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Showing releases 51-75 out of 1295.

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Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Current Biology
Archerfish target shoot with 'skillfully thrown' water
Archerfish hunt by shooting jets of water at unsuspecting prey on leaves or twigs above, knocking them into the water below before gobbling them up. Now, a study finds that those fish are much more adaptable and skillful target-shooters than anyone had given them credit for. The fish really do use water as a tool making them the first known tool-using animal to adaptively change the hydrodynamic properties of a free jet of water.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Geosphere
Team develops new, inexpensive method for understanding earthquake topography
Using high-resolution topography models not available in the past, geologists can greatly enrich their research. However, current methods of acquisition are costly and require trained personnel with high-tech, cumbersome equipment. In light of this, Kendra Johnson and colleagues have developed a new system that takes advantage of affordable, user-friendly equipment and software to produce topography data over small, sparsely vegetated sites at comparable (or better) resolution and accuracy to standard methods.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
PLOS ONE
New deep sea mushroom-shaped organisms discovered
The new organisms are multicellular and mostly non-symmetrical, with a dense layer of gelatinous material between the outer skin cell and inner stomach cell layers.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
BioScience
Pesticide risk assessments seen as biased
The Environmental Protection Agency's pesticide toxicity assessments often rely heavily on industry-funded studies and may omit research that could lead to different findings. The assessment process should be reformed in order to eliminate conflicts of interest and include a wider breadth of available information.

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Limnology & Oceanography
Underwater grass comeback bodes well for Chesapeake Bay
The Susquehanna Flats, a large bed of underwater grasses in the upper Chesapeake Bay, virtually disappeared after Tropical Storm Agnes more than 40 years ago. The grasses mysteriously began to come back in the early 2000s. Today the bed is one of the biggest and healthiest in the Bay, spanning some 20 square miles. Scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are figuring out what's behind the comeback.

Contact: Amy Pelsinsky
apelsinsky@umces.edu
410-330-1389
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Geology
Plant life forms in the fossil record: When did the first canopy flowers appear?
Most plant fossils are isolated organs, making it difficult to reconstruct the type of plant life or its ecosystem structure. In their study for Geology, published online on Aug. 28, 2014, researchers Camilla Crifò and colleagues used leaf vein density, a trait visible on leaf compression fossils, to document the occurrence of stratified forests with a canopy dominated by flowering plants.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
BioScience
Changing microbial dynamics in the wake of the Macondo blowout
Following the oil spill caused by the blowout at the Macondo wellhead in 2010, Gulf of Mexico microbial population dynamics shifted rapidly as numbers of oil degraders quickly increased. In addition, the spill provided an opportunity to study the newly described phenomenon of microbe-derived marine snow.
Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Chaos
Giant garbage patches help redefine ocean boundaries
Researchers have created a new model that could help determine what area of the world is to blame for each ocean garbage patch of floating debris -- a difficult task for a system as complex and massive as the ocean. The researchers describe the model in a paper published in the journal Chaos.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Exceptionally well preserved insect fossils from the Rhône Valley
In Bavaria, the Tithonian Konservat-Lagerstätte of lithographic limestone is well known as a result of numerous discoveries of emblematic fossils from that area (for example, Archaeopteryx). Now, for the first time, researchers have found fossil insects in the French equivalent of these outcrops -- discoveries which include a new species representing the oldest known water treader.

Contact: Nel Andre
anel@mnhn.fr
PeerJ

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Algal growth a blooming problem Space Station to help monitor
The space station's Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) instrument can help research harmful algal blooms, similar to recent concerns in Lake Erie. HICO provides a way for researchers to see 90 wavelengths of light not visible to humans.

Contact: Laura Niles
Laura.E.Niles@nasa.gov
281-244-7069
NASA/Johnson Space Center

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Nature's tiny engineers
Corals control their environment, stirring up water eddies to bring nutrients.

Contact: Andrew Carleen
acarleen@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature Geoscience
Antarctic sea-level rising faster than global rate
A new study of satellite data from the last 19 years reveals that fresh water from melting glaciers has caused the sea-level around the coast of Antarctica to rise by 2 cm more than the global average of 6 cm.

