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Showing releases 851-875 out of 1500.

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Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Geology
The legend of the kamikaze typhoons
In the late 13th Century, Kublai Khan, ruler of the Mongol Empire, launched one of the world's largest armada of its time in an attempt to conquer Japan. Early narratives describe the decimation and dispersal of these fleets by the 'kamikaze' of 1274 and 1281 CE -- a pair of intense typhoons divinely sent to protect Japan from invasion.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
303-357-1057
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
NASA measures Typhoon Hagupit's Philippine rainfall from space
After hitting Samar in the Eastern Philippines Hagupit's continued slow movement resulted in high rainfall amounts along the typhoon's track. These high rainfall totals meant that flooding occurred frequently along the typhoon's track.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Put algae in your tank
Because food crops are also used for energy production, millions of people are threatened by starvation. Algae could provide an alternative: They only need sunlight to grow, thrive in salty water on barren fields. But it is a major challenge to exactly reproduce sunlight in the laboratory. In collaboration with the Berlin LED manufacturer FUTURELED scientists at the Technische Universität München have now developed a methodology for simulating all kinds of light situations.
Bavarian State

Contact: Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technical University of Munich (TUM)

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Warmer Pacific Ocean could release millions of tons of seafloor methane
Water off Washington's coast is warming a third of a mile down, where seafloor methane shifts from a frozen solid to a gas. Calculations suggest ocean warming is already releasing significant methane offshore of Alaska to Northern California.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Scientific Reports
Ancient balloon-shaped animal fossil sheds light on Earth's ancient seas
A rare 520 million year old fossil shaped like a 'squashed bird's nest' that will help to shed new light on life within Earth's ancient seas has been discovered in China by an international research team -- and will honor the memory of a University of Leicester scientist who passed away earlier this year.
National Science Foundation in China, Royal Society in the UK

Contact: Tom Harvey
thph2@le.ac.uk
44-011-625-23644
University of Leicester

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
You are what you eat -- if you're a coral reef fish
In a world first study researchers have found a coral-eating fish that disguises its smell to hide from predators.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
NASA catches 3 days of Typhoon Hagupit's motion over Philippines
NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites flew over Typhoon Hagupit from Dec. 6 through Dec. 8 and the MODIS instrument that flies aboard both satellites provided images of the storm as it moved through the country.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Coral Reefs
New research suggests Caribbean gorgonian corals are resistant to ocean acidification
A new study on tropical shallow-water soft corals, known as gorgonians, found that the species were able to calcify and grow under elevated carbon dioxide concentrations. These results suggest that Caribbean gorgonian corals may be more resilient to the ocean acidification levels projected by the end of the 21st century than previously thought.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
NOAA: Researchers offer new insights into predicting future droughts in California
According to a new NOAA-sponsored study, natural oceanic and atmospheric patterns are the primary drivers behind California's ongoing drought. A high pressure ridge off the West Coast (typical of historic droughts) prevailed for three winters, blocking important wet season storms, with ocean surface temperature patterns making such a ridge much more likely.

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
Study finds early warning signals of abrupt climate change
A new study by researchers at the University of Exeter has found early warning signals of a reorganization of the Atlantic oceans' circulation which could have a profound impact on the global climate system.

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-139-272-2062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
HURL and NOAA team discover intact 'ghost ship' off Hawai'i
Researchers from the University of Hawai'i's Hawai'i Undersea Research Laboratory's and NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries discovered an intact 'ghost ship' in 2,000 feet of water nearly 20 miles off the coast of Oahu. Sitting upright, its solitary mast still standing and the ship's wheel still in place, the hulk of the former cable ship Dickenson, later the USS Kailua, was found on the seabed last year on a maritime heritage submersible mission.
Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory, NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
NASA analyzes Super Typhoon Hagupit's rains and wind on Philippine approach
Super Typhoon Hagupit is forecast to make landfall in the eastern Philippines bringing heavy rainfall, damaging winds and storm surge. NASA/JAXA's TRMM satellite and the RapidScat instrument provided rainfall and wind data, while NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm. In the Philippines, Hagupit is known locally as 'Typhoon Ruby.'
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Nature
El Niño's 'remote control' on hurricanes in the Northeastern Pacific
El Niño peaks in winter and its surface ocean warming occurs mostly along the equator. However, months later, El Niño events affect the formation of intense hurricanes in the Northeastern Pacific basin -- not along the equator. Scientists from the University of Hawai'i and the National Taiwan University published a paper today in Nature that revealed what's behind 'remote control.'

