Press Releases

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Showing releases 301-325 out of 1399.

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Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Arctic ice cap slides into the ocean
Satellite images have revealed that a remote Arctic ice cap has thinned by more than 50 meters since 2012 -- about one sixth of its original thickness -- and that it is now flowing 25 times faster.

Contact: Sarah Reed
s.j.reed@leeds.ac.uk
44-011-334-34196
University of Leeds

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Oecologia
Sisters act together
A team of researchers from the Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology at the Vetmeduni Vienna studied cichlid fishes in Lake Tanganyika in central Africa. The researchers observed that female fish dispersed longer distances from their natal grounds than males. To minimize risks and to secure the spread of their genetic information, females often swim together in a shoal with female siblings. Males prefer shoaling with non-siblings. The results were recently published in the journal Oecologia.

Contact: Heike Hochhauser
heike.hochhauser@vetmeduni.ac.at
43-125-077-1151
University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Geosphere
Alamo impact crater: New study could double its size
Carbonate rock deposits found within the mountain ranges of south-central Nevada, USA, record evidence of a catastrophic impact event known as the Alamo impact. This event occurred roughly 382 million years ago when the ancient seafloor was struck and a submarine crater was formed. The crater was filled-in with fragmented rock, and later with more typical ocean deposits, as the energy from the impact lessened and the environment returned to normal.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Niko's romp through society
After making its social debut in the Southern Pacific Ocean, NASA's Aqua satellite spotted Tropical Cyclone Niko moving through the Society Islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Using less fish to test chemicals safety
The JRC has released a new strategy on how to replace, reduce and refine the use of fish in testing of chemicals' effect on flora and fauna in water and chemicals' uptake and concentration in living organisms. Out of the 11.5 million animals used for experimental purposes in the EU (2011 data), cold blooded animals, namely reptiles, amphibians and fish represent 12.4 percent.

Contact: Elena Gonzalez Verdesoto
Elena.GONZALEZ-VERDESOTO@ec.europa.eu
European Commission Joint Research Centre

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Journal of Environmental Quality
Soils could keep contaminants in wastewater from reaching groundwater, streams
With endocrine-disrupting compounds affecting fish populations in rivers as close as Pennsylvania's Susquehanna and as far away as Israel's Jordan, a new research study shows that soils can filter out and break down at least some of these emerging contaminants. The results suggest that water pollution can be diminished by spraying treated wastewater on land rather than discharging it directly into streams, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Ecology
Study projects unprecedented loss of corals in Great Barrier Reef due to warming
The coverage of living corals on Australia's Great Barrier Reef could decline to less than 10 percent if ocean warming continues, according to a new study that explores the short- and long-term consequences of environmental changes to the reef.
NIH/National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis

Contact: Catherine Crawley
ccrawley@nimbiosonline.org
865-974-9350
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS)

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Scientific Reports
Fossils survive volcanic eruption to tell us about the origin of the Canary Islands
The most recent eruption on the Canary Islands -- at El Hierro in 2011 -- produced spectacularly enigmatic white 'floating rocks' that originated from the layers of oceanic sedimentary rock underneath the island. An international team of researchers, led from Uppsala University, use microscopic fossils found in the rocks to shed new light on the long-standing puzzle about the origin of the Canary Islands.
The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Center for Natural Disaster Sciences at Uppsala University, The Swedish Research Council

Contact: Valentin R. Troll
valentin.troll@geo.uu.se
46-184-712-570
Uppsala University

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Geology
Small drop in sea level had big impact on southern Great Barrier Reef
Research led by the University of Sydney's School of Geosciences has found that small drop in sea level 2000 years ago on the southern Greater Barrier Reef led to a dramatic slowdown in the coral reef's growth.
Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Australian Research Council

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
verity.leatherdale@sydney.edu.au
61-403-067-342
University of Sydney

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Current Biology
These jellyfish aren't just drifters
Jellyfish might look like mere drifters, but some of them have a remarkable ability to detect the direction of ocean currents and to swim strongly against them, according to new evidence in free-ranging barrel-jellyfish reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Jan. 22.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Annals of Glaciology
UNL drillers help make new Antarctic discoveries
Expedition to Antarctica yields new information about how climate change affects Antarctic glaciers; new ecosystem discovered in estuary beneath the ice.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Frank Rack
frack2@unl.edu
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
GOES-West captures birth of Tropical Cyclone Niko in Southern Pacific
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured the birth of Tropical Cyclone Niko in the Southern Pacific Ocean near French Polynesia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Freshwater Science
Researchers introduce macrosystems approach to study stream ecology
Kansas State University researchers have collaborated to create the Stream Biome Gradient Concept, which is a way to compare streams in different climates and different continents. The concept can improve how researchers study streams worldwide.
National Science Foundation, Konza Long-Term Ecological Research program, International Grasslands Center

