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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 876-900 out of 1262.

<< < 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 > >>

Public Release: 19-Aug-2013
NASA sees Tropical Storm Trami U-turning
Tropical Storm Trami appears to be a very large storm in infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Aug-2013
NASA satellite sees Pewa become a typhoon
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the tropical cyclone known as Pewa after it strengthened into a typhoon in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Aug-2013
Nature Climate Change
Study finds cost of future flood losses in major coastal cities could be over $50 billion by 2050
Climate change combined with rapid population increases, economic growth and land subsidence could lead to a more than nine-fold increase in the global risk of floods in large port cities between now and 2050.
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 18-Aug-2013
Scientific Reports
Tiny fish make 'eyes' at their killer
Small prey fish can grow a bigger 'eye' on their rear fins as a way of distracting predators and dramatically boosting their chances of survival, new research has found. Researchers from Australia's ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies have made a world-first discovery that, when constantly threatened with being eaten, small damsel fish not only grow a larger false 'eye spot' near their tail -- but also reduce the size of their real eyes.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Oona Lonnstedt
oona.lonnstedt1@jcu.edu.au
64-670-021-8346
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 16-Aug-2013
Geology
Calving sand dunes, stress fields in Southern California, and Devonian black shale
New Geology postings discuss a vanished link between Antarctica and Australia; the West Salton Detachment fault in California, USA; chemical interaction between peridotite and intruding melts in the Northern Apennines, Italy; calving barchan dunes; the nature of black shale in the Late Devonian Appalachian Basin; the Aug. 2008 avulsion belt of the Kosi River, India; reef island formation; and a one-year record of eight quakes within dune deposits of the Navajo Sandstone, Utah, USA.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 16-Aug-2013
Erin weakens to a tropical depression over eastern Atlantic
Tropical Storm Erin ran into cooler waters and dry, stable air over the Eastern Atlantic that sapped its strength and weakening the storm to depression status. NOAA's GOES-East satellite showed the storm waning today.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Aug-2013
NASA sees Tropical Storm Pewa develop in central Pacific
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over two developing low pressure areas in the Central Pacific Ocean, just before one of them strengthened into Tropical Storm Pewa.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Aug-2013
Google, Intel founders support undersea research by UMass Amherst microbiologist
Holden says, "This doesn't happen very often with ocean research, but I'm very pleased to receive the support. This private funding shows how science research has shifted," he adds. "I still apply for grants from NSF and NASA, but ocean scientists are becoming more dependent on private philanthropy. I'm very glad that organizations outside of the federal government are interested in our research and see the value of the science."
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Schmidt Ocean Institute

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 16-Aug-2013
Evolution
University of East Anglia research shows how females choose the 'right' sperm
University of East Anglia scientists have revealed how females select the 'right' sperm to fertilize their eggs when faced with the risk of being fertilized by wrong sperm from a different species. Researchers investigated salmon and trout. They found that when eggs from each species are presented with either salmon or trout, they allow fertilization by either species' sperm. But if eggs are given a choice of both species' sperm, they favor their own species'.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 15-Aug-2013
Nature
Antarctic ice core sheds new light on how the last ice age ended
Analysis of an ice core taken by the National Science Foundation-funded West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide drilling project reveals that warming in Antarctica began about 22,000 years ago, a few thousand years earlier than suggested by previous records.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter West
pwest@nsf.gov
703-292-7530
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 15-Aug-2013
Ex-Tropical Storm Utor still raining on southern China
NASA satellite data revealed that the day after Typhoon Utor made landfall in southern China, its circulation still appeared intact despite weakening over land.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Aug-2013
NASA data showed Tropical Storm Erin forming
Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite showed strong thunderstorms had developed in the eastern Atlantic low pressure system that grew into Tropical Storm Erin.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Aug-2013
Seabirds fitted with satellite tags to track movements in Gulf of Maine
Researchers at NOAA's Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary are using satellite technology to learn more about the movement, life cycle, feeding and foraging habits of Great Shearwater seabirds in the Gulf of Maine ecosystem. Scientists have recently attached satellite transmitters to 10 birds and are tracking their movements this summer. Project collaborators include US Fish and Wildlife; the University of Massachusetts in Amherst; Acadia University in Canada, and Boston University.
NOAA, US Fish and Wildlife Service, University of Massachusetts, Boston University, Acadia University, Volgenau Foundation, Blake-Nuttall Foundation

