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Showing releases 901-925 out of 1328.

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Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
Biology Letters
Sunken logs create new worlds for seafloor animals
When it comes to food, most of the deep sea is a desert. In this food-poor environment, even bits of dead wood, waterlogged enough to sink, can support thriving communities of specialized animals. A new paper by biologists at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute shows that wood-boring clams serve as 'ecosystem engineers,' making the organic matter in the wood available to other animals that colonize wood falls in the deep waters of Monterey Canyon.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Kim Fulton-Bennett
kfb@mbari.org
831-775-1835
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
NASA satellite sees Tropical Depression Peipah crawling toward Philippines
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the remnants of Tropical Depression Peipah on April 9 as the storm slowly approached the Philippines from the east. According to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, Peipah is now not expected to make landfall in eastern Visayas until April 12.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study tests theory that life originated at deep sea vents
One of the greatest mysteries facing humans is how life originated on Earth. Scientists have determined approximately when life began, roughly 3.8 billion years ago, but there is still intense debate about exactly how life began. One possibility -- that simple metabolic reactions emerged near ancient seafloor hot springs, enabling the leap from a non-living to a living world -- has grown in popularity in the last two decades.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Water users can reduce the risk of spreading invasive species
Foreign species that are devastating water ecosystems could be 'hitchhiking' around Britain on canoeists' and anglers' kit, according to a new study.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture

Contact: Chris Bunting
c.j.bunting@leeds.ac.uk
44-011-334-32049
University of Leeds

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Emerging Infectious Diseases
Sea otters can get the flu, too
Northern sea otters living off the coast of Washington state were infected with the same H1N1 flu virus that caused the world-wide pandemic in 2009, according to a new US Geological Survey and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study.

Contact: Gail Moede Rogall
gmrogall@usgs.gov
608-270-2438
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite reveals Tropical Cyclone Ita strengthening
Tropical Cyclone Ita's maximum sustained winds have increased over the last day and NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center with a visible look at the storm on April 8.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
NASA satellite sees Tropical Depression Peipah approaching Philippines
As Tropical Depression Peipah continues moving toward the central Philippines, NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and took an infrared look at the cloud top temperatures for clues about its strength.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Study: Black carbon is ancient by the time it reaches seafloor
A fraction of the carbon that finds its way into Earth's oceans -- the black soot and charcoal residue of fires -- stays there for thousands for years. A first-of-its-kind analysis shows how some black carbon breaks away and hitches a ride to the ocean floor on passing particles.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
ZooKeys
A new tiny species of crayfish from the swamps of coastal eastern Australia
Hidden in one of Australia's most developed and fastest growing areas lives one of the world's smallest freshwater crayfish species. Robert B. McCormack, the team leader for the Australian Crayfish Project, described the new species belonging to the genus Gramastacus, after eight years of research in the swamps and creeks of coastal New South Wales, Australia. The study was published in the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Rob McCormack
acp@aabio.com.au
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Environmental Biology of Fishes
Longer catch-and-release time leaves largemouth bass nests more vulnerable to predators
During spawning season, a largemouth bass male attentively guards its nest. Recent research at the University of Illinois found that catch-and-release angling could give bass predators the perfect opportunity to consume the young. In fact, the time spent away from the nest during a catch-and-release event and the subsequent exhaustion it creates for the male are critical to the survival of the embryos, particularly in lakes with high densities of brood predators.

Contact: Debra Levey Larson
dlarson@illinois.edu
217-244-2880
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Ita near Papua New Guinea
The twenty-third tropical cyclone of the Southern Pacific tropical cyclone season has developed near the Solomon Islands and strengthened into Tropical Storm Ita on April 5.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Tropical Cyclone Peipah passes Palau, Philippines prepare
Tropical Cyclone Peipah passed the island of Palau on April 5 moving through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as it heads for a landfall in the Philippines.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
NASA sees Tropical Depression 05W's bulk west of center
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Depression 05W on April 4 at 07:09 UTC/3:09 a.m. EDT. The VIIRS instrument captured a visible picture of the storm, revealing most of the clouds and thunderstorms were west of the center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
ZooKeys
A new species of horseshoe worm discovered in Japan after a 62-year gap
A team of Japanese scientists, lead by Dr. Hirose recently described a new species of horseshoe worm Phoronis emigi from sandy bottom at 33 m depth in Amakusa, Japan. This is the first new horseshoe worm species since the discovery of Phoronis pallida by Silen in 1952, 62 years ago. This study was published in the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Dr. Masato Hirose
mhirose@aori.u-tokyo.ac.jp
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Marine Mammal Science
Tracking sperm whales' ecology through stomach contents
'Understanding what resources support populations of these incredibly rare animals is important to conservation,' the lead author says of the pygmy and dwarf sperm whales she studied. 'If there are changes in the environment or their prey, we can now hope to better anticipate the potential impacts. There had been quite a knowledge gap about these animals, but this work gives us an idea of their ecological niche and requirements in the current environment.'
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Center for Marine Science at UNC Wilmington