Contact: Walter Dodds
wkdodds@k-state.edu
785-532-6998
Kansas State University

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
NASA adds up Tropical Storm Mekkhala's drenching rainfall in the Philippines
NASA/JAXA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission can measure rainfall rates from space and its data combined with other satellite data provides are used to calculate rainfall totals. After Tropical Storm Mekkhala drenched the eastern Philippines, a rainfall map was created showing almost two feet of rainfall in an isolated area.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Chelonian Conservation and Biology
Climate change threatens 30 years of sea turtle conservation success
A new University of Central Florida study is sounding the alarm about climate change and its potential impact on more than 30 years of conservation efforts to keep sea turtles around for the next generation.

Contact: Zenaida Kotala
zenaida.kotala@ucf.edu
407-823-6120
University of Central Florida

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Nature
Atmospheric warming heats the bottom of ice sheets, as well as the top
New research shows for the first time that meltwater from the surface of an ice cap in northeastern Greenland can make its way beneath the ice and become trapped, refilling a subglacial lake. This meltwater provides heat to the bottom of the ice sheet and could make the ice sheet move faster and alter how it responds to the changing climate. These groundbreaking findings provide new information about atmospheric warming and its affect on the critical zone at the base of the ice.

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Chemosphere
Simple soil mixture reverses toxic stormwater effects
A simple column of common soil can reverse the toxic effects of urban runoff that otherwise quickly kills young coho salmon and their insect prey, according to new research by Washington State University, NOAA Fisheries and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The affordable and remarkably effective treatment offers new promise for controlling toxic pollutants that collect on paved surfaces and wash off as stormwater into rivers, streams and the ocean.
US Environmental Protection Agency, NOAA/Coastal Storms Program, The Russell Family Foundation

Contact: Jenifer McIntyre
jen.mcintyre@wsu.edu
206-369-1832
Washington State University

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Scientists drilling first deep ice core at the South Pole
The 40,000-year record will be the first deep core from this part of Antarctica, and the first record longer than 3,000 years collected south of 82 degrees latitude. The exceptional cold at the South Pole preserves trace gases better than at other locations.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP sees remnants of Mekkhala
After Tropical Storm Mekkhala made landfall in the central Philippines and tracked north, it weakened to a depression. By Jan. 20, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite saw that it was a remnant circulation northeast of the Philippines, over the northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
The once-powerful Tropical Cyclone Bansi stirred up ocean sediment
Tropical Cyclone Bansi reached a Category 4 status on the Saffir-Simpson Scale on Jan. 15 and 16 as it moved through the Southern Indian Ocean. By Jan. 19 as the storm was weakening over open ocean, NASA's Aqua satellite captured a picture of sediment stirred up from the storm around the Cargados Carajos Shoals.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Climate change does not bode well for picky eaters
In a part of the world that is experiencing the most dramatic increase in temperature and climate change, two very similar species of animals are responding very differently. New research published today suggests that how these species have adapted to co-exist with one another might be to blame.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Alison Satake
asatake@lsu.edu
225-578-3870
Louisiana State University

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
PeerJ
'Citizen science' reveals positive news for Puget Sound seabirds
Many seabird species are thought to have declined around Puget Sound since the 1960s and 1970s but the new results indicate the trends have turned up for many species. The Puget Sound Partnership lists some of the species as barometers of the health of Puget Sound.
Boeing, Sustainable Path Foundation, Russell Family Foundation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Patagonia.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Biggest fish in the ocean receives international protection
Tuna and other fish species may congregate around whale sharks, but new rule reduces the chance that the giant sea creatures could get caught in nets targeting those species.

Contact: Jim Milbury
jim.milbury@noaa.gov
562-980-4006
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 19-Jan-2015
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology
Paleontologist names 9-foot-long 'predator croc' that preceded dinosaurs
Virginia Tech paleontologist Sterling Nesbitt's latest addition to the paleontological vernacular is Nundasuchus, a 9-foot-long carnivorous reptile with steak knife-like teeth and bony plates on the back.

Contact: Rosaire Bushey
busheyr@vt.edu
540-231-5035
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 19-Jan-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Giant atmospheric rivers add mass to Antarctica's ice sheet
Extreme weather phenomena called atmospheric rivers were behind intense snowstorms recorded in 2009 and 2011 in East Antarctica. The resulting snow accumulation partly offset recent ice loss from the Antarctic ice sheet, report researchers from KU Leuven.

Contact: Irina Gorodetskaya
irina.gorodetskaya@ees.kuleuven.be
32-163-72169
KU Leuven

Showing releases 301-325 out of 1399.

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