Press Releases

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Showing releases 301-325 out of 1748.

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Public Release: 22-Feb-2016
Nature Communications
Penn study reveals how fish control microbes through their gills
In a new study published in the journal Nature Communications, Oriol Sunyer of the University of Pennsylvanian and colleagues found that fish induce production of a particular antibody in their gills in response to pathogen exposure, work that could lead to improved fish vaccines for aquaculture.
US Department of Agriculture, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, European Commission

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 22-Feb-2016
Geophysical Research Letters
Sea level mapped from space with GPS reflections
The GPS signal used for 'sat-navs' could help improve understanding of ocean currents, according to new research published in Geophysical Research Letters by National Oceanography Centre scientists, alongside colleagues from the University of Michigan and Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
Natural Environmental Research Council

Contact: Holly Peacock
holly.peacock@noc.ac.uk
0238-059-6388
National Oceanography Centre, UK

Public Release: 22-Feb-2016
2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting
New research reveals surprising social networks of sharks
Although historically seen as solitary animals, new research being presented here shows sharks may have a more complex social structure than previously thought. Using tracking devices to trace the movements of individual animals in the open ocean, researchers found that Sand Tiger sharks form complex social networks that are typically seen in mammals but rarely observed in fish.

Contact: Lauren Lipuma
llipuma@agu.org
504-427-6069
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 22-Feb-2016
Coral Reefs
Reef sharks prefer bite-size meals
Sharks have a reputation for having voracious appetites, but a new study shows that most coral reef sharks eat prey that are smaller than a cheeseburger.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Lizard Island Research Station John and Laurine Proud Fellowship, Save Our Seas Foundation

Contact: Dr Ashley Frisch
ashley.frisch@jcu.edu.au
61-747-804-661
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 22-Feb-2016
Cretaceous Research
Texas fish of dinosaur era, at Perot Museum of Nature and Science, found to be new species
A 90-million-year-old fossil fish, currently on display at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas, turns out to be a new species. Research conducted by Kenshu Shimada, Ph.D., professor at DePaul University and research associate of the Sternberg Museum, reveals the 5.5-foot-long fossil fish to possess a tuna-like body with a unique 'hook-shaped sail' on its back. The fish's new species name, Pentanogmius fritschi, is in honor of local amateur collector Joseph Fritsch.

Contact: Becky Mayad
becky@mayadpr.com
214-352-1881
Perot Museum of Nature and Science

Public Release: 22-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Antarctic ice sheet is more vulnerable to CO2 than expected
Results from a new climate reconstruction of how Antarctica's ice sheets responded during the last period when atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) reached levels like those expected to occur in about 30 years, plus sediment core findings reported in a companion paper, suggest that the ice sheets are more vulnerable to rising atmospheric CO2 than previously thought.

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 22-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sea level rise in 20th century was fastest in 3,000 years, Rutgers-led study finds
Global sea level rose faster from 1900 to 2000 than during any of the previous 27 centuries. Without global warming, the Earth's sea level would have climbed by less than half the observed 20th century increase and might have dropped.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium, Strategic Environmental Research and Development Group, U.K. National Environmental Research Council, Royal Society, Harvard University

Contact: Todd B. Bates
tbates@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 22-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sea-level rise past and future: Robust estimates for coastal planners
Sea-levels worldwide will likely rise by 50 to 130 centimeters by the end of this century if greenhouse gas emissions are not reduced rapidly. This is shown in a new study led by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research that, for the first time, combines the two most important estimation methods for future sea-level rise and yields a more robust risk range. A second study provides the first global analysis of sea-level data for the past 3,000 years.

Contact: Jonas Viering, Mareike Schodder
press@pik-potsdam.de
49-331-288-2507
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)

Public Release: 21-Feb-2016
Biological Conservation
Gaps in reporting leave turtles vulnerable
A James Cook University study has called for a change in the way we manage bycatch -- to better monitor the unintentional catching of sea turtles by commercial fishers.

