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Showing releases 851-875 out of 1264.

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Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Urban Ecosystems
Snapping turtles finding refuge in urban areas while habitats are being polluted
Snapping turtles are surviving in urban areas as their natural habitats are being polluted or developed for construction projects. One solution is for people to stop using so many chemicals that are eventually dumped into the waterways, a University of Missouri scientist said.

Contact: Christian Basi
basic@missouri.edu
573-882-4430
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Journal of Sea Research
An alga stressed by the light
During the summers of 2010 and 2011, the UPV/EHU's Bentos Marino group analyzed samples of algae populations from five zones and measured the amount of light present in and the temperature of each zone over the summer. The research group observed that the algae that displayed the most signs of stress were from the zones exposed to the most solar radiation. The results of the research have been published in the Journal of Sea Research.

Contact: Aitziber Lasa
a.lasa@elhuyar.com
34-943-363-040
Elhuyar Fundazioa

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Environmental Science & Technology
Eastern US water supplies threatened by a legacy of acid rain
Noted ecologist Gene Likens, founding director of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and a co-discoverer of acid rain, was among the study's authors. The extent of alkalinity change in streams and rivers exceeded his expectations: "This is another example of the widespread impact humans are having on natural systems. Policymakers and the public think that the acid rain problem has gone away, but it has not."
NASA, National Science Foundation, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Contact: Lori Quillen
quillenl@caryinstitute.org
845-677-7600 x121
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
NASA catches Tropical Storm Kong-Rey form in northwestern Pacific
The northwestern Pacific has generated its fourteenth tropical cyclone and NASA's Aqua satellite flew over the eastern side of the storm early on Aug. 26.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
NASA sees Depression Pewa pass in Pacific
Tropical Depression Pewa dissipated in the northwestern Pacific Ocean early on Aug. 26, 2013.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
NASA sees quick forming Tropical Storm Fernand soaking Mexico
During the week of Aug. 18, the low pressure area designated as System 95E was lingering in the western Caribbean Sea and moved into the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, where it exploded into Tropical Storm Fernand late on Aug. 25.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Environmental Science & Technology
Changing river chemistry affects Eastern US water supplies
Human activity is changing the basic chemistry of large rivers in the Eastern US, with potentially major consequences for urban water supplies and aquatic ecosystems, a University of Maryland-led study has found. "It's like rivers on Rolaids," said lead investigator Sujay Kaushal.
NOAA, National Science Foundation/LTER Program, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Contact: Heather Dewar
hdewar@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sea otters promote recovery of seagrass beds
Scientists studying the decline and recovery of seagrass beds in one of California's largest estuaries have found that recolonization of the estuary by sea otters was a crucial factor in the seagrass comeback.
National Estuarine Research Reserve System, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, USGS Western Ecological Research Center

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 25-Aug-2013
Nature Climate Change
Scientists analyze the extent of ocean acidification
Ocean acidification (OA) could change the ecosystems of our seas even by the end of this century. Biologists at the Alfred Wegener Institute have assessed the extent of this ominous change. They compiled and analyzed all available data on the reaction of marine animals to OA. While the majority of investigated species are affected, the respective impacts are very specific. The results are published advanced online this Sunday in Nature Climate Change.
German Federal Ministry of Education and Research

Contact: Dr. Hans-Otto Poertner
Hans.Poertner@awi.de
Helmholtz Association

Public Release: 25-Aug-2013
Nature Geoscience
Ocean fish acquire more mercury at depth
Mercury accumulation in the ocean fish we eat tends to take place at deeper depths, in part because of photochemical reactions that break down organic mercury in well-lit surface waters, according to new research from the University of Michigan and University of Hawai'i at Manoa. More of this accessible organic mercury is also being generated in deeper waters.

Contact: Talia S Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 25-Aug-2013
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B
Insight into marine life's ability to adapt to climate change
A study into marine life around an underwater volcanic vent in the Mediterranean, might hold the key to understanding how some species will be able to survive in increasingly acidic sea water should anthropogenic climate change continue.

