Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 926-950 out of 1736.

<< < 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 > >>

Public Release: 8-Oct-2015
Science of the Total Environment
Waste water treatment plants fail to completely eliminate new chemical compounds
A study conducted on the Basque coast by a research group indicates that the most polluted waters, the ones with the highest levels of bioconcentration, the highest percentage of intersex fish, etc. exist around waste water treatment plants. Most of these plants are not equipped to eliminate the new compounds, because legislation in this matter has yet to catch up with the development of the chemical industry. The journal Science of The Total Environment has recently published a paper on the subject.

Contact: Matxalen Sotillo
komunikazioa@ehu.eus
34-688-673-770
University of the Basque Country

Public Release: 8-Oct-2015
NOAA declares third ever global coral bleaching event
As record ocean temperatures cause widespread coral bleaching across Hawaii, NOAA scientists confirm the same stressful conditions are expanding to the Caribbean and may last into the new year, prompting the declaration of the third global coral bleaching event ever on record.

Contact: Keeley Belva
keeley.belva@noaa.gov
301-713-3066
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 8-Oct-2015
Journal of Applied Ecology
Urban runoff killing coho salmon, but simple solution within reach
Toxic runoff from highways, parking lots and other developed surfaces is killing many of the adult coho salmon in urban streams along the West Coast, according to a new study that for the first time documents the fatal connection between urban stormwater and salmon survival. The good news is that the same study published today in the Journal of Applied Ecology also found that inexpensive filtration of urban runoff through simple columns of sand and soil can completely prevent the toxic effects on fish.
Region 10 of the US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington Sea Grant, NOAA Coastal Storms Program, Puget Sound Regional Stormwater Monitoring Program

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 8-Oct-2015
Current Biology
A long look back at fishes' extendable jaws
When it comes to catching elusive prey, many fishes rely on a special trick: protruding jaws that quickly extend their reach to snap up that next meal. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Oct. 8 have found a clever way to trace the evolution of jaw protrusion in fishes over many millions of years.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
PLOS ONE
Student collaboration leads to first results describing sick sea star immune response
A group of marine-disease researchers from around the country has contributed key information about sea stars' immune response when infected with a virus that is thought to cause a deadly wasting disease. It's the first time researchers have tracked how genes behave when encountering this naturally occurring pathogen.
National Science Foundation's Ecology of Infectious Marine Diseases Research Coordination Network Workshop

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
NASA provides an infrared look at Hurricane Joaquin over time
A series of NASA infrared images of Hurricane Joaquin from Oct. 1-6 show the development and movement of the storm, and its moisture stream into South Carolina.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
Satellite sees the long arms of Hurricane Oho
Hurricane Oho appears to have extremely long arms in imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on Oct. 7. Moisture from Oho is being drawn along a stationary front to Oho's northeast, making it appear as if Oho is pointing toward southwestern Canada.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
NASA's GPM reveals very strong thunderstorms in Typhoon Choi-Wan
NASA's GPM satellite saw strong thunderstorms remained in Typhoon Choi-wan as the storm continued to weaken. On October 7, the typhoon had weakened to a tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Declines in HCFC-133a, baseball and earthquakes & 5 research papers
This week from AGU includes declines in HCFC-133a, baseball and earthquakes & 5 new research papers

Contact: Leigh Cooper
lcooper@agu.org
202-777-7324
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
PLOS ONE
A village of bacteria to help frogs fight disease
The naturally occurring bacteria on a frog's skin could be the most important tool for helping the animal fight off a deadly skin disease, according to an experiment conducted by Virginia Tech researchers.

Contact: Lindsay Taylor Key
ltkey@vt.edu
540-231-6594
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Embrace the chaos: Predictable ecosystems may be more fragile
A new study published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences says managing our environment for predictable outcomes is risky. In fact, more often than not, it backfires. 'By making things predictable in the short term, we make them unpredictable in the long term,' says Steve Carpenter, director of the Center for Limnology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and lead author of the report. 'We actively make things worse.'

