Press Releases

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Showing releases 701-725 out of 1745.

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Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
Ecological Indicators
Climate change: Warm water is mixing up life in the Arctic
The warming of arctic waters in the wake of climate change is likely to produce radical changes in the marine habitats of the High North. This is indicated by data from long-term observations in the Fram Strait, which researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute have now analyzed.

Contact: Sina Loeschke
medien@awi.de
49-471-483-12008
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
Nature
Acorn worm genome reveals gill origins of human pharynx
One of the defining characteristics of chordates and other deuterostomes is the presence of gill slits, which first appeared in the acorn worm and persist vestigially in the human embryo. An international team led by UC Berkeley sequenced the genomes of two acorn worms to understand the genes that control development and the nervous system, and found a conserved cluster of six genes involved in patterning the pharynx in the worm as well as vertebrates.
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-915-3097
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
2015 AGU Fall Meeting
AGU Fall Meeting: Virtual press room and PIO uploader -- now live!
Discover the latest Earth and space science news at the 48th annual AGU Fall Meeting.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
PLOS Genetics
Sequencing algae's genome may aid biofuel production
University of Washington scientists have sequenced the complete genetic makeup of a species of ecologically important algae, which may aid in biofuel production.
United States Department of Energy, Washington Sea Grant, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: James Urton
jurton@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
Tropical Storm Rick joins an elite late-season storm group
The twenty-first tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season strengthened into a tropical storm on Nov. 19 and was renamed Tropical Storm Rick bringing the storm into a small elite group of late-season storms. NOAA's GOES-West satellite provided an early daylight image of the storm that showed it had become more organized since it formed on Nov 18.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
NASA analyzes Tropical Storm In-fa's winds, rain
As Tropical Storm In-fa continued to affect Micronesia and the Marianas Islands, NASA's RapidScat instrument measured surface winds and the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite measured areas of intense rainfall. In-fa became a typhoon early on Nov. 18 and weakened slightly to a tropical storm later in the day, maintaining tropical-storm force on Nov. 19.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
Exploring global climate impact if Antarctica's ice sheets melt
As the world anticipates a global climate change meeting next month in Paris, there is compelling historical evidence that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is vulnerable to rapid retreat and collapse, says climate scientist Alan Condron at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, yet very few if any studies have explored what might happen to Earth's climate if Antarctica's ice sheets were to melt over the next few decades.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
Science
Fish skin provides invisibility in open ocean
Scientists have solved a longstanding mystery about how some fish seem to disappear from predators in the open waters of the ocean, a discovery that could help materials scientists and military technologists create more effective methods of ocean camouflage. The findings are published in this week in Science.
Office of Naval Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiatives, National Science Foundation, University of Texas at Austin College of Natural Sciences

Contact: Christine Sinatra
christine.sinatra@austin.utexas.edu
512-471-4641
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
Current Biology
Marine animals use new form of secret light communication
Researchers from the Queensland Brain Institute at The University of Queensland have uncovered a new form of secret light communication used by marine animals. The findings may have applications in satellite remote sensing, biomedical imaging, cancer detection, and computer data storage.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Asian Office of Aerospace Research and Development, Australian Research Council

Contact: Bernadette Condren
b.condren@uq.edu.au
61-733-466-353
University of Queensland

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
Twenty-first depression forms in eastern Pacific Ocean
NOAA's GOES-West satellite provided images of the birth of the latest tropical depression in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Tropical Depression 21E formed well southwest of the Coast of Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
Biological Invasions
Research using CO2 keeps even small fry invasive carp at bay
University of Illinois researcher Cory Suski has already shown that bubbling high concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) into water is a deterrent to invasive Asian carp adults. The gas makes them feel 'woozy' and they choose to swim away. His recent research shows that fish the size of an eyelash also experience negative consequences following CO2 exposure.

Contact: Debra Levey Larson
dlarson@illinois.edu
217-244-2880
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
NASA sees In-fa become a Typhoon near Micronesia
Tropical Storm 27W intensified into a typhoon near Micronesia in the western North Pacific Ocean as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead providing visible and infrared data to forecasters.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
This week from AGU: Magma ocean, Underwater waves, & 5 new research papers
This week from AGU: Magma ocean, Underwater waves, & 5 new research papers.

