Press Releases

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Showing releases 301-325 out of 1447.

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Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Conservation Biology
First global review on the status, future of Arctic marine mammals
A multinational team surveys the status of all Arctic marine mammals, including whales, walruses, seals and polar bears. The report is a first effort to assess the status of 78 subpopulations and recommend measures to protect these species under climate change.
NASA, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Can engineered carbon nanotubes help to avert our water crisis?
Carbon nanotube membranes have a bright future in addressing the world's growing need to purify water from the sea, researchers say in a study published in the journal Desalination.

Contact: Sacha Boucherie
s.boucherie@elsevier.com
31-204-853-564
Elsevier

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
West Coast waters shifting to lower-productivity regime, new NOAA report finds
Large-scale climate patterns that affect the Pacific Ocean indicate that waters off the West Coast have shifted toward warmer, less productive conditions that may affect marine species from seabirds to salmon, according to the 2015 State of the California Current Report delivered to the Pacific Fishery Management Council. High mortality of sea lion pups in Southern California and seabirds on the Oregon and Washington coasts in recent months may be early signs of the shift.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
World's first fully integrated research facility opens in Calgary wastewater plant
For the first time, university researchers are working side-by-side with municipal operators to advance wastewater treatment technologies and knowledge that will lead to cleaner water, a better protected ecosystem and improved public health. Today, the University of Calgary and the City of Calgary unveiled the $38.5 million Advancing Canadian Wastewater Assets facility at the Pine Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Contact: Sean Myers
sean.myers2@ucalgary.ca
403-220-4756
University of Calgary

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
NTU Singapore ties up with the Smithsonian Institution for research in tropical ecology
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore has partnered the Smithsonian Institution, the world's largest museum and research complex based in the United States, to advance research in tropical ecology.

Contact: Lester Kok
lesterkok@ntu.edu.sg
Nanyang Technological University

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Seeps are microbial hotspots, homes to cosmopolitan microorganisms
New study provides evidence naturally occurring methane gas leaks in the sea floor vital to the microbial diversity are highly diverse themselves.

Contact: Andrea Boyle Tippett
aboyle@udel.edu
302-831-1421
University of Delaware

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Nathan moving south and strengthening
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Nathan east of the Queensland coast on March 16 at 0:00 UTC. The image showed a rounded circulation with bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the center of circulation.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
WIREs Water
Will future population growth be limited by freshwater availability?
The global human population is growing faster than the water supply. Investigators recently analyzed various models and trends to assess both optimistic and pessimistic projections of future water use and shortages.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
Tropical Cyclone Bavi moving through Philippine Sea
NASA's Aqua satellite captured visible and infrared data on Tropical Cyclone Bavi as it moved in a westward motion through the Philippine Sea.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
NASA sees Extra-Tropical Storm Pam moving away from New Zealand
Pam, a once powerful Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale is now an extra-tropical storm moving past northern New Zealand. NASA's Aqua satellite and the ISS-RapidScat instrument provided a look at the storm's structure and wind speed.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
VIMS develops underwater robot to assist in oil-spill cleanup
Prototype developed by Dr. Paul Panetta and crew uses sound waves to help gauge thickness of slicks.
Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

Contact: David Malmquist
davem@vims.edu
804-684-7011
Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
Nature Geoscience
Microbes in the seafloor: Little nutrients, lots of oxygen
About one-quarter of the global seafloor is extremely nutrient poor. Contrary to previous assumptions, it contains oxygen not just in the thin surface layer, but also throughout its entire thickness.

Contact: F.Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Neither more food nor better food -- still, fish biomass increases
To increase the biomass of fish, contemporary ecological theory predicts that either the amount of food or the quality of the food has to increase. In a recent experiment, researchers at Umeå University doubled the fish biomass under identical food supply and food quality by only controlling how much of total food supply that was channeled to juvenile and adult fish, respectively. The results have major implications for the exploitation (harvest) of fish populations and the coexistence of predatory fish and their prey.

Contact: Ingrid Söderbergh
ingrid.soderbergh@umu.se
46-907-866-024
Umea University

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
Nature Geoscience
East Antarctica melting could be explained by oceanic gateways
Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin have discovered two seafloor gateways that could allow warm ocean water to reach the base of Totten Glacier, East Antarctica's largest and most rapidly thinning glacier. The discovery probably explains the glacier's extreme thinning and raises concerns about how it will affect sea level rise. Their research was published in the March 16 edition of the journal Nature Geoscience.
Natural Environment Research Council, National Science Foundation, Australian Antarctic Division, NASA, G. Unger Vetlesen Foundation, University of Texas at Austin's Jackson School of Geosciences

