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Showing releases 751-775 out of 1348.

<< < 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 > >>

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
NASA's TRMM Satellite adds up Tropical Cyclone Ita's Australian soaking
After coming ashore on April 11, Tropical Cyclone Ita dropped heavy rainfall over the weekend that caused flooding in many areas of northeastern Australia's state of Queensland. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM gathered data on rainfall that was used to create a rainfall map at NASA.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Remnants of Tropical Depression Peipah still raining on Philippines
Several regions in the south and central Philippines have flood advisories as the remnants of now dissipated Tropical Depression Peipah continue to linger over the country. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite got a look at the remnant clouds from its orbit in space on April 15.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Folia Parasitologica
Bizarre parasite may provide cuttlefish clues
University of Adelaide research into parasites of cuttlefish, squid and octopus has uncovered details of the parasites' astonishing life cycles, and shown how they may help in investigating populations of their hosts.

Contact: Dr. Sarah Catalano
61-437-574-880
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Fisheries
Making dams safer for fish around the world
The pressure changes that many fish experience when they travel through the turbulent waters near a dam can seriously injure or kill the fish. Scientists from around the world, including areas like Southeast Asia and Brazil where huge dams are planned or under construction, are working together to protect fish from the phenomenon, known as barotrauma.
US Army Corps of Engineers, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
NASA sees remnants of Tropical Depression Peipah over Southern Philippines
Tropical Depression Peipah has been very stubborn and has moved over the southern and central Philippines bringing clouds, showers and gusty winds.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Ita over the Coral Sea
Tropical Cyclone Ita made landfall in northeastern Queensland, Australia, on April 11 as a powerful Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale, moved south and re-emerged in the Coral Sea on April 14 where NASA's TRMM and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellites captured imagery of the weakened storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Zootaxa
Researchers describe 4 new species of 'killer sponges' from the deep sea
Killer sponges sound like creatures from a B-grade horror movie. In fact, they thrive in the lightless depths of the deep sea. Scientists first discovered that some sponges are carnivorous about 20 years ago. Since then only seven carnivorous species have been found in all of the northeastern Pacific. A new paper authored by MBARI marine biologist Lonny Lundsten and two Canadian researchers describes four new species of carnivorous sponges living on the deep seafloor, from the Pacific Northwest to Baja California.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Kim Fulton-Bennett
kfb@mbari.org
831-775-1835
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Ice breaker: ONR researchers explore a changing Arctic
As sea ice continues to recede at a record pace in the Arctic, officials at the Office of Naval Research announced April 14 new efforts to determine the pace of change in what some are calling Earth's final frontier.

Contact: Peter Vietti
onrpublicaffairs@navy.mil
Office of Naval Research

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Puget Sound's rich waters supplied by deep, turbulent canyon
UW oceanographers made the first detailed measurements of fast-flowing water and intense mixing in a submarine canyon just off the Washington coast.
National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Nature Climate Change
Fish from acidic ocean waters less able to smell predators
Fish living on coral reefs where carbon dioxide seeps from the ocean floor were less able to detect predator odor than fish from normal coral reefs, according to a new study.
Australian Institute for Marine Science, National Geographic Society

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 11-Apr-2014
Coral Reefs
Devil in disguise: A small coral-eating worm may mean big trouble for reefs
New research from the University of Southampton has identified a coral-eating flatworm as a potential threat for coral reefs.

Contact: Jörg Wiedenmann
Joerg.wiedenmann@noc.soton.ac.uk
44-079-125-64356
University of Southampton

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
Science
Study resolves controversy over nitrogen's ocean 'exit strategies'
A decades-long debate over the dominant way that nitrogen is removed from the ocean may now be settled. Researchers found that both of the nitrogen 'exit strategies,' denitrification and anammox, are at work in the oceans.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Catherine Zandonella
czandone@princeton.edu
Princeton University

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
NASA sees hurricane-strength Tropical Cyclone Ita heading toward Queensland
Tropical Cyclone Ita has been strengthening over the last two days and by April 10, Ita had become a major hurricane in the Coral Sea when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
Zootaxa
Study shows 'dinosaurs of the turtle world' at risk in Southeast rivers
Conservation of coastal rivers of the northern Gulf of Mexico is vital to the survival of the alligator snapping turtle, including two recently discovered species, University of Florida scientists say.