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Geology
Geology spans the minute and gigantic, from skeletonized leaves in China to water on mars
New Geology studies include a mid-Cretaceous greenhouse world; the Vredefort meteoric impact event and the Vredefort dome, South Africa; shallow creeping faults in Italy; a global sink for immense amounts of water on Mars; the Funeral Mountains, USA; insect-mediated skeletonization of fern leaves in China; first-ever tectonic geomorphology study in Bhutan; the Ethiopian Large Igneous Province; the Central Andean Plateau; the Scandinavian Ice Sheet; the India-Asia collision zone; the Snake River Plain; and northeast Brazil.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Lithosphere
A once-only cataclysmic event and other mysteries of earth's crust and upper mantle
The April 2014 Lithosphere is now available in print. Locations covered include the Acatlán Complex, Mexico; east Yilgarn craton, Australia; the eastern Paganzo basin, Argentina; the hotspot-related Yellowstone crescent, USA; and the western Alps. Locations investigated in four new papers published online on 2 April include the Banks Island assemblage in Alaska and British Columbia; The Diligencia basin of the Orocopia Mountains in California; a US post-Grenville large igneous province; and South Island, New Zealand.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite flies over newborn Tropical Depression 05W
The fifth tropical depression of the northwestern Pacific Ocean tropical cyclone season formed far from land as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm on April 4.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Science
Hot mantle drives elevation, volcanism along mid-ocean ridges
Using data from seismic waves, scientists have shown that temperature deep in Earth's mantle controls the elevation and volcanic activity along mid-ocean ridges, colossal mountain ranges that line the ocean floor. The findings, published this week in Science, bolster the idea that warm mantle plumes are responsible for 'hot spot' volcanism, and shed new light on how temperature in the depths of the mantle influences the contours of the Earth's crust.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
River ice reveals new twist on Arctic melt
A new study led by Lance Lesack, a Simon Fraser University geographer and Faculty of Environment professor, has discovered unexpected climate-driven changes in the mighty Mackenzie River's ice breakup. This discovery may help resolve the complex puzzle underlying why Arctic ice is disappearing more rapidly than expected. Lesack is the lead author on 'Local spring warming drives earlier river-ice breakup in a large Arctic delta,' published recently in Geophysical Research Letters.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone's Hellen's lively remnants
Powerful Tropical Cyclone Hellen rapidly weakened after hitting northwestern Madagascar, but Hellen's remnants have recently started to show signs of life. The TRMM satellite flew over these remnants in the Mozambique Channel on April 2, 2014, at 01:43 UTC.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Magnetic anomaly deep within Earth's crust reveals Africa in North America
The repeated cycles of plate tectonics that have led to collision and assembly of large supercontinents and their breakup and formation of new ocean basins have produced continents that are collages of bits and pieces of other continents. Figuring out the origin and make-up of continental crust formed and modified by these tectonic events is vital to understanding Earth's geology and is important for many applied fields, such as oil, gas, and gold exploration.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Don't move a mussel (or a clam, or a snail)
Anyone that has spent time at a seaside pier has witnessed the destruction barnacles wreak on boat hulls. But biofouling animals are not limited to marine environments. A new paper published in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment estimates that the global management of freshwater mussels, clams, and other clinging animals costs $277 million US dollars annually.

Contact: Lori Quillen
quillenl@caryinstitute.org
845-677-7600 x233
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
New project to help millions of people living in deltas adapt to climate change
Researchers from the University of Southampton are leading an international project to understand the effect of climate change on people living in deltas in South Asia and Africa, and how they respond. The $13.5m Canadian dollar DECCMA project is funded by Canada's International Development Research Centre and the UK's Department for International Development.
International Development Research Centre

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
Extreme weather events provide window for scientists studying Amazon climate change
Extreme weather events in the Amazon Basin are giving NASA-funded scientists an opportunity to predict the impacts of climate change and deforestation on ecological processes and ecosystem services of the Amazon River wetlands.
NASA

Contact: Leandro Castello
leandro@vt.edu
540-231-5046
Virginia Tech

Showing releases 901-925 out of 1328.

<< < 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 > >>