the University of Koblenz-Landau together with the University of Milan, Aarhus University and Aachen University.
European Commission, German Ministry for Education and Research

Contact: Tilo Arnhold
presse@ufz.de
49-341-235-1635
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
BioScience
Isolated wetlands have significant impact on water quality
Geographically isolated wetlands play an outsized role in providing clean water and other environmental benefits even though they may lack the regulatory protections of other wetlands, according to an article by Indiana University researchers and colleagues.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Steve Hinnefeld
slhinnef@iu.edu
812-856-3488
Indiana University

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
NASA Terra satellite spots new Tropical Cyclone 14S
A tropical low pressure area designated as System 90S formed in the Southern Indian Ocean on Feb. 21, 2015 and has been slowly organizing and consolidating. Three days later System 90S became Tropical Storm 14S as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology
Climate-change clues from the turtles of tropical Wyoming
Tropical turtle fossils discovered in Wyoming by University of Florida scientists reveal that when the earth got warmer, prehistoric turtles headed north. But if today's turtles try the same technique to cope with warming habitats, they might run into trouble.

Contact: Jonathan Bloch
jbloch@flmnh.ufl.edu
352-514-1270
University of Florida

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Pew names 5 new marine conservation fellows for 2015
Five distinguished scientists and conservationists from Canada, Australia, Russia, and the United Kingdom are the 2015 recipients of the Pew fellowship in marine conservation. The fellowships will support research to improve ocean conservation and management.
The Pew Charitable Trusts

Contact: Rachel Brittin
rbrittin@pewtrusts.org
202-286-4149
Pew Charitable Trusts

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Nature Climate Change
New Florida Tech study links coral disease to a warming Atlantic
Over the last four decades, the iconic elkhorn and staghorn corals that dominated Caribbean reefs for millions of years have all but disappeared. According to a new study from Florida Institute of Technology, ocean warming has played a significant role in this dramatic decline.

Contact: Adam Lowenstein
adam@fit.edu
321-674-8964
Florida Institute of Technology

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
NASA adds up Tropical Cyclone Marcia's Queensland area rainfall
Powerful Tropical Cyclone Marcia dropped a lot of rain as it made landfall and moved over eastern Queensland, Australia from Feb. 19 to 21. Data from NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite was combined with other satellites to create a map of that rainfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
Sea level spiked for 2 years along northeastern North America
Sea levels from New York to Newfoundland jumped up about four inches in 2009 and 2010 because ocean circulation changed. The unusual spike in sea level caused flooding along the northeast coast of North America and was independent of any hurricanes or winter storms. The forthcoming paper is the first to document that the extreme increase in sea level rise lasted two years, not just a few months, the researchers said.
NOAA Climate Program Office

Contact: Mari N. Jensen
mnjensen@email.arizona.edu
520-626-9635
University of Arizona

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
PLOS Biology
World's protected natural areas receive 8 billion visits a year
Researchers say that the first study to attempt to gauge global visitation figures for protected areas reveals nature-based tourism has an economic value of hundreds of billions of dollars annually, and call for much greater investment in the conservation of protected areas in line with the values they sustain -- both economically and ecologically.

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Marine Biology
Great Barrier Reef corals eat plastic
Researchers in Australia have found that corals commonly found on the Great Barrier Reef will eat micro-plastic pollution. Microplastics are tiny fragments of plastic in the environment and are a widespread contaminant in marine ecosystems, particularly in inshore coral reefs.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Parasitism runs deep in malaria's family tree
The ancestors of a large family of parasites -- including those that cause malaria -- were equipped to become parasites much earlier in their lineage than previously assumed, according to University of British Columbia research.
Canadian Institutes for Health Research, Tula Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Contact: Chris Balma
balma@science.ubc.ca
602-822-5082
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
USF biologists: Reductions in biodiversity can elevate disease risk
Using a combination of experiments, field studies, and mathematical models, University of South Florida biologists and colleagues from four other universities show that having an abundance and diversity of predators -- such as dragonflies, damselflies, and aquatic bugs -- to eat parasites is good for the health of amphibians, a group of animals experiencing worldwide population declines.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Agriculture, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Jason Rohr
jasonrohr@gmail.com
813-974-0156
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
University of Tennessee professor receives prestigious award for ocean science work
Karen Lloyd's work with subsea floor mud and frozen Siberian soil has earned her an extraordinarily competitive award. The assistant professor of microbiology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, has been selected as a 2015 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Ocean Sciences.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Amy Blakely
ablakely@utk.edu
865-974-5034
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Via laser into the past of the oceans
Using cutting edge technologies experts of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel together with colleagues from the UK, Canada and the United States were able to reconstruct pH values of the Northern Pacific with a high resolution since the end of the 19th century. The study, which has been published in the current issue of the international journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveals a clear acidification trend, but also strong seasonal fluctuations.
Federal Ministry of Education and Sciences of Germany-BIOACID, National Science and engineering Resource Council, Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Sciences, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jan Steffen
presse@geomar.de
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Sloan Research Fellowships awarded to 126 young scholars
The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is pleased to announce the selection of 126 outstanding US and Canadian researchers as recipients of the 2015 Sloan Research Fellowships. Awarded annually since 1955, the fellowships honor early-career scientists and scholars whose achievements and potential identify them as rising stars, the next generation of scientific leaders. Fellows receive $50,000 to further their research.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Nate Williams
williams@sloan.org
212-649-1692
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Marine Biology
Community-led marine reserve produces benefits for fisheries and conservation
The first and only fully protected marine reserve in Scotland is continuing to provide benefits for fisheries and conservation, according to new research by the University of York.

Contact: David Garner
david.garner@york.ac.uk
44-019-043-22153
University of York

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
The ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
Scientists bring oxygen back to dead fjord
More and more of the world's waters are seriously lacking oxygen. Could we use pumps to bring oxygen and thus higher life back into these waters? A Danish/Swedish research team says yes. They installed pumps in a Swedish fjord that showed a strong oxygen deficit and now they report that all the right oxygen-loving organisms have come back to the fjord.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
birs@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Nature Climate Change
Study outlines threat of ocean acidification to coastal communities in US
Coastal communities in 15 states that depend on the $1 billion shelled mollusk industry (primarily oysters and clams) are at long-term economic risk from the increasing threat of ocean acidification, a new report concludes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: George Waldbusser
waldbuss@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-8964
Oregon State University

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists discover bacteria in marine sponges harvest phosphorus for the reef community
The study reports finding significant accumulations of polyphosphate granules in three common sponge species of the Caribbean coral reef, indicating that microorganisms that live on marine sponges are pulling phosphorus out of the water to feed themselves and survive in a deep-water environment where very few nutrients are available. This finding has important implications for understanding how phosphorus is sequestered and recycled in a reef environment.

Contact: Amy Pelsinsky
apelsinsky@umces.edu
410-330-1389
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
Tracking invasives? There's an app for that
Invasive species will have a tougher time sneaking around undetected, thanks to an app developed by Michigan State University. Midwestern residents can now snap photos with their smart phones, log a few quick notes and send their alert to a growing network of scientists and state officials who can use this critical information to increase response to these threats. The free app is one component of the Midwest Invasive Species Information Network, developed by Amos Ziegler, MSU biogeographer.

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Showing releases 251-275 out of 1413.

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