EurekAlert! - Marine Science Portal
  EurekAlert! Login | Main Page | Press Releases | Press Release Archive | Multimedia Gallery | Resources | Calendar | EurekAlert!
{TOPLEFTPHOTOALTTEXT}

Main Page
Press Releases
Multimedia Gallery
Resources
Calendar
EurekAlert! Home
EurekAlert! Login

 Search News Archive:
   
 Advanced Search
Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 1335.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
GSA Bulletin
Kīlauea, 1790 and today
Scores of people were killed by an explosive eruption of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, in 1790. Research presented in GSA Bulletin by D.A. Swanson of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and colleagues suggests that most of the fatalities were caused by hot, rapidly moving surges of volcanic debris and steam that engulfed the victims. Deposits of such surges occur on the surface on the west summit area and cover an ash bed indented with human footprints.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
The Plant Cell
Biochemistry detective work: Algae at night
In low-oxygen conditions, some organisms such as the single-cell alga Chlamydomonas are able to generate cellular energy from the breakdown of sugars without taking up oxygen. They do this using a variety of fermentation pathways, similar to those used by yeast to create alcohol. Although critical to the survival of organisms that are found all over the planet, many of the details regarding this low-oxygen energy creation process were poorly understood.

Contact: Arthur Grossman
agrossman@carnegiescience.edu
650-325-1521 x212
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Marine Chemistry
New global maps detail human-caused ocean acidification
A team of scientists has published the most comprehensive picture yet of how acidity levels vary across the world's oceans, providing a benchmark for years to come as enormous amounts of human-caused carbon emissions continue to wind up at sea. The maps are published in the journal Marine Chemistry.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kim Martineau
kimlynnmartineau@gmail.com
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
FAPESP Week California
FAPESP Week California to discuss Brazil-USA scientific research cooperation
FAPESP Week California will take place at California's UC Berkeley and UC Davis, Nov. 17 - 21, 2014. Brazilian and US researchers will present research findings and discuss topics related to health, advanced materials, climate, economics and society. The seminar is sponsored by the São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP), with support from the Brazil Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, in Washington, DC.

Contact: Fernando Cunha
cunha@fapesp.br
55-113-838-4151
Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Termite of the sea's wood destruction strategy revealed
Shipworms, known as 'termites of the sea,' have vexed mariners and seagoing vessels for centuries. A recent study involving scientists from the Ocean Genome Legacy Center of New England Biolabs at Northeastern University, the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, and other institutions has focused on the shipworm Bankia setacea to learn more about the enzymes it utilizes to break down wood for nutrition, information that may prove useful for the generation of biofuels.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Nature Geoscience
Iron fertilization less efficient for deep-sea CO2 storage than previously thought?
Ian Salter from the Alfred Wegener Institute and a team of international collaborators discovered that iron fertilization promotes the growth of shelled organisms. In a naturally iron-fertilized system in the Southern Ocean the growth and sinking of these phytoplankton grazers reduces CO2 deep-ocean storage by up to 30 percent. Ignoring this response could result in overestimating the marine CO2 storage capacity resulting from iron fertilization. The study is published by Nature Geoscience.

Contact: Kristina Baer
medien@awi.de
49-471-483-12239
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research

Public Release: 7-Nov-2014
NASA eyes Post-Tropical Storm Nuri's winds, now to affect Alaska
NASA's newest Earth observing mission, the International Space Station-Rapid Scatterometer, or ISS-RapidScat provided a look at the winds within post-tropical cyclone Nuri on Nov. 5 and 6 as it moved parallel to Japan. Nuri has moved across the Pacific and is expected to bring hurricane-force wind gusts to Alaska's Aleutian Islands today, Nov. 7.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Nov-2014
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite sees Tropical Cyclone 05B headed to India
Tropical Cyclone 05B was meandering in the Bay of Bengal on Nov. 8, but forecasters expect it to move west and head toward east-central India for landfall. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of the tropical storm off India's coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
Offshore islands amplify, rather than dissipate, a tsunami's power
Study: Coastal islands do not dissipate a tsunami's power, as previously believed.
EDSP of ENS-Cachan, Cultural Service of the French Embassy in Dublin, European Research Council, SFI, University College Dublin, EU FP7 program ASTARTE

