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Press Releases

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Showing releases 51-75 out of 1322.

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Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Review of Scientific Instruments
Synthetic fish measures wild ride through dams
A synthetic fish is helping existing hydroelectric dams and new, smaller hydro facilities become more fish-friendly. The latest version of the Sensor Fish -- a small tubular device filled with sensors that analyze the physical stresses fish experience -- measures more forces, costs about 80 percent less and can be used in more hydro structures than its predecessor, according to a paper published in the journal Review of Scientific Instruments.
US Department of Energy, Electric Power Research Institute

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Hurricane Vance headed for landfall in western Mexico
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Vance on Nov. 3 as it started moving in a northeasterly direction toward the northwestern coast of Mexico. On Nov. 4, a Tropical Storm Watch was in effect from Mazatlan northward to Topolobampo, Mexico. Hurricane Vance is forecast to make landfall in northwestern mainland Mexico on Nov. 5.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
NASA's Terra satellite sees Typhoon Nuri in eyewall replacement
High clouds had moved over Super Typhoon Nuri's eye early on Nov. 4 when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead as the storm was undergoing eyewall replacement.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Evolutionary Applications
Nature adores a hybrid
New research from Concordia, published in the journal Evolutionary Applications, shows that after a few generations of breeding and natural selection, hybrid fish are genetically as robust as their purely wild forefathers.

Contact: Cléa Desjardins
clea.desjardins@concordia.ca
51-484-824-245-068
Concordia University

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Groundwater patches play important role in forest health, water quality
Patches of soaked soil act as hot spots for microbes removing nitrogen from groundwater and returning it to the atmosphere.The discovery provides insight into forest health and water quality, say researchers from Virginia Tech and Cornell.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Davis
davisl@vt.edu
540-231-6157
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
NASA sees Super Typhoon Nuri's eye open in 2 days
Over the course of two days, from Nov. 1 to Nov. 3, NASA's Aqua satellite watched from space as Tropical cyclone Nuri strengthened into a Super Typhoon and 'opened' or developed an eye.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
Hurricane Vance dwarfs developing low pressure area
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of Hurricane Vance and a much smaller developing low pressure area in the Eastern Pacific Ocean on Nov. 3. Vance's tropical-storm force winds extended to about 250 miles in diameter.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
Environmental Conservation
Countries with poor marine safety records linked to oil spill vessels
More than half of ships involved in the 100 largest oil spills of the past three decades were registered in states that consistently fail to comply with international safety and environmental standards, UBC researchers have determined.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Applications in Plant Sciences
Scientists replicate the tide with two buckets, aquarium tubing, and a pump
A design for a new, inexpensive tidal simulation unit enables researchers to investigate tidal marsh plant growth in a controlled setting. The unit costs less than US$27 to build, takes up less than two square feet of space, and does not require external plumbing; the protocol is available in the November issue of Applications in Plant Sciences. The system could be an important tool for researchers working to preserve and restore environmentally important wetlands.
Sapelo Island National Estuarine Research Reserve, Irene Burt Boole Botany Scholarship, Georgia Southern University Graduate Student Professional Development Fund

Contact: Beth Parada
apps@botany.org
American Journal of Botany

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Mussels on California coast contaminated with giardia transmitted from land-based sources
The pathogen Giardia duodenalis is present in mussels from freshwater run-off sites and from areas where California Sea Lions lounge along the coast of California, according to a team of researchers from the University of California, Davis. One of the G. duodenalis strains found is known to infect humans; the two others occur mostly in dogs and other canids. 'Thus, the detection of these assemblages implies a potential public health risk if consuming fecally contaminated water or uncooked shellfish,' says coauthor Woutrina Smith.

Contact: Garth Hogan
ghogan@asmusa.org
202-942-9389
American Society for Microbiology

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
NASA sees remnants of Nilofar go to cyclone graveyard
Wind shear has caused the demise of former Tropical Cyclone Nilofar in the northern Arabian Sea. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Nilofar on Oct. 31 and captured an image that shows strong wind shear has pushed the bulk of clouds and showers away from Nilofar's center, basically sending the storm to its grave.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Bladderwrack: Tougher than suspected
The bladderwrack Fucus vesiculosus is actually one of the most important species of brown algae along the North Atlantic coasts. But for years their populations in the Baltic Sea were declining. Looking for the reasons, biologists of GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel now have analyzed the defense mechanisms of bladderwrack against bacterial vermin under different environmental conditions. The surprising result: The defense proved to be very robust to environmental changes. The study is published today in the international online journal PLOS ONE.

