Press Releases

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Showing releases 826-850 out of 1745.

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Public Release: 27-Oct-2015
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
The great northern cod comeback
Once an icon of overfishing, mismanagement, and stock decline, the northern Atlantic cod is showing signs of recovery according to new research published today in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences.

Contact: Rebecca Ross
rebecca.ross@cdnsciencepub.com
613-791-8334
Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)

Public Release: 27-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Distressed damsels cry for help
Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have found that fish release a chemical 'distress call' when caught by predators, dramatically boosting their chances of survival.
Australian Research Council's Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
New £2.9 million Stirling-led study on freshwater ecosystem dynamics
Major £2.9 million funding for a University of Stirling-led study into the impact of people and the natural environment on freshwater biodiversity and ecosystem resilience, is announced today by the Natural Environment Research Council.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Esther Hutcheson
e.l.hutcheson@stir.ac.uk
44-786-466-640
University of Stirling

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
NASA tracks Hurricane Patricia's remnants through Gulf states
As the remnants of Hurricane Patricia continue to generate flooding rainfall as it moved through the Gulf Coast states on Oct. 26, NASA and NOAA satellites provided data on the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Olaf moving back to 'birthplace'
Tropical Storm Olaf is leaving the Central Pacific Ocean and is headed 'home' -- that is, back to the Eastern Pacific Ocean where it developed 12 days ago. NASA's RapidScat satellite observed the winds in Olaf as it was headed toward the 140 degree latitude line that separates the two ocean basins.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Grant enables pioneering research of vast river systems in Great Plains and Asia
A five-year, $4.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation will empower researchers from multiple institutions in the US and Mongolia to develop wide-ranging scientific knowledge of river systems spanning two continents. Half the funds will support work at the University of Kansas, the lead institution on the project.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
brendan@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
NASA sees remnants of Tropical Cyclone Champi warming and raining on Alaska
On Oct. 26, satellite imagery showed the extra-tropical cyclone affecting Alaska, where it was bringing rain, gusty winds and warmer than normal temperatures.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Harmful Algae
Harmful algal blooms and climate change: Preparing to forecast the future
Marine scientists attending an international workshop warned that the future may bring more harmful algal blooms (HABs) that threaten wildlife and the economy, and called for changes in research priorities to better forecast these long-term trends. The findings of the international workshop on HABs and climate change were published this week in the journal Harmful Algae.
North Pacific Marine Science Organization, US National Office for Marine Biotoxins and Harmful Algal Blooms, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, SCOR-IOC Global Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Scientific Reports
Response to environmental change depends on variation in corals and algae partnerships
Some corals are more protective than others of their partner algae in harsh environmental conditions, new research reveals. This individual variation among corals could reflect a greater capacity than currently is recognized to adapt to changing ocean conditions brought about by climate change.
National Science Foundation, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Marine Mammal Science
What was killing the young right whales? New research finds a suspect
In a new study published in Marine Mammal Science, scientists found a close relationship between a sudden surge in whale deaths at Peninsula Valdes, Argentina, and the toxic algae Pseudo-nitzschia. The finding demonstrates that some of the largest creatures in the ocean can be vulnerable to algal blooms projected to increase with climate change.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Lost giant poop disrupts whole planet
In the past, whales, giant land mammals, and other animals played a vital role in keeping the planet fertile by transporting nutrients via their feces. However, massive declines and extinctions of many of these animals has deeply damaged this planetary nutrient recycling system, threatening fisheries and ecosystems on land, a team of scientists reports.

Contact: Joshua Brown
joshua.e.brown@uvm.edu
802-656-3039
University of Vermont

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Oryx
Only 4 percent of the ocean is protected: UBC research
Despite global efforts to increase the area of the ocean that is protected, only four per cent of it lies within marine protected areas (MPAs), according to a University of British Columbia study.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-828-3867
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Declines in whales, fish, seabirds and large animals disrupt Earth's nutrient cycle
A new study reveals that in the past large land animals, whales, seabirds and fish played a vital role in recycling nutrients from the ocean depths, spreading them far and wide across the globe and taking them deep inland. However, the paper says massive declines in their populations coupled with the extinction of most of Earth's large mammals have disrupted this efficient system of recycling important nutrients, particularly phosphorous.
European Research Council, ERC Advanced Investigator Award, Jackson Foundation, John Fell Fund of Oxford University

