EurekAlert! - Marine Science Portal
  EurekAlert! Login | Main Page | Press Releases | Press Release Archive | Multimedia Gallery | Resources | Calendar | EurekAlert!
{TOPLEFTPHOTOALTTEXT}

Main Page
Press Releases
Multimedia Gallery
Resources
Calendar
EurekAlert! Home
EurekAlert! Login

 Search News Archive:
   
 Advanced Search
Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 926-950 out of 1262.

<< < 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 > >>

Public Release: 1-Aug-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Geoscientists unearth mineral-making secrets potentially useful for new technologies
Proteins have gotten most of the attention in studies of how organic materials control the initial step of making the first tiny crystals that organisms use to build structures that help them move and protect themselves. Virginia Tech researchers have discovered that certain types of sugars, known as polysaccharides, may also control the timing and placement of minerals that animals use to produce hard structures.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: John Pastor
jdpastor@vt.edu
540-231-5646
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 1-Aug-2013
Journal of Experimental Biology
Scientists uncover secrets of starfish's bizarre feeding mechanism
Scientists have identified a molecule that enables starfish to carry out one of the most remarkable forms of feeding in the natural world.

Contact: Katrina Coutts
k.coutts@qmul.ac.uk
Queen Mary, University of London

Public Release: 1-Aug-2013
Science
Arctic sea-ice loss has widespread effects on wildlife
How the Arctic wildlife and humans will be affected by the continued melting of Arctic sea ice is explored in a review article in the journal Science, by an international team of scientists. The article examines relationships among algae, plankton, whales, and terrestrial animals such as caribou, arctic foxes, and walrus; as well as the effects of human exploration of previously inaccessible parts of the region.
National Science Foundation, Penn State University

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 31-Jul-2013
Hurricanes, Major Disasters, Coastal Protection & Rapid Recovery in Texas & the Gulf Coast Region
Texas Hurricane Center presents conference at UH Aug. 2
Coastal protection and debris management for hurricanes and other disasters are among the many topics to be discussed at a conference at the University of Houston Aug. 2, addressing preparation plans for the 2013 hurricane season. Open to members of the community, emergency managers and industry suppliers, this fifth-annual event -- "Hurricanes, Major Disasters, Coastal Protection and Rapid Recovery in Texas and the Gulf Coast Region" -- is hosted by the Texas Hurricane Center for Innovative Technology.

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

Public Release: 31-Jul-2013
Geology
Ancient whale coprolites, fault slickensides, shergottites, Ediacara, and Cascadia
Two new Geology articles this month are open access: "Steady rotation of the Cascade arc" and "Silica gel formation during fault slip: Evidence from the rock record." Other new articles cover everything from the discovery of fossilized whale "intestinal products" in central Italy to flooding as a result of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption to new findings via the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars to using microfossils to reconstruct massive earthquakes in Cascadia.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 31-Jul-2013
Navy turns to UAVs for help with radar, communications
Scientists recently launched unmanned aerial vehicles from a research vessel in a significant experiment that could help boost the Navy's radar and communications performance at sea.

Contact: Peter Vietti
onrpublicaffairs@navy.mil
703-696-5031
Office of Naval Research

Public Release: 31-Jul-2013
PLOS ONE
Robots strike fear in the hearts of fish
The latest in a series of experiments testing the ability of robots to influence live animals shows that bio-inspired robots can not only elicit fear in zebrafish, but that this reaction can be modulated by alcohol. These findings may pave the way for new methodologies for understanding anxiety and other emotions, as well as substances that modulate them.
National Science Foundation, Honors Center of Italian Universities, Mitsui USA Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
hamilton@poly.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Public Release: 31-Jul-2013
ZooKeys
Hide, ambush, kill, eat: The giant water bug Lethocerus patruelis kills a fish
The largest European water insect Lethocerus patruelis, commonly known as giant water bug, can reach the impressive size of up to 8 cm in length. A recent study, published in the open access journal Zookeys, provides detailed information on karyotype and the reproductive system of the species. The study also presents a rare opportunity to see their vicious predatory practices, catching a giant water bug larva attacking and killing a small fish on video.

Contact: Snejana Grozeva
sgrozeva@yahoo.com
359-888-673-619
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 30-Jul-2013
Santa's workshop not flooded -- but lots of melting in the Arctic
Widespread media reports of a lake at the North Pole don't hold water -- but scientists who deployed the monitoring buoys are watching closely as Arctic sea ice approaches its yearly minimum.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 30-Jul-2013
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B
Cracking how life arose on earth may help clarify where else it might exist
A novel and potentially testable theory of how life arose on earth advanced over 25 years ago by Michael Russell, research scientist in planetary chemistry and astrobiology, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, was further developed in a recent paper published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B by Russell, Wolfgang Nitschke, team leader at National Center for Scientific Research in Marseille, France; and Elbert Branscomb, an affiliate faculty member at the Institute for Genomic Biology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
NASA Astrobiology Institute

Contact: Nicholas Vasi
nvasi@illinois.edu
Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 30-Jul-2013
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Aquatic playground can turn water tanks into fish schools
Raising fish in tanks that contain hiding places and other obstacles can make the fish both smarter and improve their chances of survival when they are released into the wild, according to an international team of researchers.
Research Council of Norway

