Press Releases

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Showing releases 301-325 out of 1741.

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Public Release: 23-Nov-2015
Big data reveals glorious animation of Antarctic bottom water
A remarkably detailed animation of the movement of the densest and coldest water in the world around Antarctica has been produced using data generated on Australia's most powerful supercomputer, Raijin.

Contact: Alvin Stone
alvin.stone@unsw.edu.au
61-241-861-7366
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 23-Nov-2015
Chapman University professor is Regional Coordinator for €3 million European Union Grant
Chapman University associate professor Hesham El-Askary, Ph.D., is the regional coordinator on a €3 million grant from the European Union's Horizon 2020. The work of Dr. El-Askary and his colleagues will focus on earth observation related research with the aim of providing timely and accurate information, forecasts and projections.
European Union

Contact: Sheri Ledbetter
sledbett@chapman.edu
714-289-3143
Chapman University

Public Release: 23-Nov-2015
NASA's Terra satellite sees Typhoon In-fa stretching
NASA's Terra satellite flew over Typhoon In-fa on Nov. 23 and imagery showed the storm had become elongated to the northeast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Nov-2015
NASA eyes Tropical Cyclone Annabelle in Southern Indian Ocean
Tropical Storm Annabelle formed early on Nov. 21 in the Southern Indian Ocean, strengthened briefly and began a weakening trend on Nov. 23. NASA's Terra satellite and RapidScat instrument captured imagery of the storm after it developed.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Nov-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Rick become a post-tropical low
The remnants of post-tropical cyclone Rick continued to linger in the Eastern Pacific Ocean on Nov. 23. An animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed the weakening of Tropical Storm Rick into a remnant low pressure area from Nov. 21 to Nov. 23 in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, far off-shore from western Mexico. NASA's RapidScat instrument spotted the remnant's strongest winds on its eastern side on Nov. 22.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Nov-2015
Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
Bivalve family tree offers evolutionary clues
Florida State University researchers, along with an international team of scientists, have put together the most complete look to date of the evolutionary family tree of cardiid bivalves, commonly known as cockles and clams.

Contact: Kathleen Haughney
khaughney@fsu.edu
850-644-1489
Florida State University

Public Release: 23-Nov-2015
Biological Conservation
Marine airgun noise could cause turtle trauma
Scientists from the University of Exeter are warning of the risks that seismic surveys may pose to sea turtles. Widely used in marine oil and gas exploration, seismic surveys use airguns to produce sound waves that penetrate the sea floor to map oil and gas reserves.
Natural Environment Research Council, Darwin Initiative

Contact: Jo Bowler
J.Bowler@exeter.ac.uk
University of Exeter

Public Release: 23-Nov-2015
New Antarctic season tackles ambitious science and logistical challenges
The British Antarctic Survey (BAS) 2015/16 field season is underway with dozens of scientists and support staff -- together with planes and tonnes of equipment and fresh supplies -- arriving at BAS's five Antarctic research stations.

Contact: Athena Dinar
amdi@bas.ac.uk
44-012-232-21441
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 23-Nov-2015
Global Change Biology
Climate study finds evidence of global shift in the 1980s
Planet Earth experienced a global climate shift in the late 1980s on an unprecedented scale, fueled by anthropogenic warming and a volcanic eruption, according to new research published this week. Scientists say that a major step change, or 'regime shift,' in the Earth's biophysical systems, from the upper atmosphere to the depths of the ocean and from the Arctic to Antarctica, was centered around 1987, and was sparked by the El Chichón volcanic eruption in Mexico five years earlier.

Contact: Andrew Merrington
andrew.merrington@plymouth.ac.uk
01-752-588-003
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 23-Nov-2015
Nature Geoscience
Surprise: Stretchy slabs in deep Earth
New observations from an international geophysics team, including Carnegie's Lara Wagner, suggest that the standard belief that the Earth's rigid tectonic plates stay strong when they slide under another plate and sink into the deep Earth may not be universal. Instead, the new work suggests that the Nazca slab in Peru may be relatively weak and deforms easily.

Contact: Lara Wagner
lwagner@carnegiescience.edu
202-478-8838
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 23-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate can grind mountains faster than they can be rebuilt
An international research team has for the first time attempted to measure all the material leaving and entering a mountain range over more than a million years and discovered that erosion caused by glaciation during ice ages can wear down mountains faster than plate tectonics can build them. Researchers studied the St. Elias Mountains on Alaska's coast and found that erosion accelerated sharply about 1 million years ago when global cooling triggered stronger ice ages.
National Science Foundation, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

Contact: Anton Caputo
anton.caputo@jsg.utexas.edu
512-232-9623
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Microevolutionary evidence: The eyes have it
A new study shows that larger eye size is the source of a sizable reproductive advantage for a tiny freshwater crustacean, Daphnia obtusa. The research provides hard data for eye microevolution that, until now, were lacking.

