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Showing releases 926-950 out of 1541.

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Public Release: 31-Dec-2014
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite sees strong wind shear tearing Jangmi apart
Tropical Depression Jangmi encountered strong southeasterly vertical wind shear in the Sulu Sea and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible picture of the storm on Dec. 31.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Dec-2014
PLOS ONE
Unique Sulawesi frog gives birth to tadpoles
Frogs exhibit an amazing variety of reproductive behaviors, ranging from brooding their eggs in their mouths to carrying tadpoles on their backs. Fewer than a dozen species of 6,000+ worldwide have developed internal fertilization, and some of these give birth to froglets instead of eggs. One species that has internal fertilization, a fanged frog from the island of Sulawesi in Indonesia, has been observed to give direct birth to tadpoles, which is unique among amphibians.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
NASA sees a weaker Tropical Depression Jangmi slide into Sulu Sea
Tropical storm Jangmi, known in the Philippines as 'Seniang' weakened to a tropical depression as it moved into the Sulu Sea and NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the storm that showed its eastern side was still affecting the central and northern Philippines on Dec. 30.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
NASA sees heaviest rainfall north of Tropical Cyclone Kate's eye
As Tropical Cyclone Kate continues moving southwest through the Southern Indian Ocean, NASA/JAXA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed overhead on Dec. 30 and measured the rainfall rates happening throughout the storm. Kate had strengthened since Dec. 29 and developed an eye.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Dec-2014
NASA spots Tropical Storm Jangmi moving into Sulu Sea
NASA's Aqua satellite saw Tropical Storm Jangmi as it moved through the central and southern Philippines on Dec. 29. Jangmi is known locally in the Philippines as Tropical Storm Seniang.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Dec-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Kate in open ocean
Tropical Cyclone Kate peaked in strength on Dec. 28, and NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm on Dec. 29 as it began weakening over the open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Dec-2014
PLOS ONE
What are the mechanisms of zooxanthella expulsion from coral?
Coral bleaching, which often results in the mass mortality of corals and in the collapse of coral reef ecosystems, has become an important issue around the world, with the number of coral reefs decreasing annually. Our research group with its collaborators demonstrated that corals more actively digest and expel damaged symbiotic zooxanthellae under conditions of thermal stress, and that this is likely to be a mechanism that helps corals to cope with environmental change.
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan

Contact: Norifumi Miyokawa
pr-research@office.hiroshima-u.ac.jp
Hiroshima University

Public Release: 24-Dec-2014
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite spots birth of Tropical Cyclone Kate
The tropical low pressure area previously known as System 95S organized and strengthened into Tropical Cyclone Kate on Dec. 24 and the Cocos Keeling Islands are expected to feel its effects on Dec. 25 and 26. NASA-NOAA's Suomi-NPP satellite passed over Kate after it formed.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Study pumps up the volume on understanding of marine invertebrate hearing
Noise pollution in the ocean is increasingly recognized as harmful to marine mammals, affecting their ability to communicate, find mates, and hunt for food. But what impact does noise have on invertebrates -- a critical segment of the food web?

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
ICES Journal of Marine Science
Distribution of fish on the northeast US shelf influenced by both fishing and climate
Scientists studying the distribution of four commercial and recreational fish stocks in Northeast US waters have found that climate change can have major impacts on the distribution of fish, but the effects of fishing can be just as important and occur on a more immediate time scale. The four species studied -- black sea bass, scup, summer flounder, and southern New England/Mid-Atlantic Bight winter flounder -- have varied in abundance and have experienced heavy fishing pressure at times over the past 40 years.
National Research Council Fellowship, National Marine Fisheries Service

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
221 new species described by the California Academy of Sciences in 2014
In 2014, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added 221 new plant and animal species to our family tree. The new species include 110 ants, 16 beetles, three spiders, 28 fishes, 24 sea slugs, two marine worms, 9 barnacles, two octocorals, 25 plants, one waterbear, and one tiny mammal.

Contact: Haley Bowling
hbowling@calacademy.org
415-379-5123
California Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Modern genetics confirm ancient relationship between fins and hands
Efforts to connect the evolutionary transition from fish fins to wrist and fingers with the genetic machinery for this adaptation have fallen short because they focused on the wrong fish. Now, researchers describe the genetic machinery for autopod assembly in a non-model fish, the spotted gar.
The Brinson Foundation, National Science Foundation, Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development, National Institutes of Health, Volkswagen Foundation, The Alexander von Humboldt-Foundation

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Nature Geoscience
Coral reveals long-term link between Pacific winds, global climate
New research indicates that shifts in Pacific trade winds played a key role in twentieth century climate variation and are likely again influencing global temperatures. The study, led by NCAR and the University of Arizona, uses a novel method of analyzing coral chemistry to reveal winds from a century ago.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, University of Arizona, Philanthropic Education Organization, UK Natural Environment Research Council, US Department of Energy

