Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 801-825 out of 1749.

<< < 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 > >>

Public Release: 28-Oct-2015
Freshwater Science
Queen's researchers link crayfish decline in Algonquin Park lakes to lack of calcium
Researchers from Queen's University have linked the localized near-extinction of a native crayfish species in four lakes in Algonquin Park to declining calcium levels.

Contact: Chris Armes
chris.armes@queensu.ca
613-533-6000 x77513
Queen's University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
Nordic seas cooled 500,000 years before global oceans
The cooling of the Nordic seas towards modern temperatures started in the early Pliocene, half a million years before the global oceans cooled. A new study of fossil marine plankton published in Nature Communications today demonstrates this.

Contact: Stijn De Schepper
Stijn.Deschepper@uni.no
47-555-83826
The University of Bergen

Public Release: 28-Oct-2015
Science
Scientists call for ambitious program to unlock the power of Earth's microbial communities
A consortium of 48 scientists from 50 institutions in the United States has called for an ambitious research effort to understand and harness microbiomes -- the communities of microorganisms that inhabit ecosystems as varied as the human gut and the ocean, to improve human health, agriculture, bioenergy, and the environment. Their proposal, published in the Oct. 30 issue of the journal Science, calls for a major research project to develop new research tools and collaborations that will unlock the secrets of Earth's microbial communities.

Contact: Jim Cohen
cohen@kavlifoundation.org
805-278-7495
The Kavli Foundation

Public Release: 28-Oct-2015
Current Biology
Electric eel: Most remarkable predator in animal kingdom
Recent research on the electric eel by Vanderbilt University biologist Ken Catania has revealed that it is not the primitive creature it has been portrayed. Instead, it has a sophisticated control of the electrical fields it generates that makes it one of the most remarkable predators in the animal kingdom.
National Science Foundation, John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, National Academy of Sciences/Pradel Award

Contact: David F Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2015
Science
Scientists call for unified initiative to advance microbiome research
A group of leading scientists representing a wide range of disciplines has formed a unified initiative to support basic research, technological development and commercial applications to better understand and harness the capabilities of Earth's vast systems of microorganisms.

Contact: Matt Wood
matthew.wood@uchospitals.edu
773-702-5894
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 28-Oct-2015
Current Biology
Electric eels curl up to deliver even more powerful shocks
Electric eels temporarily paralyze their prey by shocking them with electricity using a series of brief, high-voltage pulses, much as a Taser would do. Now, a researcher has discovered that the eels can double the power of their electrical discharge by curling up their bodies. In bringing their tail up and around, the eels sandwich prey between the two poles of their electric organ, which runs most of the length of their long, flexible bodies.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 27-Oct-2015
NASA looks at winds, cloud extent of Patricia's remnant hybrid system
NASA's RapidScat analyzed the winds in the Gulf of Mexico that were associated with the hybrid storm the included the remnants of former Eastern Pacific Ocean Hurricane Patricia. NOAA's GOES-East satellite showed the extent of the hybrid system's cloud cover over the southeastern US on Oct. 27.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Oct-2015
Astronomical Journal
Probing the mysteries of Europa, Jupiter's cracked and crinkled moon
New research, using spectrographic data from the W. M. Keck telescope's, shows what are likely deposits from Europa's sub-surface ocean on it's so-called 'chaos terrain.'

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 27-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Marine reserves will need stepping stones to help fishes disperse between them
A massive field effort on the Belizean Barrier Reef has revealed for the first time that the offspring of at least one coral reef fish, a neon goby, do not disperse far from their parents. The results indicate that if marine protected areas aim to conserve such fishes, and biodiversity more broadly, then they must be spaced closely enough to allow larvae to disperse successfully between them.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Buston
buston@bu.edu
857-253-8276
Boston University

Public Release: 27-Oct-2015
Weakening post-Tropical Storm Olaf examined by NASA's GPM satellite
After maintaining hurricane intensity for over a week former category four hurricane Olaf is now a post-tropical storm and moved into hurricane history. The GPM core observatory satellite flew above Olaf and analyzed the rainfall within the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
100-year-old mystery solved: Adult eel observed for the first time in the Sargasso Sea
After more than a century of speculation, researchers have finally proved that American eels really do migrate to the Sargasso Sea to reproduce. A team of Canadian scientists reports having established the migratory route of this species by tracking 28 eels fitted with satellite transmitters. One of these fish reached the northern boundary of the Sargasso Sea, the presumed reproduction site for the species, after a 2,400 km journey.

