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Showing releases 76-100 out of 1286.

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Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Changing Antarctic winds create new sea level threat
New research shows projected changes in the winds circling the Antarctic may accelerate global sea level rise significantly more than previously estimated.

Contact: Alvin Stone
alvin.stone@unsw.edu.au
61-241-861-7366
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Geology
Denali duck-billed dino tracks
A trio of paleontologists has discovered a remarkable new tracksite in Alaska's Denali National Park filled with duck-billed dinosaur footprints -- technically referred to as hadrosaurs -- that demonstrates they not only lived in multi-generational herds but thrived in the ancient high-latitude, polar ecosystem. The paper provides new insight into the herd structure and paleobiology of northern polar dinosaurs in an arctic greenhouse world.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 4-Jul-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Arthur's July fourth fireworks on US East Coast
Hurricane Arthur made landfall in North Carolina on July 3, and today, July 4, it is bringing its own fireworks along the Mid-Atlantic and New England states.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Rethinking the reef
A new study by biologists at San Diego State University and Scripps Institution of Oceanography shows that inhabited coral islands that engage in commercial fishing dramatically alter their nearby reef ecosystems, disturbing the microbes, corals, algae and fish that call the reef home.

Contact: Natalia Elko
natalia.elko@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-2585
San Diego State University

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Tropical Storm Douglas weakening in the eastern Pacific
Tropical Storm Douglas is on a weakening trend, according to the National Hurricane Center, and satellite imagery showed that the storm appeared more elongated on July 3.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
NASA sees rainfall in newborn Tropical Depression 8W
Powerful thunderstorms in some areas of newborn Tropical Depression 08W in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean were dropping heavy rainfall on July 3 as NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Arthur's cloud-covered eye
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Arthur on July 2 at 2:50 p.m. EDT on July 2, it saw a cloud-covered eye as the storm was on the way to becoming a hurricane.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Nature
Ironing out details of the carbon cycle
Iron is an essential element in all living creatures, and its availability in seawater can have a profound effect on phytoplankton growth and, consequently, the earth's carbon cycle. In the journal Nature, University of South Carolina researchers Seth John and Tim Conway have just published an assessment of the various sources of dissolved iron in the north Atlantic Ocean, establishing that a great deal of it, some 70 to 90 percent, originates from dust blowing off the Sahara desert.

Contact: Steven Powell
spowell2@mailbox.sc.edu
803-777-1923
University of South Carolina

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Whales as ecosystem engineers
A review of research on whales shows that they have more a powerful influence on the function of oceans, global carbon storage, and the health of commercial fisheries than has been commonly assumed. The continued recovery of great whales from centuries of overhunting may help to buffer marine ecosystems from destabilizing stresses, including climate change, reports a global team of scientists led by the University of Vermont.

Contact: Joshua Brown
joshua.e.brown@uvm.edu
802-656-3039
University of Vermont

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers from the UCA prove the existence of large accumulations of plastic in all of the oceans
Researchers from the University of Cadiz have made an unprecedented discovery: they have shown that there are five large accumulations of plastic debris in the open oceans, coinciding with the five main ocean gyres in the surface waters of the ocean. As well as the well-known accumulation of plastic rubbish in the North Pacific, these experts have proven the existence of similar accumulations in the centre of the North Atlantic, the South Pacific, the South Atlantic and the Indian Oceans.

