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Showing releases 301-325 out of 1306.

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Public Release: 12-Jun-2014
Goldschmidt2014
New research shows Western Amazon under threat from oil pollution
A new study of pollution records indicates that the Western Amazon, an area of unparalleled biological and cultural diversity, may have been contaminated by widespread oil pollution over a 30-year period. This work will be presented at the Goldschmidt conference in Sacramento, California.

Contact: Press Officer
tom@parkhill.it
39-349-238-8191
European Association of Geochemistry

Public Release: 12-Jun-2014
Scientific Reports
Climate change winners and losers
A group of scientists have traced the genetics of modern penguin populations back to their early ancestors from the last Ice Age to better understand how three Antarctic penguin species -- gentoo, Adelie, and chinstrap penguins -- fared in response to past climate change.
Zoological Society of London, National Science Foundation, Quark Expeditions

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Study of white sharks in the northwest Atlantic offers optimistic outlook for recovery
White sharks are among the largest, most widespread apex predators in the ocean, but are also among the most vulnerable. A new study, the most comprehensive ever on seasonal distribution patterns and historic trends in abundance of white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) in the western North Atlantic Ocean, used records compiled over more than 200 years to update knowledge and fill in gaps in information about this species. The study was published June 11 in PLOS ONE.
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
A NASA view of Tropical Cyclone Nanauk in the Arabian Sea
Tropical Cyclone 02A has consolidated and strengthened over a 24-hour period between June 10-11 and an image from NASA's Aqua satellite showed a more rounded tropical storm, despite wind shear.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Study shows Deepwater Horizon crude oil impairs swimming performance of juvenile mahi-mahi
A new study led by University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science scientists showed up to a 37 percent decrease in overall swimming performance of Deepwater Horizon oil-exposed juvenile mahi-mahi. The findings reveal the toxic effects of crude oil on ecologically and commercially valuable fish that reside in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Cristina now a hurricane, NASA's TRMM satellite sees heavy rainfall within
Before Tropical Storm Cristina intensified into a hurricane, NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead and gathered data that showed areas of heavy rainfall were occurring within.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Energy demands of raising a pup push sea otter moms to the limit
By the time a sea otter pup is weaned, its mother may be so depleted physiologically that she is unable to survive the stress of a minor wound or infection. To understand why this happens, UC Santa Cruz biologist Nicole Thometz quantified the energy demands of a growing sea otter pup, revealing just how much it costs a sea otter mom to raise her pup.
US Geological Survey, Office of Naval Research, Otter Cove Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Forest loss starves fish
Research shows forest debris that drains into lakes is an important contributor to freshwater food chains -- bolstering fish diets to the extent that increased forest cover causes fish to get 'fat' and sparse forest leaves smaller, underfed fish.

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
BioScience
Climate change beats biodiversity as a press, scientific, and funding priority
A study that compared coverage of biodiversity and of climate change in newspapers, scientific articles, and research funding decisions shows that climate change eclipsed biodiversity loss as a priority in the mid-2000s, according to several measures. Since both trends threaten essential ecosystems, biodiversity researchers should seek to emulate the ascendancy of climate change and increase their efforts on research that addresses both trends.
Portuguese Ministry of Education and Science

Contact: Timothy M. Beardsley
tbeardsley@aibs.org
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Motherhood is no picnic for sea otter moms
Sea otters consume 25 percent of their own body weight each day just to stay warm and when nursing young their metabolic demands must rocket, but no one knew how much. Nicole Thometz, from the University of California at Santa Cruz, USA, and colleagues have discovered that sea otter moms invest a colossal 930 MJ of energy to successfully raise a pup and this expense can force them to make difficult decisions about their pups' futures.
US Geological Survey Western Ecological Research Center, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Kathryn Knight
kathryn.knight@biologists.com
44-012-234-25525
The Company of Biologists

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite spots Arabian Sea tropical cyclone
Tropical Cyclone 02A formed in the Arabian Sea as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and captured a visible photo of the storm, spotting strongest storms south of its center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Christina's birth and severe weather in US South
NASA's Aqua satellite captured a picture of newborn Tropical Storm Cristina on June 10, marking the birth date of the Eastern Pacific Ocean's third tropical storm of the season.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Coho salmon: Pinks' and chums' eating cousin
Newly published research co-authored by scientists at Simon Fraser University and the Raincoast Conservation Foundation shows juvenile coho salmon benefit from dining on the distant remains of their spawning pink and chum cousins. While juvenile coho salmon feed directly on spawning pink and chum salmon carcasses and eggs, even coho with no direct contact with spawning pink and chum benefit from their nutrient contributions to stream ecosystems.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Geology
Syracuse University geologists confirm oxygen levels of ancient oceans
Geologists at the Syracuse University College of Arts and Sciences have discovered a new way to study oxygen levels in the Earth's oldest oceans.

