Press Releases

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Showing releases 751-775 out of 1500.

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Public Release: 16-Jan-2015
NASA sees a smaller eye in a stronger Tropical Cyclone Bansi
Tropical Cyclone Bansi's eye was wide open as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead on Jan. 15. As Bansi strengthened on Jan. 16, the eye decreased in size.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Jan-2015
Satellite sees heavy rain in Tropical Storm Mekkhala on its approach to Philippines
The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite analyzed Tropical Storm Mekkhala and identified areas of heavy rainfall as the storm drew closer to the Philippines.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
Heart arrhythmias detected in deep-diving marine mammals
A new study of dolphins and seals shows that despite their remarkable adaptations to aquatic life, exercising while holding their breath remains a physiological challenge for marine mammals. The study, published Jan. 15 in Nature Communications, found a surprisingly high frequency of heart arrhythmias in bottlenose dolphins and Weddell seals during the deepest dives.
US Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Genetics Society of America names John Postlethwait as recipient of George W. Beadle Award
The Genetics Society of America is pleased to announce that John H. Postlethwait, Ph.D., has been selected to receive the Society's George W. Beadle Award for outstanding contributions to the community of genetics researchers. The award, whose namesake was a Nobel laureate and geneticist, recognizes Dr. Postlethwait's seminal contributions to the zebrafish community. Dr. Postlethwait will receive the honor next week at GSA's 6th Strategic Conference of Zebrafish Investigators, Jan. 17-21, in Pacific Grove, Calif.

Contact: Raeka Aiyar
raiyar@genetics-gsa.org
202-412-1120
Genetics Society of America

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Science
Nearly half the systems crucial to stability of planet compromised
Almost half of the processes that are crucial to maintaining the stability of the planet have become dangerously compromised by human activity. That is the view of an international team of 18 researchers who provide new evidence of significant changes in four of the nine systems which regulate the resilience of the Earth.

Contact: Elena Bennett
Elena.Bennett@mcgill.ca
McGill University

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Bansi's eye almost quadruple in area
Tropical Cyclone Bansi reached Category 4 hurricane status earlier this week and developed an eye. As the storm weakened to a Category 2 storm on Jan. 14 the eye became cloud-filled. When NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over on Jan. 15, the storm re-strengthened back to a Category 4 and the eye was again visible and almost quadrupled in width.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
NASA's GPM satellite sees Tropical Storm mekkhala organizing
Tropical Depression Mekkhala strengthened and organized on Jan. 14 and overnight into Jan. 15 when it reached tropical storm status. As the storm was consolidating, NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite captured rainfall data of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Current Biology
For sea turtles, there's no place like magnetic home
Adult sea turtles find their way back to the beaches where they hatched by seeking out unique magnetic signatures along the coast, according to new evidence from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Contact: Thania Benios
thania_benios@unc.edu
919-962-8596
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Science
Wildlife loss in the global ocean
Over the past 500 years, approximately 500 land-based animal species have gone the way of the dodo, becoming extinct as a result of human activity. In the ocean, where scientists count only 15 or so such losses, the numbers currently aren't nearly as dire.

Contact: Julie Cohen
media@bren.ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Science
Tiny plant fossils a window into Earth's landscape millions of years ago
A team led by the University of Washington has discovered a way to determine the tree cover and density of trees, shrubs and bushes in locations over time based on clues in the cells of plant fossils preserved in rocks and soil. Quantifying vegetation structure throughout time could shed light on how the Earth's ecosystems changed over millions of years.
National Science Foundation, Geological Society of America, University of Washington, Burke Museum

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Current Biology
For sea turtles, there's no place like magnetic home
Adult sea turtles find their way back to the beaches where they hatched by seeking out unique magnetic signatures along the coast, according to new evidence reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Jan. 15.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
Frontiers in Microbiology
New species discovered beneath ocean crust
Researchers have found a new species of sulfate-breathing microbes locked away in an aquifer that flows underneath the ocean floor.
National Science Foundation, NASA Astrobiology Institute

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
Mark A. Cane selected as fellow of the Oceanography Society
The Oceanography Society would like to congratulate Professor Mark A. Cane on being selected as the newest Fellow of The Oceanography Society. The citation on Professor Cane's certificate recognizes him for contributions to the understanding and prediction of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation and the tropical oceans and their effects on climate and society. Professor Cane will be formally recognized during the Ocean Sciences Meeting, Feb. 21-26, 2016, in New Orleans, La.

