Press Releases

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Showing releases 701-725 out of 1739.

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Public Release: 16-Sep-2015
U-M researchers to study Detroit River phosphorus, impacts of green infrastructure
Researchers at the University of Michigan have been awarded a three-year, $3 million grant from the Erb Family Foundation to determine the Detroit River's contributions to algae blooms that plague Lake Erie each summer.
Erb Family Foundation

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
University of Michigan

Public Release: 16-Sep-2015
Robots help to map England's only deep-water Marine Conservation Zone
The first true three-dimensional picture of submarine canyon habitats has been produced using a unique combination of marine robotics and ship-based measurements. The information captured in this new set of maps ranges in scale from the 200km canyon down to the size of an individual cold-water coral polyp, and will be used to inform the management of the only English Marine Conservation Zone in deep water.
European Research Council, Natural Environmental Research council, DEFRA

Contact: Holly Peacock
holly.peacock@noc.ac.uk
0238-059-6388
National Oceanography Centre, UK

Public Release: 16-Sep-2015
NASA mapped heavy rainfall from Tropical Storm Vamco
Tropical Storm Vamco was a short-lived tropical storm but brought large amounts of rainfall to southeastern Asia. The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite measured the rainfall over four days and showed some impressive totals.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2015
NASA sees a comma-shaped Tropical Storm Krovanh over Marianas
The Marianas Islands in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean were in the tail of Tropical Storm Krovanh's 'comma shape' when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead early on Sept. 16.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2015
PLOS ONE
Counting underwater vital for marine conservation
Understanding how genetic diversity occurs within species is paramount for conservation, according to University of Queensland scientists. The new research by UQ biologists has identified regions of high and low multi-species genetic diversity in Australia's marine waters. Lead author and Honorary Research Fellow with UQ's School of Biological Sciences, Lisa Pope said the varying genetic diversity had implications for both marine conservation and broader understanding of how species form.
University of Queensland

Contact: Dr. Lisa Pope
l.pope@uq.edu.au
61-042-976-4433
University of Queensland

Public Release: 15-Sep-2015
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Young chum salmon may get biggest nutrition boost from Elliott Bay restored beaches
University of Washington researchers have found the types of organisms in Seattle's Elliott Bay change depending on the shoreline nearby, either armored or restored beaches. Young chum salmon adjusted their diets based on these changes.
National Science Foundation, Seattle Department of Transportation

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 15-Sep-2015
NASA gets infrared view of new Tropical Storm 20W
The twentieth tropical depression of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean formed early on Sept. 14 and became a tropical storm the next day, triggering a tropical storm watch. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the low pressure area as it was consolidating and saw powerful thunderstorms circling the center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Sep-2015
New DNA research reveals genetic heritage of elusive vaquita
A new method of teasing information from scarce and highly degraded genetic samples is helping NOAA Fisheries and Mexican scientists unravel the genetic heritage of the enigmatic vaquita, the most endangered marine mammal on Earth.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 15-Sep-2015
Review of Scientific Instruments
New tool for studying magnetic, self-propelled bacteria that resemble compass needles
In the Marvel Comics universe, Professor Xavier and the X-Men are only able to fend off archrival Magneto, the magnetic mutant with the ability to control metals, once they understand the scope of his powers. To better understand the behavior of the microbial world's Magnetos -- magnetically influenced water-dwellers known as magnetotactic bacteria -- three researchers have developed a tool that allows these microscopic species to be studied more easily, especially in their natural environment.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 14-Sep-2015
Biology Letters
A more acidic ocean will bend the mermaid's wineglass
New research from the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories shows that a more acidic ocean can weaken the protective shell of a delicate alga. The findings, published Sept. 9 in the journal Biology Letters, come at a time when global climate change may increase ocean acidification.
National Science Foundation, Mediterranean Sea Acidification Program

Contact: James Urton
jurton@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 14-Sep-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Research shows evolution in real time
In ongoing research to record the interaction of environment and evolution, a team led by University of California, Riverside biologist David Reznick has found new information illustrating the evolution of a population of guppies. Working in a river in Trinidad, the researchers determined which male guppies would contribute more offspring to the population as well as which would live longer and which would have a shorter lifespan.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 14-Sep-2015
NASA's RapidScat catches a day in the short life of Tropical Storm Vamco
Tropical Storm Vamco lived for two days in the South China Sea. On the day it developed into a depression the RapidScat instrument aboard the International Space Station provided forecasters data on its surface winds.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Sep-2015
Journal of the Marine Biology Association of the United Kingdom
Researchers find major gaps in understanding risks, benefits of eating fish
Fish tissue is rarely measured for concentrations of both harmful contaminants and healthful nutrients across a range of species and geographic regions, say a Dartmouth researcher and her colleagues who reviewed the risks and benefits of eating seafood.

