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Showing releases 251-275 out of 1304.

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Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Huge waves measured for first time in Arctic Ocean
The first measurements of waves in the middle of the Arctic Ocean recorded house-sized waves during a September 2012 storm. More sensors are going out this summer to study waves in newly ice-free Arctic waters.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
NASA sees warmer cloud tops as Tropical Storm Hernan degenerates
Tropical Storm Hernan degenerated into a remnant low pressure area on July 29. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed cloud tops were warming as the storm weakened.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Biodiversity and Conservation
Major turtle nesting beaches protected in 1 of the UK's far flung overseas territories
Sea turtles are not a species one would normally associate with the United Kingdom. But on the remote UK overseas territory of Ascension Island, one of the world's largest green turtle populations is undergoing something of a renaissance.

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
44-782-730-9332
University of Exeter

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Biogeosciences
From 'Finding Nemo' to minerals -- what riches lie in the deep sea?
As fishing and the harvesting of metals, gas and oil expand deeper and deeper into the ocean, scientists are drawing attention to the services provided by the deep sea, the world's largest environment. 'This is the time to discuss deep-sea stewardship before exploitation is too much farther underway,' says lead author Andrew Thurber. In a review published today in Biogeosciences, Thurber and colleagues summarize what this habitat provides to humans, emphasizing the need to protect it.

Contact: Barbara Ferreira
media@egu.eu
49-892-180-6703
European Geosciences Union

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Progress in Oceanography
NOAA: Alaska fisheries and communities at risk from ocean acidification
Ocean acidification is driving changes in waters vital to Alaska's valuable commercial fisheries and subsistence way of life, according to new NOAA-led research that will be published online in Progress in Oceanography.

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Hernan near Mexico's Baja California
Tropical Storm Hernan developed over this past weekend and reached hurricane strength before vertical wind shear kicked in and kicked the storm down. NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hernan when it was developing as a tropical depression near Baja California, Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Satellite sees Genevieve's remnants chased by 2 more systems
Tropical Storm Genevieve may be a remnant low pressure area but there's still a chance it could make a comeback. Meanwhile, GOES-West satellite imagery showed there are two developing low pressure areas 'chasing' Genevieve to the east. NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center has suddenly become very busy tracking these three areas.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Journal of Insect Science
New species of mayfly discovered in India
Scientists have discovered a new species of mayfly in the southern Western Ghats, a mountain range along the west coast of India.

Contact: Richard Levine
rlevine@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Impact of Deepwater Horizon oil spill on coral is deeper and broader than predicted
A new discovery of two additional coral communities showing signs of damage from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill expands the impact footprint of the 2010 spill in the Gulf of Mexico.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Ecosystem Impacts of Oil and Gas Inputs to the Gulf, Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Natural Resource Damage Assessment

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Tropical Storm Genevieve forms in Eastern Pacific
The seventh tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean formed and quickly ramped up to a tropical storm named 'Genevieve.' The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's GOES-West satellite captured an infrared image of the newborn storm being trailed by two other areas of developing low pressure to its east.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
NASA maps Typhoon Matmo's Taiwan deluge
When Typhoon Matmo crossed over the island nation of Taiwan it left tremendous amounts of rainfall in its wake. NASA used data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite to calculate just how much rain fell over the nation.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Noise pollution impacts fish species differently
Acoustic disturbance has different effects on different species of fish, according to a new study from the universities of Bristol and Exeter which tested fish anti-predator behavior.

Contact: Philippa Walker
press-office@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-7777
University of Bristol

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Western Indian Ocean communities play vital role in conservation
An international team of researchers led by the University of York has carried out the first assessment of community-led marine conservation in the Western Indian Ocean. The results, reported in the journal PLOS ONE, point to a revolution in the management of marine protected areas, with almost half of the sites -- more than 11,000 square km -- in the region now under local community stewardship.
Natural Environment Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Contact: David Garner
david.garner@york.ac.uk
44-019-043-22153
University of York

