EurekAlert! - Marine Science Portal
  EurekAlert! Login | Main Page | Press Releases | Press Release Archive | Multimedia Gallery | Resources | Calendar | EurekAlert!
{TOPLEFTPHOTOALTTEXT}

Main Page
Press Releases
Multimedia Gallery
Resources
Calendar
EurekAlert! Home
EurekAlert! Login

 Search News Archive:
   
 Advanced Search
Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 826-850 out of 1262.

<< < 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 > >>

Public Release: 28-Aug-2013
GSA Today science: Biofilms, MISS, and stromatolites
In the Sept. issue of GSA Today, Nora Noffke of Old Dominion University and Stan Awramik of the University of California, Santa Barbara, describe the interaction of carpet-like communities of benthic microorganisms (biofilms) with sediment dynamics at the sediment-water interface to form distinctive sedimentary structures called microbialites.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 28-Aug-2013
NASA tallies Tropical Storm Fernand's massive rainfall from space
When Tropical Storm Fernand formed near Mexico's Gulf coast earlier this week, TRMM gathered data on the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2013
Remembering a famous debate 400 years ago and water's still-unsolved mysteries
For online and print audiences deep into lazy late-summer-day reading, yearning for diversions from everyday cares, how about a glimpse 400 years back in time at a famous clash between Galileo and an arch-enemy over why ice floats on water? That debate is the topic of a story in the current edition of Chemical & Engineering News. C&EN is the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 28-Aug-2013
ZooKeys
AC or DC? 2 newly described electric fish from the Amazon are wired differently
Two new species of weakly electric fishes from the Amazon with some unusual characteristics are described in the open-access journal ZooKeys. Often collected together and so similar in many respects that they have been mistaken for a single species, the two species differ most notably with respect to their electric organs and electric signals.

Contact: John P. Sullivan
jpsullivan@cornell.edu
607-342-2234
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 28-Aug-2013
PLOS ONE
Fish larvae sniff reef odor to find their way home
Reef fish larvae are only millimeters-long when they hatch, but can smell the presence of coral reefs from several kilometers offshore, and use this odor to navigate home. The results are reported August 28 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Claire Paris from the University of Miami and colleagues from other institutions.

Contact: Jyoti Madhusoodanan
jmadhusoodanan@plos.org
415-568-4545
PLOS

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers
Fukushima radioactive plume to reach US in 3 years
Researchers find it will take three years from the date of leakage for the the plume of radioactive water to reach the US coastline.

Contact: Alvin Stone
alvin.stone@unsw.edu.au
61-293-858-953
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Deep-Sea Research II: Topical Studies in Oceanography
Submarine canyons a source of marine invertebrate diversity, abundance
Submarine canyons play an important role in maintaining high levels of biodiversity of small invertebrates in the seafloor sediments of the main and northwestern Hawaiian Islands, according to research from the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. What's more, scientists have used this data to draw new connections between the levels of faunal diversity and the heterogeneity of submarine canyon landscapes at various spatial scales.

Contact: Talia S. Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
NJIT professor appointed to National Research Council
NJIT Professor Michel Boufadel has been appointed a member of a National Research Council (of the National Academies) committee on the Effective Daily Recovery Capacity. The appointment is through Nov. 14, 2013. The task includes providing guidelines on the best techniques for skimming oil off the ocean surface following spills. Such guidelines are important for preparedness of regions regarding oil spills.

Contact: Sheryl Weinstein
973-596-3436
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Fernand's remnants still drenching eastern Mexico
Tropical moisture continued to stream over eastern Mexico on Aug. 27, from the remnants of former Tropical Storm Fernand.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kong-Rey battling wind shear
NASA satellite imagery on Aug. 27 showed that wind shear was having an effect on the thunderstorms in Tropical Storm Kong-Rey's northern quadrant.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Urban Ecosystems
Snapping turtles finding refuge in urban areas while habitats are being polluted
Snapping turtles are surviving in urban areas as their natural habitats are being polluted or developed for construction projects. One solution is for people to stop using so many chemicals that are eventually dumped into the waterways, a University of Missouri scientist said.

Contact: Christian Basi
basic@missouri.edu
573-882-4430
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Journal of Sea Research
An alga stressed by the light
During the summers of 2010 and 2011, the UPV/EHU's Bentos Marino group analyzed samples of algae populations from five zones and measured the amount of light present in and the temperature of each zone over the summer. The research group observed that the algae that displayed the most signs of stress were from the zones exposed to the most solar radiation. The results of the research have been published in the Journal of Sea Research.