Contact: Andrew Gould
andrew.gould@plymouth.ac.uk
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 25-Aug-2013
Nature Geoscience
Mercury levels in Pacific fish likely to rise in coming decades
University of Michigan researchers and their University of Hawaii colleagues say they've solved the longstanding mystery of how mercury gets into open-ocean fish, and their findings suggest that levels of the toxin in Pacific Ocean fish will likely rise in coming decades.
National Science Foundation, John D. MacArthur Professorship, Pelagic Fisheries Research Program

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 23-Aug-2013
Wayne State receives grant to reduce emissions of toxins by power plants into Great Lakes
A team of Wayne State University researchers are working on a technology that could quickly and significantly reduce the emission of mercury and other toxic substances by power plants into the Great Lakes basin.
Great Lakes Protection Fund

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 23-Aug-2013
NASA measures moderate rainfall in newborn Tropical Storm Ivo
The ninth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season strengthened into Tropical Storm Ivo on Aug. 23 as NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Aug-2013
NASA infrared imagery indicates Pewa weakened
Cloud top temperatures warmed up on NASA infrared imagery, indicating that the uplift in Tropical Storm Pewa was waning.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Aug-2013
Methods in Ecology and Evolution
Underwater intelligence
How do you track a fish underwater? Rethinking the traditional, ad hoc approach to acoustic telemetry, University of Hawaii at Manoa scientists Martin Pedersen and Kevin Weng have proposed a new state-space model for analyzing fish movement data collected by marine observation networks. Their new model was recently published in the scientific journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution. Its goal is to quantify the uncertainty associated with this imperfect locating system, and to improve its accuracy.

Contact: Talia S Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 22-Aug-2013
NASA catches Typhoon Trami's landfall in China
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Trami during the time it was making landfall in eastern China and captured an infrared view of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Aug-2013
A Pacific-wide satellite view catches Tropical Storm Pewa and a developing storm
A view of the Pacific Ocean from NOAA's GOES-West satellite caught Tropical Storm Pewa moving through the Northwestern part of the ocean and two developing low pressure areas, one designated System 94E, several hundred miles off the Mexican coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Aug-2013
Journal of Climate
The potential for successful climate predictions!
Marine scientists, under the auspices of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, recently managed to successfully hindcast climate shifts in the Pacific. These shifts also have a profound effect on the average global surface air temperature of the Earth.

Contact: Mojib Latif
mlatif@geomar.de
49-431-600-4050
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 22-Aug-2013
Science
Morphing manganese
A discovery reported in "Science" this week by University of Delaware researchers alters understanding of the chemistry that moves elements, such as oxygen, carbon, and manganese, through the natural world.
National Science Foundation, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Andrea Boyle Tippett
aboyle@udel.edu
302-831-1421
University of Delaware

Public Release: 21-Aug-2013
Tropical Storm Pewa passing Wake Island
Satellite imagery showed that Tropical Storm Pewa has passed Wake Island on Aug. 21.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Aug-2013
NASA sees Typhoon Trami passing Taiwan for China landfall
NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Typhoon Trami's center just north of Taiwan as it headed for landfall in eastern China.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Aug-2013
Global Ecology and Biogeography
Epic ocean voyages of baby corals revealed
For the first time, scientists have recreated the journeys of millimetre-sized baby coral through the world's seas, suggesting some of these tiny adventurers may cross entire oceans.

Contact: Hannah Johnson
hannah.johnson@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8896
University of Bristol

Public Release: 21-Aug-2013
PLOS ONE
Warming Antarctic seas likely to impact on krill habitats
Antarctic krill are usually less than 6 cm in length but their size belies the major role they play in sustaining much of the life in the Southern Ocean. They are the primary food source for many species of whales, seals, penguins and fish.

Contact: Paul Seagrove
psea@bas.ac.uk
44-012-232-21414
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 20-Aug-2013
Science
University of Montana researcher finds loss of sea ice causes ecological changes
A new paper co-written by UM associate professor Mark Hebblewhite details ecological changes caused by a loss of Arctic sea ice. The paper concludes that the loss of sea ice obviously will impact the marine food web and the marine mammals that depend on sea ice habitat. Other major ecological changes in adjacent land-based habitats and species also will occur because of warming oceans.

Contact: Mark Hebblewhite
mark.hebblewhite@umontana.edu
406-243-6675
The University of Montana

Showing releases 851-875 out of 1264.

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