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Showing releases 851-875 out of 1338.

<< < 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 > >>

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
NASA sees ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian's remnants persist
NASA's TRMM satellite continues to follow the remnants of former Tropical Cyclone Gillian as it moved from the Southern Pacific Ocean into the Southern Indian Ocean where it appears to be re-organizing.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
Satellite confirms Tropical Cyclone Mike's quick disappearing act
Tropical Cyclone Mike didn't even last a day in the Southern Pacific Ocean as NOAA's GOES-West satellite revealed the storm dissipating just 24 hours after it was born.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Plankton make scents for seabirds and a cooler planet
The top predators of the Southern Ocean, far-ranging seabirds, are tied both to the health of the ocean ecosystem and to global climate regulation through a mutual relationship with phytoplankton, according to newly published work from UC Davis.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
Behaviour
Passive acoustic monitoring reveals clues to minke whale calling behavior and movements
Scientists using passive acoustic monitoring to track minke whales in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean have found clues in the individual calling behaviors and movements of this species. These findings provide insight into one of the least studied baleen whales.
National Oceanographic Partnership Program, US Navy N45 Program, NOAA Ocean Acoustics Program

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
Geosphere
Geosphere presents articles examining lithospheric evolution and geologic history
Geosphere articles posted online March 17, 2014, include additions to two series: 'CRevolution 2: Origin and Evolution of the Colorado River System II' and 'Origin and Evolution of the Sierra Nevada and Walker Lane.' Other articles present new seismic data for the Slate Range of California, USA; the first detailed geologic map from the Likhu Khola region of east central Nepal; and a review of pre-21st century ideas about the origin of Grand Canyon.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
NASA sees ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian affect Indonesia
The remnants of former Tropical Cyclone Gillian moved out of the Southern Pacific Ocean and into the Indian Ocean only to trigger warnings and watches for part of Indonesia on Mar. 19.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
Satellite sees newborn South Pacific Tropical Storm Mike
NOAA's GOES-West satellite caught the birth of Tropical Storm Mike in the Southern Pacific Ocean on March 19.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
PLOS ONE
Tracking endangered leatherback sea turtles by satellite, key habitats identified
Most satellite tagging studies of leatherbacks have focused on adult females on their tropical nesting beaches, so little is known worldwide about males and subadults, the researcher point out. But now, tagging and satellite tracking in locations where leatherbacks forage has allowed the scientists to get a much richer picture of the leatherback's behavior and dispersal patterns on the open ocean.
University of Massachusetts at Amherst, NOAA, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Massachusetts Department of Marine Fisheries

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Geology
New from Geology: Fossils, earthquakes, gold, and sea-bed landslides
Geology papers published March 17, 2014, cover modeling of seabed turbidity currents; a large earthquake at Lake Vaettern, Switzerland, about 11,500 years ago; genesis of high-grade gold at the Porgera gold deposit, Papua New Guinea; discovery of the Ediacaran guide fossil Cloudina sp. and the depositional age of the Bambui Group; earthquakes along the fossil Moho in Alpine Corsica; and using LiDAR to better understand New Zealand's Alpine Fault.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
NASA releases first interactive mosaic of lunar north pole
Scientists, using cameras aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, have created the largest high resolution mosaic of our moon's north polar region. The six-and-a-half feet (two-meters)-per-pixel images cover an area equal to more than one-quarter of the United States.
NASA

Contact: Elizabeth Zubritsky
elizabeth.a.zubritsky@nasa.gov
301-614-5438
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
New airborne GPS technology for weather conditions takes flight
A new technique led by a researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego stands to improve weather models and hurricane forecasting by detecting precise conditions in the atmosphere through a new GPS system aboard airplanes. The first demonstration of the technique, detailed in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, is pushing the project's leaders toward a goal of broadly implementing the technology in the near future on commercial aircraft.
National Science Foundation, NASA, and others

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
NASA sees some strength left in remnants of Tropical Cyclone Gillian
NASA's TRMM satellite passed over the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Gillian and spotted some towering thunderstorms and areas of heavy rainfall, indicating there's still power in the former tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Humans drive evolution of conch size
Smithsonian scientists found that 7,000 years ago, the Caribbean fighting conch contained 66 percent more meat than its descendants do today. Because of persistent harvesting of the largest conchs, it became advantageous for the animal to mature at a smaller size, resulting in evolutionary change.
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama's National Secretariat for Science, Technology and Innovation

