Press Releases

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Showing releases 901-925 out of 1567.

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Public Release: 19-Feb-2015
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Probiotic toxin fights coldwater disease in rainbow trout
The rainbow trout is a work of art but when the freshwater fish falls prey to Coldwater Disease, its colorful body erodes into ragged ulcers. The bacterial infection can kill up to 30 percent of hatchery stock and causes millions in economic loss. Now, scientists at University of Idaho and Washington State University have found a simple and effective method to combat Coldwater Disease using some of the trout's own intestinal bacteria as probiotics.
Western Regional Aquaculture Center, Idaho State Board of Education

Contact: Doug Call
drcall@wsu.edu
509-335-6313
Washington State University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2015
NASA covers Tropical Cyclone Lam's landfall in northern territory
As Tropical Cyclone Lam made landfall in Australia's Northern Territory on Feb. 19 (EST), NASA satellites and instruments gathered data on the storm's structure and behavior. Two instruments aboard NASA's Aqua satellite, NASA-JAXA's GPM core satellite, the RapidScat instrument aboard the International Space Station provided information to forecasters before and after Lam came ashore.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Feb-2015
Journal of Waterway, Port, Coastal and Ocean Engineering
Study outlines impact of tsunami on the Columbia River
Engineers at Oregon State University have completed one of the most precise evaluations yet done about the impact of a major tsunami event on the Columbia River, what forces are most important in controlling water flow and what areas might be inundated.

Contact: David Hill
david.hill@oregonstate.edu
541-737-4939
Oregon State University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2015
Marine Pollution Bulletin
New study reveals the global impact of debris on marine life
Nearly 700 species of marine animal have been recorded as having encountered manmade debris such as plastic and glass according to the most comprehensive impact study in more than a decade.

Contact: Andrew Merrington
andrew.merrington@plymouth.ac.uk
44-175-258-8003
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
UC Riverside biogeochemist receives high honor
Timothy Lyons, a distinguished professor of biogeochemistry in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of California, Riverside, has been named a 2015 Geochemical Fellow by the Geochemical Society and the European Association of Geochemistry. The honorary title is awarded to outstanding scientists who have made major contributions to the field of geochemistry. Lyons explores the evolving compositions of the early atmosphere and oceans. He is one of 10 scientists named 2015 Geochemical Fellows.

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
NASA satellites reveal Tropical Cyclone Lam strengthening
NASA's Aqua satellite saw powerful, cold, high thunderstorms circling the center of strengthening Tropical Cyclone Lam as it appeared to cover most of the northern half of Australia's Gulf of Carpentaria.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
NASA satellite sees newborn Tropical Cyclone Marcia threatening Queensland
Part of the Queensland, Australia's eastern coast is now under warnings from Tropical Cyclone Marcia. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Marcia that showed the storm had consolidated and organized within the last day.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Size matters in the battle to adapt to diverse environments and avoid extinction
By examining research on global patterns of amphibian diversification over hundreds of millions of years, De Lisle and Rowe discovered that 'sexually dimorphic' species -- those in which males and females differ in size, for example -- are at lower risk of extinction and better able to adapt to diverse environments.

Contact: Kim Luke
kim.luke@utoronto.ca
416-978-4352
University of Toronto

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Global Change Biology
Sardines move north due to ocean warming
Sardines, anchovies and mackerels play a crucial role in marine ecosystems, as well as having a high commercial value. However, the warming of waters makes them vanish from their usual seas and migrate north, as confirmed by a pioneering study analyzing 57,000 fish censuses from 40 years. The researchers warn that coastal towns dependent on these fishery resources must adapt their economies.

Contact: SINC Team
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Nature
Major changes in coastal marine ecosystems forecasted in new climate models
By the end of the 21st century, climate change will significantly alter an important oceanographic process that regulates the productivity of fisheries and marine ecosystems, Northeastern researchers report in a new paper in published online Wednesday in the journal Nature.

Contact: Emily Bhatti
e.bhatti@neu.edu
617-373-3287
Northeastern University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Nature
Global warming to increase ocean upwelling, but fisheries impact uncertain
A report to be published Thursday in the journal Nature suggests that global warming may increase upwelling in several ocean current systems around the world by the end of this century, especially at high latitudes, and will cause major changes in marine biodiversity.
Northeastern University, National Science Foundation

Contact: Bruce Menge
mengeb@science.oregonstate.edu
541-737-5358
Oregon State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
UM Rosenstiel School professor receives $2.5 million to study Agulhas Current
Scientists at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science received a $2.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation to conduct a climate research study off the coast of South Africa.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
When estimating fish populations, seeing is believing
By adding video cameras to fish traps, scientists get more precise abundance estimates for several important species of reef fish, including red snapper and gag grouper. In the accompanying audio podcast, a scientist and a fisherman share very different perspectives on why this is important.

