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Showing releases 951-975 out of 1311.

<< < 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 > >>

Public Release: 3-Dec-2013
NASA sees thirty-third tropical depression form in Northwestern Pacific
The Northwestern Pacific Ocean tropical cyclone season continues with the formation of the thirty-third tropical depression today, Dec. 3, 2013.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Dec-2013
NERC announces the winner of its first photo and essay competition
The winners of NERC's inaugural short article and photography competition were announced at an awards ceremony in central London this evening.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Harriet Jarlett
harrle@nerc.ac.uk
44-179-341-1939
Natural Environment Research Council

Public Release: 3-Dec-2013
Anglo-French partnership develops guidance on future management of English Channel
An Anglo-French partnership of academic, government, industry and environmental organisations are working together to influence future policy decisions affecting the world's busiest waterway.
Interreg IVa

Contact: Alan Williams
alan.williams@plymouth.ac.uk
01-752-588-004
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 3-Dec-2013
PLOS ONE
Antarctic fjords are climate-sensitive hotspots of diversity in a rapidly warming region
In the first significant study of seafloor communities in the glacier-dominated fjords along the west Antarctic Peninsula, scientists expected to find an impoverished seafloor highly disturbed by glacial sedimentation, similar to what has been documented in well-studied Arctic regions. Instead, they found high levels of diversity and abundance in megafauna. The difference can be explained by the fact that the subpolar Antarctic is in an earlier stage of climate warming than the Arctic.

Contact: Talia S Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 3-Dec-2013
166th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
Silent stalkers of dark ocean waters
The mating roar of a male harbor seal is supposed to attract a partner, not a predator. Unfortunately for the seals, scientists have found evidence that marine-mammal-eating killer whales eavesdrop on their prey. Previous research had shown mammal-eating killer whales are nearly silent before making a kill, neither vocalizing nor using their echolocation. The likely reason, researchers say, is the excellent hearing of the seals, porpoises, and other animals the whales stalk.

Contact: Jennifer Lauren Lee
jlee@aip.org
301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 2-Dec-2013
Marine Pollution Bulletin
SU biologist develops method for monitoring shipping noise in dolphin habitat
A biologist in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences has developed a system of techniques for tracking ships and monitoring underwater noise levels in a protected marine mammal habitat. The techniques are the subject of a groundbreaking article in Marine Pollution Bulletin, focusing on the bottlenose dolphin population in Scotland's Moray Firth.

Contact: Rob Enslin
rmenslin@syr.edu
315-443-3403
Syracuse University

Public Release: 2-Dec-2013
Current Biology
UCSB researcher shows microplastic transfers chemicals, impacting health
With global production of plastic exceeding 280 metric tons every year, a fair amount of it makes its way to the natural environment. However, until now researchers haven't known whether ingested plastic transfers chemical additives or pollutants to wildlife. A study conducted by UCSB's National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis shows toxic concentrations of pollutants and additives enter the tissue of animals that have eaten microplastic. The findings are published in Current Biology.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ia.ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 2-Dec-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Arctic study shows key marine food web species at risk from increasing CO2
A research expedition to the Arctic, as part of the Catlin Arctic Survey, has revealed that tiny crustaceans, known as copepods, that live just beneath the ocean surface are likely to battle for survival if ocean acidity continues to rise. The study found that copepods that move large distances, migrating vertically across a wide range of pH conditions, have a better chance of surviving.
Catlin Arctic Survey

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 2-Dec-2013
Current Biology
Microplastics make marine worms sick
Tiny bits of plastic trash could spell big trouble for marine life, starting with the worms, say a team of researchers from Plymouth University and the University of Exeter who report their evidence in a pair of studies in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Dec. 2. Those marine worms play a key ecological role as an important source of food for other animals.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 1-Dec-2013
Nature Climate Change
Marine reserves enhance resilience to climate change
A new study, led by a University of Southampton scientist, highlights the potential for fish communities in marine reserves to resist climate change impacts better than communities on fished coasts.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 27-Nov-2013
166th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
Glaciers sizzle as they disappear into warmer water
The sounds of bubbles escaping from melting ice make underwater glacial fjords one of the loudest natural marine environments on earth, according to research to be presented at the fall meeting of the Acoustical Society of America.

