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Showing releases 801-825 out of 1325.

<< < 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 > >>

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Curtin researchers in search for acoustic evidence of MH370
Curtin University researchers have been examining a low-frequency underwater sound signal that could have resulted from Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370. The signal, which was picked up by underwater sound recorders off Rottnest Island just after 1:30 am UTC on the 8th March, could have resulted from Flight MH370 crashing into the Indian Ocean but could also have originated from a natural event, such as a small earth tremor.

Contact: Megan Meates
megan.meates@curtin.edu.au
61-892-664-241
Curtin University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Climate engineering can't erase climate change
Tinkering with climate change through climate engineering isn't going to help us get around what we have to do says a new report authored by researchers at six universities, including Simon Fraser University. After evaluating a range of possible climate-altering approaches to dissipating greenhouse gases and reducing warming, the interdisciplinary team concluded there's no way around it. We have to reduce the amount of carbon being released into the atmosphere.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Limnology & Oceanography
UGA ecologists provide close-up of coral bleaching event
New research by University of Georgia ecologists sheds light on exactly what happens to coral during periods of excessively high water temperatures. Their study, published in the journal Limnology and Oceanography, documents a coral bleaching event in the Caribbean in minute detail and sheds light on how it changed a coral's community of algae -- a change that could have long-term consequences for coral health, as bleaching is predicted to occur more frequently in the future.
National Science Foundation, World Bank

Contact: Dustin Kemp
dkemp1@uga.edu
University of Georgia

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
NASA infrared imagery sees heavy rain potential in Tropical Depression 2E
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Depression 2E that revealed high, very cold cloud top temperatures.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Deep sea fish remove 1 million tonnes of CO2 every year from UK and Irish waters
Deep sea fishes remove and store more than one million tonnes of CO2 from UK and Irish surface waters every year, according to a new study led by the University of Southampton.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Biology Letters
Iron, steel in hatcheries may distort magnetic 'map sense' of steelhead
Exposure to iron pipes and steel rebar, such as the materials found in most hatcheries, affects the navigation ability of young steelhead trout by altering the important magnetic 'map sense' they need for migration.
Oregon Sea Grant

Contact: Nathan Putman
Nathan.putman@gmail.com
205-218-5276
Oregon State University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
PeerJ
Notifying speeding mariners lowers ship speeds in areas with North Atlantic right whales
There are only around 500 North Atlantic right whales alive today. In an effort to further protect these critically endangered animals, a recent NOAA regulation required large vessels to reduce speed in areas seasonally occupied by the whales. The policy of notifying -- but not necessarily citing -- speeding vessels in protected areas was effective in lowering their speeds, helping to protect these magnificent creatures from ship collisions, while keeping punitive fines to mariners to a minimum.

Contact: Jerry Slaff
jerry.slaff@noaa.gov
202-236-6662
PeerJ

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
GSA Bulletin
New Ichthyosaur graveyard found
In a new study published in the Geological Society of America Bulletin, geoscientists Wolfgang Stinnesbeck of the University of Heidelberg and colleagues document the discovery of forty-six ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaurs (marine reptiles). These specimens were discovered in the vicinity of the Tyndall Glacier in the Torres del Paine National Park of southern Chile. Among them are numerous articulated and virtually complete skeletons of adults, pregnant females, and juveniles.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Paleoceanography
Modern ocean acidification is outpacing ancient upheaval, study suggests
In a new study published in the latest issue of Paleoceanography, scientists estimate that surface ocean acidity increased by about 100 percent during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum in a few thousand years or more, and stayed that way for the next 70,000 years.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kim Martineau
kmartine@ldeo.columbia.edu
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Solving the puzzle of ice age climates
Researchers look to the Southern Ocean for an explanation of the 'Last Glacial Maximum.'
National Science Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite sees Eastern Pacific tropical cyclone forming
There's a new tropical low pressure area brewing in the Eastern Pacific and NASA's TRMM satellite flew overhead and got a read on its rainfall rates and cloud heights.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Global Change Biology
Britain's urban rivers cleanest in 20 years
Scientists from Cardiff University have found that Britain's urban rivers are the cleanest they've been in over two decades.

