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Showing releases 876-900 out of 1740.

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Public Release: 15-Oct-2015
Evolution
Tiny plant shows us how living things cope with big changes
A small freshwater plant that has evolved to live in harsh seawater is giving scientists insight into how living things adapt to changes in their environment.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 15-Oct-2015
Endangered Species Research
Sex and sea turtles: New FAU study reveals impact of climate change, sea level rise
Because sea turtles don't have an X or Y chromosome, their sex is defined during development by the incubation environment. Warmer conditions produce females and cooler conditions produce males. The shift in climate is shifting turtles as well, because as the temperature of their nests change so do their reproduction patterns.
National Save the Sea Turtle Foundation, Save our Seas Foundation, Nelligan Sea Turtle Support Fund

Contact: Gisele Galoustian
ggaloust@fau.edu
561-297-2676
Florida Atlantic University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2015
Science
Ocean protection gaining momentum, but still lags progress made on land
Extraordinary progress in the past decade has brought 1.6 percent of the world's ocean to a category of 'strongly protected,' researchers say in a new analysis in the journal Science, but the accomplishments are still far behind those that have been achieved on land, and those that are urgently needed. International policy agreements call for protection of 10 percent of coastal and marine areas by 2020, while some conservation organizations and most scientists say 20-50 percent of ocean protection is needed.

Contact: Jane Lubchenco
lubchenco@oregonstate.edu
541-737-5337
Oregon State University

Public Release: 14-Oct-2015
PLOS ONE
Study shows new potential indirect effects of humans on water quality
A study published today shows that a newly studied class of water contaminants that is known to be toxic and hormone disrupting to marine animals is present likely due in part to indirect effects of human activity.

Contact: Rhonda Zurn
rzurn@umn.edu
612-626-7959
University of Minnesota

Public Release: 14-Oct-2015
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite sees strong wind shear affecting depression
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Depression Nora on Oct. 14 and saw strong wind shear pushing the bulk of clouds and showers northeast of the center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Oct-2015
BioScience
New concept to help set priorities in water management
The basic principle behind most strategies aimed at renaturalizing ecosystems is to increase biodiversity by restoring natural habitat structure. These projects often do not result in the success researchers had hoped for because the complexity of ecological relationships is so vast. Researchers have now developed a theoretical framework -- the concept of ecological simplification -- aimed at closing this gap. They tested it in two iconic river landscapes.
National Science Foundation, Montana Institute on Ecosystems

Contact: Dr. Marc Peipoch Guell
marc.peipoch@mso.umt.edu
406-243-6058
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Public Release: 14-Oct-2015
NASA's GPM sees some intense areas in Tropical Storm Koppu
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite analyzed rainfall within Tropical Storm Koppu and identified areas of some intense thunderstorms.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Oct-2015
Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems
Bubble plumes off Washington, Oregon suggest warmer ocean may be releasing frozen methane
The location of bubble plumes off the Pacific Northwest supports the idea that gradual ocean warming at about a third of a mile down may be releasing frozen methane in the seafloor.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 14-Oct-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Impacts on Europa, ocean acidification, dam removal and research papers
This week from AGU are stories on the impacts on Europa, ocean acidification, dam removal and five new research papers.

Contact: Leigh Cooper
lcooper@agu.org
202-777-7324
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 14-Oct-2015
GPM sees heavy rainfall in intensifying Tropical Depression Champi
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite found moderate to heavy rainfall occurring in Tropical Depression Champi before it strengthened into a tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Oct-2015
Nature Geoscience
New insights into the dynamics of past climate change
A new study finds that changing climate in the polar regions can affect conditions in the rest of the world far quicker than previously thought.

Contact: Sarah Collins
sarah.collins@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-65542
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 14-Oct-2015
Nature
Rising seas will drown mangrove forests
Mangrove forests around the Indo-Pacific region could be submerged by 2070, international research published today says. Even with relatively low sea-level rises, many mangrove forests had a poor outlook said Professor Catherine Lovelock, a University of Queensland ecologist.
Global Change Institute, University of Queensland, Australian Research Council

Contact: Catherine Lovelock
c.lovelock@uq.edu.au
61-733-652-304
University of Queensland

Public Release: 14-Oct-2015
Remote Sensing of the Environment
Chesapeake Bay surface water temperature is increasing over time
A new study shows that surface water temperature in the Chesapeake Bay is increasing more rapidly than air temperature, signaling a need to look at the impact of warming waters on one of the largest and most productive estuaries in the world.