Contact: Jennifer Lauren Lee
jlee@aip.org
301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 27-Nov-2013
NASA watches as India braces for Tropical Cyclone Lehar
Tropical Cyclone Lehar is weakening as it heads for a landfall in eastern India.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Nov-2013
Geophysical Research Letters
Lakes discovered beneath Greenland ice sheet
The study, published in Geophysical Research Letters, discovered two subglacial lakes 800 meters below the Greenland Ice Sheet. Subglacial lakes are likely to influence the flow of the ice sheet, impacting global sea level change. The discovery of the lakes in Greenland will also help researchers to understand how the ice will respond to changing environmental conditions.

Contact: Dr. Steven Palmer
S.J.Palmer@exeter.ac.uk
44-785-465-4722
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 27-Nov-2013
NASA sees Alessia reclaim her crown as a Tropical Storm
The former tropical storm Alessia reclaimed her title on Nov. 27 in the Gulf of Carpentaria, as NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead and observed heavy rainfall occurring in bands of thunderstorms around the storm's center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Nov-2013
PLOS ONE
EU fishing fleets reap profits while taxpayers foot the bill
The European Union's taxpayers are paving the way for fishing fleets to reel in valuable catch in developing countries while fishing companies pocket the profits, according to University of British Columbia researchers.

Contact: Lisa Boonzaier
l.boonzaier@fisheries.ubc.ca
604-367-4988
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 26-Nov-2013
Global Change Biology
Reef fish find it's too hot to swim
A team of researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University has shown that ocean warming may reduce the swimming ability of many fish species, and have major impacts on their ability to grow and reproduce.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Jacob Johansen
Jacob.Johansen@my.jcu.edu.au
61-041-694-8733
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 26-Nov-2013
NASA sees Ex-Tropical Cyclone Alessia's remnants trying to reorganize
After making landfall near Darwin on Nov. 24, the remnants of Ex-Tropical Cyclone Alessia worked its way over to Australia's Northern Territory where it was seen from NASA's Aqua satellite.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Nov-2013
NASA satellite tracks Tropical Cyclone Lehar moving toward India
Tropical cyclone Lehar, located in the Bay of Bengal, continues to gain intensity while heading toward the same area of India where a much weaker tropical cyclone Helen recently came ashore.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Nov-2013
ICES Journal of Marine Science
Google Earth reveals untold fish catches
Large fish traps in the Persian Gulf could be catching up to six times more fish than what's being officially reported, according to the first investigation of fish catches from space conducted by University of British Columbia scientists.

Contact: Lisa Boonzaier
l.boonzaier@fisheries.ubc.ca
604-367-4988
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 26-Nov-2013
Nature Communications
Seahorse heads have a 'no wake zone' that's made for catching prey
Seahorses are slow, docile creatures, but their heads are perfectly shaped to sneak up and quickly snatch prey, according to marine scientists from the University of Texas at Austin.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brad Gemmell
brad.Gemmelll@utexas.edu
512-983-0244
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 26-Nov-2013
Global Change Biology
Large study shows pollution impact on coral reefs -- and offers solution
One of the largest and longest experiments ever done to test the impact of nutrient loading on coral reefs today confirmed what scientists have long suspected -- that this type of pollution from sewage, agricultural practices or other sources can lead to coral disease and bleaching. But there was unexpectedly good news - when you cleaned up the water, the corals recovered.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Rebecca Vega-Thurber
Rebecca.vega-thurber@oregonstate.edu
541-737-1851
Oregon State University

Public Release: 25-Nov-2013
Management of Biological Invasions Journal
CSI-type study identifies snakehead
Several Canadian biologists, including two at Simon Fraser University, are breathing a collective sigh of relief after learning that a monstrous fish found in a Burnaby, B.C., pond is not a northern snakehead. But their identification of its correct identity is still a serious concern. The researchers' findings are in a new study, published online by the Management of Biological Invasions Journal.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 25-Nov-2013
GSA Bulletin
GSA Bulletin posts new studies from China, Egypt and Israel, Argentina, Mexico, California, Appalachia
GSA Bulletin articles posted online ahead of print in November cover sedimentology in the Sinai-Negev erg of Egypt and Israel; petrology in the Tongling area of Anhui Province in eastern China; paleotopography in the Central Andes of Argentina; sedimentology of the Monterey Submarine Canyon, offshore California, USA; geochronology of Volcan Tepetiltic, western Mexico; and thermochronology of the Appalachian Mountains.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 25-Nov-2013
NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Lehar over the Andaman Islands
The Andaman Islands received an unwelcome visitor on Nov. 25 in the form of Tropical Cyclone Lehar.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Nov-2013
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Alessia make landfall near Darwin
Tropical Cyclone made landfall near Darwin, Australia on Nov. 24 as a weak tropical storm as NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead and measured its rainfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 951-975 out of 1311.

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