Contact: Steven Powell
spowell2@mailbox.sc.edu
803-777-1923
University of South Carolina

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
Nature
Low-oxygen 'dead zones' in North Pacific linked to past ocean warming
A new study has found a link between abrupt ocean warming at the end of the last ice age and the sudden onset of low-oxygen, or hypoxic, conditions that led to vast marine dead zones. Results of the research, which was funded by the National Science Foundation, are published today in the journal Nature.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
NASA sees In-Fa get better organized, re-strengthen
When the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission of GPM core satellite analyzed Tropical Storm In-fa, data showed the storm had become better organized over the previous 24 hours. After GPM, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image that confirmed a better-organized storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
Current Biology
Polarization vision gives fiddler crabs the edge in detecting rivals
Fiddler crabs use polarization vision to sense the approach of rivals, scientists at the University of Bristol have found. The research, carried out in Panama, is the first field-based evidence that animals use polarization vision to enhance the detection of objects.

Contact: Hannah Johnson
hannah.johnson@bristol.ac.uk
001-179-288-896
University of Bristol

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
NASA's Aqua satellite eyes Tropical Storm Rick in Eastern Pacific
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Rick and captured a visible light image that showed the storm far off the coast of western Mexico. Rick continued to hang on to its status as tropical storm on Nov. 20, although a minimal one.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
Substantial funding for DFG Transregional CRC on 'Arctic Climate Change'
The German Research Foundation (DFG) supports the new Transregional Collaborative Research Centre TR 172 'Arctic climate change' during the next four years.
German Research Foundation, Transregional Collaborative Research Centre TR 172, ArctiC Amplification Climate Relevant Atmospheric and SurfaCe Processes, Feedback Mechanisms:(AC)

Contact: Tilo Arnhold
presse@tropos.de
49-341-271-77189
Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS)

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
Ecological Indicators
Climate change: Warm water is mixing up life in the Arctic
The warming of arctic waters in the wake of climate change is likely to produce radical changes in the marine habitats of the High North. This is indicated by data from long-term observations in the Fram Strait, which researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute have now analyzed.

Contact: Sina Loeschke
medien@awi.de
49-471-483-12008
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
Nature
Acorn worm genome reveals gill origins of human pharynx
One of the defining characteristics of chordates and other deuterostomes is the presence of gill slits, which first appeared in the acorn worm and persist vestigially in the human embryo. An international team led by UC Berkeley sequenced the genomes of two acorn worms to understand the genes that control development and the nervous system, and found a conserved cluster of six genes involved in patterning the pharynx in the worm as well as vertebrates.
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-915-3097
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
2015 AGU Fall Meeting
AGU Fall Meeting: Virtual press room and PIO uploader -- now live!
Discover the latest Earth and space science news at the 48th annual AGU Fall Meeting.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
PLOS Genetics
Sequencing algae's genome may aid biofuel production
University of Washington scientists have sequenced the complete genetic makeup of a species of ecologically important algae, which may aid in biofuel production.
United States Department of Energy, Washington Sea Grant, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: James Urton
jurton@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
Tropical Storm Rick joins an elite late-season storm group
The twenty-first tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season strengthened into a tropical storm on Nov. 19 and was renamed Tropical Storm Rick bringing the storm into a small elite group of late-season storms. NOAA's GOES-West satellite provided an early daylight image of the storm that showed it had become more organized since it formed on Nov 18.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
NASA analyzes Tropical Storm In-fa's winds, rain
As Tropical Storm In-fa continued to affect Micronesia and the Marianas Islands, NASA's RapidScat instrument measured surface winds and the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite measured areas of intense rainfall. In-fa became a typhoon early on Nov. 18 and weakened slightly to a tropical storm later in the day, maintaining tropical-storm force on Nov. 19.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
Exploring global climate impact if Antarctica's ice sheets melt
As the world anticipates a global climate change meeting next month in Paris, there is compelling historical evidence that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is vulnerable to rapid retreat and collapse, says climate scientist Alan Condron at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, yet very few if any studies have explored what might happen to Earth's climate if Antarctica's ice sheets were to melt over the next few decades.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
Science
Fish skin provides invisibility in open ocean
Scientists have solved a longstanding mystery about how some fish seem to disappear from predators in the open waters of the ocean, a discovery that could help materials scientists and military technologists create more effective methods of ocean camouflage. The findings are published in this week in Science.
Office of Naval Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiatives, National Science Foundation, University of Texas at Austin College of Natural Sciences

Contact: Christine Sinatra
christine.sinatra@austin.utexas.edu
512-471-4641
University of Texas at Austin

Showing releases 301-325 out of 1741.

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