Press Releases

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Showing releases 951-975 out of 1737.

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Public Release: 30-Sep-2015
Ocean Conservancy releases report outlining solutions to issue of plastic waste in oceans
Ocean Conservancy today announced the global launch of Stemming the Tide: Land-based strategies for a plastic-free ocean -- a first-of-its-kind, solutions-oriented report in partnership with the McKinsey Center for Business and Environment that outlines specific land-based solutions for plastic waste in the ocean, starting with the elimination of plastic waste leakage in five priority countries (China, Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam and Thailand).
Adessium Foundation, 11th Hour Racing, Hollomon Price Foundation, Forrest C. & Frances H. Lattner Foundation, Mariposa Foundation

Contact: Cassandra Poulis
Cassandra.Poulis@Edelman.com
212-729-2176
Edelman Public Relations

Public Release: 30-Sep-2015
Environmental Science & Technology
Surface of the oceans affects climate more than thought
The oceans seem to produce significantly more isoprene, and consequently affect stronger the climate than previously thought. This emerges from a study by the Institute of Catalysis and Environment in Lyon (IRCELYON, CNRS / University Lyon 1) and the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, which had studied samples of the surface film in the laboratory. The results underline the global significance of the chemical processes at the border between ocean and atmosphere.
European Research Council

Contact: Tilo Arnhold
presse@tropos.de
49-341-271-77189
Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS)

Public Release: 30-Sep-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Gulf Stream ring water intrudes onto continental shelf like 'Pinocchio's nose'
Ocean robots installed off the coast of Massachusetts have helped scientists understand a previously unknown process by which warm Gulf Stream water and colder waters of the continental shelf exchange. The process occurs when offshore waters, originating in the tropics, intrude onto the Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf and meet the waters originating in regions near the Arctic. This process can greatly affect shelf circulation, biogeochemistry and fisheries.
National Science Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 29-Sep-2015
NASA's GPM analyzes rainfall in Tropical Storm Marty
Tropical Storm Marty, which formed into a depression from an area of low pressure about 300 miles southwest of Acapulco, Mexico Saturday afternoon (local time), has been trying to strengthen while drifting slowly northward toward the southwest coast of Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2015
Satellite view of remnants of post-Tropical Cyclone Niala
Post-Tropical Cyclone Niala faded under a hostile atmospheric environment and an infrared satellite image shows the torn-apart storm's remnants southwest of Hawaii.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2015
NASA captures Typhoon Dujuan's landfall in southeastern China
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Dujuan as it made landfall in southeastern China.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2015
NASA sees wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Joaquin
Despite being battered with vertical wind shear, Tropical Depression 11 strengthened and organized into Tropical Storm Joaquin. NASA's Aqua satellite and NOAA's GOES satellite both captured images of the slightly elongated storm near the Bahamas.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2015
NASA's GPM sees Tropical Storm Joaquin form in western Atlantic
Tropical Storm Joaquin became the 10th named storm of the season after forming late last night (Sept. 28 EDT) in the western Atlantic midway between the Bahamas and Bermuda from what was previously a tropical depression (#11), which itself had formed a day earlier from an area of low pressure that had been lingering in the region since Saturday.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Arctic sea ice still too thick for regular shipping route through Northwest Passage: York research
Despite climate change, sea ice in the Northwest Passage remains too thick and treacherous for it to be a regular commercial Arctic shipping route for many decades, according to new research out of York University. Prior to this research, there was little information about the thickness of sea ice in the NWP. Next to ice coverage and type, sea ice thickness plays the most important role in assessing shipping hazards and predicting ice break-up.

Contact: Sandra McLean
sandramc@yorku.ca
416-736-2100 x22097
York University

Public Release: 29-Sep-2015
2016 International Congress of Entomology
Cuba's Dr. Juan Bisset to speak at the 2016 International Congress of Entomology in Orlando
Dr. Juan Andrés Bisset, one of Cuba's leading entomologists, will be a featured speaker at the 2016 International Congress of Entomology (ICE 2016) in Orlando, Florida.

Contact: Richard Levine
rlevine@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Monsoon mission: A better way to predict Indian weather?
To better understand global weather patterns and increase scientific collaboration between the US and India, researchers supported by the Office of Naval Research have completed a month-long cruise studying summer monsoon conditions in the Bay of Bengal.