Contact: Aitziber Lasa
a.lasa@elhuyar.com
34-943-363-040
Elhuyar Fundazioa

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Environmental Science & Technology
Eastern US water supplies threatened by a legacy of acid rain
Noted ecologist Gene Likens, founding director of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and a co-discoverer of acid rain, was among the study's authors. The extent of alkalinity change in streams and rivers exceeded his expectations: "This is another example of the widespread impact humans are having on natural systems. Policymakers and the public think that the acid rain problem has gone away, but it has not."
NASA, National Science Foundation, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Contact: Lori Quillen
quillenl@caryinstitute.org
845-677-7600 x121
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
NASA catches Tropical Storm Kong-Rey form in northwestern Pacific
The northwestern Pacific has generated its fourteenth tropical cyclone and NASA's Aqua satellite flew over the eastern side of the storm early on Aug. 26.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
NASA sees Depression Pewa pass in Pacific
Tropical Depression Pewa dissipated in the northwestern Pacific Ocean early on Aug. 26, 2013.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
NASA sees quick forming Tropical Storm Fernand soaking Mexico
During the week of Aug. 18, the low pressure area designated as System 95E was lingering in the western Caribbean Sea and moved into the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, where it exploded into Tropical Storm Fernand late on Aug. 25.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Environmental Science & Technology
Changing river chemistry affects Eastern US water supplies
Human activity is changing the basic chemistry of large rivers in the Eastern US, with potentially major consequences for urban water supplies and aquatic ecosystems, a University of Maryland-led study has found. "It's like rivers on Rolaids," said lead investigator Sujay Kaushal.
NOAA, National Science Foundation/LTER Program, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Contact: Heather Dewar
hdewar@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sea otters promote recovery of seagrass beds
Scientists studying the decline and recovery of seagrass beds in one of California's largest estuaries have found that recolonization of the estuary by sea otters was a crucial factor in the seagrass comeback.
National Estuarine Research Reserve System, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, USGS Western Ecological Research Center

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 25-Aug-2013
Nature Climate Change
Scientists analyze the extent of ocean acidification
Ocean acidification (OA) could change the ecosystems of our seas even by the end of this century. Biologists at the Alfred Wegener Institute have assessed the extent of this ominous change. They compiled and analyzed all available data on the reaction of marine animals to OA. While the majority of investigated species are affected, the respective impacts are very specific. The results are published advanced online this Sunday in Nature Climate Change.
German Federal Ministry of Education and Research

Contact: Dr. Hans-Otto Poertner
Hans.Poertner@awi.de
Helmholtz Association

Public Release: 25-Aug-2013
Nature Geoscience
Ocean fish acquire more mercury at depth
Mercury accumulation in the ocean fish we eat tends to take place at deeper depths, in part because of photochemical reactions that break down organic mercury in well-lit surface waters, according to new research from the University of Michigan and University of Hawai'i at Manoa. More of this accessible organic mercury is also being generated in deeper waters.

Contact: Talia S Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 25-Aug-2013
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B
Insight into marine life's ability to adapt to climate change
A study into marine life around an underwater volcanic vent in the Mediterranean, might hold the key to understanding how some species will be able to survive in increasingly acidic sea water should anthropogenic climate change continue.

Contact: Andrew Gould
andrew.gould@plymouth.ac.uk
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 25-Aug-2013
Nature Geoscience
Mercury levels in Pacific fish likely to rise in coming decades
University of Michigan researchers and their University of Hawaii colleagues say they've solved the longstanding mystery of how mercury gets into open-ocean fish, and their findings suggest that levels of the toxin in Pacific Ocean fish will likely rise in coming decades.
National Science Foundation, John D. MacArthur Professorship, Pelagic Fisheries Research Program

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 23-Aug-2013
Wayne State receives grant to reduce emissions of toxins by power plants into Great Lakes
A team of Wayne State University researchers are working on a technology that could quickly and significantly reduce the emission of mercury and other toxic substances by power plants into the Great Lakes basin.
Great Lakes Protection Fund

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 23-Aug-2013
NASA measures moderate rainfall in newborn Tropical Storm Ivo
The ninth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season strengthened into Tropical Storm Ivo on Aug. 23 as NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Aug-2013
NASA infrared imagery indicates Pewa weakened
Cloud top temperatures warmed up on NASA infrared imagery, indicating that the uplift in Tropical Storm Pewa was waning.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 826-850 out of 1262.

<< < 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 > >>


HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US    TOP
Copyright ©2014 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science