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Showing releases 301-325 out of 1413.

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Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Complex nerve-cell signaling traced back to common ancestor of humans and sea anemones
New research shows that a burst of evolutionary innovation in the genes responsible for electrical communication among nerve cells in our brains occurred over 600 million years ago in a common ancestor of humans and the sea anemone. The research reveals many of these genes, which when mutated in humans can lead to neurological disease, first evolved in the common ancestor of people and a group of animals that includes jellyfish, coral, and sea anemones.

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Current Biology
Molecular evidence for the loss of 3 basic tastes in penguins
A University of Michigan-led study of penguin genetics has concluded that the flightless aquatic birds lost three of the five basic vertebrate tastes -- sweet, bitter and the savory, meaty taste known as umami -- more than 20 million years ago and never regained them.
National Institutes of Health, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Wuhan University

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Current Biology
Genetic evidence shows penguins have 'bad taste'
Penguins apparently can't enjoy or even detect the savory taste of the fish they eat or the sweet taste of fruit. A new analysis of the genetic evidence reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Feb. 16 suggests that the flightless, waddling birds have lost three of the five basic tastes over evolutionary time. For them, it appears, food comes in only two flavors: salty and sour.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 15-Feb-2015
Ecology Letters
Cold-blooded animals grow bigger in the warm on land, but smaller in warm water
Scientists studying arthropods, the group of cold-blooded animals that includes crabs and insects, have found that individuals within species living on land tend to grow to a larger size in the warm and nearer the equator, but that the reverse is true of species found in water.

Contact: Will Hoyles
w.hoyles@qmul.ac.uk
07-772-512-519
Queen Mary, University of London

Public Release: 13-Feb-2015
International Society for Microbial Ecology Journal
Thames study: Rivers can be a source antibiotic resistance
Rivers and streams could be a major source of antibiotic resistance in the environment. The discovery comes following a study on the Thames river by scientists at the University of Warwick's School of Life Sciences and the University of Exeter Medical School. The study found that greater numbers of resistant bacteria exist close to some waste water treatment works, and that these plants are likely to be responsible for at least half of the increase observed.
Natural Environment Research Council, European Science Foundation, Eureopean Regional Development Fund

Contact: Tom Frew
a.t.frew@warwick.ac.uk
44-024-765-75910
University of Warwick

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
SICB Annual Meeting 2015
Remoras don't suck
Researchers have long studied animals like tree frogs, geckos, and spiders for their adhesive abilities, but what makes remoras unique in this group is they combine three key elements: the ability to securely fasten themselves for long periods of time; attach to different types of surfaces; release quickly without harming the surface.

Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
eLife
Make like a squid and transform
A new study from Tel Aviv University showcases the first example of an animal editing its own genetic makeup on-the-fly to modify most of its proteins, enabling adjustments to its immediate surroundings.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientific Reports
High seas fishing ban could boost global catches, equality
Analysis of fisheries data indicates that if increased spillover of fish stocks from protected international waters were to boost coastal catches by 18 per cent, current global catches would be maintained. When the researchers modeled less conservative estimates of stock spillover, catches in coastal waters surpassed current global levels.
Global Ocean Commission, OceanCanada, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Pew Charitable Trusts, Conservation International

Contact: Rashid Sumaila
r.sumaila@fisheries.ubc.ca
604-351-7406
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
New techniques reveal how microbes shape the health and biodiversity of oceans
Three leading experts will share their recent findings on the role of microbes in ocean ecosystems at an AAAS symposium Feb. 13 entitled 'Seeing the Invisible: How Sequencing Diverse Eukaryotes Transforms Ocean Science.'

Contact: Lindsay Jolivet
lindsay.jolivet@cifar.ca
Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Scientific Reports
Study recommends closing the high seas to fishing
The high seas globally should be closed to fishing argues a new study in the journal Scientific Reports, co-authored by Isabelle Côté, a Simon Fraser University professor of marine ecology and conservation. 'Intense fishing in the high seas,' says Côté, an SFU Department of Biological Sciences researcher, 'has resulted in habitat destruction and declining stocks of fish such as tunas and swordfishes.'

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
NOAA announces new National Saltwater Recreational Fisheries Policy
Today at the annual Progressive® Insurance Miami Boat Show, NOAA Fisheries Administrator Eileen Sobeck announced a new national policy to better serve America's 11 million recreational saltwater anglers and the companies and communities that rely on them. Recreational fishing is an important national pastime that supports 381,000 jobs and generates in $58 billion in annual sales impacts, according to a NOAA 2012 report.

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
An ocean of plastic
Ocean currents have been carrying floating debris into all five of the world's major oceanic gyres for decades. The rotating currents of these so-called 'garbage patches' create vortexes of trash, much of it plastic. However, exactly how much plastic is making its way into the world's oceans and from where it originates has been a mystery -- until now.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Diversity and Distributions
Critical green turtle habitats identified in Mediterranean
A new study led by the University of Exeter has identified two major foraging grounds of the Mediterranean green turtle and recommends the creation of a new Marine Protected Area to preserve the vulnerable species.