Contact: Jennifer Ramarui
jenny@tos.org
301-251-7708
The Oceanography Society

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
Two satellites measured rainfall in Tropical Depression Mekkhala
NASA's TRMM and GPM satellites provided a look at Tropical Depression Mekkhala's rainfall data that showed the area of moderate rainfall had expanded as the storm strengthened on Jan. 13.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
NASA eyes Tropical Cyclone Bansi's eyewall replacement
Early on January 14 NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Bansi in the Southern Indian Ocean after it weakened from a Category 4 hurricane to a Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale. Satellite data suggests that Bansi may be undergoing eyewall replacement.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
Nature
Predicting coral reef futures under climate change
Researchers examining the impact of climate change on coral reefs have found a way to predict which reefs are likely to recover following bleaching episodes and which won't. Coral bleaching is the most immediate threat to reefs from climate change; it's caused when ocean temperatures become warmer than normal maximum summer temperatures, and can lead to widespread coral death.
Australian Research Council, Leverhulme Trust, Western Indian Ocean Marine Science Association

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
Nature
Correcting estimates of sea level rise
The acceleration in global sea level from the 20th century to the last two decades has been significantly larger than scientists previously thought, according to a new Harvard study.

Contact: Peter Reuell
preuell@fas.harvard.edu
617-496-8070
Harvard University

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Climate and friends influence young corals choice of real estate
Researchers in Australia have found that where baby corals choose to settle is influenced by ocean temperature and the presence of their symbiotic algae in the water.
Australian Research Council

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
First Northwestern Pacific tropical depression has moderate rainfall
NASA/JAXA's TRMM Satellite passed over newborn Tropical Depression 1W after it came together in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on Jan. 13 and saw bands of moderate to heavy rainfall wrapping around the northern quadrant of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
NASA sees major Tropical Cyclone Bansi north of Mauritius
NASA's Terra satellite passed Tropical Cyclone Bansi on Jan. 13 when it was about 170 nautical miles (195 miles/314 km) north of the Island of Mauritius and a major hurricane in the Southern Indian Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Science
Stanford-led study says China's aquaculture sector can tip the balance in world fish supplies
China's booming aquaculture industry relies increasingly on fishmeal made from wild-caught fish. This practice depletes wild fish stocks and strains fragile ocean ecosystems, but a new Stanford-led study offers a more sustainable path.

Contact: Laura Seaman
lseaman@stanford.edu
650-723-4920
Stanford University

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Surprise discovery off California exposes loggerhead 'lost years'
North Pacific loggerhead turtles hatch in Japan, with many later reappearing 6,000 miles away off southern Baja California to forage. The sighting late last year of numerous young turtles far off the Southern California Coast provides new insight into their their epic migration across the Pacific Ocean.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
PeerJ
Sizing up giants under the sea
Researchers sifted through multiple datasets and historical records to produce more accurate and comprehensive measurements for 25 species including the blue whale, giant squid, and great white shark. The team, comprised of a mix of scientists and students, also utilized social media to promote the research and reach potential collaborators from across the world.
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, National Science Foundation

Contact: Nicole Duncan
nicole.duncan@nescent.org
919-668-7993
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Greenland meltwater contributes to rising sea levels
As the largest single chunk of melting snow and ice in the world, the massive ice sheet that covers about 80 percent of Greenland is recognized as the biggest potential contributor to rising sea levels due to glacial meltwater.
NASA Cryospheric Sciences program

Contact: Jay Mwamba
jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-7580
City College of New York

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
NASA's Aqua satellite spots Tropical Cyclone Bansi intensifying quickly
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Bansi on January 12 as it was intensifying rapidly and saw a cloud-covered eye in the storm's center. Bansi has triggered warnings for the island of Mauritius and is expected to continue intensifying while passing it.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 751-775 out of 1500.

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