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Showing releases 301-325 out of 1504.

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Public Release: 1-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ocean fronts improve climate and fishery production, study finds
A recent study by the University of Georgia found that ocean fronts -- separate regions of warm and cool water as well as salt and fresh water -- act to increase production in the ocean. Brock Woodson's research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, showed how fronts can be incorporated into current climate and fisheries models to account for small-scale interactions in fishery production and cycling of elements such as carbon and nitrogen in the ocean.

Contact: Brock Woodson
bwoodson@uga.edu
706-542-9574
University of Georgia

Public Release: 1-May-2015
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Lousy sockeye are lousy competitors
With major funding from several groups, including NSERC, an SFU doctoral student has made a key discovery regarding Fraser River sockeye's vulnerability to sea lice. Their recently published research indicates that juvenile Fraser River sockeye salmon that are highly infected with sea lice are 20 percent less successful at consuming food than their lightly infected counterparts. The study appears online in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 1-May-2015
NASA satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Quang making landfall in Western Australia
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Quang as it was making landfall near Learmonth, Western Australia on May 1.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
Marine Technology Society Journal
Listening for whales and fish in the Northwest Atlantic ocean
Scientists are using a variety of buoys and autonomous underwater vehicles to record and archive sounds from marine mammals and fish species in the western North Atlantic through a new listening network known as the US Northeast Passive Acoustic Sensing Network (NEPAN). Researchers hope NEPAN will be the first link in an extensive listening network that would extend along the entire US East Coast, and eventually to waters around the US.
Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of Defense's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program, US Navy's Living Marine Resources Program, Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readiness Division and others

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
Conservation Biology
NASA contributes to first global review of Arctic marine mammals
A recently published multinational study attempted to gauge the population trends of Arctic marine mammals and changes in their habitat, identify missing scientific information, and provide recommendations for the conservation of Arctic marine mammals over the next decades.
Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Danish Ministry of the Environment, NASA

Contact: Maria-Jose Vinas
maria-jose.vinasgarcia@nasa.gov
301-614-5883
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Quang develop an eye
Tropical Cyclone Quang strengthened during the early morning hours of April 30, Eastern Daylight Time/US, and developed an eye. The stronger Quang neared the coast of Western Australia and triggered warnings.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
Science
Fossils inform marine conservation
Fossils help predict which animals are likely to go extinct. Scientists combine information from the fossil record with information about hotspots of human impact to pinpoint animal groups and geographic areas of highest concern for marine conservation.
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, National Science Foundation, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Panama's National Secretariat for Science, Technology and Innovation, Australian Research Council and others

Contact: Beth King
kingb@si.edu
202-633-4700 x28216
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
Science
Tropical marine ecosystems most at threat from human impact
An international team of scientists has used the fossil record during the past 23 million years to predict which marine animals and ecosystems are at greatest risk of extinction from human impact. In a paper published in the journal Science, the researchers found those animals and ecosystems most threatened are predominantly in the tropics.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
Biogeosciences
'Dead zones' found in Atlantic open waters
German and Canadian researchers have discovered areas with extremely low levels of oxygen in the tropical North Atlantic, several hundred kilometers off the coast of West Africa. The levels measured in these 'dead zones' are the lowest ever recorded in Atlantic open waters. The dead zones are created in eddies, swirling masses of water that slowly move westward. Encountering an island, they could lead to mass fish kills. The research is published today in Biogeosciences.

Contact: Barbara Ferreira
media@egu.eu
49-892-180-6703
European Geosciences Union

Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
Science
Fossils help identify marine life at high risk of extinction today
A study of marine animals that went extinct over the past 23 million years found commonalities that can tell biologists which taxa and ecosystems are most at risk of extinction today. When overlaid with human impacts of overfishing, pollution, habitat destruction and ocean acidification, these risk maps may help pinpoint hotspots of future extinction. The study, led by Seth Finnegan of UC Berkeley, found that mammals are 10 times more vulnerable to extinction than clams.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Two NASA views of newborn Tropical Cyclone Quang
The tropical low pressure area formerly known as System 98S has organized and developed into Tropical Cyclone Quang in the Southern Indian Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Science academies hand over statements for G7 summit to German Chancellor Merkel
Today the national science academies of the G7 countries handed three statements to their respective heads of government for discussion during the G7 summit at Schloss Elmau in early June 2015. The papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected and poverty-related diseases, and the future of the ocean were drawn up by the seven national academies under the aegis of the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina.

Contact: Caroline Wichmann
presse@leopoldina.org
49-151-156-49436
Leopoldina

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Erosion, landslides and monsoon across the Himalayas
Scientists from Nepal, Switzerland and Germany were able to show how erosion processes caused by the monsoon are mirrored in the sediment load of a river crossing the Himalayas.

