Press Releases

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Showing releases 276-300 out of 1536.

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Public Release: 8-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Making organic molecules in hydrothermal vents in the absence of life
For more than a decade, the scientific community has postulated that methane could be spontaneously produced by chemical reactions between hydrogen from hydrothermal vent fluid and carbon dioxide. New research by geochemists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution is the first to show that methane formation does not occur during the relatively quick fluid circulation process, despite extraordinarily high hydrogen contents in the waters.
NASA, National Science Foundation, NOAA, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 8-Jun-2015
Scientists and surfers team up to assess antibiotic resistance risk
UK scientists are about to begin an innovative study that will shed light on how surfers exposed to human sewage and diffuse pollution in seawater might be affected by antibiotic resistant bacteria. A group from the University of Exeter Medical School is joining forces with environmental charity, Surfers Against Sewage, and calling on surfers across the country to help by providing samples gathered from rectal swabs.

Contact: Alex Smalley
a.j.smalley@exeter.ac.uk
44-187-225-8135
University of Exeter

Public Release: 8-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the California Academy of Sciences
California Academy of Sciences discovers 100 new species in the Philippines
Scientists from the California Academy of Sciences are celebrating World Ocean's Day with a slew of brand new marine discoveries -- more than 100 species that are likely new to science. Mysterious live animals from dimly-lit, deep-water reefs were also collected for a new exhibit at the Academy's Steinhart Aquarium, expected to open in the summer of 2016.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Haley Bowling
hbowling@calacademy.org
415-379-5123
California Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 8-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Fish declines linked to effects of excess nutrients on coastal estuaries
A comprehensive study of a major California estuary has documented the links between nutrient runoff from coastal land use, the health of the estuary as a nursery for young fish, and the abundance of fish in an offshore commercial fishery. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, focused on Elkhorn Slough and Monterey Bay on California's central coast.
The Nature Conservancy

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 5-Jun-2015
100th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
100 years of ecology at the Centennial Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
When ESA was founded in 1915, ecology was a new field, still defining its scope as a discipline rooted in the study of the relationships of organisms to each other and their environment. The 100th Annual Meeting will look back at the field's growth over the last hundred years -- and forward to the environmental challenges that will face us now and into the next century. ESA invites press and institutional public information officers to attend for free.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 5-Jun-2015
Winner announced for NNI's first Nanotechnology Student Video Contest
The video explains a new method for disinfecting drinking water using a nanodiamond powder. This nanotechnology-enabled method can kill bacteria, is biocompatible, and is reusable, making it a good alternative to traditional chlorination.
National Nanotechnology Coordination Office of the National Nanotechnology Initiative

Contact: Marlowe Newman
mnewman@nnco.nano.gov
703-292-7128
National Nanotechnology Coordination Office

Public Release: 5-Jun-2015
2nd International Ocean Research Conference
Oceanography
Study of marine reserves published in Oceanography
A new study published in the June 15th Oceanography journal finds that effective fisheries reform strategies are more than a pipe dream: they exist and they work. In fact, rights-based fisheries management can change the lives of small-scale fishermen and coastal communities around the world.

Contact: Lisa Swann
lswann@rare.org
202-368-5033
Rare

Public Release: 5-Jun-2015
Genome Research
A new role for zebrafish: Larger scale gene function studies
Scientists at the National Human Genome Research Institute are using a fairly new gene-editing technology known as CRISPR/Cas9 to target specific DNA sequences in zebrafish. This technique could dramatically accelerate the discovery of gene function and the identification of disease genes in humans.

Contact: Steven Benowitz
Steven.Benowitz@nih.gov
301-402-0911
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 5-Jun-2015
Science Advances
Diverse coral communities persist, but bioerosion escalates in Palau's low-pH waters
A new study led by scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) found that the coral reefs in Palau seem to be defying the odds, showing none of the predicted responses to low pH except for an increase in bioerosion -- the physical breakdown of coral skeletons by boring organisms such as mollusks and worms. The paper is published June 5 in the journal Science Advances.
National Science Foundation's Division of Ocean Sciences, The Dalio Foundation, Inc., The Tiffany & Co. Foundation, The Nature Conservancy, the WHOI Access to the Sea Fund

Contact: WHOI Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 4-Jun-2015
Fisheries
Applying research agendas to sport fishing
As one of the most highly prized game fish in the upper Midwest, muskellunge (also known as muskies) and northern pike help support a $20 billion sport fishing industry. Facing declines in natural reproduction, a team of scientists, including a Michigan State University inland fisheries researcher, has developed a list of research and management needs to help keep the fish -- and the industry -- thriving.
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Musky Clubs Alliance of Wisconsin, University of Michigan, Alvan Macauley Fellowship

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-432-0206
Michigan State University

Public Release: 4-Jun-2015
The secret lives of fish revealed by the digital age
'Imagine the clandestine lives of marine fishes,' begins 'Migration Ecology of Marine Fishes,' a new book by Dr. David Secor, one of the most respected voices in marine fish migration studies. Their movements, social interactions, and favorite spots are all obscured beneath the surface. However, an explosion of technological advances in data gathering and analysis has allowed fisheries scientists to observe the secret lives of fish in a whole new way.

