Press Releases

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Showing releases 901-925 out of 1631.

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Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Current Biology
Vampire squid discovery shows how little we know of the deep sea
Among soft-bodied cephalopods, vampire squid live life at a slower pace. At ocean depths from 500 to 3,000 meters, they don't swim so much as float, and they get by with little oxygen while consuming a low-calorie diet of zooplankton and detritus. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on April 20 have found that vampire squid differ from all other living coleoid cephalopods in their reproductive strategy as well.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
Cell Press

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Journal of Great Lakes Research
Model offers more ease, precision for managing invasive Asian carp
The likelihood of Asian carp eggs being kept in suspension and hatching in the St. Joseph River in Michigan has been further evaluated using a model that examines a range of multiple flow and water temperature scenarios. Results illustrate the highest percentage of Asian carp eggs at risk of hatching occurs when the streamflow is low and when the water temperature is high.

Contact: Jennifer LaVista
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Fish type, body size can help predict nutrient recycling rates
The nutrients excreted by fish in their 'pee' may be critical to the health of coastal ecosystems. But knowing whether generalizations can be made about how to predict these nutrient levels in various ecosystems has vexed researchers -- until now.
National Science Foundation, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Mick Kulikowski
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
GPM sees wind shear affecting remnants of Extra-tropical Cyclone Joalane
The GPM satellite showed the effects of wind shear and waning rainfall rates in Extra-tropical Cyclone Joalane as it was moving in a southeasterly direction through the Southern Indian Ocean.

Contact: Rob Gutro
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
New tool to connect geoscience information to decision makers
The Critical Issues Research Database seeks to connect end-users to the wealth of information available on issues at the intersection of geoscience and society such as the occurrence of natural resources, hazard mitigation and pollution risks.

Contact: Leila Gonzales
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Repeated marine predator evolution tracks changes in ancient and Anthropocene oceans
A team of Smithsonian scientists synthesized decades of scientific discoveries to illuminate the common and unique patterns driving the extraordinary transitions that whales, dolphins, seals and other species underwent as they moved from land to sea. Drawing on recent breakthroughs in diverse fields such as paleontology, molecular biology and conservation ecology, their findings offer a comprehensive look at how life in the ocean has responded to environmental change from the Triassic to the Anthropocene.
Peter Buck Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Katie Sabella

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Current Biology
Video: Octopuses have unique way to control their 'odd' forms
The body plan of octopuses is nothing if not unique, with a sophisticated brain in a soft, bilaterally symmetrical body, encircled by eight radially symmetrical and incredibly flexible arms. Now, researchers reporting the first detailed kinematic analysis of octopus arm coordination in crawling show that the animals have a unique motor control strategy to match their 'odd' form. The researchers report their findings in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on April 16.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
Cell Press

Public Release: 15-Apr-2015
Study will parse evolutionary shift between life in water and on land
University of Kansas researcher Andrew Short will analyze South American water scavenger beetles' transition between aquatic and terrestrial living -- and in the process learn more about the mechanics of evolution itself.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brendan M Lynch
University of Kansas

Public Release: 15-Apr-2015
Biology Letters
Longest mammal migration raises questions about distinct species
A team of scientists from the United States and Russia has documented the longest migration of a mammal ever recorded -- a round-trip trek of nearly 14,000 miles by a whale identified as a critically endangered species that raises questions about its status as a distinct species.
US Office of Naval Research, Exxon Neftegas Limited

Contact: Bruce Mate
Oregon State University

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Royal Society Open Science
Research details 40 million-year-old family tree of baleen whales
New research from New Zealand's University of Otago is providing the most comprehensive picture of the evolutionary history of baleen whales, which are not only the largest animals ever to live on earth, but also among the most unusual.
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, The Geoscience Society of New Zealand, The Scottish Association for Marine Science, The Systematic Association/Linnean Society of London, The Paleontological Society

Contact: Felix Mars
University of Otago

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Climate connections
Global climate has undergone periods of stability, but also instability, with abrupt, rapid and substantial climate changes occurring as a consequence of natural processes scientists still don't understand. University of South Carolina paleoceanographer Kelly Gibson contributed to the field in a recent paper, which demonstrates the influence of rapid climate change on marine ecosystems near Venezuela tens of thousands of years ago and shows how changes there were accompanied by simultaneous changes globally.