Contact: David Hosansky
hosansky@ucar.edu
303-497-8611
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Freshwater Biology
Alaska fish adjust to climate change by following the food
Not all species may suffer from climate change. A new analysis shows that Dolly Varden, a species of char common in southeast Alaska, adjust their migrations so they can keep feasting on a key food source -- salmon eggs -- even as shifts in climate altered the timing of salmon spawning.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Nature Climate Change
New challenges for ocean acidification research
To continue its striking development, ocean acidification research needs to bridge between its diverging branches towards an integrated assessment. This is the conclusion drawn by Professor Ulf Riebesell from the Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and Dr. Jean-Pierre Gattuso from the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie. In a commentary in the journal Nature Climate Change, the two internationally renowned experts reflect on the lessons learned from ocean acidification research and highlight future challenges.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
0049-431-600-2807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Trade winds ventilate the tropical oceans
Long-term observations indicate that the oxygen minimum zones in the tropical oceans have expanded in recent decades. The reason is still unknown. Now scientists at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the Collaborative Research Centre 754 'Climate - Biogeochemical Interactions in the Tropical Ocean' have found an explanation with the help of model simulations: A natural fluctuation of the trade winds. The study has been published in the international journal Geophysical Research Letters.
Collaborative Research Centre

Contact: Olaf Duteil
oduteil@geomar.de
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Annals of Botany
A vegetarian carnivorous plant
Carnivorous plants catch and digest tiny animals in order and derive benefits for their nutrition. Interestingly the trend towards vegetarianism seems to overcome carnivorous plants as well. The aquatic carnivorous bladderwort, which can be found in many lakes and ponds worldwide, does not only gain profit from eating little animals but also by consuming algae and pollen grains.

Contact: Alun Salt
ANNALSBOTANY@le.ac.uk
Oxford University Press

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
2014 AGU Fall Meeting
Earth's Future
NOAA establishes 'tipping points' for sea level rise related flooding
By 2050, a majority of US coastal areas are likely to be threatened by 30 or more days of flooding each year due to dramatically accelerating impacts from sea level rise, according to a new NOAA study, published today in the American Geophysical Union's online peer-reviewed journal Earth's Future.
NOAA

Contact: Keeley Belva
Keeley.Belva@noaa.gov
301-643-6463
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
550-million-year-old fossils provide new clues about fossil formation
A new study from University of Missouri and Virginia Tech researchers is challenging accepted ideas about how ancient soft-bodied organisms become part of the fossil record. Findings suggest that bacteria involved in the decay of those organisms play an active role in how fossils are formed -- often in a matter of just a few tens to hundreds of years. Understanding the relationship between decay and fossilization will inform future study and help researchers interpret fossils in a new way.
NASA Exobiology and Evolutionary Biology Program, NASA Astrobiology Institute, National Science Foundation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
Journal of Sustainable Tourism
Policy action urgently needed to protect Hawaii's dolphins
Tourism is increasing pressure on Hawaii's spinner dolphins. A new Duke-led study shows that long-proposed federal regulations to limit daytime access to bays where the dolphins rest are greatly needed, but local, community-based conservation measures tailored to each individual bay will speed their acceptance. A one-size-fits-all approach will not work.
NOAA, Marine Mammal Commission, State of Hawaii, Dolphin Quest

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
2014 AGU Fall Meeting
Colorado River Delta greener after engineered pulse of water
The engineered spring flood that brought water to previously dry reaches of the lower Colorado River and its delta resulted in greener vegetation, the germination of new vegetation along the river and a temporary rise in the water table, according to new results from the binational team of scientists studying the water's effects. The team's latest findings will be presented at the American Geophysical Union's annual meeting the afternoon of Dec. 18.

Contact: Mari N. Jensen
mnjensen@email.arizona.edu
520-626-9635
University of Arizona

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
Journal of the American Water Resources Association
National model of restoration: Nine Mile Run
A study by a Pitt hydrologist shows that one of the largest urban-stream restorations in the United States has led to the recovery of fish and, more importantly, a groundswell of local support.

Contact: Joe Miksch
jmiksch@pitt.edu
412-624-4356
University of Pittsburgh

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
PLOS ONE
Australia's coastal observation network may aid in understanding of extreme ocean events
A network of nine reference sites off the Australian coast is providing the latest physical, chemical, and biological information to help scientists better understand Australia's coastal seas.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Grant funds national expansion of watershed modeling website for science curriculum
Stroud Water Research Center, in collaboration with the Concord Consortium and Millersville University of Pennsylvania, received a $2.9 million dollar grant from the National Science Foundation to dramatically expand Model My Watershed, part of the WikiWatershed suite of online tools. This application allows users to explore how land use affects stream ecology and hydrology.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beverly Payton
bpayton@stroudcenter.org
610-268-2153 x305
Stroud Water Research Center

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Scientific Reports
Syracuse biologist reveals how whales may 'sing' for their supper
Humpback whales have a trick or two, when it comes to finding a quick snack at the bottom of the ocean. Even in the dark. Susan Parks, assistant professor of Biology in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences, in collaboration with a consortium of other researchers, has been studying these unique feeding behaviors. Her research emphasizes the importance of specific auditory cues that these mammoth creatures emit, as they search the deep ocean for their prey.

Contact: Amy Manley
amman100@syr.edu
315-443-9463
Syracuse University

Showing releases 926-950 out of 1541.

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