Contact: Amy Pelsinsky
apelsinsky@umces.edu
410-330-1389
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Public Release: 4-Jun-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Andres fading RapidScat of Andres
NASA's RapidScat instrument and NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look Tropical Storm Andres' fading winds and rain as it weakens toward dissipation in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
Study points to human impact on evolution of freshwater fish
In recreational fishing, the practice of catch-and-release is intended to conserve freshwater populations. The captive is unhooked and tossed back to swim away without any lasting consequences. But a new UConn study says the evolutionary path of a species may be on the line. The study is the first to identify species changes based on the fishing practice. 'We may be permanently changing fish populations over the long term,' researchers say.
The Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

Contact: Jan-Michael Hessenauer
jan-michael.hessenauer@uconn.edu
860-486-2808
University of Connecticut

Public Release: 4-Jun-2015
Hurricane Blanca now appears less organized in NASA infrared light
One of the instruments that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite looks at tropical cyclones using infrared light.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Jun-2015
Biological Conservation
Study reveals largest turtle breeding colony in the Atlantic
A new study from the University of Exeter has revealed that the Central African country of Gabon is providing an invaluable nesting ground for a vulnerable species of sea turtle considered a regional conservation priority.
Darwin Initiative (Project 20009) through the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) in the UK, Wildlife Conservation Society, Tullow Oil, Waitt Foundation, Worldwide Fund for Nature

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 4-Jun-2015
Conservation Letters
Recovering predators create new wildlife management challenges
A new study by scientists from NOAA Fisheries' Northwest Fisheries Science Center and the University of Washington examines recovering predator populations along the West Coast of the United States and in the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem, and the conflicts surrounding them. The study was published online June 4 in the journal Conservation Letters.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 4-Jun-2015
Science
Habitats contracting as fish and coral flee equator
Many species are migrating toward Earth's poles in response to climate change, and their habitats are shrinking in the process, researchers say.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Jun-2015
Science
Few opportunities to change
If you want to live, you need to breathe and muster enough energy to move, find nourishment and reproduce. This basic tenet is just as valid for us human beings as it is for the animals inhabiting our oceans.

Contact: Sina Loeschke
medien@awi.de
49-471-483-12008
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research

Public Release: 4-Jun-2015
Science
Warmer, lower-oxygen oceans will shift marine habitats
Warming temperatures and decreasing levels of dissolved oxygen will act together to create metabolic stress for marine animals. Habitats will shift to places in the ocean where the oxygen supply can meet the animals' increasing future needs.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Alfred Wegener Institute

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
New study uncovers why some threatened corals swap 'algae' partners
A new research study showed why threatened Caribbean star corals sometimes swap partners to help them recover from bleaching events. The findings are important to understand the fate of coral reefs as ocean waters warm due to climate change.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
Monaco Assessment
Antarctica and the strategic plan for biodiversity
Stanford Ph.D. candidate Cassandra Brooks will take part in a conference on Antarctic biodiversity in Monaco from June 8-10.

Contact: Cassandra Brooks
cassandrabrooks222@gmail.com
Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Gulf of Mexico erosion, Grand Canyon sandbars, rainfall fluctuations
This week from AGU come articles on Gulf of Mexico erosion, Grand Canyon sandbars, and rainfall fluctuations.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
Ocean Modeling Forum Pacific Herring Summit
Ocean Modeling Forum to bring human element to herring fishery, others
The Ocean Modeling Forum, a collaboration between the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at University of Washington and NOAA Fisheries, is trying something very rare -- bringing together multiple science models and people who care about a particular ocean resource or fishery to decide what's most important for its vitality and the communities it serves. The group will kick off its second project June 8-10 in Richmond, British Columbia, with a summit focusing on the Pacific herring fishery.

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
Nature
A check on runaway lake drainage
Draining lakes unlikely to worsen Greenland's contribution to sea levels.
National Science Foundation and NASA

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
Differences in metabolic rates of exploited and unexploited fish populations
Hessenauer and Vokoun, both of the Department of Natural Resources and the Environmnet at the University of Connecticut compared populations of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) taken from unexploited reference populations with those from inland recreational fisheries. Results suggest recreational angling may act as evolutionary force influencing metabolic rates.

Contact: Jan-Michael Hessenauer
jan-michael.hessenauer@uconn.edu
860-486-2808
University of Connecticut

Showing releases 276-300 out of 1536.

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