Contact: Jennie Lyons
jennie.lyons@noaa.gov
301-427-8003
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
National Invasive Species Awareness Week 2015
UT Arlington zebra mussels expert to receive national recognition
UT Arlington biology professor emeritus Robert McMahon, widely known for his research of invasive zebra mussels, will receive the National Invasive Species Council's Lifetime Achievement Award Feb. 22-28 in Washington, D.C.

Contact: Bridget Lewis
blewis@uta.edu
817-272-3317
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Royal Society Open Science
New species, the 'Ruby Seadragon,' discovered by Scripps researchers
While researching the two known species of seadragons as part of an effort to understand and protect the exotic and delicate fish, scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego made a startling discovery: a third species of sea dragon, named the 'Ruby Seadragon' because of its bright red colors.
Lowe Family Foundation

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
NASA satellites catch birth of Tropical Cyclone Lam in Gulf of Carpentaria
After Tropical Cyclone Lam formed in the northern Gulf of Carpentaria on Feb. 17, two NASA satellites provided data on the storm. NASA's Aqua satellite and NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Global Precipitation Measurement core satellite captured images of the newborn storm showing cloud extent and rainfall rates.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Journal of Geophysical Research -- Oceans
This week From AGU: Oklahoma earthquake faults, earthquake monitoring, and sea ice
The Feb. 17, 2015, edition of This Week From AGU features articles Oklahoma earthquake faults, earthquake monitoring, and sea ice.

Contact: Mary Catherine Adams
mcadams@agu.org
202-777-7530
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Marine Biology
Mapping seascapes in the deep ocean
Researchers from University of Southampton have developed a new, automated method for classifying hundreds of miles of the deep sea floor, in a way that is more cost efficient, quicker and more objective than previously possible.
European Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-3212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Marine and Freshwater Research
White sharks grow more slowly and mature much later than previously thought
A new study on white sharks in the western North Atlantic indicates they grow more slowly and mature much later than previously thought. The findings, published online in Marine and Freshwater Research, present the first reliable growth curve for this species in the western North Atlantic. The results: males are sexually mature around age 26 and females around age 33, much later than currently accepted estimates of 4-10 years for males and 7-13 years for females.
National Marine Fisheries Service

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Environmental Science & Technology
Satellite images reveal ocean acidification from space
Pioneering techniques that use satellites to monitor ocean acidification are set to revolutionize the way that marine biologists and climate scientists study the ocean. This new approach, that will be published Feb. 17, 2015 in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, offers remote monitoring of large swathes of inaccessible ocean from satellites that orbit the Earth some 700 km above our heads.
European Space Agency

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Complex nerve-cell signaling traced back to common ancestor of humans and sea anemones
New research shows that a burst of evolutionary innovation in the genes responsible for electrical communication among nerve cells in our brains occurred over 600 million years ago in a common ancestor of humans and the sea anemone. The research reveals many of these genes, which when mutated in humans can lead to neurological disease, first evolved in the common ancestor of people and a group of animals that includes jellyfish, coral, and sea anemones.

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Current Biology
Molecular evidence for the loss of 3 basic tastes in penguins
A University of Michigan-led study of penguin genetics has concluded that the flightless aquatic birds lost three of the five basic vertebrate tastes -- sweet, bitter and the savory, meaty taste known as umami -- more than 20 million years ago and never regained them.
National Institutes of Health, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Wuhan University

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Current Biology
Genetic evidence shows penguins have 'bad taste'
Penguins apparently can't enjoy or even detect the savory taste of the fish they eat or the sweet taste of fruit. A new analysis of the genetic evidence reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Feb. 16 suggests that the flightless, waddling birds have lost three of the five basic tastes over evolutionary time. For them, it appears, food comes in only two flavors: salty and sour.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 15-Feb-2015
Ecology Letters
Cold-blooded animals grow bigger in the warm on land, but smaller in warm water
Scientists studying arthropods, the group of cold-blooded animals that includes crabs and insects, have found that individuals within species living on land tend to grow to a larger size in the warm and nearer the equator, but that the reverse is true of species found in water.

Contact: Will Hoyles
w.hoyles@qmul.ac.uk
07-772-512-519
Queen Mary, University of London

Public Release: 13-Feb-2015
International Society for Microbial Ecology Journal
Thames study: Rivers can be a source antibiotic resistance
Rivers and streams could be a major source of antibiotic resistance in the environment. The discovery comes following a study on the Thames river by scientists at the University of Warwick's School of Life Sciences and the University of Exeter Medical School. The study found that greater numbers of resistant bacteria exist close to some waste water treatment works, and that these plants are likely to be responsible for at least half of the increase observed.
Natural Environment Research Council, European Science Foundation, Eureopean Regional Development Fund

Contact: Tom Frew
a.t.frew@warwick.ac.uk
44-024-765-75910
University of Warwick

Showing releases 901-925 out of 1567.

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