Contact: Steven Powell
University of South Carolina

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
The life force of African rivers
A new study shows the ecological importance of hippopotamus-vectored subsidies.

Contact: Julie Cohen
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Seeing the unseen: PET/CT scans reveal worms' hidden life
What are lugworms and other small animals doing in the seabed? Until now scientists have not been able to study these animals without disturbing them, but thanks to modern PET/CT scans, now we can study their hidden life.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 13-Apr-2015
NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Solo dissipating
Tropical Cyclone Solo was dissipating over the Southwestern Pacific Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on April 13, 2015.

Contact: Rob Gutro
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Coexisting in a sea of competition
Diversity of life abounds on Earth, and there's no need to look any farther than the ocean's surface for proof. There are over 200,000 species of phytoplankton alone, and all of those species of microscopic marine plants that form the base of the marine food web need the same basic resources to grow -- light and nutrients.
US Department of Defense, National Science Foundation, DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Contact: WHOI Media Relations Office
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 13-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Fragment of continental crust found under south east Iceland
An international team, including researchers at the University of Liverpool, have shown that south east Iceland is underlain by continental crust.

Contact: Sarah Stamper
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 13-Apr-2015
Nature Climate Change
Warming seas pose habitat risk for fishy favorites
Popular North Sea fish such as haddock, plaice and lemon sole could become less common on our menus because they will be constrained to preferred habitat as seas warm, according to a study published today in Nature Climate Change.

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
University of Exeter

Public Release: 10-Apr-2015
What life was like for newborn giant sea lizards during the age of the dinosaur
Many scientists have studied fossils from gigantic marine lizards called mosasaurs that lived at the time of the dinosaurs and flourished in ancient seas, but little is known about aspects of their breeding and birth. Investigators have gained new insights from young mosasaur specimens collected over 100 years ago that had previously been thought to belong to ancient marine birds. Their findings are published in Palaeontology.

Contact: Dawn Peters

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Smithsonian's Panama debate fueled by zircon dating
New evidence published in Science by Smithsonian geologists dates the closure of an ancient seaway at 13 to 15 million years ago and challenges accepted theories about the rise of the Isthmus of Panama and its impact on world climate and animal migrations.

Contact: Beth King
202-633-4700 x28216
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Dynamic dead zones alter fish catches in Lake Erie
Lake Erie's dead zones are actually quite active, greatly affecting fish distributions, catch rates and the effectiveness of fishing gear.

Contact: Marisa Lubeck
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Joalane's winds consolidate around its eye
The RapidScat instrument that flies aboard the International Space Station provided data about Tropical Cyclone Joalane's surface winds that showed how the strongest sustained winds consolidated as the tropical cyclone intensified and developed an eye. As of April 9, warnings were in effect at Rodrigues Island in the Southern Indian Ocean as Joalane approached.

Contact: Rob Gutro
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
'Warm blob' in Pacific Ocean linked to weird weather across the US
An unusually warm patch of surface water, nicknamed 'the blob' when it emerged in early 2014, is part of a Pacific Ocean pattern that may be affecting everything from West Coast fisheries and water supplies to East Coast snowstorms.
NOAA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
University of Washington

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Ferromanganese crusts record past climates
The onset of northern hemispheric glaciation cycles three million years ago has dramatically changed Arctic climate. Scientists of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Germany have now for the first time reconstructed the history of Arctic climate based on records archived in ferromanganese crusts. The study, a collaboration with the United States Geological Survey and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, has now been published in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters.

Contact: Dr. Andreas Villwock
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Deep Sea Research II
Dispersant used to clean Deepwater Horizon spill more toxic to corals than the oil
The dispersant used to remediate the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is more toxic to cold-water corals in lower concentrations than the spilled oil.
Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative

Contact: Preston M. Moretz
Temple University

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Environmental Science & Technology
Road salt guidelines need review to protect food chain in lakes: York U study
The study, conducted in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, suggests that lake and highway authorities consider adjusting road salt use protocols to protect aquatic life such as the water flea, by taking the nutritional status of the lakes into account. In particular, the study suggests revising the Water Quality Guideline for chloride, especially for lakes near winter-maintained roads on the Canadian Shield that tend to have very low nutrient levels.

Contact: Gloria Suhasini
York University

Showing releases 901-925 out of 1631.

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