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Showing releases 776-800 out of 1320.

<< < 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 > >>

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Public gets first view of a live vampire squid and other deep-sea cephalopods
From the vampire squid to the flapjack octopus, deep-sea cephalopods are both fascinating and mysterious. Since April, members of the public have been able to see these animals for the first time, as part of the ongoing 'Tentacles' special exhibition at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. A collaborative effort with the aquarium's partner institution, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, this exhibit is providing new scientific insights into the lives of these mysterious animals.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Kim Fulton-Bennett
kfb@mbari.org
831-775-1835
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Coral, human cells linked in death
Humans and corals are about as different from one another as living creatures get, but a new finding reveals that in one important way, they are more similar than anyone ever realized. A biologist at San Diego State University has discovered they share the same biomechanical pathway responsible for triggering cellular self-destruction. The finding has implications for biologists, conservationists and medical researchers.

Contact: Beth Chee
bchee@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-4563
San Diego State University

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
NOAA scientists find mosquito control pesticide low risk to juvenile oysters, hard clams
Four of the most common mosquito pesticides used along the east and Gulf coasts show little risk to juvenile hard clams and oysters, according to a NOAA study. However, the study, published in the on-line journal Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, also determined that lower oxygen levels in the water, known as hypoxia, and increased acidification actually increased how toxic some of the pesticides were. Such climate variables should be considered when using these pesticides in the coastal zone, the study concluded.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
301-713-3066
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Satellite sees System 90L dissipating over Mexico
System 90L was an area of tropical low pressure that never managed to form into a tropical depression during its lifetime, but did drop heavy rainfall on eastern and southeastern Mexico before dissipating.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite analyzes Mexico's soaking tropical rains
The movement of tropical storm Boris into southern Mexico and a nearly stationary low pressure system in the southern Gulf of Mexico caused heavy rainfall in that area. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM acts like a 'rain gauge in space' and calculated that one area received almost 2 feet of rainfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
NHAES research: New England lakes recovering rapidly from acid rain
For more than 40 years, policy makers have been working to reduce acid rain, a serious environmental problem that can devastate lakes, streams, and forests and the plants and animals that live in these ecosystems. Now new research funded by the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture indicates that lakes in New England and the Adirondack Mountains are recovering rapidly from the effects of acid rain.
New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station

Contact: William McDowell
bill.mcdowell@unh.edu
603-862-2249
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 8-Jun-2014
Nature Geoscience
Warming climates intensify greenhouse gas given out by oceans
Rising global temperatures could increase the amount of carbon dioxide naturally released by the world's oceans, fueling further climate change, a study suggests.
Scottish Alliance for Geoscience Environment Society, Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Satellite sees System 90L dissipating over Mexico
NASA and NOAA satellites are gathering visible, infrared, microwave and radar data on a persistent tropical low pressure area in the southwestern Bay of Campeche. System 90L now has a 50 percent chance for development, according to the National Hurricane Center and continues to drop large amounts of rainfall over southeastern Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Asymmetric continental margins and the slow birth of an ocean
When South America split from Africa 150 to 120 million years ago, the South Atlantic formed and separated Brazil from Angola. The continental margins formed through this separation are surprisingly different.

Contact: F.Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
Science
LSU biologist John Caprio, Japanese colleagues identify unique way catfish locate prey
John Caprio, George C. Kent Professor of Biological Sciences at LSU, and colleagues from Kagoshima University in Japan have identified that these fish are equipped with sensors that can locate prey by detecting slight changes in the water's pH level.

Contact: Aaron Looney
alooney@lsu.edu
225-578-3871
Louisiana State University

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How do phytoplankton survive a scarcity of a critical nutrient?
How do phytoplankton survive when the critical element phosphorus is difficult to find? Researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences conducted the most comprehensive survey of the content and distribution of a form of phosphorus called polyphosphate, or poly-P in the western North Atlantic. What they found was surprising.
National Science Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
NASA sees remnants of Tropical Storm Boris merging with Gulf low
The remnants of former Tropical Storm Boris moved over southern Mexico and NASA and NOAA satellite data showed that they were merging with a low pressure area in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Report supports shutdown of all high seas fisheries
Fish and aquatic life living in the high seas are more valuable as a carbon sink than as food and should be better protected, according to research from the University of British Columbia.
Global Ocean Commission