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
How much plastic debris moves from land to sea?
Researchers suggest that the world's coastal communities generated close to 275 million tons of plastic waste in 2010 -- and that 4.8 to 12.7 million tons of that plastic made its way to the oceans. They also warn that the cumulative amount of ocean-bound plastic could increase more than tenfold in the next ten years unless global infrastructure is improved.
The Ocean Conservancy

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
New study in Science calculates amount of plastic waste going into the ocean
The study, co-authored by Kara Lavender Law of Sea Education Association and principal investigator of the NCEAS marine debris working group, reported in the Feb. 13 edition of the journal Science, found between 4.8 and 12.7 million metric tons of plastic entered the ocean in 2010 from people living within 50 kilometers of the coastline. That year, a total of 275 million metric tons of plastic waste was generated in those 192 coastal countries.

Contact: Kara Lavender Law
klavender@sea.edu
508-444-1935
Sea Education Association

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Science
New Science paper calculates magnitude of plastic waste going into the ocean
How much mismanaged plastic waste is making its way from land to ocean has been a decades-long guessing game. Now, the University of Georgia's Jenna Jambeck and her National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis working group colleagues have put a number on the global problem. Their study, reported in Science, found between 4.8 and 12.7 million metric tons of plastic entered the ocean in 2010 from people living within 50 kilometers of the coastline.
Marine Debris Working Group at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California, Santa Barbara, Ocean Conservancy

Contact: Stephanie Schupska
schupska@uga.edu
706-542-6927
University of Georgia

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Cell
A new model organism for aging research: The short-lived African killifish
Studying aging and its associated diseases has been challenging because existing vertebrate models (e.g., mice) are relatively long lived, while short-lived invertebrate species (e.g., yeast and worms) lack key features present in humans. Stanford University scientists have found a new middle ground with the development of a genome-editing toolkit to study aging in the naturally short-lived African turquoise killifish.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Automatic Whale Detector, version 1.0
Scientists have combined infrared cameras with image recognition software to automatically detect and count migrating gray whales. This technology will increase the accuracy of gray whale abundance estimates.
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Contact: Rich Press
rich.press@noaa.gov
301-427-8530
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Earth's Future
Monster hurricanes reached US Northeast during prehistoric periods of ocean warming
Intense hurricanes possibly more powerful than any storms New England has experienced in recorded history frequently pounded the region during the first millennium, from the peak of the Roman Empire into the height of the Middle Ages, according to a new study. The findings could have implications for the intensity and frequency of hurricanes that the US East and Gulf coasts could experience as ocean temperatures increase as a result of climate change.
National Science Foundation, Risk Prediction Initiative at the Bermuda Institute for Ocean Sciences, DOE/National Institute for Climate Change Research, NOAA, Dalio Explore

Contact: Peter Weiss
pweiss@agu.org
202-777-7507
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
NASA-NOAA satellite sees Tropical Depression Higos sheared apart
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over Tropical Depression Higos and saw wind shear is literally pushing the storm apart.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Nature
Carbon release from ocean helped end the Ice Age
A release of carbon dioxide from the deep ocean helped bring an end to the last Ice Age, according to new collaborative research by the University of Southampton, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, the Australian National University, and international colleagues.

Contact: Patrizia Ziveri
Patrizia.ziveri@uab.cat
34-935-868-974
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Making a better wound dressing -- with fish skin
With a low price tag and mild flavor, tilapia has become a staple dinnertime fish for many Americans. Now it could have another use: helping to heal our wounds. In the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, scientists have shown that a protein found in this fish can promote skin repair in rats without an immune reaction, suggesting possible future use for human patients.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stanford researchers offer bold solutions for managing marine conservation on the high seas
A symposium at the American Association for the Advancement of Science will address marine conservation in waters outside national jurisdictions using marine protected areas. MPAs move in time and space to protect migratory species living in the high seas. 'We have sophisticated tracking data for these migratory species that show us where they are during their most vulnerable life-cycle phases,' said Larry Crowder, of Stanford's Center for Ocean Solutions.

Contact: Ker Than
kerthan@stanford.edu
650-723-9820
Stanford School of Engineering

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
PLOS ONE
Oyster disease thrives in nightly dead zones
In shallow waters around the world, where nutrient pollution runs high, oxygen levels can plummet to nearly zero at night. Oysters living in these zones are far more likely to pick up the lethal Dermo disease, a team of scientists from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center discovered. Their findings were published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE.

Contact: Kristen Minogue
minoguek@si.edu
314-605-4315
Smithsonian

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Nature
Carbon release from ocean helped end the Ice Age
A release of carbon dioxide from the deep ocean helped bring an end to the last Ice Age, according to new research led by the University of Southampton.

Contact: Steven Williams
s.williams@soton.ac.uk
0238-059-2128
University of Southampton

Showing releases 301-325 out of 1413.

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