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Showing releases 851-875 out of 1274.

<< < 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 > >>

Public Release: 22-Aug-2013
Journal of Climate
The potential for successful climate predictions!
Marine scientists, under the auspices of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, recently managed to successfully hindcast climate shifts in the Pacific. These shifts also have a profound effect on the average global surface air temperature of the Earth.

Contact: Mojib Latif
mlatif@geomar.de
49-431-600-4050
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 22-Aug-2013
Science
Morphing manganese
A discovery reported in "Science" this week by University of Delaware researchers alters understanding of the chemistry that moves elements, such as oxygen, carbon, and manganese, through the natural world.
National Science Foundation, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Andrea Boyle Tippett
aboyle@udel.edu
302-831-1421
University of Delaware

Public Release: 21-Aug-2013
Tropical Storm Pewa passing Wake Island
Satellite imagery showed that Tropical Storm Pewa has passed Wake Island on Aug. 21.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Aug-2013
NASA sees Typhoon Trami passing Taiwan for China landfall
NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Typhoon Trami's center just north of Taiwan as it headed for landfall in eastern China.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Aug-2013
Global Ecology and Biogeography
Epic ocean voyages of baby corals revealed
For the first time, scientists have recreated the journeys of millimetre-sized baby coral through the world's seas, suggesting some of these tiny adventurers may cross entire oceans.

Contact: Hannah Johnson
hannah.johnson@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8896
University of Bristol

Public Release: 21-Aug-2013
PLOS ONE
Warming Antarctic seas likely to impact on krill habitats
Antarctic krill are usually less than 6 cm in length but their size belies the major role they play in sustaining much of the life in the Southern Ocean. They are the primary food source for many species of whales, seals, penguins and fish.

Contact: Paul Seagrove
psea@bas.ac.uk
44-012-232-21414
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 20-Aug-2013
Science
University of Montana researcher finds loss of sea ice causes ecological changes
A new paper co-written by UM associate professor Mark Hebblewhite details ecological changes caused by a loss of Arctic sea ice. The paper concludes that the loss of sea ice obviously will impact the marine food web and the marine mammals that depend on sea ice habitat. Other major ecological changes in adjacent land-based habitats and species also will occur because of warming oceans.

Contact: Mark Hebblewhite
mark.hebblewhite@umontana.edu
406-243-6675
The University of Montana

Public Release: 20-Aug-2013
Federal agencies remapping coastal areas damaged by Hurricane Sandy
A day after the administration released the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force progress report,three federal agencies have announced plans for remapping parts of the East Coast, where Hurricane Sandy altered seafloors and shorelines, destroyed buildings, and disrupted millions of lives last year. NOAA, the US Geological Survey, and the US Army Corps of Engineers are using emergency supplemental funds provided by Congress to survey coastal waters and shorelines, acquiring data that will update East Coast land maps and nautical charts.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, US Geological Survey, United States Army Corps of Engineers

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
301-713-3066
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 20-Aug-2013
Tropical Storm Trami and monsoon rains causing flooding in the Philippines
Tropical Storm Trami may not be making landfall in the Philippines, but it was close enough to bring heavy rainfall when combined with monsoon rains.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2013
NASA sees another new Central Pacific tropical cyclone
The Central Pacific Ocean has generated a third tropical depression this year and NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of Tropical Depression 03C far to the west of Hawaii.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2013
NASA sees Tropical Storm Pewa temporarily weaken
Tropical Storm Pewa weakened temporarily while facing adverse atmospheric conditions in the Northwestern Pacific, and NASA's Aqua satellite captured the storm in infrared light.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2013
Gentemann to receive Falkenberg Award
Chelle L. Gentemann, Ph.D., senior principal scientist at Remote Sensing Systems is the recipient of this year's Falkenberg Award. The award is given to a scientist under age 45 who has contributed to the quality of life, economic opportunities and stewardship of the planet through the use of Earth science information. Gentemann is an alumna of the University of Miami and will be honored at a banquet on Dec. 11, as part of the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.
American Geophysical Union, Earth Science Information Partnership

