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Showing releases 851-875 out of 1337.

<< < 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 > >>

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UCLA geographers create 'easy button' to calculate river flows from space
The frustrated attempts of a UCLA graduate student to quantify the amount of water draining from Greenland's melting ice sheet led him to discover a new way to measure river flows from outer space, he and his professor report in a new study. The new approach relies exclusively on measurements of a river's width over time, which can be obtained from freely available satellite imagery.

Contact: Meg Sullivan
msullivan@support.ucla.edu
310-825-1046
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
Nature Geoscience
Climatologists offer explanation for widening of Earth's tropical belt
A team of climatologists, led by researchers at the University of California, Riverside, posits that the recent widening of the tropical belt is primarily caused by multi-decadal sea surface temperature variability in the Pacific Ocean. This variability includes the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (a long-lived El Nino-like pattern of Pacific climate variability) and anthropogenic pollutants, which act to modify the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Until now there was no clear explanation for what is driving the widening.
NASA

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
NASA satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Gillian return to remnant low status
NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Gillian's remnants in the southern Arafura Sea today, as it passes north of Australia's 'Top End.'
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Global problem of fisheries bycatch needs global solutions
Whenever fishing vessels harvest fish, other animals can be accidentally caught or entangled in fishing gear as bycatch. Numerous strategies exist to prevent bycatch, but data have been lacking on the global scale of this issue. A new in-depth analysis of global bycatch data provides fisheries and the conservation community with the best information yet to help mitigate the ecological damage of bycatch and helps identify where mitigation measures are most needed.

Contact: Beth Chee
bchee@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-4563
San Diego State University

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
Current Biology
Antarctic moss lives after 1,500+ years under ice
Researchers from the British Antarctic Survey and University of Reading report in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on March 17 that Antarctic mosses can essentially come back to life after 1,500 completely inactive years under the ice. Prior to this finding, direct regeneration from frozen plant material had been demonstrated after 20 years at most. Beyond that, only microbes had been shown to be capable of revival after so many years on hold.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 16-Mar-2014
Nature Geoscience
Southern Ocean iron cycle gives new insight into climate change
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have found unique aspects of iron cycling in the Southern Ocean which will better inform scientists about the effects of climate change.

Contact: Sarah Stamper
sarah.stamper@liv.ac.uk
01-517-943-044
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 14-Mar-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite eyeing Tropical Cyclone Gillian's rebirth
Heavy rainfall rates and powerful towering thunderstorms were spotted in what appeared to be the rebirth process of Tropical Cyclone Gillian in the Gulf of Carpentaria between Australia's Northern Territory and Queensland.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Mar-2014
NASA sees an extra-tropical Lusi north of New Zealand
NASA's Aqua satellite caught an infrared picture of Tropical Cyclone Lusi after it transitioned into an extra-tropical storm, north of New Zealand. Gale warnings are in effect in northern New Zealand.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
Bulletin of Marine Science
Fish species unique to Hawaii dominate deep coral reefs in Northwestern Hawaiian Islands
Deep coral reefs in Papahanaumokakea Marine National Monument may contain the highest percentage of fish species found nowhere else on Earth, according to a study by NOAA scientists published in the Bulletin of Marine Science. In waters 100-300 feet deep, nearly 50 percent of fish observed over a two-year period were unique to Hawaii -- higher than any other marine ecosystem. The study also found that on some deeper reefs, more than 90 percent were endemic.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Keeley Belva
keeley.belva@noaa.gov
301-643-6463
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
Nature Geoscience
UCLA study yields more accurate data on thousands of years of climate change
Using a new, cutting-edge isotopic tool, UCLA researchers have reconstructed the temperature history of a climatically important region in the Pacific Ocean.

Contact: Stuart Wolpert
swolpert@support.ucla.edu
310-206-0511
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Gillian's remnants hoping for comeback
Ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian weakened to a remnant low pressure area after making landfall in the Western Cape York Peninsula of Queensland, Australia then returned into the Gulf of Carpentaria. NASA's Aqua satellite flew over the tropical low as it struggled to re-intensify.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
NASA sees wind shear affecting Tropical Cyclone Lusi
Tropical Cyclone Lusi is battling vertical wind shear that has been pushing the bulk of precipitation away from its center. NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the storm that showed the strongest thunderstorms were being pushed away from the center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
Soft Robotics
Robotic fish designed to perform escape maneuvers described in Soft Robotics journal
A soft-bodied, self-contained robotic fish with a flexible spine that allows it to mimic the swimming motion of a real fish also has the built-in agility to perform escape maneuvers.

