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Showing releases 751-775 out of 1295.

<< < 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 > >>

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
Current Biology
Fossil porpoise has a chin for the ages
Scientists have identified a new species of ancient porpoise with a chin length unprecedented among known mammals, and suggest the animal used the tip of its face to probe the seabed for food.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Eric Gershon
eric.gershon@yale.edu
203-432-8555
Yale University

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
Current Biology
Parental care of the young from 450 million years ago
Scientists discover new fossil species revealing parental care of the young from 450 million years ago, and name it after Lucina, goddess of childbirth.

Contact: Professor David Siveter
djs@leicester.ac.uk
01-162-523-921
University of Leicester

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
Science
Saving large carnivores in the ecosystem requires multifaceted approach
Social species, such as the African wild dog, require strict participation from group members to be successful. This strategy can enhance fitness benefits for the group, but also a higher critical threshold for extinction. Awareness of life history needs to guide management strategy.

Contact: Lynn Davis
davisl@vt.edu
540-231-6157
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
Current Biology
Extinct California porpoise had a unique underbite
Millions of years ago, the coast of California was home to a species of porpoise distinguished from its living relatives by a lower jaw that extended well beyond the upper, according to researchers who report their findings in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on March 13. In other words, the long-lost porpoise had a rather distinct and unusual underbite.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 12-Mar-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Lusi over Vanuatu
Tropical Cyclone Lusi reached hurricane force as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead early on March 12.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Mar-2014
NASA sees ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian in Australia's Gulf of Carpentaria
Tropical Cyclone Gillian made landfall on the western Cape York Peninsula of Queensland, Australia, weakened and has now meandered back over water. On March 12, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the remnants in the southern Gulf of Carpentaria.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Mar-2014
NASA sees remnants of Tropical Cyclone Hadi in South Pacific
Tropical Cyclone Hadi is now a remnant low pressure area in the Southern Pacific Ocean. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm and captured a visible image of it on March 12.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Mar-2014
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Bucking conventional wisdom, researchers find black sea bass tougher than expected
In a new study, fisheries researchers found that black sea bass can usually survive the physical trauma that results from being hauled up from deep water then released at the surface. The finding is part of a larger study of the fish's mortality rate, which will inform stock assessments designed to help ensure that the black sea bass fishery is sustainable.
North Carolina Sea Grant

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 12-Mar-2014
Arctic 2050: Towards ecosystem-based management in a changing Arctic Ocean
Arctic 2050: Towards ecosystem-based management in a changing Arctic Ocean
About 150 scientists, policy makers and members of industry are gathering today at the 4th European Marine Board Forum in Brussels to discuss how best to manage the consequences of a changing Arctic Ocean for human health and well-being. The European Marine Board has convened this flagship event in collaboration with the European Polar Board, working in association with the European Science Foundation.

Contact: Veronica French
vfrench@esf.org
32-047-362-9574
European Science Foundation

Public Release: 12-Mar-2014
Astrobiology
Simulating how the Earth kick-started metabolism
Researchers have developed a new approach to simulating the energetic processes that may have led to the emergence of cell metabolism on Earth -- a crucial biological function for all living organisms.
Energy Leeds, Nuffield Foundation, NASA Astrobiology Institute

Contact: Sarah Reed
s.j.reed@leeds.ac.uk
44-113-343-4196
University of Leeds

Public Release: 11-Mar-2014
GSA Bulletin
Alps to Appalachia; submarine channels to Tibetan plateau; Death Valley to arctic Canada
On Feb. 27 and March 6, 2014, GSA Bulletin published 11 articles online ahead of print, including two that are open access: 'O2 constraints from Paleoproterozoic detrital pyrite and uraninite' and 'Sediment transfer and deposition in slope channels: Deciphering the record of enigmatic deep-sea processes from outcrop.' Other articles cover geological features in the Alps; the Appalachians; Death Valley; India; the Himalaya; the Columbia River Basalt Province; San Simeon, Calif.; Kaua'i, Hawai'i; and arctic Canada.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 11-Mar-2014
NASA eyes 2 tropical cyclones east of Australia
NASA's Aqua and TRMM satellites have been providing rainfall data, cloud heights and temperature and other valuable information to forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center as they track tropical cyclones Hadi and Lusi in the South Pacific.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Mar-2014
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Ocean food web is key in the global carbon cycle
Nothing dies of old age in the ocean. Everything gets eaten and all that remains of anything is waste. But that waste is pure gold to oceanographer David Siegel, director of the Earth Research Institute at UC Santa Barbara.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ia.ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 11-Mar-2014
NASA saw some power in Tropical Cyclone Gillian before making landfall
NASA's TRMM satellite saw some towering thunderstorms in Tropical Cyclone Gillian before it made landfall over the Western Cape York Peninsula of Queensland, Australia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Mar-2014
Aquaculture
Speed trap for fish catches domestic trout moving too slow
Washington State University researchers have documented dramatic differences in the swimming ability of domesticated trout and their wilder relatives. The study calls into question the ability of hatcheries to mitigate more than a century of disturbances to wild fish populations.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Kristy Bellinger
klbellin@gmail.com
402-960-1370
Washington State University

