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Showing releases 76-100 out of 1737.

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Public Release: 27-Jan-2016
Fish and Fisheries
Researchers examine the unintentional effects of different fishing hooks and bait on sharks and rays
By examining relevant studies related to fishing in the open ocean, researchers have found that while using circle instead of J-shaped hooks and fish instead of squid for bait may avoid harm to sea turtles, dolphins, certain whales, and possibly seabirds, it may increase the catch and injury of some sharks and rays.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 27-Jan-2016
This week from AGU: Indian Ocean warming, 2 data blogs, debris flow video, & 2 new papers
This week from AGU: Indian Ocean warming, 2 data blogs, best ever debris flow video, & 2 new papers.

Contact: Lillian Steenblik Hwang
lhwang@agu.org
202-777-7318
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 27-Jan-2016
PLOS ONE
New detection method for Goby invasion
Conventional methods of stock monitoring are unsuitable for certain fish species. For example, the infestation of an area with invasive Ponto-Caspian gobies cannot be identified in time by standard methods. Researchers at the University of Basel have developed a simple, effective and cost-efficient test for these introduced non-native fish, they report in the magazine PLOS ONE.

Contact: Yannik Sprecher
yannik.sprecher@unibas.ch
41-612-672-424
University of Basel

Public Release: 27-Jan-2016
Nature
Seagrass genome sequence lends insights to salt tolerance
In the Jan. 27, 2016 issue of Nature, a team including DOE Joint Genome Institute researchers describe the first genome of a marine flowering plant: the eelgrass Zostera marina. Coastal seagrass ecosystems cover some 200,000 square kilometers. They account for an estimated 15 percent of carbon fixed in global ocean, and also impact sulfur and nitrogen cycles. Though seagrasses are key players in coastal marine ecosystem functions, they are also endangered.
United States Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 27-Jan-2016
Nature
With climate, fertilizing oceans could be zero-sum game
Scientists plumbing the depths of the central equatorial Pacific Ocean have found ancient sediments suggesting that one proposed way to mitigate climate warming -- fertilizing the oceans with iron to produce more carbon-eating algae -- may not necessarily work as envisioned.

Contact: Kevin Krajick
kkrajick@ei.columbia.edu
212-854-9729
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 27-Jan-2016
Nature
Genome of the flowering plant that returned to the sea
An international consortium led by University of Groningen Professor of Marine Biology Jeanine Olsen published the genome of the seagrass Zostera marina in the scientific journal Nature on Jan. 27. This genome is an exceptional resource that supports a wide range of research themes, from the adaptation of marine ecosystems under climate warming and its role in carbon burial to unravelling the mechanisms of salinity tolerance that may inform the assisted breeding of crop plants.

Contact: Rene Fransen
r.fransen@rug.nl
University of Groningen

Public Release: 26-Jan-2016
New grant to investigate how bacteria induce settling and transformation of marine larvae
A grant, totaling more than $870,000, from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to the University of Hawai'i will support research to understand the mechanisms by which marine biofilm bacteria -- bacteria that live in slime films on the surfaces of all objects submerged in the sea -- induce the settling of larvae of marine invertebrate animals.
The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 26-Jan-2016
GPM flies over dissipating Tropical cyclone Corentin
Tropical cyclone Corentin was the first named tropical cyclone of 2016 in the South Indian Ocean. The GPM core satellite measured rainfall in the weakening storm. Corentin caused little danger because its genesis, maturation and dissipation all occurred over the Southern Indian Ocean about equidistant from the distant shores of Madagascar and Australia. The storm never affected land areas.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Jan-2016
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences
Model explains huge recurring rainstorms in tropical Indian and Pacific oceans
A new model explains three fundamental features of the Madden-Julian Oscillation: Its huge size, its timescale of about 45 days, and why the tropical storm clouds always move toward the east.
NASA

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Scientific Reports
Fishing for answers on bone loss in space
A paper based on the Medaka results was recently published in Nature Scientific Reports. Co-author and principal investigator Akira Kudo, a professor in the Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology at Tokyo Institute of Technology, said investigators found increased volume and activity of osteoclasts and significant reduction of bone mineral density in the fish aboard the station.

Contact: Rachel Hobson
rachel.b.hobson@nasa.gov
281-244-7449
NASA/Johnson Space Center

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
IEEE Communications Magazine
Living in the '90s? So are underwater wireless networks
University at Buffalo engineers are developing hardware and software tools to help underwater telecommunication catch up to its over-the-air counterpart.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study finds shark hotspots overlap with commercial fishing locations
A new study from an international team of scientists found commercial fishing vessels target shark hotspots, areas where sharks tend to congregate, in the North Atlantic. The researchers suggest that sharks are at risk of being overfished in these oceanic hotspots.
Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund, Batchelor Foundation, West Coast Inland Navigation District

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting
Rana A. Fine selected as Fellow of the Oceanography Society
The Oceanography Society congratulates Rana A. Fine, professor in the department of ocean sciences at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, for being selected as a Fellow of the Oceanography Society. The citation on Professor Fine's certificate recognizes her for significant contributions to the understanding of the ocean circulation and ventilation. Dr. Fine will be formally recognized on Feb. 23, 2016, during a ceremony at the Ocean Sciences Meeting in New Orleans, La.
The Oceanography Society

Contact: Jennifer Ramarui
jenny@tos.org
301-251-7708
The Oceanography Society

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Nature Geoscience
In Gulf of Mexico, microbes thrive above natural oil seeps
In the water above natural oil seeps in the Gulf of Mexico, where oil and gas bubbles rise almost a mile to break at the surface, scientists have discovered something unusual: phytoplankton, tiny microbes at the base of the marine food chain, are thriving.