Contact: Barbra Gonzalez
barbgo@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-7404
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 20-Aug-2013
Global Ecology and Biogeography
Epic ocean voyages of coral larvae revealed
A computer simulation using University of Miami's Connectivity Modeling System and conducted in collaboration with the University of Bristol has revealed the epic, ocean-spanning journeys traveled by millimeter-sized coral larvae through the world's seas. The model is the first to recreate the oceanic paths along which corals disperse globally, and will eventually aid predictions of how coral reef distributions may shift with climate change.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Barbra Gonzalez
barbgo@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-7404
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 20-Aug-2013
The chemistry behind lobster color and shell disease: New American Chemical Society video
With lobster shell disease moving up the East Coast toward Maine -- now observing Maine Lobster Month -- a new video from the world's largest scientific society focuses on the disease, the chemistry of lobster shell color and why lobster shells turn red during cooking. The American Chemical Society video, the latest episode in ACS' award-winning Bytesize Science series, is at www.BytesizeScience.com.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2013
Ecological Monographs
Dams destabilize river food webs: Lessons from the Grand Canyon
Coauthor Dr. Emma Rosi-Marshall, an aquatic ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, comments, "Given the degraded state of the world's rivers, insight into food webs is essential to conserving endangered animals, improving water quality, and managing productive fisheries."
US Geological Survey

Contact: Lori M Quillen
quillenl@caryinstitute.org
845-677-7600 x121
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Public Release: 20-Aug-2013
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Peering into the heart of aquatic embryo development
Scientists using a pioneering bio-imaging system to record simultaneously the development of hundreds of aquatic embryos have discovered significant parent-offspring similarities in the timing and sequence of that development.

Contact: Andrew Merrington
andrew.merrington@plymouth.ac.uk
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 19-Aug-2013
ICES Journal of Marine Science
Divers willingness to pay for biodiversity could help conservation efforts -- Ben-Gurion U. study
According to the study published in the ICES Journal of Marine Science, divers were willing to pay to improve the reef's attributes and were able to differentiate and rank their preferences of biodiversity, numbers of fish and corals, coral species richness, fish species richness, coral size, coral abundance, and fish abundance. Respondents ranked biodiversity as the most desirable value, while fish abundance was the least important.
United States Agency for International Development Middle East Regional Cooperation Program, Halperin and the Schechter Foundation

Contact: Andrew Lavin
andrewlavin@alavin.com
516-944-4486
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Public Release: 19-Aug-2013
Geosphere
Sea levels, Kea vs. Loa volcanoes, Sierra Nevada faulting, and carbonado diamond features
Six new Gesophere articles, posted online on Aug. 14, 2013, offer insight into a variety of geologic problems, from the minute to the massive. Authors investigate inclusion and porosity patterns in a 23-carat carbonado diamond; sea-level change offshore of New Jersey; a new age for Sierra Nevada faulting; a reconstruction of the dimensions and shape of the Great Basin over the past 500 million years; and deep-water perspectives on Hawaiian volcano growth.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 19-Aug-2013
Nature Geoscience
Newly discovered ocean plume could be major source of iron
Scientists have discovered a vast plume of iron and other micronutrients more than 1,000 km long billowing from hydrothermal vents in the South Atlantic Ocean. The finding, soon to be published in the journal Nature Geoscience, calls past estimates of iron abundances into question, and may challenge researchers' assumptions about iron sources in the world's seas.
National Science Foundation-Chemical Oceanography program, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 19-Aug-2013
Geophysical Research Letters
Global sea level rise dampened by Australia floods
When enough raindrops fall over land instead of the ocean, they begin to add up. New research led by NCAR shows that three atmospheric patterns drove so much precipitation over Australia in 2010 and 2011 that the world's ocean levels dropped measurably.
NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Bob Henson
bhenson@ucar.edu
303-497-8605
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 19-Aug-2013
NASA sees Tropical Storm Unala develop and weaken quickly
NASA's Aqua satellite has been busy capturing temperature data from developing tropical cyclones around the world. Aqua captured an image of Tropical Storm Unala in the central Pacific Ocean where it formed early today, Aug. 19.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Aug-2013
NASA catches short-lived northwestern Pacific Ocean Tropical Depression 13W
The thirteenth Tropical Depression of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean season didn't last long.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Aug-2013
NASA sees Tropical Storm Trami U-turning
Tropical Storm Trami appears to be a very large storm in infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Aug-2013
NASA satellite sees Pewa become a typhoon
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the tropical cyclone known as Pewa after it strengthened into a typhoon in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Aug-2013
Nature Climate Change
Study finds cost of future flood losses in major coastal cities could be over $50 billion by 2050
Climate change combined with rapid population increases, economic growth and land subsidence could lead to a more than nine-fold increase in the global risk of floods in large port cities between now and 2050.
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Showing releases 851-875 out of 1274.

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