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Showing releases 951-975 out of 1567.

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Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Biology Letters
Oldest fur seal identified, ending 5-million-year 'ghost lineage'
The oldest known fur seal has been discovered by a Geology PhD student at New Zealand's University of Otago, providing a missing link that helps to resolve a more than 5-million-year gap in fur seal and sea lion evolutionary history.

Contact: Robert Boessenecker
robert.boessenecker@otago.ac.nz
University of Otago

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
ORCA prototype ready for the open ocean
Its name refers to one of the biggest animals in the sea, but ORCA, the Ocean Radiometer for Carbon Assessment instrument, will be observing the smallest.
NASA

Contact: Lori Keesey
Lori.j.keesey@nasa.gov
865-244-6658
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Space Weather
This week from AGU: Disappearing dinosaur exhibits, ocean greenhouse gases, ham radio ionosphere obs
Are dinosaurs going extinct in museums? Some science museums are updating, or even removing, their dinosaur exhibits. Laura Guertin explains why in a blog post on GeoEd Trek, hosted by the American Geophysical Union.

Contact: Mary Catherine Adams
mcadams@agu.org
202-777-7530
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Adult fish facility opens Oregon's South Santiam basin to threatened salmon and steelhead
Oregon's Foster Dam just got an upgrade, one that is proving vital to the survival of threatened Upper Willamette River spring Chinook salmon and winter steelhead. A new facility ensures fish can bypass the 126-foot flood control structure in better condition as they migrate upstream, improving the odds they reach their spawning grounds high in the Willamette Valley's South Santiam basin.

Contact: Megan Morlock
Megan.Morlock@noaa.gov
503-230-5403
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
NASA-JAXA's TRMM and GPM satellites measure rainfall rates in Typhoon Higos
TRMM and GPM both saw moderate rainfall occurring in Typhoon Higos as it moved over open waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
mBio
Coral reef symbiosis: Paying rent with sugar and fat
Scientists have revealed how coral-dwelling microalgae harvest nutrients from the surrounding seawater and shuttle them out to their coral hosts, sustaining a fragile ecosystem that is under threat.

Contact: Anders Meibom
anders.meibom@epfl.ch
41-216-938-014
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Researchers investigate the communications behind swarming
New research seeks to investigate the directional information flow underlying collective animal behavior. The implications of this work, which integrates dynamical systems theory and behavioral studies, could transform the fields of behavioral brain research and neuropsychobiology. Experiments will employ robotic replicas, live zebrafish, and novel experimental protocols complemented with state-of-the-art behavioral quantification tools. They will seek to demonstrate that an information-theoretic approach can measure social animal behavior.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Public Release: 9-Feb-2015
Journal of Integrated Pest Management
JIPM offers rice growers a new resource against the rice water weevil
Rice growers now have a new resource for controlling the rice water weevil, the most harmful insect pest of rice in the United States and many other parts of the world.

Contact: Richard Levine
rlevine@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Public Release: 9-Feb-2015
Geology
Swimming reptiles make their mark in the Early Triassic
Vertebrate tracks provide valuable information about animal behavior and environments. Swim tracks are a unique type of vertebrate track because they are produced underwater by buoyant trackmakers, and specific factors are required for their production and subsequent preservation. Early Triassic deposits contain the highest number of fossil swim track occurrences worldwide compared to other epochs, and this number becomes even greater when epoch duration and rock outcrop area are taken into account.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 9-Feb-2015
NASA-JAXA's GPM satellite catches Fundi's fadeout
The final warning was issued on Tropical cyclone Fundi on Sunday, Feb. 8, as NASA-JAXA's GPM satellite captured its waning rainfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Feb-2015
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP gets an infrared look at Typhoon Higos
Typhoon Higos was on a strengthening trend when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and captured infrared data on the storm, showing powerful thunderstorms circling its center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Feb-2015
Grant supports total watershed restoration to reduce flooding, improve habitat
Scientists and watershed restoration professionals at Stroud Water Research Center will restore Sharitz Run, a Tributary to Doe Run in the headwaters of the Brandywine Creek near Coatesville and Unionville, Pennsylvania. The project goal is to reduce flooding to downstream communities and improve the stream ecology so that it will once again support a breeding population of native brook trout and other coldwater fish species.
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation

Contact: Beverly Payton
bpayton@stroudcenter.org
610-268-2153 x305
Stroud Water Research Center

Public Release: 9-Feb-2015
Journal of Ecology
Loss of posidonia reduces CO2 storage areas and could contribute to gas emissions
The loss of underwater posidonia meadows poses two problems: these areas can no longer capture and store atmospheric CO2, and they can become a source of this gas by eroding and freeing the carbon stored in the meadow. This is one of the main conclusions reached by an international research team, which assessed whether the revegetation of underwater meadows is effective in restoring their capacity to act as carbon sinks in relation to the time needed to achieve this (decades).