Contact: F.Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
American Antiquity
Study finds ancient clam beaches not so natural
In their second study to be published in just over a year, an SFU led team of scientists has discovered that ancient coastal Indigenous people were more than hunter-gatherers. 'We think that many Indigenous peoples worldwide had some kind of sophisticated marine management, but the Pacific Northwest is likely one of the few places in the world where this can be documented,' says SFU professor Dana Lepofsky.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Nature
Ice core reveals ocean currents transmitted climate changes from Arctic to Antarctic
A new highly detailed ice core from West Antarctica has revealed a consistent pattern of climate changes that started in the Arctic and spread across the globe to the Antarctic during planet Earth's last glacial period. Representing more than 68,000 years of climate history, data extracted from this extraordinary ice core is helping scientists understand past, rapid climate fluctuations between warm and cool periods that are known as Dansgaard-Oeschger events.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Justin Broglio
jbroglio@dri.edu
775-762-8320
Desert Research Institute

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Nature
Researchers find 200-year lag between climate events in Greenland, Antarctica
A new study using evidence from a highly detailed ice core from West Antarctica shows a consistent link between abrupt temperature changes on Greenland and Antarctica during the last ice age, giving scientists a clearer picture of the link between climate in the northern and southern hemispheres.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Christo Buizert
buizertc@science.oregonstate.edu
541-737-1209
Oregon State University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
New fossil rattles Moby Dick's family tree
An international team of scientists, led by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County's Curator of Marine Mammals Dr. Jorge Velez-Juarbe, has discovered a new species of an extinct pigmy sperm whale from Panama that clarifies key aspects of the evolution of the sperm whale.

Contact: Kristin Friedrich
kfriedrich@nhm.org
213-763-3532
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
Rare sperm whale fossils discovered in Panama
Rare fossils from extinct pygmy sperm whales found in Panama indicate the bone involved in sound generation and echolocation, the spermaceti organ, reduced in size throughout the whales' evolution.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Dive discovers missing aircraft hangar of sunken WW II-era Japanese submarine
A recent survey of newly discovered submarine wreck successfully located, mapped and captured on video for the first time not only the submarine's hangar and conning tower (navigation platform), and the submarine's bell. The massive aircraft hangar, large enough to launch three float-plane bombers, was the defining feature of the I-400.

Contact: Talia S. Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bigger bang for your buck: Restoring fish habitat by removing barriers
A new study from a multidisciplinary team, published April 27 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, describes a powerful new model to help decision makers maximize the cost-effectiveness of barrier removal projects that also restore migratory fish habitat.

Contact: Tom Neeson
neeson@wisc.edu
608-262-3088
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Animal Biotelemetry
Burmese python habitat use patterns may help control efforts
The largest and longest Burmese python tracking study of its kind -- here or in its native range -- is providing researchers and resource managers new information that may help target control efforts of this invasive snake, according to a new study led by the US Geological Survey.

Contact: Christian Quintero
cquintero@usgs.gov
813-352-3487
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Geology
New study shows parrotfish are critical to coral reef island building
As well as being a beautiful species capable of changing its colour, shape and even gender, new research published today shows that parrotfish, commonly found on healthy coral reefs, can also play a pivotal role in providing the sands necessary to build and maintain coral reef islands.

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
UT research uncovers lakes, signs of life under Antarctica's dry valleys
Many view Antarctica as a frozen wasteland. Turns out there are hidden interconnected lakes underneath its dry valleys that could sustain life and shed light on ancient climate change. Jill Mikucki, a University of Tennessee, Knoxville, microbiology assistant professor, was part of a team that detected extensive salty groundwater networks in Antarctica using a novel airborne electromagnetic mapping sensor system called SkyTEM.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lola Alapo
lalapo@utk.edu
865-974-3993
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Environmental Research Letters
Whitening the Arctic Ocean: May restore sea ice, but not climate
Some scientists have suggested that global warming could melt frozen ground in the Arctic, releasing vast amounts of the potent greenhouse gas methane into the atmosphere, greatly amplifying global warming. It has been proposed that such disastrous climate effects could be offset by technological approaches. One such proposal is to artificially whiten the surface of the Arctic Ocean in order to increase the reflection of the sun's energy into space and restore sea ice.

Contact: Ken Caldeira
kcaldeira@carnegiescience.edu
650-704-7212
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Biology Letters
Coastal light pollution disturbs marine animals, new study shows
Marine ecosystems can be changed by night-time artificial lighting according to new research published in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters. The results indicate that light pollution from coastal communities, shipping and offshore infrastructure could be changing the composition of marine invertebrate communities.

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Showing releases 301-325 out of 1504.

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