Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 826-850 out of 1534.

<< < 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 > >>

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
ICES Journal of Marine Science
Spiny lobster abundance study at Glover's Reef, Belize finds fishery in good shape
A recent study conducted in the waters of Glover's Reef Marine Reserve in Belize by the Wildlife Conservation Society and its partners has revealed good news for spiny lobsters: the abundance of these commercially valuable crustaceans should support local fisheries into the future, an indication that no-take areas and other regulations are protecting the nation's marine resources.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
NASA catches speedy Tropical Cyclone Eunice transitioning
Tropical Cyclone Eunice has been spinning around in the Southern Indian Ocean for the last week and by Feb. 1 as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead, the storm was transitioning into an extra-tropical cyclone.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
NASA satellite sees wind shear affecting Tropical Cyclone Ola
NASA's Terra satellite captured a picture of Tropical Cyclone Ola on Feb. 1 that showed northeasterly wind shear was pushing the clouds and showers southwest of the center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study finds deep ocean is source of dissolved iron in Central Pacific
A new study led by scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution points to the deep ocean as a major source of dissolved iron in the central Pacific Ocean. This finding highlights the vital role ocean mixing plays in determining whether deep sources of iron reach the surface-dwelling life that need it to survive.
WHOI Postdoctoral Scholar Program, Doherty Foundation, Natural Environment Research Council, European Research Council, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Freshwater Science
Researchers introduce a macrosystems approach to study stream ecology
Scientists have developed the Stream Biome Gradient Concept, a new method for studying a variety of streams across continents. It allows comparisons of streams in different climates and different continents and can improve how researchers study streams worldwide. The method is introduced in the Freshwater Science article 'The Stream Biome Gradient Concept: factors controlling lotic systems across broad biogeographic scales', available online now and published in the March 2015 issue of the journal.
National Science Foundation, Konza Long-Term Ecological Research program, International Grasslands Center

Contact: Emily Murphy
emurphy@press.uchicago.edu
773-702-7521
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
Science of the Total Environment
Arsenic stubbornly taints many US wells, say new reports
Naturally occurring arsenic in private wells threatens people in many US states and parts of Canada, according to a package of a dozen scientific papers to be published next week. The studies, focused mainly on New England but applicable elsewhere, say private wells present continuing risks due to almost nonexistent regulation in most states, homeowner inaction and inadequate mitigation measures.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program

Contact: Kevin Krajick
kkrajick@ei.columbia.edu
212-854-9729
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
NASA gathers wind, rain, cloud data on major Tropical Cyclone Eunice
NASA's RapidScat, GPM and Terra satellite have been actively providing wind, rain and cloud data to forecasters about Tropical Cyclone Eunice. The storm reached Category 5 status on the Saffir-Simpson scale on Jan. 30.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
PLOS ONE
Population genomics unveil seahorse domain
In a finding vital to effective species management, a team including City College of New York biologists has determined that the lined seahorse (Hippocampus erectus) is more a permanent resident of the western mid-Atlantic Ocean than a vagrant.

Contact: Office of Communications and Marketing
communications@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-5310
City College of New York

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
Ecosphere
Blue mussels not yet the bellwether of NE coastal environment
Mussels could be the perfect 'sentinel' species to signal the health of coastal ecosystems. But a new study of blue mussels in estuary ecosystems along 600 kilometers of coastline in the Northeast uncovered three key mysteries that will have to be solved first.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
International Journal of Remote Sensing
Scientists trial system to improve safety at sea
New satellite imaging concept proposed by University of Leicester-led team could significantly reduce search areas for missing boats and planes.
US Navy Office of Naval Research-Global

Contact: Dr. Nigel Bannister
nb101@le.ac.uk
44-011-622-31043
University of Leicester

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Environmental Science & Technology
Where did the missing oil go? New FSU study says some is sitting on the Gulf floor
A new study led by Florida State University professor of oceanography Jeff Chanton finds that some 6 million to 10 million gallons of oil from the BP oil spill are buried in the sediment on the Gulf floor, about 62 miles southeast of the Mississippi Delta.