Contact: Amy Pelsinsky
apelsinsky@umces.edu
410-330-1389
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP spots twenty-fifth tropical depression in Northwestern Pacific
2015 has been an active year for tropical cyclones in the northwestern Pacific Ocean as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite spotted the twenty-fifth tropical depression.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP gets an infrared look at Tropical Storm Nora
Tropical Storm Nora's cloud top temperatures appeared to be warming up on infrared imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite. Warming cloud top temperatures means less uplift in the air and a weaker storm. Nora is on a weakening trend according to NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center as wind shear continues to batter the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
NASA sees birth of Tropical Storm Koppu in Northwestern Pacific
Tropical Storm Koppu formed in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as a depression early on October 13 as NASA's Terra satellite passed over the storm and quickly intensified.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
New research maps areas most vulnerable to ocean acidification
New NOAA-led research maps the distribution of aragonite saturation state in both surface and subsurface waters of the global ocean and provides further evidence that ocean acidification is happening on a global scale. The study identifies the Arctic and Antarctic oceans, and the upwelling ocean waters off the west coasts of North America, South America and Africa as regions that are especially vulnerable to ocean acidification.

Contact: Monica Allen
monica.allen@noaa.gov
301-734-1123
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
NASA sees the short life of Tropical Cyclone 03A
Tropical Cyclone 03A formed in the Arabian Sea, Northern Indian Ocean on Oct. 10 and by Oct. 12 it weakened to a remnant low pressure area. NASA's Terra satellite happened over the storm when it developed and caught a visible image of this short-lived storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
PLOS ONE
In dryland African regions, limiting wildlife water access can reduce water quality
Water-dependent wildlife populations in sensitive African dryland regions need continued access to limited surface water resources -- even as human development increases in these areas -- because restricting access and concentrating wildlife populations along riparian regions can impact water quality and, potentially, human health.

Contact: Lynn Davis
davisl@vt.edu
540-231-6157
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
Interface
What does it take to escape the water? Plankton have clues
Dolphins and whales may attract a lot of attention when they leap dramatically out of the water. But aquatic animals thousands of times smaller are accomplished jumpers, too. Their acrobatics often go unnoticed, but understanding them could help improve engineering processes, like oil refining and wastewater treatment, that rely on controlling the interaction of small particles with air-water interfaces.
National Science Foundation, Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science at Virginia Tech

Contact: Eleanor Nelsen
enelsen@vt.edu
540-231-2761
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 12-Oct-2015
Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing
Scientists track speed of powerful internal waves
For the first time researchers directly measured the speed of a wave located 80 meters below the ocean's surface from a single satellite image. The new technique developed by researchers from the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science is a major advancement in the study of these skyscraper-high internal waves that rarely break the ocean surface.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 12-Oct-2015
Geology
Flood hazards: Vermont and Colorado as case studies
Catastrophic floods in 2011 in Vermont and 2013 in Colorado devastated many communities. While flood waters were the highest in recorded history, much of the damage done by these floods was not related to inundation by flood water, but instead caused by abundant erosion and sedimentation. These floods provided a rare opportunity to better understand controls on the locations of these different hazards.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 12-Oct-2015
Cleaning water one stroke at a time
A material created by University of California, Riverside engineers is the key component of a swimsuit that won an international design competition for its ability to clean water as a person swims.

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 12-Oct-2015
Marine mathematics helps to map undiscovered deep-water coral reefs
A team of marine scientists has discovered four new deep-water coral reefs in the Atlantic Ocean using the power of predictive mathematical models.
European Union

Contact: Andrew Merrington
andrew.merrington@plymouth.ac.uk
01-752-588-003
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 12-Oct-2015
Nature Geoscience
New study projects that melting of Antarctic ice shelves will intensify
New research published today projects a doubling of surface melting of Antarctic ice shelves by 2050 and that by 2100 melting may surpass intensities associated with ice shelf collapse, if greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel consumption continue at the present rate.
NASA, Doherty Postdoctoral Scholarship Program at WHOI, Netherlands Earth System Science Centre, Polar Program of the Netherlands Organization of Scientific Research, Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
580-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Showing releases 876-900 out of 1740.

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