Contact: Matthew Swayne
mls29@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 29-Jul-2013
NOAA-supported scientists find large Gulf dead zone, but smaller than predicted
NOAA-supported scientists found a large Gulf of Mexico oxygen-free or hypoxic 'dead' zone, but not as large as had been predicted. Measuring 5,840 square miles, an area the size of Connecticut, the 2013 Gulf dead zone indicates nutrients from the Mississippi River watershed, which drains 40 percent of the lower 48 states, are continuing to affect the nation's commercial and recreational marine resources in the Gulf.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 29-Jul-2013
Evolutionary Applications
Early exposure to insecticides gives amphibians higher tolerance later
Amphibians exposed to insecticides early in life -- even those not yet hatched -- have a higher tolerance to those same insecticides later in life, according to a recent University of Pittsburgh study.

Contact: B. Rose Huber
rhuber@pitt.edu
412-624-4356
University of Pittsburgh

Public Release: 26-Jul-2013
NASA's various views of Tropical Storm Dorian
NASA satellites analyzed Tropical Storm Dorian in infrared light, giving scientists an idea of the storm's structure, cloud heights and cloud temperatures.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Jul-2013
NASA sees heaviest rain north of Tropical Storm Flossie's center
As Eastern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Storm Flossie continues to move further west toward Hawaii, NASA's TRMM satellite analyzed its rainfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Jul-2013
ZooKeys
A new coral reef species from the Gambier Islands, French Polynesia
A new shallow water coral species, Echinophyllia tarae sp. n., is described from the Gambier Islands, French Polynesia. Scleractinia, also called stony corals, are exclusively marine animals; they are very similar to sea anemones but generate a hard skeleton. This coral was observed in muddy environments where several colonies showed partial mortality and re-growth. The paper describing to the new species was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Francesca Benzoni
francesca.benzoni@unimib.it
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 26-Jul-2013
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Pesticides contaminate frogs from Californian National Parks
Pesticides commonly used in California's Central Valley, one of the world's most productive agricultural regions, have been found in remote frog species miles from farmland. Writing in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, researchers demonstrate the contamination of Pacific Tree Fogs in remote mountain areas, including national parks; supporting past research on the potential transport of pesticides by the elements.

Contact: Ben Norman
Sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
44-012-437-70375
Wiley

Public Release: 25-Jul-2013
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences
Global warming to cut snow water storage 56 percent in Oregon watershed
A new report projects that by the middle of this century there will be an average 56 percent drop in the amount of water stored in peak snowpack in the McKenzie River watershed of the Oregon Cascade Range -- and that similar impacts may be found on low-elevation maritime snow packs around the world.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Eric Sproles
eric.sproles@gmail.com
541-729-1377
Oregon State University

Public Release: 25-Jul-2013
GSA Bulletin
Ghost glaciers and cosmic trips: New GSA Bulletin postings for July 2013
July 2013 GSA Bulletin postings cover the solid Earth's influence on the sea; the diverging geologic histories of the North America Cordillera; "ghost glaciers" in Greenland; the Picuris Orogeny, New Mexico, USA; the Corner Brook Lake Block in the Appalachian orogen of western Newfoundland; the Cryogenian Perry Canyon Formation in Utah, USA; geochronology of the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming, USA; and "A cosmic trip: 25 years of cosmogenic nuclides in geology."

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 25-Jul-2013
NASA's infrared data shows Tropical Storm Flossie's strength
Tropical Storm Flossie formed in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and strengthened quickly on July 25.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Jul-2013
NASA puts Tropical Storm Dorian in the infrared spotlight
The newest tropical storm to form in the Atlantic was put in NASA's "infrared spotlight."
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Jul-2013
Journal of the Royal Society Interface
UCSB study reveals mechanism behind squids' and octopuses' ability to change color
Color in living organisms can be formed two ways: Pigmentation or anatomical structure. Structural colors arise from the physical interaction of light with biological nanostructures. A wide range of organisms possess this ability, but the biological mechanisms underlying the process have been poorly understood.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ia.ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 25-Jul-2013
Current Biology
Captured: Mysterious oyster killers
University of British Columbia researchers have apprehended tiny, elusive parasites that have plagued oysters from British Columbia to California.

Contact: Brian Lin
brian.lin@ubc.ca
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 25-Jul-2013
Nature
Study explains Pacific equatorial cold water region
A new study published this week in the journal Nature reveals for the first time how the mixing of cold, deep waters from below can change sea surface temperatures on seasonal and longer timescales.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Jim Moum
moum@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-2553
Oregon State University

Public Release: 25-Jul-2013
Nature
Deciphering the air-sea communication
A German-Russian research team has investigated the role of heat exchange between ocean and atmosphere in long-term climate variability in the Atlantic. The scientists analyzed meteorological measurements and sea surface temperatures over the past 130 years. It was found that the ocean significantly affects long term climate fluctuations, while the seemingly chaotic atmosphere is mainly responsible for the shorter-term, year-to-year changes. The paper appeared in the recent issue of Nature.
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Contact: Dr. Andreas Villwock
avillwock@geomar.de
49-431-600-2802
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Showing releases 926-950 out of 1262.

<< < 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 > >>


HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US    TOP
Copyright ©2014 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science