Contact: Steven Williams
s.williams@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-2128
University of Southampton

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Cristobal racing through North Atlantic
Satellite imagery shows Hurricane Cristobal racing through the North Atlantic on Friday, August 29 while losing its tropical characteristics.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
NASA animation shows Hurricane Marie winding down
NOAA's GOES-West satellite keeps a continuous eye on the Eastern Pacific and has been covering Hurricane Marie since birth. NASA's GOES Project uses NOAA data and creates animations and did so to show the end of Hurricane Marie.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Nature Climate Change
Managing coasts under threat from climate change and sea-level rise
Coastal regions under threat from climate change and sea-level rise need to tackle the more immediate threats of human-led and other non-climatic changes, according to a team of international scientists.

Contact: Becky Attwood
r.attwood@soton.ac.uk
University of Southampton

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Current Biology
Ready for mating at the right time
Fish rely on pheromones to trigger social responses and to coordinate reproductive behavior in males and females. Scientists at the Marine Science Center at the University of the Algarve in Faro, Portugal, and at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, have now identified such a signal molecule in the urine of male Mozambique tilapia: this pheromone boosts hormone production and accelerates oocyte maturation in reproductive females.
Foundation for Science and Technology of Portugal, Max Planck Society

Contact: Dr. Bernd Schneider
schneider@ice.mpg.de
49-364-157-1600
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
GSA Bulletin
Snails tell of the rise and fall of the Tibetan Plateau
The rise of the Tibetan plateau -- the largest topographic anomaly above sea level on Earth -- is important for both its profound effect on climate and its reflection of continental dynamics. In this study published in GSA Bulletin, Katharine Huntington and colleagues employ a cutting-edge geochemical tool -- 'clumped' isotope thermometry -- using modern and fossil snail shells to investigate the uplift history of the Zhada basin in southwestern Tibet.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
The ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
Not all phytoplankton in the ocean need to take their vitamins
Some species of marine phytoplankton, such as the prolific bloomer Emiliania huxleyi, can grow without consuming vitamin B1 (thiamine), researchers have discovered.
National Center for Genome Resources, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Packard Foundation

Contact: Lindsay Jolivet
lindsay.jolivet@cifar.ca
416-971-4876
Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
NASA sees a weaker Tropical Storm Marie
When NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of what is now Tropical Storm Marie, weakened from hurricane status on Aug. 28, the strongest thunderstorms were located in the southern quadrant of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Ecology Letters
Study finds marine protected areas inadequate for protecting fish and ocean ecology
A new study reports that an expansion of marine protected areas is needed to protect fish species that perform key ecological functions. According to investigators from the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations, previous efforts at protecting fish have focused on saving the largest numbers of species, often at the expense of those species that provide key and difficult-to-replace ecological functions.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
NASA's TRMM analyzes Hurricane Cristobal
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM Satellite provided a look under the hood of Hurricane Cristobal as it continues moving north and paralleling the US East Coast. NASA's HS3 hurricane mission also investigated the storm. Cristobal is now close enough to the coast to trigger high surf advisories.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite adds up Cristobal's heavy rainfall in the Caribbean
The Caribbean Islands of Turks and Caicos were drenched from Tropical Storm Cristobal before the storm moved north and intensified into a hurricane. NASA's TRMM satellite added up the rainfall and revealed the soaking those islands received.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite sees powerful towering storms in Cristobal
NASA's TRMM satellite identified areas of heavy rainfall occurring in Hurricane Cristobal as it continued strengthening on approach to Bermuda.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
NASA sees massive Marie close enough to affect southern California coast
Two NASA satellites captured visible and infrared pictures that show the massive size of Hurricane Marie. Marie is so large that it is bringing rough surf to the southern coast of California while almost nine hundred miles west of Baja California.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
University of Utah biologist wins Turkey's top science prize
University of Utah biologist Çagan Sekercioglu, who campaigns to save wetlands in his native Turkey, has won that nation's highest science prize, which is similar to the US National Medal of Science.

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Showing releases 51-75 out of 1295.

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