Press Releases

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Showing releases 276-300 out of 1433.

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Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Evolutionary Applications
Evolving to cope with climate change
Researchers have successfully measured the potential of the Atlantic Silverside to adapt to ocean acidification. This is the first such measurement for a vertebrate animal.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Miller
tim.miller@uconn.edu
860-486-4064
University of Connecticut

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Earth's Future
The tides they are a changin'
Scientists from the University of Southampton have found that ocean tides have changed significantly over the last century at many coastal locations around the world.
Natural Environmental Research Council, Engineering and Physical Science Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Journal of Coastal Research
Evidence indicates Yucatan Peninsula hit by tsunami 1,500 years ago
The eastern coastline of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, a mecca for tourists, may have been walloped by a tsunami between 1,500 and 900 years ago, says a new study involving Mexico's Centro Ecological Akumal and the University of Colorado Boulder.
Centro Ecological Akumal, United States Geological Survey

Contact: Charles Shaw
yucatanchas@hotmail.com
831-884-5635
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Science
New detector sniffs out origins of methane
An instrument identifies methane's origins in mines, deep-sea vents, and cows.
National Science Foundation, Shell Oil, Deep Carbon Observatory, National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, German Research Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Science
Nutrient pollution damages streams in ways previously unknown, ecologists find
An important food resource has been disappearing from streams without anyone noticing until now. In a new study published March 6 in the journal Science, a team of researchers led by University of Georgia ecologists reports that nutrient pollution causes a significant loss of forest-derived carbon from stream ecosystems, reducing the ability of streams to support aquatic life.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth Gavrilles
bethgav@uga.edu
706-542-7247
University of Georgia

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Current Biology
Menopausal whales are influential and informative leaders
Menopause is a downright bizarre trait among animals. It's also rare. Outside of the human species, only the female members of two whale species outlive their reproductive lives in such a major way. Female killer whales typically become mothers between the ages of 12 and 40, but they can live for more than 90 years. Males rarely make it past 50. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology have new evidence to explain why.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Current Biology
Old mothers know best: Killer whale study sheds light on the evolution of menopause
A new study led by the Universities of Exeter and York has shown that female killer whales survive after menopause because they help their family members find food during hard times. This research provides insights into why women continue to live long after they can no longer have children.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
44-787-943-3087
University of Exeter

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
James Cook University in major study on rapid fish acclimatization
A JCU team from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies has been granted more than $600,000 to find out why fish exposed to high water temperatures have offspring that are born already acclimatized to the high temperatures.
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology

Contact: Alistair Bone
alistair.bone@jcu.edu.au
61-747-814-942
James Cook University

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Environmental Science and Technology
Scientists question rush to build Nicaragua canal
A consortium of environmental scientists including Rice University's Pedro Alvarez has expressed strong concern about the impact of a controversial Central American canal across Nicaragua.

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Global Change Biology
NSU researchers discover hurricanes helped accelerate spread of lionfish
NSU researchers studied the correlation between hurricanes and spread of invasive species, lionfish, due to changes in ocean currents.

Contact: Joe Donzelli
jdonzelli@nova.edu
954-262-2159
Nova Southeastern University

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society
Usual prey gone, a fish survives by changing predictably
Without the Bahamas mosquitofish to eat, bigmouth sleepers slide down the food chain and survive on insects, snails and crustaceans. And, in so doing, sleepers' behaviors, ratio of males to females and physical appearance change, too.
National Science Foundation, University of Oklahoma, North Carolina State University

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Quaternary Science Reviews
New data provided by seabed sediments on the climate within the Mediterranean basin
An international team of scientists which included three University of Granada and the Andalusian Institute of Earth Sciences researchers (a joint UGR-CISC center) have found new data on the weather in the Mediterranean basin over the course of the past 20.000 years thanks to the chemical composition of sediments deposited in its seabed.

Contact: Francisca Martínez Ruiz
fmruiz@ugr.es
0034-958-230-000
University of Granada

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Animal functional diversity started out poor, became richer over time
The finding refutes a hypothesis by the famed evolutionary biologist Stephen J. Gould that marine creatures underwent an 'early burst' of functional diversity during the dawn of animal life.

