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Showing releases 951-975 out of 1338.

<< < 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 > >>

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting
What has happened to the tsunami debris from Japan?
The amount of debris in the ocean is growing exponentially, becoming more and more hazardous and harmful to marine life and therefore to our ocean food source. Measuring and tracking the movements of such debris are still in their infancy. The driftage generated by the tragic 2011 tsunami in Japan gave scientists Nikolai Maximenko and Jan Hafner a unique chance to learn about the effects of the ocean and wind on floating materials as they move across the North Pacific Ocean.
International Pacific Research Center, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, NASA, NOAA

Contact: Gisela Speidel
gspeidel@hawaii.edu
808-956-9252
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite saw extreme rainfall from Tropical Cyclone Guito
Tropical Cyclone Guito has been a powerful rainmaker, and fortunately, data from NASA's TRMM satellite shows that the heaviest rainfall has occurred over the open waters of the Mozambique Channel and not over land.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
Diversity and Distributions
Legal harvest of marine turtles tops 42,000 each year
A new study has found that 42 countries or territories around the world permit the harvest of marine turtles -- and estimates that more than 42,000 turtles are caught each year by these fisheries.

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
07-827-309-332
University of Exeter

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting
What is El Nino Taimasa?
During a very strong El Nino, sea level can drop in the tropical western South Pacific and tides remain below normal for up to a year, especially around Samoa. Scientists at the International Pacific Research Center, University of Hawaii, and the University of New South Wales, are studying the climate effects of this variation of El Nino, naming it 'El Nino Taimasa' after the wet stench of coral die-offs, called 'taimasa' by Samoans.
National Science Foundation, International Pacific Research Center, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, NASA, NOAA, Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research

Contact: Gisela Speidel
gspeidel@hawaii.edu
808-956-9252
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
Biota Neotropica
Peru's Manu National Park sets new biodiversity record
When it comes to amphibian and reptile biodiversity, the eastern slopes of the Andes mountains in South America stand out. A new survey of 'herps' in and around Manu National Park in Peru by UC Berkeley postdoc Rudolf von May and his Illinois colleagues Alessandro Catenazzi and Edgar Lehr recorded a greater biodiversity -- 287 species, some new to science -- than any other protected area in the world, including the previous leader in Ecuador.
National Science Foundation, National Geographic Society

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
Ecology and Society
Surveys find that despite economic challenges Malagasy fishers support fishing regulations
Scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and other groups have found that the fishing villages of Madagascar -- a country with little history of natural resource regulation -- are generally supportive of fishing regulations, an encouraging finding that bodes well for sustainable strategies needed to reduce poverty in the island nation.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
NASA satellite sees a ragged eye develop in Tropical Cyclone Guito
NASA satellite data was an 'eye opener' when it came to Tropical Cyclone 15S, now known as Guito in the Mozambique Channel today, Feb. 19, 2014.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
Progress in Oceanography
Stratification determines the fate of fish stocks in the Baltic Sea
In the Baltic Sea, two cod stocks evolve independently. Also, the juveniles of two economically important flatfish species, flounder and plaice, live there within limited space. This is possible due to the different salinity within this inland sea. Scientists of GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Germany and the National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark, explain how these hydrographic conditions affect the distribution of fish eggs and growth of economically important fish stocks.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-431-600-2807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
Nature
The ups and downs of early atmospheric oxygen
The period of extended low oxygen spanning from roughly two to less than one billion years ago was a time of remarkable chemical stability in the Earth's ocean and atmosphere. A University of California, Riverside team of biogeochemists reports that oxygen was much lower than previously thought during this important middle chapter in Earth history, which likely explains the low abundances and diversity of eukaryotic organisms and the absence of animals.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6397
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
Nature Communications
Pond-dwelling powerhouse's genome points to its biofuel potential
Duckweed is a tiny floating plant that's been known to drive people daffy. It's one of the smallest and fastest-growing flowering plants that often becomes a hard-to-control weed in ponds and small lakes. But it's also been exploited to clean contaminated water and as a source to produce pharmaceuticals. Now, the genome of Greater Duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza) has given this miniscule plant's potential as a biofuel source a big boost.
DOE/Office of Science, Selman Waksman Chair in Molecular Genetics

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Mechanisms of Development
Research of zebrafish neurons may lead to understanding of birth defects like spina bifida
Using zebrafish, scientists can determine how individual neurons develop, mature and support basic functions like breathing, swallowing and jaw movement. Researchers at the University of Missouri say that learning about neuronal development and maturation in zebrafish could lead to a better understanding of birth defects such as spina bifida in humans.

