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Showing releases 901-925 out of 1278.

<< < 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 > >>

Public Release: 30-Oct-2013
NASA eyes a 'decoupled' Tropical Depression Raymond
Tropical Storm Raymond weakened to a depression early on Oct. 30 and is expected to dissipate later in the day.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Oct-2013
Marine Mammal Science
Research confirms bottom-feeding behavior of humpback whales
Humpback whales are known for the complexity of their feeding techniques, which include "trapping" krill and other prey within bubble nets they produce and gulping up to two-thirds their weight in prey-laden water. Now, scientists have confirmed that humpback whales in the southern Gulf of Maine are spending more feeding time on the ocean floor than in any of these other feeding behaviors.
Office of Naval Research, NOAA

Contact: Beth Potier
beth.potier@unh.edu
603-862-1566
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 30-Oct-2013
PLOS ONE
Listen up: Oysters may use sound to select a home
Oysters begin their lives as tiny drifters, but when they mature they settle on reefs. New research from North Carolina State University shows that the sounds of the reef may attract the young oysters, helping them locate their permanent home.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tracey Peake
tracey_peake@ncsu.edu
919-515-6142
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 29-Oct-2013
Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences
Redwood trees reveal history of West Coast rain, fog, ocean conditions
Researchers have found a way to use coastal redwood trees as a window into historic climate, using oxygen and carbon atoms in the wood to detect fog and rainfall in previous seasons.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 29-Oct-2013
UCLA report urges new global policy effort to tackle crisis of plastic litter in oceans
A new report by authors from UCLA School of Law's Emmett Center on Climate Change and the Environment and UCLA's Institute of the Environment and Sustainability explores the sources and impacts of plastic marine litter, and offers domestic and international policy recommendations to tackle these growing problems--a targeted, multifaceted approach aimed at protecting ocean wildlife, coastal waters and economies, and human health.

Contact: Sara Rouche
rouche@law.ucla.edu
310-206-2221
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 29-Oct-2013
NASA sees newborn twenty-ninth Depression in the Philippine Sea
NASA infrared imagery revealed that bands of thunderstorms have been wrapping into the center of newborn Tropical Depression 29W, indicating it's organizing and strengthening in the Philippine Sea.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Oct-2013
NASA sees Tropical Storm Raymond fading fast
Satellite data showed some recent convective activity within Tropical Storm Raymond on Oct. 28 but southwesterly wind shear and cooler ocean temperatures are predicted by the National Hurricane Center to weaken the tropical storm to a remnant low on Wednesday Oct. 30, 2013.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Oct-2013
Global Change Biology
New study suggests coral reefs may be able to adapt to moderate climate change
Coral reefs may be able to adapt to moderate climate warming, improving their chance of surviving through the end of this century, if there are large reductions in carbon dioxide emissions, according to a study funded by NOAA and researched by the agency's scientists and its academic partners. Results further suggest corals have already adapted to part of the warming that has occurred.
NOAA/Coral Reef Conservation Program

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
301-713-3066
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 29-Oct-2013
NRL demonstrates capabilities of coupled oceanic and atmospheric prediction tools
Researchers demonstrate in-situ atmospheric and oceanic sensing systems and real-time operational mesoscale numerical weather prediction models at TRIDENT WARRIOR 2013.

Contact: Daniel Parry
nrlpao@nrl.navy.mil
202-767-2541
Naval Research Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Oct-2013
PLOS Biology
Events coordination during embryogenesis
A new study by Weill Cornell Medical College scientists reveals a mechanism through which the expression of genes is controlled -- a finding that highlights genetic mutations that can impair the timing of gene expression. Such mutations can affect the coordination of key events that are required for stepwise development of an organism, and can also give rise to cancer by turning on genes at the wrong time