Contact: Stephen Carpenter
steve.carpenter@wisc.edu
608-338-6759
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
American Polar Society Symposium
Polar region changes in response to global warming to be discussed by leading thinkers
The most authoritative forum on the role of the polar regions in global climate change will be held Nov. 3-6, 2015, at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego. World-class leaders in science and diplomacy will come together in a symposium to review the latest findings from research on the impact of rising global temperatures on sea and land ice and their ecosystems at the top and bottom of the world.

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Satellites see Hurricane Joaquin moving through Northern Atlantic
NASA and NOAA satellites have been watching Hurricane Joaquin move to the northeast through the northern Atlantic Ocean. Although Joaquin is moving away from the US and Canada it is still generating dangerous surf conditions.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
NASA sees Typhoon Choi-wan moving north in Western Pacific
Typhoon Choi-wan continued to move north in the western Pacific Ocean as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead in space on Oct. 6 and took an infrared look at the storm. Earlier, the RapidScat instrument aboard the International Space Station measured the storm's strongest winds.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
NASA gets Hurricane Oho by the tail
Tropical Storm Oho intensified into a hurricane on October 6 and appeared to have a 'tail' in Infrared NASA satellite imagery. Oho is the seventh hurricane of the 2015 season in the North Central Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Self-regulating corals protect their skeletons against ocean acidification
Scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies have found a species of coral living in a dynamic reef system, which is able to protect itself from the impact of ocean acidification.
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
NASA tracking Tropical Storm Oho, south of Hawaii
NASA's RapidScat instrument that flies aboard the International Space Station saw that newly formed Central Pacific Ocean Tropical Storm Oho's strongest side was east of its center. By Oct. 5, NOAA's GOES satellite saw a more circular, more uniform circulation.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
Satellite sees the short life of Tropical Depression 8C
ropical Depression 8C formed southwest of Hawaii on October 3 and by October 4 it was a post-tropical cyclone. A day later NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of the storm as it tracked in a westerly direction through the Central Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Choi-Wan strengthening over open ocean
Tropical storm Choi-wan was spinning over open waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite saw the strengthening storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites analyze Hurricane Joaquin near Bermuda
Hurricane Joaquin maintained its comma shape as it brought heavy rains, strong winds and ocean swells to Bermuda on October 5 when NASA satellites passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
Nature Geoscience
Volcanic eruptions affect flow of world's major rivers, study finds
Major volcanic eruptions can have a significant effect on the flow of the biggest rivers around the world, research shows.
Natural Environment Research Council, European Research Council

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ancient alga knew how to survive on land before it left water & evolved into first plant
A team of scientists from the John Innes Centre, the University of Wisconsin - Madison and other international collaborators, has discovered how an ancient alga was able to inhabit land, before it went on to evolve into the world's first plant and colonize the earth.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, National Science Foundation

Contact: Geraldine Platten
geraldine.platten@jic.ac.uk
01-603-450-238
John Innes Centre

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
National Climate Change
The warmer the higher: Sea-level rise from Filchner-Ronne ice in Antarctica
The more ice is melted of the Antarctic Filchner-Ronne shelf, the more ice flows into the ocean, and the more the region contributes to global sea-level rise. Unlike some some other parts of Antarctica, this region is not characterized by instabilities which, once triggered, can lead to persistent ice discharge into the ocean even without a further increase of warming. So for the Filchner-Ronne ice, this is a tiny bit of good news.

Contact: Jonas Viering
press@pik-potsdam.de
49-331-288-2507
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bacteria in the world's oceans produce millions of tonnes of hydrocarbons each year
Scientists have calculated that millions of tonnes of hydrocarbons are produced annually by photosynthetic bacteria in the world's oceans.

Contact: Sarah Collins
sarah.collins@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-65542
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
PLOS ONE
Are fish the greatest athletes on the planet?
Scientists have discovered that fish are far more effective at delivering oxygen throughout their body than almost any other animal, giving them the athletic edge over other species.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Showing releases 926-950 out of 1736.

<< < 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 > >>