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Showing releases 51-75 out of 1320.

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Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
NASA analyzes Super Typhoon Hagupit's rains and wind on Philippine approach
Super Typhoon Hagupit is forecast to make landfall in the eastern Philippines bringing heavy rainfall, damaging winds and storm surge. NASA/JAXA's TRMM satellite and the RapidScat instrument provided rainfall and wind data, while NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm. In the Philippines, Hagupit is known locally as 'Typhoon Ruby.'
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Nature
El Niño's 'remote control' on hurricanes in the Northeastern Pacific
El Niño peaks in winter and its surface ocean warming occurs mostly along the equator. However, months later, El Niño events affect the formation of intense hurricanes in the Northeastern Pacific basin -- not along the equator. Scientists from the University of Hawai'i and the National Taiwan University published a paper today in Nature that revealed what's behind 'remote control.'

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Science
Electric eels deliver Taser-like shocks
A Vanderbilt biologist has determined that electric eels possess an electroshock system uncannily similar to a Taser.
National Science Foundation, National Academy of Sciences, Guggenheim Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Science
Antarctic seawater temperatures rising
The temperature of the seawater around Antarctica is rising according to new University of East Anglia research. New findings published in Science reveal how shallow shelf seas of West Antarctica have warmed over the last 50 years. This has accelerated the melting and sliding of glaciers in the area, and there is no indication that this trend will reverse.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Science
Antarctica: Heat comes from the deep
The water temperatures on the West Antarctic shelf are rising. The reason for this is predominantly warm water from greater depths, which as a result of global change now increasingly reaches the shallow shelf. There it has the potential to accelerate the glacier melt from below and trigger the sliding of big glaciers. These data are published today by scientists of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel together with colleagues from the UK, the US and Japan in the international journal Science.

Contact: Dr. Sunke Schmidtko
sschmidtko@geomar.de
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
PLOS ONE
Arabian Sea humpback whales isolated for 70,000 years
Scientists from Wildlife Conservation Society, the American Museum of Natural History, the Environment Society of Oman, and other organizations have made a fascinating discovery in the northern Indian Ocean: humpback whales inhabiting the Arabian Sea are the most genetically distinct humpback whales in the world and may be the most isolated whale population on earth.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
Small drains mean big problems at 'baby beaches'
High fecal counts frequently detected at so-called 'baby beaches' may not be diaper-related. UC Irvine researchers found that during summer months, small drainpipes emptying into enclosed ocean bays have a disproportionate impact on calmer waters. The findings were published Tuesday in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Janet Wilson
janethw@uci.edu
949-824-3969
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
'Ocean Worlds'
Jan Zalasiewicz and Mark Williams's new book, 'Ocean Worlds,' examines the nature and deep history of oceans, looks at how and when oceans may have formed on Earth and how they evolved, explores the importance of oceans in hosting life on which both humans and animals depend, considers how climate change, pollution, and over-exploitation are putting resources at risk, looks at what we know of oceans on other planets and considers what may become of our oceans in the future.

Contact: Molly Grote
molly.grote@oup.com
212-743-8337
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
NASA tracks intensifying Typhoon Hagupit
Typhoon Hagupit continues to intensify as it continued moving through Micronesia on Dec. 3 triggering warnings. NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and captured an image of the strengthening storm while the Rapidscat instrument aboard the International Space Station provided information about the storm's winds.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
New study explains the role of oceans in global 'warming hiatus'
New research shows that ocean heat uptake across three oceans is the likely cause of the 'warming hiatus' -- the current decade-long slowdown in global surface warming.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
Nature
Protect the world's deltas
Extensive areas of the world's deltas -- which accommodate some of the world's major cities -- will be drowned in the next century by rising sea levels, according to a Comment piece in this week's Nature. Dr. Liviu Giosan, a geologist with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and colleagues call for maintenance efforts to be started now to avert the loss of vast expanses of coastline, and the consequent losses of ecological services, economic and social crises, and large-scale migrations.