Contact: Sean Mattson
mattsons@si.edu
202-633-4700 x28290
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Oceanography
New statistical models could lead to better predictions of ocean patterns
The world's oceans cover more than 72 percent of the earth's surface, impact a major part of the carbon cycle, and contribute to variability in global climate and weather patterns. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri applied complex statistical models to increase the accuracy of ocean forecasting that influences the ways in which forecasters predict long-range events such as El Nińo and the lower levels of the ocean food chain.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Ocean Modelling
NRL models Deepwater Horizon oil spill
Dr. Jason Jolliff, an oceanographer with the US Naval Research Laboratory, published a paper showing combined COAMPS and BioCast data predicted where oil would go after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill. His method applies to predicting ocean optical properties for mine detection and other US Navy missions.
US Naval Research Laboratory

Contact: Kyra Wiens
kyra.wiens@nrl.navy.mil
202-404-3324
Naval Research Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Cultural hitchhiking: How social behavior can affect genetic makeup in dolphins
A UNSW-led team of researchers studying bottlenose dolphins that use sponges as tools has shown that social behavior can shape the genetic makeup of an animal population in the wild. The research on dolphins in Shark Bay in Western Australia is one of the first studies to show this effect -- which is called cultural hitchhiking -- in animals other than people. The research is published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Contact: Deborah Smith
deborah.smith@unsw.edu.au
61-047-849-2060
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UCLA geographers create 'easy button' to calculate river flows from space
The frustrated attempts of a UCLA graduate student to quantify the amount of water draining from Greenland's melting ice sheet led him to discover a new way to measure river flows from outer space, he and his professor report in a new study. The new approach relies exclusively on measurements of a river's width over time, which can be obtained from freely available satellite imagery.

Contact: Meg Sullivan
msullivan@support.ucla.edu
310-825-1046
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
Nature Geoscience
Climatologists offer explanation for widening of Earth's tropical belt
A team of climatologists, led by researchers at the University of California, Riverside, posits that the recent widening of the tropical belt is primarily caused by multi-decadal sea surface temperature variability in the Pacific Ocean. This variability includes the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (a long-lived El Nino-like pattern of Pacific climate variability) and anthropogenic pollutants, which act to modify the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Until now there was no clear explanation for what is driving the widening.
NASA

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
NASA satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Gillian return to remnant low status
NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Gillian's remnants in the southern Arafura Sea today, as it passes north of Australia's 'Top End.'
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Global problem of fisheries bycatch needs global solutions
Whenever fishing vessels harvest fish, other animals can be accidentally caught or entangled in fishing gear as bycatch. Numerous strategies exist to prevent bycatch, but data have been lacking on the global scale of this issue. A new in-depth analysis of global bycatch data provides fisheries and the conservation community with the best information yet to help mitigate the ecological damage of bycatch and helps identify where mitigation measures are most needed.

Contact: Beth Chee
bchee@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-4563
San Diego State University

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
Current Biology
Antarctic moss lives after 1,500+ years under ice
Researchers from the British Antarctic Survey and University of Reading report in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on March 17 that Antarctic mosses can essentially come back to life after 1,500 completely inactive years under the ice. Prior to this finding, direct regeneration from frozen plant material had been demonstrated after 20 years at most. Beyond that, only microbes had been shown to be capable of revival after so many years on hold.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 16-Mar-2014
Nature Geoscience
Southern Ocean iron cycle gives new insight into climate change
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have found unique aspects of iron cycling in the Southern Ocean which will better inform scientists about the effects of climate change.

Contact: Sarah Stamper
sarah.stamper@liv.ac.uk
01-517-943-044
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 14-Mar-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite eyeing Tropical Cyclone Gillian's rebirth
Heavy rainfall rates and powerful towering thunderstorms were spotted in what appeared to be the rebirth process of Tropical Cyclone Gillian in the Gulf of Carpentaria between Australia's Northern Territory and Queensland.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Mar-2014
NASA sees an extra-tropical Lusi north of New Zealand
NASA's Aqua satellite caught an infrared picture of Tropical Cyclone Lusi after it transitioned into an extra-tropical storm, north of New Zealand. Gale warnings are in effect in northern New Zealand.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
Bulletin of Marine Science
Fish species unique to Hawaii dominate deep coral reefs in Northwestern Hawaiian Islands
Deep coral reefs in Papahanaumokakea Marine National Monument may contain the highest percentage of fish species found nowhere else on Earth, according to a study by NOAA scientists published in the Bulletin of Marine Science. In waters 100-300 feet deep, nearly 50 percent of fish observed over a two-year period were unique to Hawaii -- higher than any other marine ecosystem. The study also found that on some deeper reefs, more than 90 percent were endemic.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Keeley Belva
keeley.belva@noaa.gov
301-643-6463
NOAA Headquarters

Showing releases 851-875 out of 1338.

<< < 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 > >>


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