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Science
Electric eels deliver Taser-like shocks
A Vanderbilt biologist has determined that electric eels possess an electroshock system uncannily similar to a Taser.
National Science Foundation, National Academy of Sciences, Guggenheim Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Science
Antarctic seawater temperatures rising
The temperature of the seawater around Antarctica is rising according to new University of East Anglia research. New findings published in Science reveal how shallow shelf seas of West Antarctica have warmed over the last 50 years. This has accelerated the melting and sliding of glaciers in the area, and there is no indication that this trend will reverse.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Science
Antarctica: Heat comes from the deep
The water temperatures on the West Antarctic shelf are rising. The reason for this is predominantly warm water from greater depths, which as a result of global change now increasingly reaches the shallow shelf. There it has the potential to accelerate the glacier melt from below and trigger the sliding of big glaciers. These data are published today by scientists of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel together with colleagues from the UK, the US and Japan in the international journal Science.

Contact: Dr. Sunke Schmidtko
sschmidtko@geomar.de
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
PLOS ONE
Arabian Sea humpback whales isolated for 70,000 years
Scientists from Wildlife Conservation Society, the American Museum of Natural History, the Environment Society of Oman, and other organizations have made a fascinating discovery in the northern Indian Ocean: humpback whales inhabiting the Arabian Sea are the most genetically distinct humpback whales in the world and may be the most isolated whale population on earth.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
Small drains mean big problems at 'baby beaches'
High fecal counts frequently detected at so-called 'baby beaches' may not be diaper-related. UC Irvine researchers found that during summer months, small drainpipes emptying into enclosed ocean bays have a disproportionate impact on calmer waters. The findings were published Tuesday in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Janet Wilson
janethw@uci.edu
949-824-3969
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
'Ocean Worlds'
Jan Zalasiewicz and Mark Williams's new book, 'Ocean Worlds,' examines the nature and deep history of oceans, looks at how and when oceans may have formed on Earth and how they evolved, explores the importance of oceans in hosting life on which both humans and animals depend, considers how climate change, pollution, and over-exploitation are putting resources at risk, looks at what we know of oceans on other planets and considers what may become of our oceans in the future.

Contact: Molly Grote
molly.grote@oup.com
212-743-8337
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
NASA tracks intensifying Typhoon Hagupit
Typhoon Hagupit continues to intensify as it continued moving through Micronesia on Dec. 3 triggering warnings. NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and captured an image of the strengthening storm while the Rapidscat instrument aboard the International Space Station provided information about the storm's winds.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
New study explains the role of oceans in global 'warming hiatus'
New research shows that ocean heat uptake across three oceans is the likely cause of the 'warming hiatus' -- the current decade-long slowdown in global surface warming.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
Nature
Protect the world's deltas
Extensive areas of the world's deltas -- which accommodate some of the world's major cities -- will be drowned in the next century by rising sea levels, according to a Comment piece in this week's Nature. Dr. Liviu Giosan, a geologist with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and colleagues call for maintenance efforts to be started now to avert the loss of vast expanses of coastline, and the consequent losses of ecological services, economic and social crises, and large-scale migrations.

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
PLOS ONE
Arabian Sea humpback whale population may have been isolated for about 70,000 years
A population of humpback whales that resides in the Arabian Sea may have been isolated for approximately 70,000 years.
Environment Society of Oman, Shell Oman Marketing, Petroleum Development Oman, UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Ford Middle East, Veritas Geophysical, Salalah Port Services, Five Oceans LLC, Tawoos LLC

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Molecular Ecology
A glimmer of hope for corals as baby reef builders cope with acidifying oceans
While the threat of coral bleaching as a result of climate change poses a serious risk to the future of coral reefs worldwide, new research has found that some baby corals may be able to cope with the negative effects of ocean acidification.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Nova Southeastern University to receive approximately $8.5 million for oil spill research
NSU Oceanographic Center researchers will study the effects of oil spills and dispersants on marine ecosystem in the Gulf of Mexico.
Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative

Contact: Joe Donzelli
jdonzelli@nova.edu
954-262-2159
Nova Southeastern University

Showing releases 851-875 out of 1500.

<< < 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 > >>