Contact: Jean-François Huppé
jean-francois.huppe@dc.ulaval.ca
418-656-7785
Université Laval

Public Release: 27-Oct-2015
Journal of Applied Ecology
Seals not competing with Irish fishing stocks, according to new research
Seals are not threatening commercial fishing stocks in Irish waters, with the possible exception of wild Atlantic salmon, according to new research led by Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK. The findings show that seals are having no significant impact on populations of the most popular species of fish caught for commercial purposes along the south and west coasts of Ireland, from counties Galway to Waterford.

Contact: Una Bradley
u.bradley@qub.ac.uk
0044-028-909-75384
Queen's University Belfast

Public Release: 27-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Distressed damsels cry for help
In a world first study researchers from Uppsala University, Sweden and James Cook University in Australia and have found that prey fish captured by predators release chemical cues that acts as a 'distress call', dramatically boosting their chances for survival. The findings are published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Contact: Dr. Oona Lönnstedt
oona.lonnstedt@ebc.uu.se
46-184-716-404
Uppsala University

Public Release: 27-Oct-2015
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
The great northern cod comeback
Once an icon of overfishing, mismanagement, and stock decline, the northern Atlantic cod is showing signs of recovery according to new research published today in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences.

Contact: Rebecca Ross
rebecca.ross@cdnsciencepub.com
613-791-8334
Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)

Public Release: 27-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Distressed damsels cry for help
Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have found that fish release a chemical 'distress call' when caught by predators, dramatically boosting their chances of survival.
Australian Research Council's Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
New £2.9 million Stirling-led study on freshwater ecosystem dynamics
Major £2.9 million funding for a University of Stirling-led study into the impact of people and the natural environment on freshwater biodiversity and ecosystem resilience, is announced today by the Natural Environment Research Council.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Esther Hutcheson
e.l.hutcheson@stir.ac.uk
44-786-466-640
University of Stirling

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
NASA tracks Hurricane Patricia's remnants through Gulf states
As the remnants of Hurricane Patricia continue to generate flooding rainfall as it moved through the Gulf Coast states on Oct. 26, NASA and NOAA satellites provided data on the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Olaf moving back to 'birthplace'
Tropical Storm Olaf is leaving the Central Pacific Ocean and is headed 'home' -- that is, back to the Eastern Pacific Ocean where it developed 12 days ago. NASA's RapidScat satellite observed the winds in Olaf as it was headed toward the 140 degree latitude line that separates the two ocean basins.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Grant enables pioneering research of vast river systems in Great Plains and Asia
A five-year, $4.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation will empower researchers from multiple institutions in the US and Mongolia to develop wide-ranging scientific knowledge of river systems spanning two continents. Half the funds will support work at the University of Kansas, the lead institution on the project.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
brendan@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
NASA sees remnants of Tropical Cyclone Champi warming and raining on Alaska
On Oct. 26, satellite imagery showed the extra-tropical cyclone affecting Alaska, where it was bringing rain, gusty winds and warmer than normal temperatures.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Harmful Algae
Harmful algal blooms and climate change: Preparing to forecast the future
Marine scientists attending an international workshop warned that the future may bring more harmful algal blooms (HABs) that threaten wildlife and the economy, and called for changes in research priorities to better forecast these long-term trends. The findings of the international workshop on HABs and climate change were published this week in the journal Harmful Algae.
North Pacific Marine Science Organization, US National Office for Marine Biotoxins and Harmful Algal Blooms, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, SCOR-IOC Global Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Scientific Reports
Response to environmental change depends on variation in corals and algae partnerships
Some corals are more protective than others of their partner algae in harsh environmental conditions, new research reveals. This individual variation among corals could reflect a greater capacity than currently is recognized to adapt to changing ocean conditions brought about by climate change.
National Science Foundation, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Marine Mammal Science
What was killing the young right whales? New research finds a suspect
In a new study published in Marine Mammal Science, scientists found a close relationship between a sudden surge in whale deaths at Peninsula Valdes, Argentina, and the toxic algae Pseudo-nitzschia. The finding demonstrates that some of the largest creatures in the ocean can be vulnerable to algal blooms projected to increase with climate change.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Lost giant poop disrupts whole planet
In the past, whales, giant land mammals, and other animals played a vital role in keeping the planet fertile by transporting nutrients via their feces. However, massive declines and extinctions of many of these animals has deeply damaged this planetary nutrient recycling system, threatening fisheries and ecosystems on land, a team of scientists reports.

Contact: Joshua Brown
joshua.e.brown@uvm.edu
802-656-3039
University of Vermont

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Oryx
Only 4 percent of the ocean is protected: UBC research
Despite global efforts to increase the area of the ocean that is protected, only four per cent of it lies within marine protected areas (MPAs), according to a University of British Columbia study.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-828-3867
University of British Columbia

Showing releases 801-825 out of 1749.

<< < 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 > >>