Contact: Ker Than
kerthan@stanford.edu
650-723-9820
Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Geology
Lightning plus volcanic ash makes glass
In their open-access paper for Geology, Kimberly Genareau and colleagues propose, for the first time, a mechanism for the generation of glass spherules in geologic deposits through the occurrence of volcanic lightning. The existence of fulgurites -- glassy products formed in rocks and sediments struck by cloud-to-ground lightning -- provide direct evidence that geologic materials can be melted via natural lightning occurrence.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week From AGU: Ionosphere irregularities, Colombian volcanoes, Salish Sea nutrients
Researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, in collaboration with the University of New Brunswick in Canada, are studying irregularities in the ionosphere, a part of the atmosphere centered about 350 kilometers (217 miles) above the ground that defines the boundary between Earth and space.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Journal of Applied Ecology
'No take zones' in English Channel would benefit marine wildlife and the fishing industry
Marine conservationists are increasingly pinning their hopes on marine protected areas (MPAs) to save threatened species and reduce over-fishing. However, while most people agree that stopping some types of fishing in MPAs would benefit wildlife and fisheries, working out which fishing activities should be banned is often complicated and controversial.

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
The Cryosphere
Combined Arctic ice observations show decades of loss
Historic submarine and modern satellite records show that average ice thickness in the central Arctic Ocean dropped by 65 percent from 1975 to 2012. September ice thickness, when the ice cover is at a minimum, dropped by 85 percent.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
10th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting
10th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting
Register now for 10th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting. The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute has assembled a roster of dynamic speakers and workshops for its Annual Meeting, March 23-26, 2015.

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New technique improves forecasts for Canada's prized salmon fishery
A method developed by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego researchers for analyzing and predicting nature's dynamic and interconnected systems has improved forecasts of populations of Fraser River Sockeye Salmon, a highly prized fishery in British Columbia.
National Science Foundation, Foundation for the Advancement of Outstanding Scholarship and Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan, NSF NOAA Comparative Analysis of Marine Ecosystem Organization Program

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Mysterious microbes hold big possibilities for Sloan Research Fellow Alyson Santoro
Marine microbiologist Alyson Santoro of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science was recently awarded a prestigious Sloan Research Fellowship to study mysterious single-celled mircroorganisms called archaea. Once thought to live only in extreme environments, they are now known to be among the most abundant organisms on the planet yet still little is known about them.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Amy Pelsinsky
apelsinsky@umces.edu
410-330-1389
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
UT research: Conservation organizations need to keep up with nature
A new paper authored by a University of Tennessee, Knoxville, professor suggests that in order to cope, conservation organizations need to adapt like the organisms they seek to protect. The paper, published in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, argues that conservation organizations need to be bolder in their adaptation efforts given the rate and extent of the ecological changes that are coming.

Contact: Amy Blakely
ablakely@utk.edu
865-974-5034
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Journal of Animal Ecology
In hot and cold water: The private lives of 'Hoff' crabs revealed
Researchers at the University of Southampton have shed light on the private life of a new species of deep-sea crab, previously nicknamed the 'Hoff' crab because of its hairy chest.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Hormone-disrupting chemicals and climate change increase risk of extinction in wildlife
The impact of pollution on wildlife could be made dramatically worse by climate change according to a new study published today in the journal PNAS.
Natural Environment Research Council, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, University of Exeter and AstraZeneca's Global Safety Health and Environment Research Programme

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 27-Feb-2015
NASA's Terra satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Glenda stretching out
NASA's Terra satellite revealed that Tropical Cyclone Glenda was being stretched out by wind shear on Feb. 27.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Feb-2015
The Condor
Salish Sea seagull populations halved since 1980s
The number of seagulls in the Strait of Georgia is down by 50 per cent from the 1980s and University of British Columbia researchers say the decline reflects changes in the availability of food.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Showing releases 276-300 out of 1433.

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