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Showing releases 751-775 out of 1324.

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Public Release: 13-Jun-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Cristina making a reverse in strength
Hurricane Cristina intensified rapidly on June 12 and infrared satellite data showed cloud top temperatures became extremely cold as thunderstorms towered to the top of the troposphere. One day later, Cristina was weakening quickly and infrared data showed cloud top temperatures were warming as the cloud tops dropped.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Jun-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Nanauk's soaking swan song
Tropical Storm Nanauk was dissipating in the Arabian Sea on Friday, June 13 as it ran into increasing vertical wind shear, dry air moving into the tropical cyclone and cooler sea surface temperatures.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Jun-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Scientists identify Deepwater Horizon Oil on shore even years later, after most has degraded
Years after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil spill, oil continues to wash ashore as oil-soaked 'sand patties,' persists in salt marshes abutting the Gulf of Mexico, and questions remain about how much oil has been deposited on the seafloor. Scientists from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences have developed a unique way to fingerprint oil, and have successfully identified Macondo Well oil, even after most of it has degraded.
National Science Foundation, GoMRI-015, Deep-C Consortium

Contact: Darlene Crist
dtcrist@bigelow.org
207-315-1976
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Public Release: 12-Jun-2014
NASA takes Tropical Cyclone Nanuak's temperature
Tropical Cyclone Nanauk is holding its own for now as it moves through the Arabian Sea. NASA's Aqua satellite took its cloud top temperatures to determine its health.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Jun-2014
NASA and NOAA satellites analyze Category 4 Hurricane Cristina
A fleet of satellites from NASA and NOAA are on the job monitoring the first major hurricane of the Eastern Pacific Ocean Season as Hurricane Cristina has reached Category 4 status on the Saffir-Simpson scale.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Jun-2014
Acidification and warming threaten Mediterranean Sea iconic species
Scientist finalize their findings about the threat of Mediterranean Sea warming and acidification on key species and ecosystems after a 3.5 year study in Barcelona this week. They have found that this sea is warming and acidifying at unprecedented rates. The main reason is emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels causing warming of the ocean as well as acidification of its waters due to uptake of CO2 by surface waters.
European Commission 7th Framework Programme

Contact: Patrizia Ziveri
patrizia.ziveri@uab.cat
34-935-868-974
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Public Release: 12-Jun-2014
Science
Scientists discover link between climate change and ocean currents over 6 million years
Scientists have discovered a relationship between climate change and ocean currents over the past six million years after analysing an area of the Atlantic near the Strait of Gibraltar, according to research published today in the journal Science.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Paul Teed
paul.teed@rhul.ac.uk
07-818-014-167
Royal Holloway, University of London

Public Release: 12-Jun-2014
Goldschmidt2014
New research shows Western Amazon under threat from oil pollution
A new study of pollution records indicates that the Western Amazon, an area of unparalleled biological and cultural diversity, may have been contaminated by widespread oil pollution over a 30-year period. This work will be presented at the Goldschmidt conference in Sacramento, California.

Contact: Press Officer
tom@parkhill.it
39-349-238-8191
European Association of Geochemistry

Public Release: 12-Jun-2014
Scientific Reports
Climate change winners and losers
A group of scientists have traced the genetics of modern penguin populations back to their early ancestors from the last Ice Age to better understand how three Antarctic penguin species -- gentoo, Adelie, and chinstrap penguins -- fared in response to past climate change.
Zoological Society of London, National Science Foundation, Quark Expeditions

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Study of white sharks in the northwest Atlantic offers optimistic outlook for recovery
White sharks are among the largest, most widespread apex predators in the ocean, but are also among the most vulnerable. A new study, the most comprehensive ever on seasonal distribution patterns and historic trends in abundance of white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) in the western North Atlantic Ocean, used records compiled over more than 200 years to update knowledge and fill in gaps in information about this species. The study was published June 11 in PLOS ONE.
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
A NASA view of Tropical Cyclone Nanauk in the Arabian Sea
Tropical Cyclone 02A has consolidated and strengthened over a 24-hour period between June 10-11 and an image from NASA's Aqua satellite showed a more rounded tropical storm, despite wind shear.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Study shows Deepwater Horizon crude oil impairs swimming performance of juvenile mahi-mahi
A new study led by University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science scientists showed up to a 37 percent decrease in overall swimming performance of Deepwater Horizon oil-exposed juvenile mahi-mahi. The findings reveal the toxic effects of crude oil on ecologically and commercially valuable fish that reside in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Cristina now a hurricane, NASA's TRMM satellite sees heavy rainfall within
Before Tropical Storm Cristina intensified into a hurricane, NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead and gathered data that showed areas of heavy rainfall were occurring within.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Energy demands of raising a pup push sea otter moms to the limit
By the time a sea otter pup is weaned, its mother may be so depleted physiologically that she is unable to survive the stress of a minor wound or infection. To understand why this happens, UC Santa Cruz biologist Nicole Thometz quantified the energy demands of a growing sea otter pup, revealing just how much it costs a sea otter mom to raise her pup.
US Geological Survey, Office of Naval Research, Otter Cove Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Forest loss starves fish
Research shows forest debris that drains into lakes is an important contributor to freshwater food chains -- bolstering fish diets to the extent that increased forest cover causes fish to get 'fat' and sparse forest leaves smaller, underfed fish.