Contact: Steve Ormerod
ormerod@cardiff.ac.uk
029-208-75871
Cardiff University

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
BioScience
Rolling old river is indeed changing
A team of ecologists has documented and summarized far-reaching changes in the Hudson since 1987, most as a result of human activity. Invasive species, pollution reductions, increased flow, and higher temperatures are among the most pronounced causes, but other changes are mysterious. Rivers must be understood over a decadal timescale, the researchers argue.
Hudson River Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jennifer Williams
jwilliams@aibs.org
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Current Biology
Gannet sat nav reveals impact of fishing vessels
Fishing vessels have a far bigger ecological footprint than previously thought, according to research which tracked the movement and behavior of seabirds using GPS devices.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
44-782-730-9332
University of Exeter

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Current Biology
Fishing boats are powerful seabird magnets
It's no surprise that seabirds are attracted to fishing boats, and especially to the abundance of discards that find their way back into the ocean. But researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on June 2 now find that those boats influence bird behavior over much longer distances than scientists had expected.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 30-May-2014
New satellite animation shows the end of Hurricane Amanda
A new animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows the weakening and dissipation of the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Hurricane Amanda.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-May-2014
Tropical Storm Amanda gets bisected and animated by NASA's CloudSat
Tropical Storm Amanda continues to weaken in the eastern Pacific from dry air and wind shear.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-May-2014
Historical Biology
Huge tooth fossil shows marine predator had plenty to chew on
A fossilized tooth belonging to a fearsome marine predator has been recorded as the largest of its kind found in the UK, following its recent discovery.

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 29-May-2014
Science
When eradicating invasive species threatens endangered species recovery
Efforts to eradicate invasive species increasingly occur side by side with programs focused on recovery of endangered ones. But what should resource managers do when the eradication of an invasive species threatens an endangered species? In a new study, UC Davis scientists examine that conundrum now taking place in the San Francisco Bay.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Alan Hastings
amhastings@ucdavis.edu
530-752-8116
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Lithosphere
What shaped it, how old is it, and are they connected?
Two articles recently published online for the journal LITHOSPHERE investigate the influence of climate, erosion, and tectonics on the lay of the land in the Bolivian Andes. Nicole Gasparini of Tulane University and Kelin Whipple of Arizona State University tackle rainfall patterns, rock uplift, and the distribution of crustal deformation caused by tectonics. In both studies, they conclude that tectonics win out over rainfall when it comes to shaping Earth' surface in the area.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Wild coho may seek genetic diversity in mate choice
A new study suggests that wild coho salmon that choose mates with disease-resistant genes different from their own are more likely to produce greater numbers of adult offspring returning to the river some three years later.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board

Contact: Michael Banks
Michael.banks@oregonstate.edu
541-867-0420
Oregon State University

Public Release: 28-May-2014
NASA's TRMM and Aqua satellites peer into Tropical Storm Amanda
Hurricane Amanda has weakened to a tropical storm, but not before NASA's TRMM satellite took a look under its clouds at the rate of heavy rainfall it was generating.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-May-2014
NASA sees northern Indian Ocean System 92B's end
The tropical low pressure area known as System 92B finally dissipated on the east central coast of India on May 27 after six days of struggling to develop.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Natural History
NUS researchers discover unusual parenting behavior by a Southeast Asian treefrog
Researchers from the Department of Biological Sciences at the National University of Singapore Faculty of Science have discovered that a Southeast Asian species of treefrog practices parental care to increase the likelihood of survival of its offspring. Chiromantis hansenae, is currently the only species in the treefrog family in Southeast Asia that is known to exhibit such behavior.

Contact: Kimberley Wang
kimberley.wang@nus.edu.sg
National University of Singapore

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Biology Letters
Fish more inclined to crash than bees
Swimming fish do not appear to use their collision warning system in the same way as flying insects, according to new research from Lund University in Sweden that has compared how zebra fish and bumblebees avoid collisions. The fish surprised the researchers.

Contact: Christine Scholtyssek
christine.scholtyssek@biol.lu.se
46-462-223-193
Lund University

Showing releases 801-825 out of 1325.

<< < 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 > >>


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