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
PLOS ONE
Arabian Sea humpback whale population may have been isolated for about 70,000 years
A population of humpback whales that resides in the Arabian Sea may have been isolated for approximately 70,000 years.
Environment Society of Oman, Shell Oman Marketing, Petroleum Development Oman, UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Ford Middle East, Veritas Geophysical, Salalah Port Services, Five Oceans LLC, Tawoos LLC

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Molecular Ecology
A glimmer of hope for corals as baby reef builders cope with acidifying oceans
While the threat of coral bleaching as a result of climate change poses a serious risk to the future of coral reefs worldwide, new research has found that some baby corals may be able to cope with the negative effects of ocean acidification.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Nova Southeastern University to receive approximately $8.5 million for oil spill research
NSU Oceanographic Center researchers will study the effects of oil spills and dispersants on marine ecosystem in the Gulf of Mexico.
Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative

Contact: Joe Donzelli
jdonzelli@nova.edu
954-262-2159
Nova Southeastern University

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Hagupit as Micronesia posts warnings
NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible picture of Tropical Storm Hagupit in the western North Pacific Ocean on Dec. 2, when several warnings were in effect for islands in Micronesia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Tracking elephants, ecstasy, and emerging diseases
In the December issue of ESA Frontiers, new diseases travel on the wings of birds In a rapidly changing north and elephants and ecstasy: tracking animal state of being.
United States Geological Survey, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Scientific Reports
New techniques for estimating Atlantic bluefin tuna reproduction
In their study published this week in Nature's online open-access journal Scientific Reports, Lutcavage, a fisheries oceanographer and director of the Large Pelagics Research Center at University of Massachusetts Amherst's Gloucester Marine Station, with her two former doctoral students Heinisch and Jessica Knapp at the University of New Hampshire, introduce a new endocrine-based approach to determine timing of sexual maturation in one of the most important commercial tuna species in the Atlantic.

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Environmental Research Letters
CO2 warming effects felt just a decade after being emitted
It takes just 10 years for a single emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) to have its maximum warming effects on the Earth.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Estimates of anthropogenic nitrogen in the ocean may be high
Inundation of nitrogen into the atmosphere and terrestrial environments, through fossil fuel combustion and extensive fertilization, has risen tenfold since preindustrial times according to research published in Global Biogeochemical Cycles. Excess nitrogen can infiltrate water tables and can trigger extensive algal blooms that deplete aquatic environments of oxygen, among other damaging effects.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Global Change Biology
Ozone depletion is a major climate driver in the southern hemisphere
When people hear about the dangers of the ozone hole, they often think of sunburns and associated health risks, but new research shows that ozone depletion changes atmospheric and oceanic circulation with potentially devastating effects on weather in the Southern Hemisphere weather.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
NASA satellites provide triple coverage on Tropical Storm Sinlaku
Tropical Storm Sinlaku made landfall in east-central Vietnam bringing some moderate to heavy rainfall with it. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's TRMM and GPM satellites analyzed the rainfall rates occurring in Sinlaku before it made landfall while NASA's Terra satellite spotted the storm as it came ashore in Vietnam.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
NASA's Terra Satellite catches fast-developing Tropical Storm Hagupit
Tropical Storm Hagupit was just a low pressure area on Nov. 30, but warm waters and good atmospheric conditions allowed the storm to develop rapidly. By Dec. 1 the low pressure area strengthened into a tropical storm when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Biogeosciences
Baltic Sea: Climate change counteracts decline in eutrophication
Despite extensive measures to protect the Baltic Sea from anthropogenic activities since the late 1980s, oxygen concentrations continue to decrease. Rising temperatures in the bottom water layers could be the reason for the oxygen decline. This paper reports on the first comprehensive analysis of measurement data from the Boknis Eck time series station, and it was recently published in the international journal Biogeosciences.

Contact: Jan Steffen
jsteffen@geomar.de
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Biological Reviews
Mass extinction led to many new species of bony fish
With over 30,000 species worldwide, the ray fins are currently the largest group of fish. These bony fish were not always as numerous, however. Losses of other fish species, such as cartilaginous fish, helped them to spread successfully. As paleontologists from the University of Zurich together with international researchers reveal, a series of serious extinction events between 300 to 200 million years ago played a central role in the development of today's fish fauna.

Contact: Dr. Carlo Romano
carlo.romano@pim.uzh.ch
41-446-342-347
University of Zurich

Public Release: 27-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Ancient algae provides clues of climate impact on today's microscopic ocean organisms
A study of ancient marine algae, led by the University of Southampton, has found that climate change affected their growth and skeleton structure, which has potential significance for today's equivalent microscopic organisms that play an important role in the world's oceans.
Natural Environment Research Council, Royal Society Research Fellowship, UK Ocean Acidification Research Programme

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Showing releases 51-75 out of 1320.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>


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