Contact: Andres Cozar
andres.cozar@uca.es
34-956-016-267
University of Cadiz

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
The Future of Coral Reefs
Lessons from the west: Great Barrier Reef in danger
Scientists at a coral reef symposium in Canberra this week are examining degraded reefs off the Northwest Australian coast in an effort to determine what lies ahead for the Great Barrier Reef. 'Reefs north of Exmouth have experienced large-scale bleaching in the past five years,' says Professor Malcolm McCulloch from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at the University of Western Australia.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Jennifer Lappin
Jennifer.Lappin@jcu.edu.au
041-774-1638
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
The Future of Coral Reefs
Decade of benefits for the Great Barrier Reef
With this week marking the tenth anniversary of the rezoning of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, prominent marine scientists from around the world have gathered in Canberra to discuss its successes -- both expected and unexpected.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Melissa Lyne
041-551-4328
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Current Biology
With 'biological sunscreen,' mantis shrimp see the reef in a whole different light
In an unexpected discovery, researchers have found that the complex eyes of mantis shrimp are equipped with optics that generate ultraviolet color vision. Mantis shrimp's six UV photoreceptors pick up on different colors within the UV spectrum based on filters made from an ingredient other animals depend on as built-in biological sunscreen, according to research reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on July 3.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
NASA sees a weaker Tropical Storm Douglas
NASA's Aqua satellite captured a picture of Tropical Storm Douglas as it began moving into cooler waters in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite spots heavy rainfall around Tropical Storm Arthur's center
Tropical Storm Arthur appears to be ramping up, and NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite spotted heavy rainfall occurring around the storm's center on July 1 when it was centered over the Bahamas.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
Wind shear wipes out Tropical Cyclone Elida
Strong northwesterly wind shear took its toll on Tropical Storm Elida, weakening it to a remnant low early on July 2.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
Future Earth to get globally distributed secretariat
Future Earth, a new international programme for global sustainability which brings together thousands of the world's leading researchers on global environmental change, will have a new secretariat with a unique and innovative structure that spans three continents. The announcement came today from the International Council for Science, on behalf of the members of the Science and Technology Alliance for Global Sustainability.

Contact: Lucie Robidoux
lucie.robidoux@videotron.ca
514-571-6403
International Council for Science

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
From despair to repair: Dramatic decline of Caribbean corals can be reversed
With only about one-sixth of the original coral cover left, most Caribbean coral reefs may disappear in the next 20 years, primarily due to the loss of grazers in the region, according to the latest report by the Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network, the International Union for Conservation of Nature and the United Nations Environment Programme.

Contact: Terry Collins
tc@tca.tc
416-878-8712
International Union for Conservation of Nature

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
Marine Pollution Bulletin
Zone tropical coastal oceans; manage them more like land resources: Scientists
Leading international scientists today published a joint call for societies to introduce and enforce use zoning of Earth's coastal ocean waters, mirroring approaches commonly used to manage and protect land resources. The 24 scientists, from Canada, the USA, the UK, China, Australia, New Caledonia, Sweden and Kenya, underline that 20 percent of humanity -- mostly in developing countries -- lives within 100 km of a tropical coast and urge new management measures as population and climate impacts on coastal waters worsen.

Contact: Terry Collins
tc@tca.tc
416-878-8712
United Nations University

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Genetic study reveals vulnerability of northwest dolphins
A new study estimating population genetic structure of little-known dolphins inhabiting Western Australia's north coast highlights vulnerability.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
Society for Experimental Biology Annual Meeting 2014
Blood donations could help reduce the risk of heart disease in shift workers
Austrian researchers have found that jetlag has severe effects on red blood cells, possibly explaining the high incidence of heart disease seen in shift workers. However, these effects can be counterbalanced by fresh, young red blood cells -- making blood donations a potential therapy for shift workers.

Contact: Caroline Wood
cwood4@sheffield.ac.uk
07-891-211-052
Society for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Scientific Reports
Behind a marine creature's bright green fluorescent glow
Probing the mysterious glow of light produced naturally by animals, scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have deciphered the structural components related to fluorescence brightness in the primitive sea creature known as amphioxus. The study carries implications for a variety of industries looking to maximize brightness of natural fluorescence, including applications in biotechnology such as adapting fluorescence for biomedical protein tracers and tracking gene expression in the human body.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Marine Biology
A case study of manta rays and lagoons
Doug McCauley chose one of the most isolated places in the world, Palmyra Atoll, to study the ecology of the Manta alfredi.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Tags reveal Chilean devil rays are among ocean's deepest divers
Thought to dwell mostly near the ocean's surface, Chilean devil rays (Mobula tarapacana) are most often seen gliding through shallow, warm waters. But a new study by scientists at WHOI and international colleagues reveals that these large and majestic creatures are actually among the deepest-diving ocean animals.
National Science Foundation, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Harrison Foundation, Portuguese Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Global Change Biology
Scientists uncover the key to adaptation limits of ocean dwellers
The simpler a marine organism is structured, the better it is suited for survival during climate change. Scientists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, discovered this in a new meta-study, which appears today in the research journal Global Change Biology.

Contact: Kristina Baer
medien@awi.de
49-471-483-12139
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research

Showing releases 76-100 out of 1286.

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