Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 1439.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 12-May-2015
All NASA eyes on Tropical Storm Dolphin
Three NASA satellite instruments took aim at Tropical Storm Dolphin. Dolphin responded by posing for pictures as it headed west towards Guam gathering strength and speed as it moves.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-May-2015
mBio
Bacteria the newest tool in detecting environmental damage
A team of researchers from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a method of using bacteria to help test for the presence of a wide array of pollutants.
Berkeley Laboratory

Contact: David Goddard
david.goddard@utk.edu
865-974-0683
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Ana becomes first 2015 Atlantic tropical storm and weakens ashore
On May 9, 2015, at 1626 UTC (12:26 PM EDT) the GPM satellite flew over when ANA was making the change from subtropical storm to tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Evolutionary Applications
Mining pollution alters fish genetics in southwest England
Pollution from historic mining activities in south west England has led to a reduction in genetic diversity of brown trout according to new research from the University of Exeter. The findings, which will be published on Friday, May 15, in the journal Evolutionary Applications, indicate that human activity can alter the genetic patterns of wild populations -- an important issue in modern conservation.

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-139-272-2062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Ocean head count: Scientists develop new methods to track ocean biodiversity
How can you track changes in complex marine ecosystems over time? MBARI scientists are part of a team trying to do just this with a five-year, $7 million grant through the National Ocean Partnership Program. The proposed Marine Biodiversity Observation Network will combine species counts and ecological data from existing research programs with newer data gathered using cutting-edge satellites, robots, and genetic analyses.
NASA, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, US Department of the Interior-Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

Contact: Kim Fulton-Bennett
kfb@mbari.org
831-775-1835
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Scientific Data
New national database of coastal flooding launched
Scientists have compiled a new database of coastal flooding in the UK over the last 100 years, which they hope will provide crucial information to help prevent future flooding events.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-3212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 12-May-2015
eLife
Nothing fishy about new way to produce sunscreen pill and lotion
Scientists from Oregon State University have discovered that fish can produce their own sunscreen. They have copied the method used by fish for potential use in humans.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jennifer Mitchell
j.mitchell@elifesciences.org
44-012-238-55373
eLife

Public Release: 12-May-2015
The Cryosphere
New study shows Antarctic ice shelf is thinning from above and below
A decade-long scientific debate about what's causing the thinning of one of Antarctica's largest ice shelves is settled this week with the publication of an international study in the journal The Cryosphere.
Natural Environment Research Council, National Science Foundation

Contact: Athena Dinar
amdi@bas.ac.uk
44-122-322-1441
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Science
Photosynthesis has unique isotopic signature, UCLA researchers report
Photosynthesis leaves behind a unique calling card in the form of a chemical signature that is spelled out with stable oxygen isotopes, UCLA geochemists reported April 24 in the journal Science. The findings suggest that similar isotopic signatures could exist for many biological processes, including some that are difficult to observe with current tools.

Contact: Stuart Wolpert
swolpert@support.ucla.edu
310-206-0511
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 11-May-2015
For the first time, scientists tag a loggerhead sea turtle off US West Coast
Fifty miles out to sea from San Diego, in the middle of April, under a perfectly clear blue sky, NOAA Fisheries scientists Tomo Eguchi and Jeff Seminoff leaned over the side of a rubber inflatable boat and lowered a juvenile loggerhead sea turtle into the water. That turtle was a trailblazer -- the first of its kind ever released off the West Coast of the United States with a satellite transmitter attached.

Contact: Jim Milbury
jim.milbury@noaa.gov
562-980-4006
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Gulf of Maine red tide bloom expected to be similar to past 3 years
New England's spring and summer red tides will be similar in extent to those of the past three years, according to the 2015 Gulf of Maine red tide seasonal forecast. The forecast is the eighth seasonal Gulf of Maine red tide forecast funded by NOAA and issued by scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and North Carolina State University. The forecast is part of a larger NOAA effort to deliver ecological forecasts that support human health and coastal and marine stewardship.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, State of Maine, University of North Carolina State University

