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Showing releases 76-100 out of 1340.

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Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Satellite eyes first major Atlantic Hurricane in 3 years: Gonzalo
Hurricane Gonzalo has made the jump to major hurricane status and on Oct. 15 was a Category 4 storm on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. NOAA's GOES-East satellite provided imagery of the storm. According to the National Hurricane Center, Gonzalo is the first category 4 hurricane in the Atlantic basin since Ophelia in 2011.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite watches Tropical Storm Ana intensifying
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over intensifying Tropical Storm Ana as it was moving through the Central Pacific Ocean and toward the Hawaiian Islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
New study shows the importance of jellyfish falls to deep-sea ecosystem
This week, researchers from University of Hawai'i, Norway, and the UK have shown with innovative experiments that a rise in jellyfish blooms near the ocean's surface may lead to jellyfish falls that are rapidly consumed by voracious deep-sea scavengers. Previous anecdotal studies suggested that deep-sea animals might avoid dead jellyfish, causing dead jellyfish from blooms to accumulate and undergo slow degradation by microbes, depleting oxygen at the seafloor and depriving fish and invertebrate scavengers.
Norwegian Research Council

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Fishery Bulletin
Could sleeper sharks be preying on protected Steller sea lions?
Pacific sleeper sharks, a large, slow-moving species thought of as primarily a scavenger or predator of fish, may be preying on something a bit larger -- protected Steller sea lions in the Gulf of Alaska. A new study has found the first indirect evidence that this cold-blooded shark that can grow to a length of more than 20 feet -- longer than a great white shark -- and may be an opportunistic predator of juvenile Steller sea lions.
North Pacific Marine Research Program, US Department of Commerce

Contact: Markus Horning
markus.horning@oregonstate.edu
541-867-0270
Oregon State University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Analytical Chemistry
Dolphin 'breathalyzer' could help diagnose animal and ocean health
Alcohol consumption isn't the only thing a breath analysis can reveal. Scientists have been studying its possible use for diagnosing a wide range of conditions in humans -- and now in the beloved bottlenose dolphin. In a report in the American Chemical Society journal Analytical Chemistry, one team describes a new instrument that can analyze the metabolites in breath from dolphins, which have been dying in alarming numbers along the Atlantic coast this year.
Office of Naval Research, Hartwell Foundation, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Water Resources Research
Lake Erie increasingly susceptible to large cyanobacteria blooms
Lake Erie has become increasingly susceptible to large blooms of toxin-producing cyanobacteria since 2002, potentially complicating efforts to rein in the problem in the wake of this year's Toledo drinking water crisis, according to a new study led by University of Michigan researchers.
Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, University of Michigan Water Center, Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
BMC Evolutionary Biology
Ancient fossils confirmed among our strangest cousins
More than 100 years since they were first discovered, some of the world's most bizarre fossils have been identified as distant relatives of humans, thanks to the work of University of Adelaide researchers.
Australian Research Council, Spanish Research Council, National Geographic Society

Contact: Diego Garcia-Bellido
diego.garcia-bellido@adelaide.edu.au
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Conservation Physiology
Sheltering habits help sharks cope with acid oceans
Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have found that the epaulette shark, a species that shelters within reefs and copes with low oxygen levels, is able to tolerate increased carbon dioxide in the water without any obvious physical impact.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Conservation Physiology
Sharks that hide in coral reefs may be safe from acidifying oceans
A study published online today in the journal Conservation Physiology has shown that the epaulette shark (Hemiscyllium ocellatum) displays physiological tolerance to elevated carbon dioxide (CO₂) in its environment after being exposed to CO₂ levels equivalent to those that are predicted for their natural habitats in the near future.
School of Marine and Tropical Biology, School of Earth and Environmental Science, Australian Reseaerch Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Kirsty Doole
kirsty.doole@oup.com
01-865-355-439
Oxford University Press

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Researchers solve riddle of the rock pools
Research from the University of Exeter has revealed that the rock goby (Gobius paganellus), an unassuming little fish commonly found in rock pools around Britain, southern Europe, and North Africa, is a master of camouflage and can rapidly change color to conceal itself against its background.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists discover carbonate rocks are unrecognized methane sink
Since the first undersea methane seep was discovered 30 years ago, scientists have meticulously analyzed and measured how microbes in the seafloor sediments consume the greenhouse gas methane. They have now found a type of rock known as authigenic carbonate also contains vast amounts of active microbes that take up methane. This demonstrates that the global methane process is still poorly understood.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andrew Thurber
athurber@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-4500
Oregon State University