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
NASA see birth of Tropical Cyclone 5B in Bay of Bengal
The fifth tropical cyclone of the Northern Indian Ocean season formed in the Bay of Bengal as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and captured an image of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Nuri resemble a frontal system
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Nuri on Nov. 6 and captured an infrared picture of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Harmful Algae
Nutrients that feed red tide 'under the microscope' in major study
The 'food' sources that support Florida red tides are more diverse and complex than previously realized, according to five years' worth of research on red tide and nutrients published recently as an entire special edition of the scientific journal Harmful Algae. The microbiology, physiology, ecology and physical oceanography factors affecting red tides were documented in new detail and suggestions for resource managers addressing red tide in the coastal waters of southwest Florida were offered.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Darlene Crist
dtcrist@bigelow.org
207-315-2567 x103
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Zebrafish stripped of stripes
Within weeks of publishing surprising new insights about how zebrafish get their stripes, the same University of Washington group is now able to explain how to 'erase' them.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sandra Hines
shines@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
Evolutionary Applications
Mosquitofish genitalia change rapidly due to human impacts
Human environmental changes can markedly -- and rapidly -- affect fish shape, specifically the shape of mosquitofish genitalia in the Bahamas.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brian Langerhans
langerhans@ncsu.edu
919-515-3514
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
NASA sees Typhoon Nuri pass Iwo To, Japan
Typhoon Nuri continued moving in a northeasterly direction passing the island of Iwo To, Japan when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
NASA's TRMM and GPM satellites analyze Hurricane Vance before landfall
TRMM and GPM revealed areas of heavy rain within the storm before it weakened to a depression and made landfall on Nov. 5.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
Scientists on NOAA-led mission discover new coral species off California
A National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-led research team has discovered a new species of deep-sea coral and a nursery area for catsharks and skates in the underwater canyons located close to the Gulf of Farallones and Cordell Bank national marine sanctuaries off the Sonoma coast.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, US Geological Survey, California Academy of Sciences

Contact: Keeley Belva
keeley.belva@noaa.gov
301-643-6463
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
How corals can actually benefit from climate change effects
New research from associate professor of marine science Justin Ries explains how moderate increases in ocean acidification and temperature can enhance the growth rates of some reef-forming corals.

Contact: Casey Bayer
c.bayer@neu.edu
617-373-2592
Northeastern University

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
Global Food Security
Understanding of global freshwater fish and fishing too shallow, scientists say
Inland fish have to make a bigger splash. What sounds counter-intuitive to an activity commonly perceived as quiet is the broad recommendation of scientists at Michigan State University recommending that small-scale fishing in the world's freshwater bodies must have a higher profile to best protect global food security.
United States Geological Survey

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-432-0206
Michigan State University

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Study shows benefits of being fat (but not too fat) for deep-diving elephant seals
Researchers using a new type of tracking device on female elephant seals have discovered that adding body fat helps the seals dive more efficiently by changing their buoyancy. The study looked at the swimming efficiency of elephant seals during their feeding dives and how that changed in the course of months-long migrations at sea as the seals put on more fat.
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, US Office of Naval Research

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Review of Scientific Instruments
Synthetic fish measures wild ride through dams
A synthetic fish is helping existing hydroelectric dams and new, smaller hydro facilities become more fish-friendly. The latest version of the Sensor Fish -- a small tubular device filled with sensors that analyze the physical stresses fish experience -- measures more forces, costs about 80 percent less and can be used in more hydro structures than its predecessor, according to a paper published in the journal Review of Scientific Instruments.
US Department of Energy, Electric Power Research Institute

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Hurricane Vance headed for landfall in western Mexico
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Vance on Nov. 3 as it started moving in a northeasterly direction toward the northwestern coast of Mexico. On Nov. 4, a Tropical Storm Watch was in effect from Mazatlan northward to Topolobampo, Mexico. Hurricane Vance is forecast to make landfall in northwestern mainland Mexico on Nov. 5.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
NASA's Terra satellite sees Typhoon Nuri in eyewall replacement
High clouds had moved over Super Typhoon Nuri's eye early on Nov. 4 when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead as the storm was undergoing eyewall replacement.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Evolutionary Applications
Nature adores a hybrid
New research from Concordia, published in the journal Evolutionary Applications, shows that after a few generations of breeding and natural selection, hybrid fish are genetically as robust as their purely wild forefathers.

Contact: Cléa Desjardins
clea.desjardins@concordia.ca
51-484-824-245-068
Concordia University

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Groundwater patches play important role in forest health, water quality
Patches of soaked soil act as hot spots for microbes removing nitrogen from groundwater and returning it to the atmosphere.The discovery provides insight into forest health and water quality, say researchers from Virginia Tech and Cornell.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Davis
davisl@vt.edu
540-231-6157
Virginia Tech

Showing releases 251-275 out of 1335.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>


HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US    TOP
Copyright ©2015 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science