Contact: Kathryn Ruehle
kruehle@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Heritable variation discovered in trout behavior
Populations of endangered salmonids are supported by releasing large quantities of hatchery-reared fish, but the fisheries' catches have continued to decrease. Earlier research has shown that certain behavioral traits explain individual differences in how fish survive in the wild. A new Finnish study conducted on brown trout now shows that there are predictable individual differences in behavioral traits, like activity, tendency to explore new surroundings and stress tolerance.

Contact: Anssi Vainikka
anssi.vainikka@uef.fi
358-500-443-290
University of Eastern Finland

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
Current Biology
Fossil porpoise has a chin for the ages
Scientists have identified a new species of ancient porpoise with a chin length unprecedented among known mammals, and suggest the animal used the tip of its face to probe the seabed for food.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Eric Gershon
eric.gershon@yale.edu
203-432-8555
Yale University

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
Current Biology
Parental care of the young from 450 million years ago
Scientists discover new fossil species revealing parental care of the young from 450 million years ago, and name it after Lucina, goddess of childbirth.

Contact: Professor David Siveter
djs@leicester.ac.uk
01-162-523-921
University of Leicester

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
Science
Saving large carnivores in the ecosystem requires multifaceted approach
Social species, such as the African wild dog, require strict participation from group members to be successful. This strategy can enhance fitness benefits for the group, but also a higher critical threshold for extinction. Awareness of life history needs to guide management strategy.

Contact: Lynn Davis
davisl@vt.edu
540-231-6157
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
Current Biology
Extinct California porpoise had a unique underbite
Millions of years ago, the coast of California was home to a species of porpoise distinguished from its living relatives by a lower jaw that extended well beyond the upper, according to researchers who report their findings in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on March 13. In other words, the long-lost porpoise had a rather distinct and unusual underbite.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 12-Mar-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Lusi over Vanuatu
Tropical Cyclone Lusi reached hurricane force as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead early on March 12.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Mar-2014
NASA sees ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian in Australia's Gulf of Carpentaria
Tropical Cyclone Gillian made landfall on the western Cape York Peninsula of Queensland, Australia, weakened and has now meandered back over water. On March 12, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the remnants in the southern Gulf of Carpentaria.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Mar-2014
NASA sees remnants of Tropical Cyclone Hadi in South Pacific
Tropical Cyclone Hadi is now a remnant low pressure area in the Southern Pacific Ocean. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm and captured a visible image of it on March 12.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Mar-2014
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Bucking conventional wisdom, researchers find black sea bass tougher than expected
In a new study, fisheries researchers found that black sea bass can usually survive the physical trauma that results from being hauled up from deep water then released at the surface. The finding is part of a larger study of the fish's mortality rate, which will inform stock assessments designed to help ensure that the black sea bass fishery is sustainable.
North Carolina Sea Grant

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 12-Mar-2014
Arctic 2050: Towards ecosystem-based management in a changing Arctic Ocean
Arctic 2050: Towards ecosystem-based management in a changing Arctic Ocean
About 150 scientists, policy makers and members of industry are gathering today at the 4th European Marine Board Forum in Brussels to discuss how best to manage the consequences of a changing Arctic Ocean for human health and well-being. The European Marine Board has convened this flagship event in collaboration with the European Polar Board, working in association with the European Science Foundation.

Contact: Veronica French
vfrench@esf.org
32-047-362-9574
European Science Foundation

Public Release: 12-Mar-2014
Astrobiology
Simulating how the Earth kick-started metabolism
Researchers have developed a new approach to simulating the energetic processes that may have led to the emergence of cell metabolism on Earth -- a crucial biological function for all living organisms.
Energy Leeds, Nuffield Foundation, NASA Astrobiology Institute

Contact: Sarah Reed
s.j.reed@leeds.ac.uk
44-113-343-4196
University of Leeds

Public Release: 11-Mar-2014
GSA Bulletin
Alps to Appalachia; submarine channels to Tibetan plateau; Death Valley to arctic Canada
On Feb. 27 and March 6, 2014, GSA Bulletin published 11 articles online ahead of print, including two that are open access: 'O2 constraints from Paleoproterozoic detrital pyrite and uraninite' and 'Sediment transfer and deposition in slope channels: Deciphering the record of enigmatic deep-sea processes from outcrop.' Other articles cover geological features in the Alps; the Appalachians; Death Valley; India; the Himalaya; the Columbia River Basalt Province; San Simeon, Calif.; Kaua'i, Hawai'i; and arctic Canada.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Showing releases 851-875 out of 1337.

<< < 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 > >>


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