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
30-171-330-366
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Tropical Storm Dolphin threatening Micronesia
The MODIS instrument on the Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Dolphin riding roughshod over the Federated States of Micronesia.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Ana makes landfall in South Carolina on Mother's Day
This was no Mother's Day gift to South Carolina as Ana made landfall on Sunday. Just before 6 am, Ana made landfall north of Myrtle Beach, SC with sustained winds of 45 mph, slightly lower than the 50 mph winds it was packing as a tropical storm over the Atlantic.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Noul makes landfall in Philippines, thousands flee
On Sunday, May 10, 2015, Super Typhoon Noul (designated Dodong in the Philippines) made landfall in Santa Ana, a coastal town in Cagayan on the northeastern tip of the Philippine Islands. Close to 2,500 residents evacuated as the storm crossed over, and as of today no major damage or injuries have been reported.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Nature Geoscience
Solving corrosive ocean mystery reveals future climate
Around 55 million years ago, an abrupt global warming event triggered a highly corrosive deep-water current through the North Atlantic Ocean. The current's origin puzzled scientists for a decade, but an international team of researchers has now discovered how it formed and the findings may have implications for the carbon dioxide emission sensitivity of today's climate.
National Computational Infrastructure -- Australia

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Nature Climate Change
Water fleas genetically adapt to climate change
The water flea has genetically adapted to climate change. Biologists from KU Leuven, Belgium, compared 'resurrected' water fleas -- hatched from 40-year-old eggs -- with more recent specimens. The project was coordinated by Professor Luc De Meester from the Laboratory of Aquatic Ecology, Evolution and Conservation.
Agency for Innovation by Science and Technology, KU Leuven Centre of Excellence on Eco- and Socio-evolutionary Dynamics

Contact: Katrien Bollen
news@kuleuven.be
KU Leuven

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Did ocean acidification cause marine mollusc extinction?
New research, led by the University of Southampton, has questioned the role played by ocean acidification, produced by the asteroid impact that killed the dinosaurs, in the extinction of ammonites and other planktonic calcifiers 66 million years ago.
European Project on Ocean Acidification, Natural Environment Research Council, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Department of Energy and Climate Change, UK Ocean Acidification Program

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-3212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Nature Geoscience
Solution to corrosive ocean mystery reveals future climate
Researchers have discovered how an abrupt global warming event triggered a highly corrosive deep-water current to flow through the North Atlantic Ocean 55 million years ago solving a mystery that has puzzled scientists for a decade. The findings published in Nature Geoscience today may also help determine how sensitive our climate was to CO2 in the past.

Contact: Alvin Stone
alvin.stone@unsw.edu.au
61-241-861-7366
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 9-May-2015
Ana tightens up and becomes tropical
Up until Saturday morning, Ana had been referred to as a subtropical storm, rather than a tropical storm. As of Saturday morning she made the transition to a full tropical storm overnight as the storm tightened up and became more organized with most of the shower and thunderstorm activity becoming centered within Ana.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-May-2015
PLOS ONE
New tool helps researchers, managers plan for sea scallop fishery in the future
Sea scallops, one of the most valuable commercial fisheries in the United States, are a well managed and monitored fishery, yet little is known about how changing ocean temperatures and ocean chemistry and other environmental factors could impact the fishery. A study in PLOS ONE describes a new computer model to help inform scallop management discussions and decisions in the coming decades.
NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program through the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science's Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research, Center for Climate and Energy Decision Making, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 8-May-2015
Tropical Depression 07W expected to intensify to typhoon
Forecasters expect Tropical Depression 07W which is riding behind Typhoon Noul to intensify to typhoon strength within the next five days.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-May-2015
Noul's impending landfall raises warning #2 in Luzon
The Philippines warning center has raised a #2 warning for its citizens in the Luzon province of Catanduanes.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-May-2015
GPM and Suomi-NPP fly above subtropical storm Ana
During the past few days subtropical storm ANA was developing off the southeastern coast of the United States.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-May-2015
Stan Yavno receives Arnold Berliner Award 2015
The Arnold Berliner Award 2015 has been presented to Stan Yavno from Tel Aviv University and the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel. He receives the award for his research on the phenotypic plasticity of native and non-native pumpkinseed sunfish, published in Springer's flagship multidisciplinary science journal, The Science of Nature.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 8-May-2015
Nature Communications
Environmental exposure to hormones used in animal agriculture greater than expected
Research by an Indiana University environmental scientist and colleagues at universities in Iowa and Washington finds that potentially harmful growth-promoting hormones used in beef production are expected to persist in the environment at higher concentrations and for longer durations than previously thought.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Steve Hinnefeld
slhinnef@iu.edu
812-856-3488
Indiana University

Showing releases 51-75 out of 1439.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>