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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 1305.

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Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Science
Animals built reefs 550 million years ago, fossil study finds
It is a remarkable survivor of an ancient aquatic world -- now a new study sheds light on how one of Earth's oldest reefs was formed.
Natural Environment Research Council, University of Edinburgh, Laidlaw Trust

Contact: Corin Campbell
corin.campbell@ed.ac.uk
01-316-502-246
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Science
Ancient ocean currents may have changed pacing and intensity of ice ages
In a new study in Science, researchers find that the deep ocean currents that move heat around the globe stalled or even stopped about 950,000 years ago, possibly due to expanding ice cover in the north. The slowing currents increased carbon dioxide storage in the ocean, leaving less in the atmosphere, which kept temperatures cold and kicked the climate system into a new phase of colder but less frequent ice ages, they hypothesize.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kim Martineau
kmartine@ldeo.columbia.edu
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Science
Scientists find the shocking truth about electric fish
Scientists have found how the electric fish evolved its jolt. Writing June 27, 2014, in the journal Science, a team of researchers led by Michael Sussman of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Harold Zakon of the University of Texas at Austin and Manoj Samanta of the Systemix Institute in Redmond, Wash., identifies the regulatory molecules involved in the genetic and developmental pathways that electric fish have used to convert a simple muscle into an organ capable of generating a potent electrical field.
National Science Foundation, W. M. Keck Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michael Sussman
msussman@wisc.edu
608-262-8608
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Managing specialized microbes to clean stubborn chemicals from the environment
In a series of new studies, Anca Delgado, a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, examines unique groups of microorganisms, capable of converting hazardous chlorinated chemicals like trichloroetheene into ethene, a benign end product of microbial biodegradation.

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer
Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Wild Connection: What Animal Mating and Courtship Tell Us About Human Relationships
Sex-crazed turtles, confused bees, and cheating swans. These are just a few of the things animal behavior expert Dr. Jennifer Verdolin discusses in this new book that blends humor and science to show the similarities between humans and animals when it comes to dating and relationships.

Contact: Jennifer Verdolin
jverdolin@yahoo.com
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Changes in forage fish abundance alter Atlantic cod distribution, affect fishery success
A shift in the prey available to Atlantic cod in the Gulf of Maine that began nearly a decade ago contributed to the controversy that surrounded the 2011 assessment for this stock. A recent study of how this occurred may help fishery managers, scientists, and the industry understand and resolve apparent conflicts between assessment results and the experiences of the fishing industry.
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Invasive watersnakes introduced to California may pose risk to native species
Watersnakes, commonly seen in the lakes, rivers and streams of the eastern United States, are invading California waterways and may pose a threat to native and endangered species in the state, according to a University of California, Davis, study.

Contact: Jonathan Rose
jprose@ucdavis.edu
319-631-8292
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Are fish near extinction?
A new study from Tel Aviv University has uncovered the reason why 90 percent of fish larvae are biologically doomed to die mere days after hatching. This understanding of the mechanism that kills off the majority of the world's fish larvae may help find a solution to the looming fish crisis in the world.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Nature
Study links Greenland ice sheet collapse, sea level rise 400,000 years ago
A new study suggests that a warming period more than 400,000 years ago pushed the Greenland ice sheet past its stability threshold, resulting in a nearly complete deglaciation of southern Greenland and raising global sea levels some four to six meters.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anders Carlson
acarlson@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-3625
Oregon State University

Public Release: 24-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Can coral save our oceans?
New research from Tel Aviv University has uncovered the protective properties of soft coral tissue, which proved resilient when exposed to declining oceanic pH levels. The study provides insight into the changing face of coral reefs threatened by dropping oceanic pH levels as a result of climate change and may provide a new approach toward preserving the harder, calcified reef foundations.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 24-Jun-2014
Journal of Royal Society Interface
Young researcher discovers source of disco clams' light show
The disco clam was named for the rhythmic, pulsing light that ripples along the lips of its mantle. UC Berkeley graduate student Lindsey Dougherty was fascinated the first time she saw the clam, and set out to investigate the reflective material on its lips and why it flashes. She reports that the mirror is actually a highly reflective, densely packed layer of silica spheres a mere 340 nanometers across never before seen in animals.