Public Release: 10-Mar-2014
Daniel Goodman Memorial Symposium
Ecologist to be memorialized with national symposium set for March 20-21
A symposium to honor the late Daniel Goodman, a Montana State University ecologist who died unexpectedly in 2012, will be held March 20-21 at the Museum of the Rockies.

Contact: Evelyn Boswell
evelynb@montana.edu
406-994-5135
Montana State University

Public Release: 10-Mar-2014
NASA satellites eye troublesome Tropical Cyclone Lusi
Tropical Cyclone Lusi has spawned warnings and watches in the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, and New Zealand as it moves through the South Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Mar-2014
Chemical spill activates Virginia Tech engineers in effort to determine long-term effects
Virginia Tech engineers snapped into action when more than 10,000 gallons of a chemical mixture leaked from a storage tank near Charleston, W.Va. Civil and environmental engineering graduate students jumped into the lab to develop analytical chemical techniques that isolated the six major components in the crude mixture and identified their chemical structures.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Pastor
jdpastor@vt.edu
540-231-5646
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 10-Mar-2014
Environmental Science and Technology
New research shows elevated mercury from in-ground wastewater disposal
As towns across Cape Cod struggle with problems stemming from septic systems, a recent study by a Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution scientist focuses on one specific toxic by-product: mercury. In a study of local groundwater, biogeochemist Carl Lamborg found microbial action on wastewater transforms it into more mobile, more toxic forms of the element.

Contact: Press Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 10-Mar-2014
Gillian and Hadi spell double tropical trouble around Queensland
On Friday, March 7, there were two tropical lows located east and west of Queensland, Australia. Those lows organized and intensified into Tropical Cyclone Gillian and Hadi and were caught together in one amazing image from NASA's Aqua satellite.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Mar-2014
Nature Geoscience
Sun's energy influences 1,000 years of natural climate variability in North Atlantic
Changes in the sun's energy output may have led to marked natural climate change in Europe over the last 1,000 years, according to researchers at Cardiff University. Scientists studying seafloor sediments found that changes in the sun's activity can have a considerable impact on the ocean-atmospheric dynamics in the North Atlantic, with potential effects on regional climate.
Natural Environment Research Council, National Science Foundation, Switzerland

Contact: Heath Jeffries
jeffrieshv1@cardiff.ac.uk
44-790-882-4029
Cardiff University

Public Release: 9-Mar-2014
Evolutionary Applications
Farm salmon pose clear reproductive threat to wild gene pools
New research from the University of East Anglia shows that while farmed salmon are genetically different to their wild counterparts, they are just as fertile. This is important information because millions of farmed salmon escape into the wild -- posing threats to wild gene pools. The research team say farmed salmon should be sterilised to protect wild gene pools.
Natural Environment Research Council, the Royal Society

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 7-Mar-2014
NASA satellites see double tropical trouble for Queensland, Australia
There are two developing areas of tropical low pressure that lie east and west of Queensland, Australia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Mar-2014
Global Change Biology
Urgent need to study the impacts of biomass burning and haze on marine ecosystems
The unprecedented high levels of transboundary haze in Southeast Asia last year prompted Dr. Zeehan Jaafar, a lecturer at the Department of Biological Sciences at the National University of Singapore Faculty of Science, and Dr. Tse-Lynn Loh, a postdoctoral research associate at the Daniel P. Haerther Center for Conservation and Research, John G. Shedd Aquarium, to critically evaluate the potential impacts of biomass burning and haze to marine ecosystems.

Contact: Kimberley Wang
kimberley.wang@nus.edu.sg
National University of Singapore

Public Release: 6-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Academy B
Study provides new information about the sea turtle 'lost years'
A new study satellite tracked 17 young loggerhead turtles in the Atlantic Ocean to better understand sea turtle nursery grounds and early habitat use during the 'lost years.' The study, conducted by a collaborative research team, including scientists from the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, was the first long-term satellite tracking study of young turtles at sea.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
786-256-4446
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Showing releases 751-775 out of 1295.

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