Contact: Alistair Bone
alistair.bone@jcu.edu.au
James Cook University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2016
Nanotoxicity study wins top-download status from Royal Society of Chemistry in January 2016
A consortium of researchers at several US universities have conducted one of first environmental analyses of four engineered nanomaterials commonly used in semiconductor manufacturing, using samples provided directly from the industry. Their study found short-term exposure posed little health or environmental risk, and their published paper was one of the most downloaded papers in 2015.
Semiconductor Research Corporation, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Jill Goetz
jgoetz@email.arizona.edu
520-621-1992
University of Arizona College of Engineering

Public Release: 19-Feb-2016
NASA sees major Tropical Cyclone Winston approaching Fiji
Powerful Tropical Cyclone Winston continued to intensify as it neared Fiji and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the strengthening storm with a clear eye. Warnings are posted in Fiji as the storm is expected to make landfall there as a major hurricane.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Feb-2016
NASA's GPM sees Tropical Cyclone Uriah start weakening trend
Over two days, the Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core observatory satellite had excellent views of Tropical Cyclone Uriah in the South Indian Ocean. GPM found heavy rainfall was occurring in the storm but saw a weakening trend begin.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Feb-2016
Tracking El Niño's impact
A team of geologists is set to measure coastal erosion and the effects of sea level rise brought by El Niño this winter.
California Sea Grant/Program Development Award

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 19-Feb-2016
2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting
New research reveals sound of deep-water animal migration
New research reveals the sound of deep-water animal migration.

Contact: Lauren Lipuma
llipuma@agu.org
504-427-6069
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry
Tyrosinase inhibitors from terrestrial and marine resources
Tyrosinase is a multifunctional copper-containing enzyme widely distributed in microorganisms as well as plants and animals which has a primordial role in melanin biosynthesis thus impacting on skin color and pigmentation.

Contact: Faizan ul Haq
faizan@benthamscience.org
Bentham Science Publishers

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Winston U-turn toward Fiji
Tropical Cyclone Winston made a U-turn in the Southern Pacific Ocean just north of Niue, and appears to be headed back toward Fiji.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Dangerous fishing may be endangered
Catch shares, a form of 'rights-based' fisheries management adopted for several fisheries in the Pacific Northwest, may put an end to the kind of daring exploits chronicled in the Deadliest Catch.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
California's ecological abundance
UCSB researchers contributed chapters to 'Ecosystems of California,' an integrated assessment of each major ecosystem in the state

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
EARTH: Revealing potential tsunami inundation on California coast
Given new information about the capability of faults to produce stronger earthquakes than previously thought, researchers at the University of California Riverside wondered if the current tsunami hazard maps for California adequately predict inundation zones.

Contact: Maureen Moses
mmoses@americangeosciences.org
703-379-2480
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
NASA infrared imagery shows wind shear affecting Tropical Cyclone Uriah
The Southern Indian Ocean's Tropical Cyclone Uriah is now past its peak and continues to weaken. Infrared satellite imagery from NASA revealed wind shear has already begun to take a toll on the storm. Wind shear began affecting Tropical Cyclone Uriah on February 17 as it reached its peak intensity. By February 18, increasing vertical wind shear's effect became more apparent.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
Nature
Seagrass genome study to boost ecological insight in marine ecosystems
Seagrasses provide the foundation of highly productive ecosystems present along the coasts of all continents except Antarctica, where they rival tropical rain forests and coral reefs in ecosystem services. In colonizing sedimentary shorelines of the world's oceans, seagrasses found a vast new habitat free of terrestrial competitors and insect pests, but had to adapt to cope with new structural and physiological challenges related to full marine conditions.

Contact: Sooike Stoops
sooike.stoops@vib.be
32-474-289-252
VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Colossal Antarctic ice-shelf collapse followed last ice age
A new PNAS study is providing clues about how Antarctica's nation-sized Ross Ice Shelf might respond to a warming climate. US and Japanese oceanographers showed that a 100,000-square-mile section of the ice shelf broke apart within 1,500 years during a warming period after the last ice age.
NFS/Polar Programs, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Wiess Visiting Professor Program of Rice University's Department of Earth Science

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
PLOS ONE
Can ecotourism save endangered species?
Using population viability modelling, Griffith University researchers Professor Ralf Buckley, Dr. Guy Castley and Dr. Clare Morrison have developed a method that for the first time quantifies the impact of ecotourism on threatened species.

Contact: Michael Jacobson
m.jacobson@griffith.edu.au
61-075-552-9250
Griffith University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Frontiers in Microbiology
Marine virus outbreaks linked to coral bleaching
A study by biologists from Rice University and Oregon State University has found that significant outbreaks of marine viruses may be associated with coral bleaching events, especially as a result of multiple environmental stresses.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Scientific Reports
How hunter-gatherers preserved their food sources
New research explores the impact of hunter-gatherers on north Pacific marine food webs and the behaviors that helped preserve their network of food sources.

Contact: John German
jdg@santafe.edu
Santa Fe Institute

Showing releases 301-325 out of 1748.

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