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Press Releases

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Showing releases 826-850 out of 1327.

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Public Release: 1-May-2014
Clemson researchers help track mysterious, endangered 'little devil'
Clemson University's South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit joined with Grupo Jaragua and the American Bird Conservancy to lead the first-ever effort to track via satellite the black-capped petrel, an endangered North Atlantic seabird known for its haunting call and mysterious nighttime habits.

Contact: Patrick Jodice
pjodice@clemson.edu
864-656-6190
Clemson University

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Amphibians in a vise: Climate change robs frogs, salamanders of refuge
Amphibians in the West's high-mountain areas find themselves caught between climate-induced habitat loss and predation from introduced fish. A novel combination of tools could help weigh where amphibians are in the most need of help.
Department of the Interior's Northwest Climate Science Center, David H. Smith Conservation Research

Contact: Sandra Hines
shines@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Science
Viruses hijack deep-sea bacteria at hydrothermal vents
More than a mile beneath the ocean's surface, as dark clouds of mineral-rich water billow from seafloor hot springs called hydrothermal vents, unseen armies of viruses and bacteria wage war.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Algae 'see' a wide range of light
Aquatic algae can sense an unexpectedly wide range of color, allowing them to sense and adapt to changing light conditions in lakes and oceans. The study by researchers at UC Davis was published earlier this year in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture, US Department of Defense, the Packard Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Suomi NPP satellite sees clouds filling Tropical Storm Tapah's eye
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP passed over Tapah and captured a visible image of the storm that gave a hint of weakening as clouds began to fill its eye.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
European seafloor survey reveals depth of marine litter problem
A major new survey of the seafloor has found that even in the deepest ocean depths you can find bottles, plastic bags, fishing nets and other types of human litter.

Contact: Andrew Merrington
andrew.merrington@plymouth.ac.uk
01-752-588-003
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society
A researcher from the University of Cádiz discovers 18 new species of molluscs
Leila Carmona, from the Marine Biology and Fisheries Group, has reviewed, from a molecular and morphological point of view, a family of marine gastropod molluscs, the Aeolidiidae nudibranch.

Contact: Leila Carmona
leila.carmona@uca.es
01-134-647-578-099
University of Cadiz

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
NOAA-led researchers discover ocean acidity is dissolving shells of tiny snails off West Coast
A NOAA-led research team has found the first evidence that acidity of continental shelf waters off the West Coast is dissolving the shells of tiny free-swimming marine snails, called pteropods, which provide food for pink salmon, mackerel and herring, according to a new paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Contact: Monica Allen
monica.allen@noaa.gov
301-734-1123
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Sample of a frog's slimy skin predicts susceptibility to disease, says CU-Boulder
A simple sample of the protective mucus layer that coats a frog's skin can now be analyzed to determine how susceptible the frog is to disease, thanks to a technique developed by a researcher at the University of Colorado Boulder.
Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: Douglas Woodhams
dwoodhams@gmail.com
720-245-5828
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Over 60 years of citizen science observations detect trends in Midwestern lakes
Over 60 years of data collected across eight states by citizen scientists may demonstrate their potential to contribute to monitoring long-term lake water trends over a large area.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
415-590-3558
PLOS

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
European seafloor survey reveals depth of marine litter
A large-scale seafloor survey off the European coast has found widespread presence of bottles, plastic bags, fishing nets, and other types of human litter at all sample locations.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
415-590-3558
PLOS

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
OCULLAR sees ocean color day and night
A team led at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., has developed an instrument capable of observing ocean color during normal sunlight conditions and under moonlight -- a first-ever capability that will allow scientists to monitor the health and chemistry of the planet's oceans literally around the clock.
NASA

Contact: Lori Keesey
lori.j.keesey@nasa.gov
865-244-6658
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Science
Octillions of microbes in the seas: Ocean microbes show incredible genetic diversity
The smallest, most abundant marine microbe, Prochlorococcus, is a photosynthetic bacterial species essential to the marine ecosystem. It's estimated that billions of the single-celled creatures live in the oceans, forming the center of the marine food web. They occupy a range of ecological niches based on temperature, light, water chemistry and interactions with other species.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Environmental Engineering Science
Graphene not all good
In a first-of-its-kind study of how a material some think could transform the electronics industry moves in water, researchers at the University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering found graphene oxide nanoparticles are very mobile in lakes or streams and therefore likely to cause negative environmental impacts if released.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Tapah through infrared satellite eyes: Now a typhoon
Tropical Storm Tapah strengthened since April 28 and early on April 29, the storm reached typhoon strength.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
NOAA reports show strong economic gains from fishing, continued improvement in fish stocks
Two new NOAA reports, Fisheries Economics of the United States 2012 and the Status of US Fisheries 2013, show positive trends in the steady rebuilding of the country's federally managed fisheries off our coasts, and the important role fisheries contribute to the United State economy.