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite spots Central Pacific's Tropical Storm Ana
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ana on Monday, Oct. 13 after it formed in the Central Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
NASA satellite spots Hudhud's remnants
Cyclone Hudhud made landfall in east-central India on Oct. 12 and caused a lot of damage and several fatalities as it moved inland and weakened to a remnant low pressure area. NASA saw those remnants on Oct. 14.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Extra-Tropical Storm Vongfong pulling away from Hokkaido, Japan
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Extra-Tropical Storm Vongfong on Oct. 4 as it was moving away from Hokkaido, Japan, the northernmost of the big islands. Vongfong transitioned into an extra-tropical storm early on Oct. 4 as its core changed from warm to cold.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Gonzalo head toward Bermuda
Tropical Storm Gonzalo intensified into a hurricane late on Monday, Oct. 14 and is expected to become a major hurricane as it moves toward Bermuda.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface
This week from AGU: Glacier health check, world ocean atlas, liquid brines on Mars
This week from AGU: Glacier health check, world ocean atlas, and liquid brines on Mars.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Avian Biology
A canary for climate change
Researchers find that wing-propelled diving seabirds, as well as their extinct relatives, may have served as an indicator species for environmental changes and faunal shifts. The findings also elucidate how past extinctions have influenced the modern distribution and population size of existing species.
National Science Foundation, National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, University of Texas at Austin

Contact: Nicole Duncan
nicole.duncan@nescent.org
919-668-7993
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Palaeogeoraphy, Palaeocilmatology, Palaeoecology
Past climate change and continental ice melt linked to varying CO2 levels
Scientists at the Universities of Southampton and Cardiff have discovered that a globally warm period in Earth's geological past featured highly variable levels of CO2.

Contact: Steven Williams
s.williams@soton.ac.uk
0238-059-2128
University of Southampton

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Caribbean coral reef inhabitants critical in determining future of reefs
New research led by the University of Exeter has found that species that live in and erode coral reefs will play a major role in determining the future of reefs. The research, which is published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, highlights the delicate balance that exists between bioerosion and carbonate production on coral reefs.
Leverhulme Trust UK International Research Network Grant

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Genetics
For one family, zebrafish help provide genetic answers
Research in zebrafish has helped identify the cause of an unknown genetic disorder affecting a boy and two of his uncles, scientists report in the journal Genetics. The researchers tracked down a mutation carried only by the affected males and their mothers, within a gene called RPL10. When the equivalent gene was suppressed in zebrafish, the animals developed smaller heads, which is one of the major symptoms of the human disease.

Contact: Raeka Aiyar
press@genetics-gsa.org
202-412-1120
Genetics Society of America

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
PeerJ
Turtle tumors linked to excessive nitrogen from land-based pollution
Hawai'i's sea turtles are afflicted with chronic and often lethal tumors caused by consuming non-native algae 'superweeds' along coastlines where nutrient pollution is unchecked. The disease that causes these tumors is considered a leading cause of death in endangered green sea turtles.
Disney's Worldwide Conservation Fund

Contact: Talia S Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Taking infestation with a grain of salt
New research shows that salinity plays a major role in salt marsh grass's response to insect grazing.
California Sea Grant

Contact: Natalia Elko
natalia.elko@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-2585
San Diego State University

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Earliest-known lamprey larva fossils unearthed in Inner Mongolia
Researchers describe the oldest identified lamprey fossils displaying the creature in stages of pre-metamorphosis and metamorphosis.
National Basic Research Program of China, Asian-Swedish Research Partnership Program of the Swedish Research Council, KU Endowment

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
blynch@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
SETAC North America 35th Annual Meeting
SETAC North America 35th Annual Meeting
The Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) will be hosting its 35th annual meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia Nov. 9-13 2014.

Contact: Jen Lynch
jen.lynch@setac.org
850-469-150-0109
Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Ethology, Ecology and Evolution
University of Tennessee study finds crocodiles are sophisticated hunters
Vladimir Dinets, a research assistant professor in UT's Department of Psychology, has found that crocodiles work as a team to hunt their prey. His research tapped into the power of social media to document such behavior.

Contact: Whitney Heins
wheins@utk.edu
865-974-5460
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Showing releases 76-100 out of 1340.

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