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Press Releases

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Showing releases 926-950 out of 1321.

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Public Release: 25-Mar-2014
Journal of Marine Science and Engineering
Model now capable of street-level storm-tide predictions
A new modeling study demonstrates the ability to predict a hurricane's storm tide at a much finer scale than current operational methods.

Contact: David Malmquist
davem@vims.edu
804-684-7011
Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Public Release: 25-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia
Paleontologists assemble giant turtle bone from fossil discoveries made centuries apart
A broken fossil turtle bone discovered by an amateur paleontologist in 2012 turned out to be the missing half of a bone first described in 1849. The surprising puzzle discovery has led paleontologists from the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University and the New Jersey State Museum to revise conventional wisdom of how long fossils can survive exposed to surface conditions. It also provides insight into one of the largest turtle species ever known.

Contact: Rachel Ewing
raewing@drexel.edu
215-895-2614
Drexel University

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
NASA spots Tropical Cyclone Gillian's eye closing
Tropical Cyclone Gillian's eye was starting to 'close' or become cloud-filled when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean on March 23.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
NASA sees Tropical Depression 04W's remnants affecting Palawan
Tropical Depression 04W formed in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on March 23 and marched across the southern Philippines.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
Global Change Biology
Lots of carbon dioxide equivalents from aquatic environments
Large amounts of carbon dioxide equivalents taken up by plants on land are returned to the atmosphere from aquatic environments. This is the conclusions from a study carried out by two students at Linkoping University, Sweden.

Contact: David Bastviken
david.bastviken@liu.se
46-734-144-970
Linköping University

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
NOAA led study: Crude oil causes developmental abnormalities in large marine fish
Crude oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster causes severe defects in the developing hearts of bluefin and yellowfin tunas, according to a new study by a team of NOAA and academic scientists. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on the 25th anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill, show how the largest marine oil spill in United States history may have affected tunas and other species that spawned in oiled offshore habitats in the northern Gulf of Mexico.
NOAA

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New study shows heart abnormalities in fish embryos exposed to Deepwater Horizon oil
A new study showed that several Gulf of Mexico fish embryos developed serious defects in heart development following exposure to crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The study is the first to analyze the effects of the primary toxic agents released from crude oil on several commercially important pelagic fish species that spawn in the Gulf of Mexico.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
786-256-4446
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 21-Mar-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical System 94W affecting Philippines
The tropical low pressure area centered just east of the southern Philippines appeared more organized on visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite on March 21.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Mar-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Gillian reborn near Java
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the reborn tropical cyclone known as Gillian on March 21 and captured a visible image of the storm, located just south of the island of Java.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Mar-2014
Wayne State receives grant to advance ecological restoration efforts in the Great Lakes
Foreign mussels hitchhiking to the Great Lakes in the ballast water tanks of international freighters are becoming one of the most vexing environmental problems facing the Great Lakes. A group of scientists from Wayne State University, in collaboration with the United States Geological Survey and the Environmental Protection Agency, are working together to battle this problem.
US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 21-Mar-2014
Nature Climate Change
Deep ocean current may slow due to climate change, Penn research finds
A new study by the University of Pennsylvania's Irina Marinov and Raffaele Bernardello and colleagues from McGill University has found that recent climate change may be acting to slow down one of the ocean's 'conveyer belts,' with potentially serious consequences for the future of the planet's climate.
NOAA

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 21-Mar-2014
Science
Dust in the wind drove iron fertilization during ice age
A study published in Science by researchers at Princeton University and ETH Zurich confirms a longstanding hypothesis that wind-borne dust carried iron to the region of the globe north of Antarctica, driving plankton growth and eventually leading to the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Catherine Zandonella
czandone@princeton.edu
609-258-0541
Princeton University