Contact: PLOS Biology
biologypress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers quantify toxic ocean conditions during major extinction 93.9 million years ago
A research team led by UC Riverside biogeochemists reports that oxygen-free and hydrogen sulfide-rich waters extended across roughly five percent of the ocean 93.9 million years ago -- far more than the modern ocean's 0.1 percent but much less than previous estimates for this event. Across this event, a major biological extinction in the marine realm took place. The new work shows that only portions of the ocean need to contain sulfide to greatly impact biota.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
NASA catches glimpse of the brief life of Southern Indian Ocean's first tropical cyclone
The first tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season lasted about one day.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
An eye-opener: NASA sees Hurricane Raymond reborn for a brief time
Tropical Storm Raymond moved away from western Mexico and into warmer waters with less wind shear over the weekend of Oct. 26-27, where it strengthened into a hurricane again.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
Extra-Tropical Storm Lekima weakens in Northern Pacific
Once a typhoon now an extra-tropical cyclone in the far northern Pacific Ocean, Lekima is weakening over cool waters.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
Climate of the Past
El Niño is becoming more active
A new approach to analyzing geological and biological clues from the past to reconstruct El Niņo activity during the past 600 years resolves disagreements and reveals that El Niņo has become more active in recent decades. The work, published in Climate of the Past by scientists from the University of New South Wales and the University of Hawaii International Pacific Research Center, may also help yield more accurate El Niņo projections with further global warming.
Australian Research Council, National Science Foundation, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology

Contact: Gisela Speidel
gspeidel@hawaii.edu
808-956-9252
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
Nature Communications
Study maps human impacts on top ocean predators along US west coast
The California Current System along the U.S. west coast is among the richest ecosystems in the world, driven by nutrient input from coastal upwelling and supporting a great diversity of marine life. Like coastal regions in general, it is also heavily impacted by human activities. A new study reveals areas along the west coast where human impacts are highest on marine predators such as whales, seals, seabirds, and turtles.
Sloan Foundation, Packard Foundation, Moore Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
Global Change Biology
Irukandji threat to southern waters
Researchers from Griffith University's Australian Rivers Institute have conducted a series of climate change simulation experiments to investigate whether the dangerous tropical jellyfish, the Irukandji, is likely to establish breeding populations in the South East. It was found that while higher sea temperatures could provide an opportunity for adult Irukandji to expand their range south, increasing ocean acidification may inhibit the development of juveniles.

Contact: Helen Wright
helen.wright@griffith.edu.au
047-840-6565
Griffith University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
Environmental Research Letters
Melting Arctic sea ice could increase summer rainfall in northwest Europe suggests new study
A new study offers an explanation for the extraordinary run of wet summers experienced by Britain and northwest Europe between 2007 and 2012. The study found that loss of Arctic sea ice shifts the jet stream further south than normal resulting in increased rain during the summer in northwest Europe.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 27-Oct-2013
Biology Letters
Bird buffet requires surveillance
Behavior of semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) feeding during low tide in the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, surprised Guy Beauchamp, an ornithologist and research officer at the University of Montreal's Faculty of Veterinary Medicine.

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-343-7593
University of Montreal

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
NASA sees Tropical Storm Francisco becoming extra-tropical
Cold air, mid-latitude westerly winds and wind shear are taking a toll on Tropical Storm Francisco and transitioning the storm into a cold core low pressure area.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
NASA sees Typhoon Lekima stretching out and closing its eye
NASA's TRMM satellite observed Typhoon Lekima's shrinking eye on Oct. 24, and by the Oct. 25, the eye had shrunk to just 4 nautical miles.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Reading ancient climate from plankton shells
Climate changes from millions of years ago are recorded at daily rate in ancient sea shells, new research shows.

Contact: Simon Redfern
satr@cam.ac.uk
44-075-303-12963
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Cold front coming to swallow remnants of Tropical Storm Lorenzo
Satellite imagery on Oct. 25 showed a cold front approaching the remnants of Tropical Storm Lorenzo in the central Atlantic Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Mexico does not love Raymond, NASA sees weaker storm
South-central Mexico was inundated with heavy rains from Hurricane Raymond during the week of Oct. 20, and Raymond has finally weakened to a tropical storm and is moving away from the coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
WIREs Climate Change
Scientists develop new method to help global coasts adapt to sea-level rise
A team of scientists, led by the University of Southampton, has developed a new method to help the world's coasts adapt to global sea-level rises over the next 100 years.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Showing releases 901-925 out of 1278.

<< < 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 > >>


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