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Protecting and connecting the Flathead National Forest
A new report from the Wildlife Conservation Society calls for completing the legacy of Wilderness lands on the Flathead National Forest in Montana. The report identifies important, secure habitats and landscape connections for five species -- bull trout, westslope cutthroat trout, grizzly bears, wolverines, and mountain goats. These iconic species are vulnerable to loss of secure habitat from industrial land uses and/or climate change.

Contact: Scott Smith
ssmith@wcs.org
718-220-3698
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Nature Geoscience
Understanding the ocean's role in Greenland glacier melt
The Greenland Ice Sheet is a 1.7 million-square-kilometer, 2-mile thick layer of ice that covers Greenland. Its fate is inextricably linked to our global climate system.
WHOI Ocean Climate Change Institute

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 18-Jun-2014
Ecological Indicators
Wildlife scientists map fishing resources to assist land managers, anglers
Researchers mapped a cultural ecosystem service approach by identifying the key features that influence anglers' enjoyment, such as environmental quality, accessibility, and fish abundance.

Contact: Lynn Davis
davisl@vt.edu
540-231-6157
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 18-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Fish-eating spiders discovered in all parts of the world
Spiders are traditionally viewed as predators of insects. Zoologists from Switzerland and Australia have now published a study that shows: spiders all over the world also prey on fish. The academic journal PLOS ONE has just published the results.

Contact: Olivia Poisson
olivia.poisson@unibas.ch
University of Basel

Public Release: 18-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Fish-eating spiders discovered around the world
Spiders from five different families prey on small fish in the wild.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
A noisy world: Crabs can hear
Northeastern researchers are the first to show that marine crabs are capable of hearing and that their auditory ability plays an important role in their response to fish predators. In a new paper published Tuesday in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Hughes and her team show that sound plays at least as much of a role in mud crabs' reaction to fish behavior as other widely studied cues -- and possibly more.

Contact: Casey Bayer
c.bayer@neu.edu
617-373-2592
Northeastern University

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
ESA Ecology
Why species matter
UC Santa Barbara doctoral candidate Caitlin Fong travels to French Polynesia often but not for vacation. She goes there to study a coral reef ecosystem influenced by human impacts such as overfishing and nutrient pollution.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Tropical depression Hagibis gets a second chance
Tropical Depression Hagibis appeared out for the count when it made landfall along southeastern China on June 16, but moved back into the South China Sea where it regenerated and sped northeast through the East China Sea.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
TRMM eyes rainfall in dissipating former Hurricane Cristina
TRMM passed over a dissipating former Hurricane Cristina and found it still contained heavy rain as it rapidly weakened.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Chemical pollution of European waters is stronger than anticipated
Substantial improvements in freshwater quality by 2015 have been a declared objective of the EU member states, manifesting itself by the requirements of the Water Framework Directive. A recent study conducted by the Institute for Environmental Sciences Landau together with the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research and fellow scientists from France and Switzerland shows that this target is unlikely to be met due to the high levels of toxicants in the water bodies.
Electricité de France, French National Research Agency, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Contact: Tilo Arnhold
presse@ufz.de
49-341-235-1635
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
99th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Ecological Society of America meets in Sacramento, Calif., Aug. 10-15, 2014
The Ecological Society of America's 99th Annual Meeting 'From Oceans to Mountains: It's all Ecology' will meet in Sacramento, Cal., from Sunday evening, Aug. 10, to Friday morning, Aug. 15, at the Sacramento Convention Center. ESA invites press and institutional public information officers to attend for scientific presentations on drought, climate, food, forests, fire, predators, prey and more.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
A satellite view: Former Hurricane Cristina now a ghost of its former self
An infrared image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed what appeared to be a ghostly ring of clouds and no convection in former Hurricane Cristina on Monday, June 16, as the system weakened to a remnant low pressure area.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Great white shark population in good health along California coast, UF study finds
The great white shark is not endangered in the eastern North Pacific, and, in fact, is doing well enough that its numbers likely are growing, according to an international research team led by a University of Florida researcher.

Contact: George Burgess
gburgess@flmnh.ufl.edu
352-318-3812
University of Florida

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
NASA catches short-lived tropical cyclone Hagibis landfalling in China
Tropical storm Hagibis only lived through 6 bulletins issued by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center in its short lifetime in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The final bulletin was issued on June 15 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) after Hagibis made landfall in China.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 276-300 out of 1305.

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