Contact: Abel Grau
abel.grau@csic.es
34-915-681-471
Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)

Public Release: 6-Feb-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Unseen volcanoes may play role in Earth's long-term climate
The intensity of volcanic activity at deeply submerged mid-ocean ridges waxes and wanes on a roughly 100,000-year cycle, according to a new study that might help explain poorly understood variations in Earth's climate that occur on approximately the same timetable.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
Innovative restoration techniques used to rebuild West Coast abalone populations
Overfishing and disease contributed to the decline of seven abalone species. White abalone, in particular, is likely extinct because remaining males and females are not located in close enough proximity to reproduce successfully. Spawning and rearing white abalone in a laboratory has been accomplished on a small scale, but partners are turning attention to producing sufficient numbers of white abalone to eventually outplant them to suitable rocky reef habitats off the coast of Southern California.

Contact: Megan Morlock
Megan.Morlock@noaa.gov
503-230-5403
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
How tuna stay warm with cold hearts
Scientists at The University of Manchester, working with colleagues at Stanford University in America, have discovered how prized bluefin tuna keep their hearts pumping during temperature changes that would stop a human heart.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Monterey Bay Aquarium Foundation.

Contact: Morwenna Grills
Morwenna.Grills@manchester.ac.uk
44-016-127-52111
University of Manchester

Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Seafloor volcano pulses may alter climate
A new study shows that undersea volcanoes flare up on strikingly regular cycles, ranging from two weeks to 100,000 years -- and, that they erupt almost exclusively during the first six months of each year. The pulses -- apparently tied to short- and long-term changes in earth's orbit, and to sea levels -- may help trigger natural climate swings.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Krajick
kkrajick@ei.columbia.edu
212-854-9729
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
Genetics lab unravels mystery killing at sea
NOAA Fisheries scientists happened onto a killer whale attack too late to tell what species had been the target. So they recovered all that was left -- a whale lung -- and probed its DNA to for clues to where it came from. It turned out to be the first documentation of killer whales attacking a rarely seen pygmy sperm whale.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
Geochemical Perspectives Letters
15-million-year-old mollusk protein found
A team of Carnegie scientists have found 'beautifully preserved' 15-million-year-old thin protein sheets in fossil shells from southern Maryland. The team collected samples from Calvert Cliffs, along the shoreline of the Chesapeake Bay, a popular fossil collecting area. They found fossilized shells of a snail-like mollusk called Ecphora that lived in the mid-Miocene era.

Contact: Robert Hazen
rhazen@carnegiescience.edu
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 4-Feb-2015
UM School of Communication to create open educational resource on ocean health
The University of Miami's Department of Cinema and Interactive Media at the School of Communication has received a two-year grant of over $405,000 from the Friends of Stark Parks and the Herbert W. Hoover Foundation, for the creation of a unique Open Educational Resource that will not only explain the science underlying ocean health management, but also help bring the specific work of top researchers from their worldwide field locations to university curricula.
Friends of the Stark Parks, The Herbert W. Hoover Foundation

Contact: Barbara Gutierrez
bgutierrez@miami.edu
305-284-3205
University of Miami

Public Release: 4-Feb-2015
Nature
Evidence from warm past confirms recent IPCC estimates of climate sensitivity
New evidence showing the level of atmospheric CO2 millions of years ago supports recent climate change predictions from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Contact: Steven Williams
s.williams@soton.ac.uk
0238-059-2128
University of Southampton

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Pacific wind patterns, Ethiopia's sedimentary record, US air quality
Unusual weather that contributed to the California drought also led to an unprecedented drop in small plant-like organisms in the northeastern Pacific Ocean that form the base of the ocean food chain, potentially affecting fish, birds and marine mammals, according to a new study published in Geophysical Research Letters.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Global Change Biology
Puget Sound salmon face more ups and downs in river flows
Climate change projections predict increased climate variability, which is already appearing in the form of more pronounced fluctuations in salmon rivers around Puget Sound, Wash. That poses increased risks for threatened Chinook salmon, a new study finds.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
NASA's Aqua satellite sees demise of Tropical Cyclone Ola
Tropical Cyclone Ola was being battered by vertical wind shear in the Southern Pacific Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and captured an infrared picture of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Food Control
University of South Florida researchers develop handheld sensor to sniff out fish fraud
Researchers at the University of South Florida's College of Marine Science have developed a handheld sensor capable of debunking fraudulent seafood species claims, helping to ensure that consumers are get what they pay for.
Florida Sea Grant, Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation, Gulf and South Atlantic Fisheries Foundation, Inc.

Contact: Dr. John Paul
jpaul@usf.edu
727-553-1168
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Showing releases 951-975 out of 1567.

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