Contact: Lillian Steenblik Hwang
lhwang@agu.org
207-777-7318
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tel Aviv Univ discovery may redefine classifications in the animal kingdom
Tel Aviv University researchers have found that a close cousin of the jellyfish has evolved over time into a microscopic parasite. The finding represents the first case of extreme evolutionary degeneration of an animal body.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
Environmental Science & Technology Letters
3-D printed parts from some commercial devices toxic to zebrafish embryos
The recent boom in 3-D printing has driven innovations in fields as disparate as haute couture and medical implants. But little is known about the safety of the materials used. In a new study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters, scientists showed that some 3-D printed parts are highly toxic to zebrafish embryos. Their findings could have implications not only for aquatic life but also for hobbyists, manufacturers and patients.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Warming ocean worsened Australia's fatal 2010/2011 floods
A study by a team of US and Australian researchers shows that long-term warming of the Indian and Pacific oceans played an important role in increasing the severity of the devastating floods that struck Australia in 2010/2011. The researchers found that, during a strong La Niña, warmer sea surface temperatures make Australia three times as likely to experience rainfall levels akin to the 2010/2011 event.
Australian Research Council

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
Nature
Low-oxygen 'dead zones' in North Pacific linked to past ocean-warming events
A new study has found a link between abrupt ocean warming at the end of the last ice age and the sudden onset of low-oxygen, or hypoxic conditions that led to vast marine dead zones. Results of the study, which was funded by the National Science Foundation, are being published this week in the journal Nature.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Summer Praetorius
spraetorius@carnegiescience.edu
510-648-5027
Oregon State University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
Biology Letters
Cure for chytrid: Scientists discover method to eliminate killer fungus
Research published today details the first-ever successful elimination of a fatal chytrid fungus in a wild amphibian, marking a major breakthrough in the fight against the disease responsible for devastating amphibian populations worldwide.

Contact: Laura Copsey
laura.copsey@zsl.org
020-744-96247
Zoological Society of London

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
Nature
Our closest wormy cousins
OIST has analyzed the genomes of two acorn worm species and found that approximately two-thirds of human genes have counterparts in the ancestors of these marine animals. These ancient genes, and their organization within the genome, were already in place in the common ancestor of humans and acorn worms that lived over half a billion years ago.
US Public Health Service, NASA, FP7/European Research Council, Molecular Genetics Unit of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate, Academia Sinica and Ministry of Science and Technology Taiwan

Contact: Natori Kaoru
kaoru.natori@oist.jp
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
PLOS ONE
Whale sharks in Gulf of Mexico swim near the surface, take deep dives
Tracking whale sharks in the Gulf of Mexico revealed their use of near-surface waters, as expected, but also their use of deeper water off the continental shelf, including remaining at depth greater than 50 meters continuously for more than three days, according to a study published Nov. 18, 2015, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by John Tyminski from Mote Marine Laboratory, Florida, and colleagues from the US and Mexico.

Contact: Kayla Graham
kgraham@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
PLOS ONE
Sea ice loss associated with increased summer land use by Chukchi Sea polar bears
Polar bears' use of land during substantial summer sea ice loss in the Chukchi Sea increased by 30 days, according to a study published Nov. 18, 2015, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Karyn Rode from the US Geological Survey, Alaska, and colleagues.
See financial disclosure

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
Powerful new global arena needed to confront coming water challenges, elite UN board warns
The final report of a board of 20 independent advisors to the UN Secretary-General on water and sanitation offers blunt observations and calls for an overhaul of the way the world body deals with the issues.

Contact: Terry Collins
tc@tca.tc
416-878-8712
UN Secretary-General's Advisory Board on Water and Sanitation

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
Ecosphere
Small landscape changes can mean big freshwater gains
A new opportunity for improving the health and supply of Wisconsin's lakes, waterways and groundwater has emerged from a recent study in the journal Ecosphere by the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Water Sustainability and Climate Project.

Contact: Jiangxiao Qiu
jqiu7@wisc.edu
608-556-6982
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm 27W form in Marianas Islands, warnings up
The tropical low pressure area previously known as System 95W consolidated and was classified as a Tropical Depression 27W on Nov. 17, 2015. The Suomi NPP satellite captured a view of the strengthening storm as warnings were posted in Micronesia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
NASA measures India's deadly flooding rains
During the past week extreme rainfall from two slow moving tropical low pressure areas caused severe flooding in southeastern India. One of the lows, designated System 97B continued to linger along the southeastern Indian coast on Nov. 17. As System 97B and another low pressure area dropped heavy rainfall, NASA and partners around the world gathered data using an array of satellites.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 701-725 out of 1745.

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