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
301-713-3066
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 14-Aug-2013
NOAA announces additions to National System of Marine Protected Areas
NOAA announced the inclusion of 82 existing marine protected areas into the National System of Marine Protected Areas. This addition brings the total number of marine protected areas in the national system to 437. Sites in the system remain under the management of the agency that established them, but work voluntarily and cooperatively together to address common management problems, such as adapting to climate change impacts or managing emerging ocean uses.
NOAA, US Department of the Interior

Contact: Keeley Belva
keeley.belva@noaa.gov
301-713-3066
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 14-Aug-2013
Environmental Science and Technology
Successful deployment of an autonomous deep-sea explorer to search for new forms of microbial life
Scientists are reporting "a significant step forward" in proving the feasibility of launching fleets of autonomous robots that search Earth's deep oceans for exotic new life forms. Their description of successful deployment of the trailblazer for such a project -- an autonomous seafloor lander equipped with a mini-laboratory the size of a kitchen trash can that is able to detect minute traces of DNA in the deep oceans -- appears in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 14-Aug-2013
Canadian Journal of Animal Science
Spicing up your fish fillets with science
In a paper just published in the Canadian Journal of Animal Science, authors investigated strategies to increase long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in rainbow trout. They looked at the addition of coriander oil to vegetable oil-based diets to increase the bioconversion of alpha-linolenic acid to EPA and DHA.

Contact: Jenny Ryan
jenny.ryan@nrcresearchpress.com
Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)

Public Release: 14-Aug-2013
Nature
Study explains early warming of West Antarctica at end of last ice age
West Antarctica began emerging from the last ice age about 22,000 years ago -- well before other regions of Antarctica and the rest of the world. Scientists say that changes in the amount of solar energy triggered the warming of West Antarctica and the subsequent release of carbon dioxide from the Southern Ocean amplified the effect and resulted in warming on a global scale, eventually ending the ice age.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Ed Brook
brook@geo.oregonstate.edu
541-737-8197
Oregon State University

Public Release: 14-Aug-2013
Nature
Earth orbit changes key to Antarctic warming that ended last ice age
New research from an ice core taken from West Antarctica shows that the warming that ended the last ice age in Antarctica began at least two, and perhaps four, millennia earlier than previously thought.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Vince Stricherz
vinces@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 13-Aug-2013
NASA identifies heavy rainfall in South China Sea's Typhoon Utor
As Typhoon Utor was exiting the northwestern Philippines, NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead and detected some heavy rainfall in Utor's thunderstorm "feeder-bands" as it re-strengthened over the South China Sea.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Aug-2013
PeerJ
Study finds 'ray' wings sold to consumers include vulnerable species & can be mislabeled
Genetic testing by DNA Barcoding, has revealed which species are sold under the commercial term "ray wings" in Ireland and the UK. The blonde ray, given the lowest rating for sustainability in the marine conservation society's good fish guide, was the most widely sold. Samples from the only retailer to label products as originating from more sustainable sources demonstrated high levels of mislabeling, substituted by more vulnerable species. Therefore, consumers cannot make informed purchasing decisions.

Contact: Andrew Griffiths
andiff100@googlemail.com
44-781-205-1365
PeerJ

Public Release: 12-Aug-2013
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Baby corals pass the acid test
Corals can survive the early stages of their development even under the tough conditions that rising carbon emissions will impose on them says a new study from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Globally, ocean acidification remains a major concern and scientists say it could have severe consequences for the health of adult corals, however, the evidence for negative effects on the early life stages of corals is less clear cut.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Andrew Baird
andrew.baird@jcu.edu.au
61-040-028-9770
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 12-Aug-2013
Science
Seasonal carbon dioxide range expanding as more is added to Earth's atmosphere
Levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rise and fall each year as plants, through photosynthesis and respiration, take up the gas in spring and summer, and release it in fall and winter.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 12-Aug-2013
Nature
Lampreys provide hints to ancient immune cells
Lampreys have immune cells that resemble gamma delta T cells from mammals, birds and fish, researchers have found. This has implications for the evolution of the vertebrate immune system.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 12-Aug-2013
NASA satellites capture Super-Typhoon Utor before and after landfall
Four NASA satellites provided data on Super-Typhoon Utor before and after the storm made landfall in the Philippines.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Aug-2013
NASA saw Henriette fading and 2 struggling lows behind
Once a hurricane, Henriette weakened to a depression in the Central Pacific Ocean on Sunday, Aug. 11 and dissipated by Aug. 12 as two other low pressure areas continued to struggle.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 876-900 out of 1262.

<< < 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 > >>


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