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
BioScience
Climate change beats biodiversity as a press, scientific, and funding priority
A study that compared coverage of biodiversity and of climate change in newspapers, scientific articles, and research funding decisions shows that climate change eclipsed biodiversity loss as a priority in the mid-2000s, according to several measures. Since both trends threaten essential ecosystems, biodiversity researchers should seek to emulate the ascendancy of climate change and increase their efforts on research that addresses both trends.
Portuguese Ministry of Education and Science

Contact: Timothy M. Beardsley
tbeardsley@aibs.org
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Motherhood is no picnic for sea otter moms
Sea otters consume 25 percent of their own body weight each day just to stay warm and when nursing young their metabolic demands must rocket, but no one knew how much. Nicole Thometz, from the University of California at Santa Cruz, USA, and colleagues have discovered that sea otter moms invest a colossal 930 MJ of energy to successfully raise a pup and this expense can force them to make difficult decisions about their pups' futures.
US Geological Survey Western Ecological Research Center, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Kathryn Knight
kathryn.knight@biologists.com
44-012-234-25525
The Company of Biologists

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite spots Arabian Sea tropical cyclone
Tropical Cyclone 02A formed in the Arabian Sea as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and captured a visible photo of the storm, spotting strongest storms south of its center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Christina's birth and severe weather in US South
NASA's Aqua satellite captured a picture of newborn Tropical Storm Cristina on June 10, marking the birth date of the Eastern Pacific Ocean's third tropical storm of the season.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Coho salmon: Pinks' and chums' eating cousin
Newly published research co-authored by scientists at Simon Fraser University and the Raincoast Conservation Foundation shows juvenile coho salmon benefit from dining on the distant remains of their spawning pink and chum cousins. While juvenile coho salmon feed directly on spawning pink and chum salmon carcasses and eggs, even coho with no direct contact with spawning pink and chum benefit from their nutrient contributions to stream ecosystems.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Geology
Syracuse University geologists confirm oxygen levels of ancient oceans
Geologists at the Syracuse University College of Arts and Sciences have discovered a new way to study oxygen levels in the Earth's oldest oceans.

Contact: Rob Enslin
rmenslin@syr.edu
315-443-3403
Syracuse University

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Our Ocean
UK science trio called to Washington ocean summit
Three leading environmental scientists from the UK have been invited to talk about the state of the world's oceans to an audience including US Secretary of State John Kerry at an ocean summit in Washington.

Contact: NERC Press Office
pressoffice@nerc.ac.uk
44-017-934-11568
Natural Environment Research Council

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
2nd International Conference on Integrative Salmonid Biology (ICISB)
Scientific breakthrough: International collaboration has sequenced salmon genome
Today the International Cooperation to Sequence the Atlantic Salmon Genome announced completion of a fully mapped and openly accessible salmon genome.
Genome British Columbia

Contact: Jennifer Boon
jboon@genomebc.ca
778-327-8374
Genome BC

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Molecular Ecology
Genetics reveal that reef corals and their algae live together but evolve independently
New research reveals that Caribbean corals and the algae that inhabit them form a remarkably stable relationship -- new knowledge that can serve as an important tool in preserving and restoring vital reef-building corals. The research could be used to decide which heat-tolerant corals to bring into nurseries, to grow, and to replant back on the reef to restore healthy coral populations.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Public gets first view of a live vampire squid and other deep-sea cephalopods
From the vampire squid to the flapjack octopus, deep-sea cephalopods are both fascinating and mysterious. Since April, members of the public have been able to see these animals for the first time, as part of the ongoing 'Tentacles' special exhibition at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. A collaborative effort with the aquarium's partner institution, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, this exhibit is providing new scientific insights into the lives of these mysterious animals.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Kim Fulton-Bennett
kfb@mbari.org
831-775-1835
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Showing releases 751-775 out of 1324.

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