Contact: Kenneth Krysko
kenneyk@flmnh.ufl.edu
352-273-1945
University of Florida

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
Journal of Paleontology
MU researchers find rare fossilized embryos more than 500 million years old
The Cambrian Period is a time when most phyla of marine invertebrates first appeared. Also dubbed the 'Cambrian explosion,' fossilized records from this time provide glimpses into evolutionary biology. Most fossils show the organisms' skeletal structure, which may give researchers accurate pictures of these prehistoric organisms. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found rare, fossilized embryos they believe were undiscovered previously. Their methods of study may help with future interpretation of evolutionary history.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
Landscape and Urban Planning
Health of ecosystems on US golf courses better than predicted
Currently, there are more than 18,300 golf courses in the US covering over 2.7 million acres. The ecological impacts of golf courses are not always straightforward with popular opinion suggesting that environmentally, golf courses have a negative impact on ecosystems. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have determined that golf courses can offer a viable habitat for stream salamanders, and enhanced management practices may be beneficial to ecosystems within golf courses.
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
eLife
Planaria deploy an ancient gene expression program in the course of organ regeneration
In the April 15, 2014, issue of the online journal eLife, Stowers Institute for Medical Research Investigator Alejandro Sanchez Alvarado and colleagues report the identification of genes that worms use to rebuild an amputated pharynx.
Stowers Institute for Medical Research, National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Kim Bland, Ph.D.
ksb@stowers.org
816-926-4015
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
ZooKeys
Name of new weakly electric fish species reflects hope for peace in Central Africa
Two new species of weakly electric fishes from the Congo River basin are described in the open-access journal ZooKeys. One of them, known from only a single specimen, is named 'Petrocephalus boboto.' 'Boboto' is the word for peace in the Lingala language, the lingua franca of the Congo River, reflecting the authors' hope for peace in troubled Central Africa.

Contact: John P. Sullivan
jpsullivan@cornell.edu
607-342-2234
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
Weather
New research puts conventional theories on Titanic disaster on ice
Academics at the University of Sheffield have dispelled a long-held theory that the Titanic was unlucky for sailing in a year with an exceptional number of icebergs and say the risk of icebergs is actually higher now.
National Environment Research Council

Contact: Hannah Postles
h.postles@sheffield.ac.uk
01-142-221-046
University of Sheffield

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Reef fish arrived in 2 waves
The world's reefs are hotbeds of biological diversity, including over 4,500 species of fish. A new study shows that the ancestors of these fish colonized reefs in two distinct waves, before and after the mass extinction event about 66 million years ago that wiped out the dinosaurs.
National Science Foundation, Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Coral reefs of the Mozambique Channel a leading candidate for saving marine diversity
Marine scientists working in the Western Indian Ocean have found that the corals of the Mozambique Channel should be a priority for protection as climate change continues to threaten these rainforests of the sea.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Ita intensifying
Tropical Cyclone Ita has been intensifying as it tracks from Papua New Guinea toward Queensland, Australia, and NASA's TRMM satellite noticed the development of an eye feature.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
Biology Letters
Sunken logs create new worlds for seafloor animals
When it comes to food, most of the deep sea is a desert. In this food-poor environment, even bits of dead wood, waterlogged enough to sink, can support thriving communities of specialized animals. A new paper by biologists at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute shows that wood-boring clams serve as 'ecosystem engineers,' making the organic matter in the wood available to other animals that colonize wood falls in the deep waters of Monterey Canyon.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Kim Fulton-Bennett
kfb@mbari.org
831-775-1835
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
NASA satellite sees Tropical Depression Peipah crawling toward Philippines
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the remnants of Tropical Depression Peipah on April 9 as the storm slowly approached the Philippines from the east. According to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, Peipah is now not expected to make landfall in eastern Visayas until April 12.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study tests theory that life originated at deep sea vents
One of the greatest mysteries facing humans is how life originated on Earth. Scientists have determined approximately when life began, roughly 3.8 billion years ago, but there is still intense debate about exactly how life began. One possibility -- that simple metabolic reactions emerged near ancient seafloor hot springs, enabling the leap from a non-living to a living world -- has grown in popularity in the last two decades.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Showing releases 751-775 out of 1348.

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