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Science
Synchronization of North Atlantic, North Pacific preceded abrupt warming, end of ice age
Scientists have long been concerned that global warming may push Earth's climate system across a 'tipping point,' where rapid melting of ice and further warming may become irreversible -- a hotly debated scenario with an unclear picture of what this point of no return may look like. A new study suggests that combined warming of the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans thousands of years ago may have provided the tipping point for abrupt warming and rapid melting of the northern ice sheets.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Summer Praetorius
spraetorius@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-6159
Oregon State University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Science
Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles
Invertebrate numbers have decreased by 45 percent on average over a 35 year period in which the human population doubled, reports a study on the impact of humans on declining animal numbers. This decline matters because of the enormous benefits invertebrates such as insects, spiders, crustaceans, slugs and worms bring to our day-to-day lives, including pollination and pest control for crops, decomposition for nutrient cycling, water filtration and human health.

Contact: Rebecca Caygill
r.caygill@ucl.ac.uk
44-020-310-83846
University College London

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
NASA sees Typhoon Matmo making second landfall in China
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Typhoon Matmo when it was moving through the Taiwan Strait for its final landfall in mainland China.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Satellite shows Atlantic tropical depression degenerate
NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured imagery of the Atlantic Ocean's Tropical Depression 2 is it degenerated into a tropical wave on July 23.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Calcification in changing oceans explored in special issue of the Biological Bulletin
The July issue of the Biological Bulletin, published by the Marine Biological Laboratory, addresses the challenges faced by calcifiers -- organisms that use calcium from their environment to create hard carbonate skeletons and shells for stability and protection -- as ocean composition changes worldwide.

Contact: Gina Hebert
ghebert@mbl.edu
508-289-7725
Marine Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Research charts the ecological impact of microbial respiration in the oxygen-starved ocean
A sulfur-oxidizing bacterial group called SUP05 will play an increasingly important role in carbon and nutrient cycling in the world's oceans as oxygen minimum zones expand, according to research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Contact: Chris Balma
balma@science.ubc.ca
604-822-5082
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
15-year analysis of blue whale range off California finds conflict with shipping lanes
A comprehensive analysis of the movements of blue whales off the West Coast found that their favored feeding areas are bisected by heavily used shipping lanes, increasing the threat of injury and mortality. But moving the shipping lanes off Los Angeles and San Francisco to slightly different areas -- at least, during summer and fall when blue whales are most abundant -- could significantly decrease the probability of ships striking the whales.
National Science Foundation, National Geographic Society, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Bruce Mate
bruce.mate@oregonstate.edu
541-867-0202
Oregon State University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature
Genetic study shows major impact of climate change on Antarctic fur seals
Genetic analysis of Antarctic fur seals, alongside decades of in-depth monitoring, has provided unique insights into the effect of climate change on a population of top-predators. Published in Nature this week, the findings show that the seals have significantly altered in accordance with changes in food availability that are associated with climate conditions. Despite a shift in the population towards 'fitter' individuals, this fitness is not passing down through generations, leaving the population in decline.
British Antarctic Survey Natural Environment Research Council, Marie Curie FP7 Reintegration Grant, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Contact: Paul Seagrove
psea@bas.ac.uk
44-012-232-21414
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Blue whales' dangerous feeding grounds
Tracking of blue whales by satellite over a 15-year period off the US West Coast suggests that the whales consistently return to feed in specific locations each year.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Scientists to investigate effects of climate change on Chesapeake Bay
A Virginia Tech researcher will examine the effects of climate change on water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. A multi-university team will answer the ongoing questions of how the impacts of man-made stressors such as agricultural use and burgeoning populations work in concert with a warming planet on water systems.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Zeke Barlow
bzeke@vt.edue
540-231-5417
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
NASA provides double vision on Typhoon Matmo
Two instruments aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provided different views of Typhoon Matmo on its approach to Taiwan today, July 22.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Global Ecology and Conservation
New study reveals vulnerability of sharks as collateral damage in commercial fishing
A new study that examined the survival rates of 12 different shark species when captured as unintentional bycatch in commercial longline fishing operations found large differences in survival rates across the 12 species, with bigeye thresher, dusky, and scalloped hammerhead being the most vulnerable.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Showing releases 251-275 out of 1304.

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