Contact: Monica Kortsha
mkortsha@jsg.utexas.edu
512-471-2241
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
NOAA announces novel feeder for juvenile and larval fish
NOAA Fisheries researchers have developed a fish feeder that allows fish farmers to automatically feed young fish on a recurrent basis while protecting the feed from oxidation and clumping. The patent-pending Microparticulate Feeder for Larval and Juvenile Fish was developed at NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, Wash., and is now available for licensing by a qualified US company.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
Nature Climate Change
Study: Past warming increased snowfall on Antarctica, affecting global sea level
A new study confirms that snowfall in Antarctica will increase significantly as the planet warms, offsetting future sea level rise from other sources -- but the effect will not be nearly as strong as many scientists previously anticipated because of other, physical processes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Clark
clarkp@geo.oregonstate.edu
541-737-1247
Oregon State University

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
Nature Geoscience
Warm ocean water is making Antarctic glacier vulnerable to significant melting
Researchers have discovered a valley underneath East Antarctica's most rapidly-changing glacier that delivers warm water to the base of the ice, causing significant melting.
Natural Environment Research Council, National Science Foundation, Australian Antarctic Division, NASA's Operation IceBridge, G. Unger Vetlesen Foundation

Contact: Hayley Dunning
h.dunning@imperial.ac.uk
020-759-42412
Imperial College London

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
Nature Climate Change
Global warming brings more snow to Antarctica
Although it sounds paradoxical, rising temperatures might result in more snowfall in Antarctica. Each degree Celsius of regional warming could increase snowfall on the ice continent by about 5 percent, an international team of scientists now quantified. The results provide a missing link for future projections of Antarctica's critical contribution to sea-level rise. However, the increase in snowfall will not save Antarctica from losing ice.

Contact: Jonas Viering
press@pik-potsdam.de
49-331-288-2507
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
Nature Geoscience
Frequency of tornadoes, hail linked to El Niño, La Niña
A new study shows that El Niño and La Niña conditions can help predict the frequency of tornadoes and hail storms in some of the most susceptible regions of the United States.

Contact: Francesco Fiondella
francesco@iri.columbia.edu
646-321-2271
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 15-Mar-2015
BMC Ecology
Rare glimpse into how coral procreates could aid future conservation
A rare and threatened Caribbean coral species has for the first time been successfully bred and raised in the lab, according to research published in the open-access journal BMC Ecology. The study provides the first photos of juveniles of this species, and could provide information to help bolster local coral reef conservation. The team plans to 'out-plant' these lab-grown juveniles in the wild which could help populations become more resilient to climate change.

Contact: Joel Winston
Joel.Winston@biomedcentral.com
44-020-319-22081
BioMed Central

Public Release: 14-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New research finds oceanic microbes behave in a synchrony across ocean basins
Researchers from the University of Hawai'i - Manoa and colleagues found that microbial communities in different regions of the Pacific Ocean displayed strikingly similar daily rhythms in their metabolism despite inhabiting extremely different habitats -- the nutrient-rich waters off California and the nutrient-poor waters north of Hawai'i. Furthermore, in each location, the dominant photoautotrophs appear to initiate a cascade effect wherein the other major groups of microbes perform their metabolic activities in a coordinated and predictable way.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, National Science Foundation, Simons Foundation, NASA, David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 13-Mar-2015
NASA sees fading rare south Atlantic storm 90Q, one of three since 2004
Just one day after it formed, the southern Atlantic Ocean the now former sub-tropical storm 90Q appeared to be fizzling out on NASA satellite imagery. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed little convection associated with the storm on March 12. Sub-tropical and tropical storms are rare in the Southern Atlantic, and this one marks the third since 2004.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Mar-2015
Tropical Cyclone Nathan crawling in NASA satellite imagery
Tropical Cyclone Nathan has made its cyclonic loop in the Coral Sea near Queensland, Australia's Cape York Peninsula, and is headed away from land. However, satellite imagery reveals that Nathan's movement away from Queensland is a slow crawl.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Mar-2015
Theoretical Ecology
Invasive species use landmarking to find love in a hopeless place
Tiny populations of invasive species such as Asian carp start their domination of new ecosystems by hanging out at local landmarks, according to a new study published in the journal Theoretical Ecology this week. Understanding how species use these local hotspots can play a key role in how officials approach population control for conserving endangered species and controlling invasive ones.

Contact: Nick Manning
nmanning@uwaterloo.ca
519-888-4451
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 13-Mar-2015
Tropical Storm Bavi moving through Northwestern Pacific Ocean
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Bavi as it continued on a west-northwesterly track through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Bavi has already generated a typhoon watch for Guam, Rota, Tinian and Saipan.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 301-325 out of 1447.

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