Contact: Jan Steffen
jsteffen@geomar.de
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Tropical Depression Nuri now haunting the western Pacific Ocean
Tropical Depression Nuri formed on Halloween morning, Oct. 31, and is haunting the waters of the western North Pacific Ocean. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a ghostly-white image of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Tropical Storm Vance's center looks like a pumpkin to NASA's Terra satellite
Tropical Depression 21E strengthened overnight on Oct. 30 and by Halloween morning, Tropical Storm Vance was haunting the waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. In a false-colored infrared image from NASA's Terra satellite on Oct. 31, the strong thunderstorms around the center resemble a pumpkin.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
ESA Frontiers November preview
Connectivity cost calculations for conservation corridors, crop companions, jellyfish and human well-being and micromanaging microbes.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Twenty-first Eastern Pacific tropical depression born on Oct. 30
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of the birth of the Eastern Pacific Ocean's twenty-first tropical depression, located far south of Acapulco, Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Global Change Biology
Dartmouth study finds restoring wetlands can lessen soil sinkage, greenhouse gas emissions
Restoring wetlands can help reduce or reverse soil subsidence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to research in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta by Dartmouth College researchers and their colleagues.

Contact: John Cramer
John.Cramer@Dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
NASA sees Cyclone Nilofar looking more like a comet than a tropical cyclone
Tropical Cyclone Nilofar was closing in on the border between Pakistan and northwestern India on Oct. 30 when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead from space. Wind shear continued to affect the storm making it appear more like a comet with a tail, than a tropical cyclone.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Scientific Reports
Reef-builders with a sense of harmony
Cold-water corals of the species Lophelia pertusa are able to fuse skeletons of genetically distinct individuals. On dives with JAGO, a research submersible stationed at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, scientists from Scotland and Germany made the first-ever discovery of branches of different colors that had flawlessly merged. The ability to fuse supports the reef stability and thus contributes to the success of corals as reef-builders of the deep sea.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-431-600-2807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
New study finds oceans arrived early to Earth
Earth is known as the Blue Planet because of its oceans, which cover more than 70 percent of the planet's surface and are home to the world's greatest diversity of life. While water is essential for life on the planet, the answers to two key questions have eluded us: where did Earth's water come from and when?
Harriett Jenkins NASA Graduate Fellowship, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Award for Innovative Research, NASA Cosmochemistry Award

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
European salamanders and newts vulnerable to fungal disease from Asia
A skin-eating fungal disease brought to Europe by humans now poses a major threat to native salamanders and newts, scientists have warned.
Ghent University, Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp, Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs

Contact: An Martel
An.Martel@UGent.be
32-496-831-161
Ghent University

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
Emerging disease could wipe out American, European salamanders
A fungal disease from Asia wiped out salamanders in parts of Europe and will likely reach the US through the international wildlife trade in Asian newts sold as pets, say US experts. In an Oct. 31 Science paper, an international team reports the fungus arose in Asia 30 million years ago and is lethal to many European and American newt species. It has not yet been found in North American wild amphibians.
Ghent University Special Research Fund, University of Maryland-Smithsonian Institution Seed Grant, Illinois Department of Natural Resources State Wildlife Grant, National Science Foundation.

Contact: Heather Dewar
hdewar@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Plump turtles swim better: First models of swimming animals
For the first time, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Florida Atlantic University, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have measured the forces that act on a swimming animal and the energy the animal must expend to move through the water.
Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund, UW Foundation

Contact: Warren Porter
wpporter@wisc.edu
608-262-1719
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Nilofar being affected by wind shear
Wind shear has kicked in and has been pushing clouds and showers away from Tropical Cyclone Nilofar's center. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image that showed the effects of the shear on Oct. 29.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
New study shows 3 abrupt pulse of CO2 during last deglaciation
A new study shows that the rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide that contributed to the end of the last ice age more than 10,000 years ago did not occur gradually, but was characterized by three 'pulses' in which C02 rose abruptly.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Ed Brook
brooke@geo.oregonstate.edu
541-737-8197
Oregon State University

Showing releases 51-75 out of 1322.

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