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-828-3867
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Sea star disease epidemic surges in Oregon, local extinctions expected
Just in the past two weeks, the incidence of sea star wasting syndrome has exploded along the Oregon Coast and created an epidemic of historic magnitude, one that threatens to decimate Oregon's entire population of purple ochre sea stars. Prior to this, Oregon had been the only part of the West Coast that had been largely spared this devastating disease.
Oregon Sea Grant

Contact: Kristen Milligan
milligak@science.oregonstate.edu
541-737-8862
Oregon State University

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
A professor's plan to protect the environment wins $125 million
An NJIT professor is the leader of a design team that won $125 million from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development to protect Nassau County's South Shore from storm surges and rising sea levels.
US Department of Housing and Urban Development

Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
PALAIOS
Scientist uses fossils to prove historic Ohio millstones have French origins
A geologist studied fossils to confirm that stones used in 19th century Ohio grain mills originated from France. Fossils embedded in these millstones were analyzed to determine that stones known as French buhr were imported from regions near Paris, France, to Ohio in the United States. Dr. Joseph Hannibal, curator of invertebrate paleontology at The Cleveland Museum of Natural History, was lead author on research published in the Society for Sedimentary Geology journal PALAIOS.

Contact: Glenda Bogar
gbogar@cmnh.org
216-231-2071
Cleveland Museum of Natural History

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
NASA sees Depression Boris mOVING over Mexico with heavy rainfall
Tropical Depression 2E strengthened into Tropical Storm Boris briefly on June 3 before making landfall in southern Mexico and weakening into a depression.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How red tide knocks out its competition
New research reveals how the algae behind red tide thoroughly disables -- but doesn't kill -- other species of algae. The study shows how chemical signaling between algae can trigger big changes in the marine ecosystem.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Journal of Zoology
Crooning in the concrete jungle: Taiwan's frogs use drains to amplify mating calls
As our cities continue to grow many animal species have to choose to abandon their changing habitats or adapt to their new setting. In Taiwan the tiny mientien tree frog (Kurixalus diootocus) is making the most of its new situation by using city storm drains to amplify mating calls.

Contact: Ben Norman
Sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
44-012-437-70375
Wiley

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Feeding increases coral transplant survival
Feeding juvenile corals prior to transplantation into a new reef may increase their survival.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Curtin researchers in search for acoustic evidence of MH370
Curtin University researchers have been examining a low-frequency underwater sound signal that could have resulted from Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370. The signal, which was picked up by underwater sound recorders off Rottnest Island just after 1:30 am UTC on the 8th March, could have resulted from Flight MH370 crashing into the Indian Ocean but could also have originated from a natural event, such as a small earth tremor.

Contact: Megan Meates
megan.meates@curtin.edu.au
61-892-664-241
Curtin University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Climate engineering can't erase climate change
Tinkering with climate change through climate engineering isn't going to help us get around what we have to do says a new report authored by researchers at six universities, including Simon Fraser University. After evaluating a range of possible climate-altering approaches to dissipating greenhouse gases and reducing warming, the interdisciplinary team concluded there's no way around it. We have to reduce the amount of carbon being released into the atmosphere.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Limnology & Oceanography
UGA ecologists provide close-up of coral bleaching event
New research by University of Georgia ecologists sheds light on exactly what happens to coral during periods of excessively high water temperatures. Their study, published in the journal Limnology and Oceanography, documents a coral bleaching event in the Caribbean in minute detail and sheds light on how it changed a coral's community of algae -- a change that could have long-term consequences for coral health, as bleaching is predicted to occur more frequently in the future.
National Science Foundation, World Bank

Contact: Dustin Kemp
dkemp1@uga.edu
University of Georgia

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
NASA infrared imagery sees heavy rain potential in Tropical Depression 2E
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Depression 2E that revealed high, very cold cloud top temperatures.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Deep sea fish remove 1 million tonnes of CO2 every year from UK and Irish waters
Deep sea fishes remove and store more than one million tonnes of CO2 from UK and Irish surface waters every year, according to a new study led by the University of Southampton.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Showing releases 776-800 out of 1320.

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