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 14-Sep-2015
Ecological Economics
Protected areas save mangroves, reduce carbon emissions
Protected areas not only keep significant swaths of Indonesia's shrinking mangrove habitats intact, but also prevent emissions of carbon dioxide that would have been released had these mangroves been cleared, according to a study in the journal Ecological Economics.
Linden Trust for Conservation and Roger and Victoria Sant

Contact: Erin McKenzie
erin.mckenzie@duke.edu
919-613-3652
Duke University

Public Release: 14-Sep-2015
Engineer receives rapid NSF support to probe water woes in Flint, Michigan
A Virginia Tech engineer is traveling to Flint, Michigan, this week as part of a National Science Foundation-funded $50,000 one-year study into a 'perfect storm' of water distribution system corrosion problems.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Steven Mackay
smackay@vt.edu
540-231-4787
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 14-Sep-2015
Global Change Biology
World's turtles face plastic deluge danger
An international study led by a University of Queensland researcher has revealed more than half the world's sea turtles have ingested plastic or other human rubbish. The study, led by Dr. Qamar Schuyler from UQ's School of Biological Sciences, found the east coasts of Australia and North America, Southeast Asia, southern Africa, and Hawaii were particularly dangerous for turtles due to a combination of debris loads and high species diversity.
Australian Research Council Linkage Project, Earthwatch Australia, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Healthy Waterways and Australia Zoo

Contact: Dr. Qamar Schuyler
q.schuyler@uq.edu.au
61-427-566-868
University of Queensland

Public Release: 11-Sep-2015
Remnants of ex-Tropical Storm Linda spreading inland
NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw the remnants of former Tropical Storm Linda begin to spread inland over the northern Baja Peninsula of Mexico, and they are expected to affect the southwestern US over the next couple of days.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Sep-2015
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP sees a lopsided Tropical Storm Henri
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Henri on Sept. 11 and saw that almost all of the clouds and showers associated with the storm were on the northeastern side of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Sep-2015
NASA spots Kilo becoming extra-tropical near Hokkaido, Japan
NASA's Aqua satellite spotted Tropical Storm Kilo brushing the eastern side of Hokkaido, Japan early on Sept. 11 as it was becoming extra-tropical.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Sep-2015
PeerJ
Researchers identify 3 new fossil whale species of New Zealand
University of Otago paleontology researchers are continuing to rewrite the history of New Zealand's ancient whales by describing two further genera and three species of fossil baleen whales.

Contact: Dr. Robert Boessenecker
boesseneckerrw@cofc.edu
University of Otago

Public Release: 10-Sep-2015
Marine Ecology
Visual details released of recently discovered methane seep
Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have released details of a deep-sea site roughly 48 kilometers (30 miles) west of Del Mar (just north of San Diego, Calif.) where methane is seeping out of the seafloor, the first such finding in the region.
UC Ship Funds, Rick and Patty Elkus, Julia Brown, Steve Strachan, Stout Foundation, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Secoy Foundation

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 10-Sep-2015
Satellite sees Tropical Storm Linda weakening near Baja California
NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw a much weaker Tropical Storm Linda near the Baja California Peninsula of Mexico on September 10. The infrared image showed Linda as a swirl of clouds with strongest thunderstorms on the eastern side.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Sep-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Southern Ocean removing carbon dioxide from atmosphere more efficiently
Since 2002, the Southern Ocean has been removing more of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, according to two new studies.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 10-Sep-2015
Autonomy, advanced materials in focus as ONR, Indian scientists meet
Answering the call from the Chief of Naval Operations to help build and strengthen international partnerships, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and ONR Global have increased scientific cooperation with the Indian government in recent weeks, including a series of high-profile meetings in India Aug. 21-23, and in the US just before that.

Contact: Bob Freeman
onrpublicaffairs@navy.mil
703-696-5031
Office of Naval Research

Public Release: 10-Sep-2015
NOAA awards $2.75 million for marine mammal rescue efforts
Today, NOAA Fisheries announced the award of $2.75 million in grant funding to partner organizations in 16 states to respond to and rehabilitate stranded marine mammals and collect data on their health. The John H. Prescott Marine Mammal Rescue Assistance Grant Program provides funding to non-profit and for-profit organizations, academic institutions, and state agencies that are members of the National Marine Mammal Stranding Network.
NOAA Fisheries

Contact: Connie Barclay
connie.barclay@noaa.gov
301-427-8029
NOAA Headquarters

Showing releases 701-725 out of 1739.

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