Contact: Rob Enslin
rmenslin@syr.edu
315-443-3403
Syracuse University

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Our Ocean
UK science trio called to Washington ocean summit
Three leading environmental scientists from the UK have been invited to talk about the state of the world's oceans to an audience including US Secretary of State John Kerry at an ocean summit in Washington.

Contact: NERC Press Office
pressoffice@nerc.ac.uk
44-017-934-11568
Natural Environment Research Council

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
2nd International Conference on Integrative Salmonid Biology (ICISB)
Scientific breakthrough: International collaboration has sequenced salmon genome
Today the International Cooperation to Sequence the Atlantic Salmon Genome announced completion of a fully mapped and openly accessible salmon genome.
Genome British Columbia

Contact: Jennifer Boon
jboon@genomebc.ca
778-327-8374
Genome BC

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Molecular Ecology
Genetics reveal that reef corals and their algae live together but evolve independently
New research reveals that Caribbean corals and the algae that inhabit them form a remarkably stable relationship -- new knowledge that can serve as an important tool in preserving and restoring vital reef-building corals. The research could be used to decide which heat-tolerant corals to bring into nurseries, to grow, and to replant back on the reef to restore healthy coral populations.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Public gets first view of a live vampire squid and other deep-sea cephalopods
From the vampire squid to the flapjack octopus, deep-sea cephalopods are both fascinating and mysterious. Since April, members of the public have been able to see these animals for the first time, as part of the ongoing 'Tentacles' special exhibition at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. A collaborative effort with the aquarium's partner institution, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, this exhibit is providing new scientific insights into the lives of these mysterious animals.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Kim Fulton-Bennett
kfb@mbari.org
831-775-1835
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Coral, human cells linked in death
Humans and corals are about as different from one another as living creatures get, but a new finding reveals that in one important way, they are more similar than anyone ever realized. A biologist at San Diego State University has discovered they share the same biomechanical pathway responsible for triggering cellular self-destruction. The finding has implications for biologists, conservationists and medical researchers.

Contact: Beth Chee
bchee@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-4563
San Diego State University

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
NOAA scientists find mosquito control pesticide low risk to juvenile oysters, hard clams
Four of the most common mosquito pesticides used along the east and Gulf coasts show little risk to juvenile hard clams and oysters, according to a NOAA study. However, the study, published in the on-line journal Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, also determined that lower oxygen levels in the water, known as hypoxia, and increased acidification actually increased how toxic some of the pesticides were. Such climate variables should be considered when using these pesticides in the coastal zone, the study concluded.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
301-713-3066
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Satellite sees System 90L dissipating over Mexico
System 90L was an area of tropical low pressure that never managed to form into a tropical depression during its lifetime, but did drop heavy rainfall on eastern and southeastern Mexico before dissipating.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite analyzes Mexico's soaking tropical rains
The movement of tropical storm Boris into southern Mexico and a nearly stationary low pressure system in the southern Gulf of Mexico caused heavy rainfall in that area. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM acts like a 'rain gauge in space' and calculated that one area received almost 2 feet of rainfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
NHAES research: New England lakes recovering rapidly from acid rain
For more than 40 years, policy makers have been working to reduce acid rain, a serious environmental problem that can devastate lakes, streams, and forests and the plants and animals that live in these ecosystems. Now new research funded by the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture indicates that lakes in New England and the Adirondack Mountains are recovering rapidly from the effects of acid rain.
New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station

Contact: William McDowell
bill.mcdowell@unh.edu
603-862-2249
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 8-Jun-2014
Nature Geoscience
Warming climates intensify greenhouse gas given out by oceans
Rising global temperatures could increase the amount of carbon dioxide naturally released by the world's oceans, fueling further climate change, a study suggests.
Scottish Alliance for Geoscience Environment Society, Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Satellite sees System 90L dissipating over Mexico
NASA and NOAA satellites are gathering visible, infrared, microwave and radar data on a persistent tropical low pressure area in the southwestern Bay of Campeche. System 90L now has a 50 percent chance for development, according to the National Hurricane Center and continues to drop large amounts of rainfall over southeastern Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 301-325 out of 1306.

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