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone 15S form in the Mozambique Channel
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone 15S as it formed in the Mozambique Channel on Feb. 18 and the AIRS instrument aboard gathered infrared data on its cloud top temperatures and potential.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Scientific Reports
A battery small enough to be injected, energetic enough to track salmon
Scientists have created a microbattery that packs twice the energy compared to current microbatteries used to monitor the movements of salmon. The battery is just slightly larger than a long grain of rice and can be injected into an organism.
US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting
2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting: Press conference announcement; sending press kits; press registration
This release focuses on the 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting: Press conference announcement; Sending press kits to Hawaii; Press registration.

Contact: Mary Catherine Adams
mcadams@agu.org
202-777-7530
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Sloan Research Fellowships awarded to 126 young scholars
The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is pleased to announce the selection of 126 outstanding US and Canadian researchers as recipients of the 2014 Sloan Research Fellowships. Awarded annually since 1955, the fellowships are given to early-career scientists and scholars whose achievements and potential identify them as rising stars, the next generation of scientific leaders.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Nate Williams
williams@sloan.org
212-649-1692
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Increase in Arctic cyclones is linked to climate change, new study shows
A new study in Geophysical Research Letters uses historical climate model simulations to demonstrate that there has been an Arctic-wide decrease in sea level pressure since the 1800's.

Contact: Ben Norman
Sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
44-012-437-70375
Wiley

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
PLOS ONE
Dartmouth-UConn study shows coastal water, not sediment, predicts mercury contamination
A Dartmouth-University of Connecticut study of the northeast United States shows that methylmercury concentrations in estuary waters -- not in sediment as commonly thought -- are the best way to predict mercury contamination in the marine food chain.
NIH/National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: John Cramer
John.Cramer@Dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 17-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ancient herring catch nets fisheries weakness
Archaeological data indicate modern herring management needs to take a longer look into the past to manage fisheries for the future says a new study involving Simon Fraser University researchers. That is one of the key findings in the study, just published online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. SFU researchers Iain McKechnie, Dana Lepofsky and Ken Lertzman, and scientists in Ontario, Alberta and the United States are its co-authors.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
Coral Reefs
Do Guam mantas plan moon parties?
Guam mantas will be forever mentioned in the scientific literature because of UOG Master of Biology candidate Julie Hartup's passion for her research subject. She has been studying Guam's Manta alfredi for eight years and is the first to document a very interesting behavior, mantas eating fish spawn.

Contact: Olympia Terral
olympia.uog@gmail.com
University of Guam

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientists call for new stewardship of the deep ocean: Earth's last frontier
Humans are encroaching more vigorously into the ocean's deep regions, exploiting its resources and putting its habitats and natural services at risk. Lisa Levin of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego believes a new "stewardship mentality" across disciplines is required for the future health and integrity of the deep ocean. Levin and several other experts will describe this need Feb. 16 during a news briefing and symposium at the AAAS meeting in Chicago.
Deep-Ocean Stewardship Initiative, Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation at Scripps

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Deep ocean needs policy, stewardship where it never existed
Plans to begin mining nodules of valuable metals from deep ocean deposits have oceanographers concerned about the lack of public awareness or international agreements governing these habitats. "The deep sea is out of sight, out of mind ... there's a whole level of concern that isn't being expressed when it comes to deep sea industrialization," said Cindy Van Dover of the Duke Marine Lab.

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2014
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Crab nebula of life
Researchers Chu, et.al., have constructed the most complete and extensive crab sequence dataset to date. Their recalibrated crab gene tree using DNA and mitochondrial sequences from 140 species and 58 crab families provides some important new insights into the timing and diversity of crab evolution.

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
MBEpress@gmail.com
480-258-8972
Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)

Public Release: 14-Feb-2014
Arctic biodiversity under serious threat from climate change according to new report
Climate change caused by human activities is by far the worst threat to biodiversity in the Arctic. Some of these changes are already visible. Unique and irreplaceable Arctic wildlife and landscapes are crucially at risk due to global warming caused by human activities according to the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment, a new report prepared by 253 scientists from 15 countries under the auspices of the Arctic Council.
Danish EPA

Contact: DSc. Hans Meltofte
mel@dmu.dk
45-29-88-92-78
Aarhus University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
Scientists discover the mechanism of heart failure in fish exposed to oil spills
Researchers from NOAA Fisheries and Stanford University, working on the Natural Resources Damage Assessment following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, have found that some petroleum compounds act as ion channel blockers in the heart cells of young tuna, disrupting normal cardiac function. This will lead to the creation of new diagnostic tools for measuring the biological impact of pollution, and may have implications for the health of vertebrates other than fish as well.
NOAA, and others

Contact: Rich Press
rich.press@noaa.gov
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
NOAA researcher says Arctic marine mammals are ecosystem sentinels
As the Arctic continues to see dramatic declines in seasonal sea ice, warming temperatures and increased storminess, the responses of marine mammals can provide clues to how the ecosystem is responding to these physical drivers.
NOAA

Contact: Monica Allen
monica.allen@noaa.gov
202-379-6693
NOAA Headquarters

Showing releases 951-975 out of 1338.

<< < 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 > >>


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