Contact: Kathleen Haughney
khaughney@fsu.edu
850-644-1489
Florida State University

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Journal of Great Lakes Research
Invasive species in the Great Lakes by 2063
The Great Lakes are the freshwater system that has been the most invaded by non-native species. Researchers predict they will remain vulnerable to future waves of invasions, unless some US-Canadian coordinated measures are implemented. The scientists also identify some species at high risk of being in the Lakes by 2063, if nothing is done.
Great Lakes Futures Project, Transborder Research University Network, Environment Canada, Michigan Sea Grant, New York Sea Grant, Canadian Aquatic Invasive Species Network, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Melody Enguix
melody.enguix@mcgill.ca
514-398-6751
McGill University

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Diamondra sitting in the middle of the Indian Ocean not threatening land
Tropical Cyclone Diamondra is currently in the middle of the Indian Ocean and is not threatening any land masses at this time.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Tropical Cyclone Eunice still churning in the Southern Indian Ocean
The MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Cyclone Eunice in the South Indian Ocean, well south of Diego Garcia and the Cocos Islands. Its location is 637 nautical miles south-southwest of these islands. The storm is currently tracking south-southeastward at 10 knots.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Science
Global warming won't mean more stormy weather
A study led by atmospheric physicists at the University of Toronto finds that global warming will not lead to an overall increasingly stormy atmosphere, a topic debated by scientists for decades. Instead, strong storms will become stronger while weak storms become weaker, and the cumulative result of the number of storms will remain unchanged.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Sean Bettam
s.bettam@utoronto.ca
416-946-7950
University of Toronto

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Current Biology
Study on dopamine neurons could instruct research into mobility and neurological disorders
A University of Leicester team finds for the first time when and why dopamine-releasing cells in the forebrain are activated.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Dr. Jonathan McDearmid
jrm33@le.ac.uk
01-162-523-913
University of Leicester

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Bio-inspired autonomous vehicles expand Navy littoral capabilities
NRL researchers have taken inspiration from nature to design and develop novel underwater propulsion and control solutions for near-shore and littoral zone missions using autonomous underwater vehicles.

Contact: Daniel Parry
daniel.parry@nrl.navy.mil
202-767-2541
Naval Research Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Current Biology
New research shows our seas are in trouble
New research by the University of Sheffield has warned of the increasing risk of extinction to our marine life.
Royal Society

Contact: Clare Parkin
clare.parkin@sheffield.ac.uk
01-142-229-851
University of Sheffield

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Mercury levels in Hawaiian yellowfin tuna increasing
Mercury concentrations in Hawaiian yellowfin tuna are increasing at a rate of 3.8 percent or more per year, according to a new University of Michigan-led study that suggests rising atmospheric levels of the toxin are to blame.
University of Michigan, Fonds de recherche du Quebec-Nature et Technologies, National Science Foundation, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Scientific Reports
Tracking fish easier, quicker, safer with new injectable device
A new acoustic fish-tracking tag is so tiny it can be injected with a syringe. It's small size enables researchers to more precisely and safely record how fish swim through dams and use that information to make dams more fish-friendly.
US Army Corps of Engineers

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Molecular Ecology
Genetic basis of color diversity in coral reefs discovered
Scientists from the University of Southampton have discovered the genetic basis which allows corals to produce their stunning range of colors.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
PLOS ONE
Baleen whales hear through their bones
Understanding how baleen whales hear has posed a great mystery to marine mammal researchers. New research by San Diego State University biologist Ted W. Cranford and University of California, San Diego engineer Petr Krysl reveals that the skulls of at least some baleen whales, specifically fin whales in their study, have acoustic properties that capture the energy of low frequencies and direct it to their ear bones.

Contact: Natalia Elko
natalia.elko@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-2585
San Diego State University

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Energy & Fuels
Researchers produce two bio-fuels from a single algae
A common algae commercially grown to make fish food holds promise as a source for both biodiesel and jet fuel, according to a new study published in the journal Energy & Fuels.
National Science Foundation, Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Nature Climate Change
Erratic as normal: Arctic sea ice loss expected to be bumpy in the short term
Arctic sea ice extent plunged precipitously from 2001 to 2007, then barely budged between 2007 and 2013. Even in a warming world, researchers should expect such unusual periods of no change -- and rapid change -- at the world's northern reaches, according to a new paper.

Contact: Jennifer Kay
jennifer.e.kay@colorado.edu
303-492-6289
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Journal of Wildlife Diseases
In Illinois, muskrats and minks harbor toxoplasmosis, a cat disease
A new study of muskrats and minks in central Illinois indicates that toxoplasmosis, a disease spread by cats, is moving rapidly through the landscape and contaminating local waterways.

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Showing releases 826-850 out of 1534.

<< < 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 > >>