Contact: Kevin Krajick
kkrajick@ei.columbia.edu
212-854-9729
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Nature Microbiology
Study shows large variability in abundance of viruses that infect ocean microorganisms
Marine microorganisms play a critical role in capturing atmospheric carbon, but a new study finds much less certainty than previously believed about the populations of the viruses that infect these important organisms.
National Science Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Simons Foundation

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 22-Jan-2016
NASA sees Corentin reach hurricane strength
The Southern Indian Ocean's Tropical Cyclone Corentin achieved hurricane strength on Jan. 22 as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead. When Aqua flew over Corentin on Jan. 22, 2016, at 08:35 UTC (3:35 a.m. EST), the Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument saw an eye forming. Bands of thunderstorms wrapped around the storm and into the center from the north and west.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Jan-2016
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Victor weakening under wind shear
After days at hurricane-force, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed that Tropical Cyclone Victor in the South Pacific Ocean was falling apart as a result of wind shear. Victor has weakened to a tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Jan-2016
Nature Communications
Melting Greenland ice sheet may affect global ocean circulation, future climate
Scientists from the University of South Florida, along with colleagues in Canada and the Netherlands, have determined that the influx of fresh water from the Greenland ice sheet is 'freshening' the North Atlantic Ocean and could disrupt the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, an important component of global ocean circulation that could have a global effect. Researchers say the it could impact the future climate in places such as portions of Europe and North America.
NASA

Contact: Tim Dixon
thd@usf.edu
305-323-1820
University of South Florida (USF Innovation)

Public Release: 22-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Environmental toxin may increase risk of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative illnesses
In a new study, scientists from the Institute for EthnoMedicine, a non-profit medical research organization in Jackson Hole, and the University of Miami Brain Endowment Bank, have shown that BMAA, an environmental toxin found in some harmful algal blooms, causes an Alzheimer's-like neurodegenerative disease among Pacific islanders.

Contact: Andrea Johnson
andrea.johnson@djescience.com
312-240-3112
DJE Science

Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting
Arnold L. Gordon selected as fellow of The Oceanography Society
The Oceanography Society congratulates Professor Arnold L. Gordon (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University) on being selected as a Fellow of The Oceanography Society. The citation on Professor Gordon's certificate recognizes him for his fundamental contributions to our understanding of how the global ocean is interconnected, drawing from his observations of the Southern Ocean, Indonesian Seas, and Agulhas retroflection. Dr. Gordon will be recognized during a ceremony on Feb. 23, 2016, at the Ocean Sciences Meeting in New Orleans, La.
The Oceanography Society

Contact: Jennifer Ramarui
jenny@tos.org
301-251-7708
The Oceanography Society

Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
Scientific Reports
Removal of derelict fishing gear has major economic impact
A new study by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science shows that removal of derelict fishing gear could generate millions of dollars in extra harvest value for commercial fisheries worldwide.
NOAA Marine Debris Program

Contact: David Malmquist
davem@vims.edu
804-684-7011
Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
NASA sees cloud top temperatures warming in Cyclone Victor
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite shows that cloud top temperatures are warming in Tropical Cyclone Victor. Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted that Victor is on a weakening trend, however, warnings were in effect in Tonga on Jan. 21.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
NASA measures rainfall in newborn Tropical Cyclone Corentin
Tropical Cyclone Corentin developed in the Southern Indian Ocean as NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission core satellite flew overhead and analyzed the storm's rainfall and clouds.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
Ecology and Evolution
UI biologists find sexuality, not extra chromosomes, benefits animal
Why do animals engage in sexual reproduction? UI biologists sought answers with mud snails that breed both sexually and asexually. They found that asexual snails grow faster and reach reproductive age quicker than sexual snails, which raises new questions about sex's role in reproduction. Results published this month in the journal Ecology and Evolution.
US National Science Foundation, Research Council of Norway, Iowa Center for Research for Undergraduates

Contact: Richard Lewis
richard-c-lewis@uiowa.edu
319-384-0012
University of Iowa

Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
Tagging project confirms Sea of the Hebrides importance to basking sharks
A pioneering three-year project to learn some of the secrets of Scotland's basking sharks by using satellite tag technology has shown an area off the west coast to be truly important for these giant fish.

Contact: Duncan Sandes
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-139-272-2062
University of Exeter

Showing releases 76-100 out of 1737.

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