Contact: Connie Baraclay
connie.barclay@noaa.gov
301-427-8029
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Nature Climate Change
New research shows increasing ocean temperatures affecting coral reefs
A group of international researchers has found increasing ocean temperatures are causing coral reefs to retain more of their larvae, thus leaving large reef systems less interconnected.
Australian Research Council, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, State of Queensland

Contact: Joe Donzelli
jdonzelli@nova.edu
954-262-2159
Nova Southeastern University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Experimental Biology 2014
Coral reefs provide potent new anti-HIV proteins
Researchers have discovered a new class of proteins capable of blocking the HIV virus from penetrating T-cells. The proteins, found in a coral from Australia's northern coast, could be well-suited for use in gels or sexual lubricants to provide a potent barrier against HIV infection, potentially filling a pressing need for a female-applied anti-HIV microbicide that doesn't rely on a man's willingness to use a condom.

Contact: Nancy Lamontagne
media@faseb.org
919-617-1330
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Molecular Biology and Evolution
How a fish can fry: Scientists uncover evolutionary clues behind electric fish
Take a muscle cell, modify it over millions of years, and you end up with an exciting and literally shocking evolutionary result: the electric fish.The authors speculate that the down-regulation of the Scn4aa gene leads to quicker evolution and adaptation.

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
MBEpress@gmail.com
480-258-8972
Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Nature Climate Change
More coral babies staying at home on future reefs
Researchers have found that increasing ocean temperatures due to climate change will soon see reefs retaining and nurturing more of their own coral larvae, leaving large reef systems less interconnected and potentially more vulnerable. "We found that at higher temperatures more coral larvae will tend to stay on their birth reef," says the lead author of the study published today, Dr Joana Figueiredo from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Joana Figueiredo
jfigueiredo@nova.edu
594-262-3638
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Newborn Tropical Storm Tapah threatens Saipan and Tinian
A tropical storm warning is in force for Saipan and Tinian as Tropical Storm Tapah moves north through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on April 28.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Ecology Letters
Studies affirm crabs killing Northeast saltmarshes
Two newly published studies by a team of Brown University researchers provide ample new evidence that the reason coastal saltmarshes are dying from Long Island to Cape Cod is that hungry crabs, left unchecked by a lack of predators, are eating the cordgrass.
National Science Foundation, Voss Environmental Fellowship Program

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Marine Biology
Australian marine reserves provide safe passageway for endangered species
The value of Australia's newly established network of marine parks has been highlighted by an international project that used satellites to track the vulnerable flatback sea turtle. The findings are published in Springer's journal Marine Biology. In the study, researchers from Deakin University, Swansea University and Pendoley Environmental consultancy used advanced satellite tracking systems to record the passage of more than 70 flatbacks off the north-west Australian coastline.

Contact: Saskia Rohmer
saskia.rohmer@gmx.de
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Limnology & Oceanography
R.I. nitrogen cycle differs in bay and sound
A new study reports that anammox, a key process in the nitrogen cycle, is barely present in Narragansett Bay even though it's a major factor just a little farther out into Rhode Island Sound. Scientists traced that to differences between bay and sound sediments, but that raises new questions about what's going on in the Bay to account for those.
National Science Foundation, Rhode Island Sea Grant

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Geology
What lies beneath modern New England? Mountain-building and the end of an ancient ocean
When and where did the ancient Iapetus Ocean suture (the most fundamental Appalachian structure) form? Is part of New England made up of ancient African-derived rocks? What is the Moretown terrane? This new Geology study by researchers from Harvard, Middlebury College, Boise State University, and Williams College finds new evidence for an earlier closing of the Iapetus that is farther west than previous studies have reported.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Showing releases 826-850 out of 1327.

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