Contact: Bob Freeman
onrpublicaffairs@navy.mil
703-696-5031
Office of Naval Research

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
NASA satellites dissect Typhoon Dujuan affecting Taiwan
NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites provided visible and infrared data on Typhoon Dujuan's clouds while NASA's RapidScat instrument analyzed the storm's powerful winds as it approached Taiwan.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
NASA's RapidScat spots Tropical Storm Niala's waning winds
The RapidScat instrument saw the strongest winds in the Central Pacific Ocean's Tropical Storm Niala were on the northwestern side, facing the Big Island of Hawaii while the rest of the storm was below tropical-storm strength.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
NASA views new Atlantic tropical depression in infrared
The eleventh tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean formed early on Sept. 28 over 400 miles southwest of Bermuda as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and looked at the storm in infrared light.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
NASA's RapidScat sees the end of Tropical Storm Ida
The RapidScat instrument saw former Tropical Storm Ida's waning winds when the International Space Station passed over the remnant low pressure area on Sept. 25, 2015.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Marty along west coast of Mexico
NASA's RapidScat instrument provided a look at the tropical-storm force winds within Tropical Storm Marty as it continued to hug the coast of western Mexico. The seventeenth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific formed around 5 p.m. EDT on Sept. 26 and by 11 p.m. EDT had strengthened into Tropical Storm Marty.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Nature Geoscience
How ocean circulation changed atmospheric CO2
Changes to overturning circulation in the Southern Ocean as a result of temperatures over Antarctica play key role in carbon uptake by the oceans.

Contact: Alvin Stone
alvin.stone@unsw.edu.au
61-241-861-7366
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Nature Climate Change
Gone fishing: Loss of ocean predators has impact on climate change strategies
As Australia engages in debate over shark culling, new research says unsustainable harvesting of larger fish will affect how we tackle climate change.

Contact: Michael Jacobson
m.jacobson@griffith.edu.au
61-075-552-9250
Griffith University

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
University of South Florida researchers battle red tide with two new grants
Scientists from the University of South Florida and colleagues have received a total of more than $750,000 in two separate grants to further the development and implementation of new technologies to forecast occurrences of 'red tide' and to identify Karenia brevis, the organism that lies at the root of the toxic blooms.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Bob Weisberg
weisberg@usf.edu
727-553-1568
University of South Florida (USF Innovation)

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Nature Geoscience
Scientists solve deep ocean carbon riddle
New research involving scientists from University of Southampton and the National Oceanography Centre Southampton has identified a crucial process behind the reason why dissolved organic carbon levels in the deep oceans are constant despite a continuous supply from the surface ocean.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
NYC risks future flooding during hurricanes
Whether or not a coastal city floods during a hurricane depends on the storm, tide and sea level, and now a team of climate scientists show that the risk of New York City flooding has increased dramatically during the industrial era as a result of human-caused climate change.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Flood risk on rise for New York City and New Jersey coast, study finds
For the first time, climate researchers compared both sea-level rise rates and storm surge heights in prehistoric and modern eras and found that the combined increases of each have raised the likelihood of a devastating 500-year flood occurring as often as every 25 years.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Science Foundation

Contact: Ken Branson
kbranson@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0580
Rutgers University

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Nature Geoscience
Ocean circulation rethink solves climate conundrum
Researchers from the University of Exeter believe they have solved one of the biggest puzzles in climate science. The new study, published in Nature Geoscience, explains the synchrony observed during glacial periods when low temperatures in the Southern Ocean correspond with low levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide.
Royal Society Wolfson Foundation, National Science Foundation, and others

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-139-272-2062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
King crabs threaten Antarctic ecosystem due to warming ocean
King crabs may soon become high-level predators in Antarctic marine ecosystems where they haven't played a role in tens of millions of years, according to a new study led by Florida Institute of Technology.

Contact: Adam Lowenstein
adam@fit.edu
321-674-8964
Florida Institute of Technology

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Journal of Applied Ecology
Offshore wind farms could be more risky for gannets than previously thought, study shows
Offshore wind farms which are to be built in waters around the UK could pose a greater threat to protected populations of gannets than previously thought, according to a new study by researchers at the universities of Leeds, Exeter and Glasgow.
UK Department of Energy and Climate Change, Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Ben Jones
B.P.Jones@leeds.ac.uk
44-113-343-8059
University of Leeds

Showing releases 951-975 out of 1737.

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