Contact: University of Oxford News Office
news.office@admin.ox.ac.uk
44-018-652-80534
University of Oxford

Public Release: 23-Oct-2015
NASA analyzes record-breaking Hurricane Patricia
NASA satellites and instruments have been monitoring the record-breaking Hurricane Patricia as it rapidly intensified off the southwestern coast of Mexico on Oct. 23. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP saw frigid cloud top temperatures, NOAA's GOES-West satellite provided imagery and animations that showed the extent of the storm, NASA's Terra satellite provided visible data, and the RapidScat instrument aboard the International Space Station measured its surface winds.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2015
Journal of Clinical Microbiology
Deadly fish virus still present in Wisconsin lake
In May 2007, hundreds of freshwater drum -- also known as sheepshead -- turned up dead in Lake Winnebago and nearby Little Lake Butte des Morts, both inland lakes near Oshkosh, Wis. The fish were splotched with red and their eyes were swollen and bulging. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources launched a quick response and, working with the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, quickly learned that a deadly virus was responsible: viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, or VHSv.

Contact: Tony Goldberg
tgoldberg@vetmed.wisc.edu
608-890-2618
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 23-Oct-2015
NASA satellite sees Typhoon Champi elongating
Typhoon Champi appeared to be the victim of vertical wind shear in infrared imagery from NASA's Terra satellite. Champi has become elongated while moving through the western North Pacific Ocean and is expected to become extra-tropical by Oct. 24.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2015
Tropical Depression 26W moving faster than spinning
Tropical Depression 26W was spinning down and speeding up as it was becoming an extra-tropical storm. In fact, its sustained winds were weaker than its forward speed as it moved through the western North Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2015
NASA sees Hurricane Olaf still a major hurricane
NASA's Aqua satellite saw Central Pacific Ocean Hurricane Olaf maintained its eye and remained a major hurricane on Oct. 23.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2015
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite sees record-breaking Hurricane Patricia
At 8 a.m. EDT on Oct. 23, 2015, the National Hurricane Center said that Hurricane Patricia had grown into a monster hurricane. In fact, it is the strongest eastern north pacific hurricane on record. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite analyzed the temperatures and structure within the storm as it passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2015
International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction
Japanese sea defense guidelines could assist other tsunami-prone nations, study suggests
Japan's lead in implementing sea defense improvements is an important reference point for other tsunami-prone nations to help guard against future disasters, a study led by Plymouth University has suggested.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Alan Williams
alan.williams@plymouth.ac.uk
44-175-258-8004
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015
Nature Cell Biology
Collaborative research reveals a new view of cell division
Basic research into the mechanisms of cell division, using eggs and embryos from frogs and starfish, has led researchers to an unexpected discovery about how animal cells control the forces that shape themselves. During a key point in cytokinesis a cell's cortex becomes an excitable medium resulting in waves that serve to regulate enzyme activities.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015
Acta Crystallographica Section D
Deep-sea bacteria could help neutralize greenhouse gas, researchers find
A type of bacteria plucked from the bottom of the ocean could be put to work neutralizing large amounts of industrial carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere, a group of University of Florida researchers has found.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Doug Bennett
dougbennett@ufl.edu
352-273-5706
University of Florida

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015
NASA sees the 26th Northwestern Pacific Tropical Depression form
It has been a busy season in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, tropically speaking. The twenty-sixth tropical depression of the western North Pacific Ocean hurricane season formed and NASA's Aqua satellite saw it come together.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015
NASA gets clear look into Typhoon Champi's 36-nautical-mile-wide eye
When the eye of a tropical cyclone is 36 nautical miles (41.4 mile/ 66.7 km) wide, it's pretty easy to spot from NASA's Aqua satellite in orbit. On Oct. 22, 2015, two instruments aboard Aqua saw the large eye surrounded by powerful thunderstorms. Champi's eye was very close to the island of Iwo To, Japan.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015
Royal Society Open Science
New study provides first field observations of rare Omura's whales
An international team of biologists has made the first-ever field observations of one of the least known species of whales in the world -- Omura's whales -- off the coast of Madagascar.
International Whaling Commission Small Cetacean Conservation Fund, US Marine Mammal Commission, Prince Albert II Conservation Fund

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Showing releases 826-850 out of 1745.

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