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
PLOS ONE
Ancient clam gardens nurture food security
A three-year study of ancient clam gardens in the Pacific Northwest has led researchers, including three from Simon Fraser University, to make a discovery that could benefit coastal communities' food production. PLOS ONE, a peer-reviewed science journal, has just published their study. The researchers discovered that ancient clam gardens made by Aboriginal people produced quadruple the number of butter clams and twice the number of littleneck clams as unmodified clam beaches.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
NASA sees ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian's remnants persist
NASA's TRMM satellite continues to follow the remnants of former Tropical Cyclone Gillian as it moved from the Southern Pacific Ocean into the Southern Indian Ocean where it appears to be re-organizing.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
Satellite confirms Tropical Cyclone Mike's quick disappearing act
Tropical Cyclone Mike didn't even last a day in the Southern Pacific Ocean as NOAA's GOES-West satellite revealed the storm dissipating just 24 hours after it was born.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Plankton make scents for seabirds and a cooler planet
The top predators of the Southern Ocean, far-ranging seabirds, are tied both to the health of the ocean ecosystem and to global climate regulation through a mutual relationship with phytoplankton, according to newly published work from UC Davis.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
Behaviour
Passive acoustic monitoring reveals clues to minke whale calling behavior and movements
Scientists using passive acoustic monitoring to track minke whales in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean have found clues in the individual calling behaviors and movements of this species. These findings provide insight into one of the least studied baleen whales.
National Oceanographic Partnership Program, US Navy N45 Program, NOAA Ocean Acoustics Program

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
Geosphere
Geosphere presents articles examining lithospheric evolution and geologic history
Geosphere articles posted online March 17, 2014, include additions to two series: 'CRevolution 2: Origin and Evolution of the Colorado River System II' and 'Origin and Evolution of the Sierra Nevada and Walker Lane.' Other articles present new seismic data for the Slate Range of California, USA; the first detailed geologic map from the Likhu Khola region of east central Nepal; and a review of pre-21st century ideas about the origin of Grand Canyon.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
NASA sees ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian affect Indonesia
The remnants of former Tropical Cyclone Gillian moved out of the Southern Pacific Ocean and into the Indian Ocean only to trigger warnings and watches for part of Indonesia on Mar. 19.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
Satellite sees newborn South Pacific Tropical Storm Mike
NOAA's GOES-West satellite caught the birth of Tropical Storm Mike in the Southern Pacific Ocean on March 19.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
PLOS ONE
Tracking endangered leatherback sea turtles by satellite, key habitats identified
Most satellite tagging studies of leatherbacks have focused on adult females on their tropical nesting beaches, so little is known worldwide about males and subadults, the researcher point out. But now, tagging and satellite tracking in locations where leatherbacks forage has allowed the scientists to get a much richer picture of the leatherback's behavior and dispersal patterns on the open ocean.
University of Massachusetts at Amherst, NOAA, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Massachusetts Department of Marine Fisheries

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Geology
New from Geology: Fossils, earthquakes, gold, and sea-bed landslides
Geology papers published March 17, 2014, cover modeling of seabed turbidity currents; a large earthquake at Lake Vaettern, Switzerland, about 11,500 years ago; genesis of high-grade gold at the Porgera gold deposit, Papua New Guinea; discovery of the Ediacaran guide fossil Cloudina sp. and the depositional age of the Bambui Group; earthquakes along the fossil Moho in Alpine Corsica; and using LiDAR to better understand New Zealand's Alpine Fault.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
NASA releases first interactive mosaic of lunar north pole
Scientists, using cameras aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, have created the largest high resolution mosaic of our moon's north polar region. The six-and-a-half feet (two-meters)-per-pixel images cover an area equal to more than one-quarter of the United States.
NASA

Contact: Elizabeth Zubritsky
elizabeth.a.zubritsky@nasa.gov
301-614-5438
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
New airborne GPS technology for weather conditions takes flight
A new technique led by a researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego stands to improve weather models and hurricane forecasting by detecting precise conditions in the atmosphere through a new GPS system aboard airplanes. The first demonstration of the technique, detailed in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, is pushing the project's leaders toward a goal of broadly implementing the technology in the near future on commercial aircraft.
National Science Foundation, NASA, and others

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
NASA sees some strength left in remnants of Tropical Cyclone Gillian
NASA's TRMM satellite passed over the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Gillian and spotted some towering thunderstorms and areas of heavy rainfall, indicating there's still power in the former tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 926-950 out of 1321.

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