Press Releases

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Showing releases 976-1000 out of 1571.

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Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
Innovative restoration techniques used to rebuild West Coast abalone populations
Overfishing and disease contributed to the decline of seven abalone species. White abalone, in particular, is likely extinct because remaining males and females are not located in close enough proximity to reproduce successfully. Spawning and rearing white abalone in a laboratory has been accomplished on a small scale, but partners are turning attention to producing sufficient numbers of white abalone to eventually outplant them to suitable rocky reef habitats off the coast of Southern California.

Contact: Megan Morlock
Megan.Morlock@noaa.gov
503-230-5403
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
How tuna stay warm with cold hearts
Scientists at The University of Manchester, working with colleagues at Stanford University in America, have discovered how prized bluefin tuna keep their hearts pumping during temperature changes that would stop a human heart.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Monterey Bay Aquarium Foundation.

Contact: Morwenna Grills
Morwenna.Grills@manchester.ac.uk
44-016-127-52111
University of Manchester

Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Seafloor volcano pulses may alter climate
A new study shows that undersea volcanoes flare up on strikingly regular cycles, ranging from two weeks to 100,000 years -- and, that they erupt almost exclusively during the first six months of each year. The pulses -- apparently tied to short- and long-term changes in earth's orbit, and to sea levels -- may help trigger natural climate swings.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Krajick
kkrajick@ei.columbia.edu
212-854-9729
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
Genetics lab unravels mystery killing at sea
NOAA Fisheries scientists happened onto a killer whale attack too late to tell what species had been the target. So they recovered all that was left -- a whale lung -- and probed its DNA to for clues to where it came from. It turned out to be the first documentation of killer whales attacking a rarely seen pygmy sperm whale.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
Geochemical Perspectives Letters
15-million-year-old mollusk protein found
A team of Carnegie scientists have found 'beautifully preserved' 15-million-year-old thin protein sheets in fossil shells from southern Maryland. The team collected samples from Calvert Cliffs, along the shoreline of the Chesapeake Bay, a popular fossil collecting area. They found fossilized shells of a snail-like mollusk called Ecphora that lived in the mid-Miocene era.

Contact: Robert Hazen
rhazen@carnegiescience.edu
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 4-Feb-2015
UM School of Communication to create open educational resource on ocean health
The University of Miami's Department of Cinema and Interactive Media at the School of Communication has received a two-year grant of over $405,000 from the Friends of Stark Parks and the Herbert W. Hoover Foundation, for the creation of a unique Open Educational Resource that will not only explain the science underlying ocean health management, but also help bring the specific work of top researchers from their worldwide field locations to university curricula.
Friends of the Stark Parks, The Herbert W. Hoover Foundation

Contact: Barbara Gutierrez
bgutierrez@miami.edu
305-284-3205
University of Miami

Public Release: 4-Feb-2015
Nature
Evidence from warm past confirms recent IPCC estimates of climate sensitivity
New evidence showing the level of atmospheric CO2 millions of years ago supports recent climate change predictions from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Contact: Steven Williams
s.williams@soton.ac.uk
0238-059-2128
University of Southampton

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Pacific wind patterns, Ethiopia's sedimentary record, US air quality
Unusual weather that contributed to the California drought also led to an unprecedented drop in small plant-like organisms in the northeastern Pacific Ocean that form the base of the ocean food chain, potentially affecting fish, birds and marine mammals, according to a new study published in Geophysical Research Letters.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Global Change Biology
Puget Sound salmon face more ups and downs in river flows
Climate change projections predict increased climate variability, which is already appearing in the form of more pronounced fluctuations in salmon rivers around Puget Sound, Wash. That poses increased risks for threatened Chinook salmon, a new study finds.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
NASA's Aqua satellite sees demise of Tropical Cyclone Ola
Tropical Cyclone Ola was being battered by vertical wind shear in the Southern Pacific Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and captured an infrared picture of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Food Control
University of South Florida researchers develop handheld sensor to sniff out fish fraud
Researchers at the University of South Florida's College of Marine Science have developed a handheld sensor capable of debunking fraudulent seafood species claims, helping to ensure that consumers are get what they pay for.
Florida Sea Grant, Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation, Gulf and South Atlantic Fisheries Foundation, Inc.

Contact: Dr. John Paul
jpaul@usf.edu
727-553-1168
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Environmental Science and Technology
How will ocean acidification impact marine life?
A new analysis provides a holistic assessment of the impacts of climate change and ocean acidification on marine organisms including coral, shellfish, sea urchins, and other calcifying species.
European Research Council

Contact: Katherine Leitzell
leitzell@iiasa.ac.at
43-676-838-07316
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Oceans' increasing mercury levels may be harming fish
Mercury contamination of ocean fish is a serious global health issue, and a new analysis of published reports reveals that the concentration of mercury in yellowfin tuna caught near Hawai'i is increasing at a rate of 3.8 percent per year.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Zebrafish flex their muscles for research aboard the International Space Station
The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) Zebrafish Muscle investigation observes the effects of microgravity on the zebrafish, Danio rerio, a tropical freshwater fish belonging to the minnow family.

Contact: Laura Niles
Laura.E.Niles@nasa.gov
281-244-7069
NASA/Johnson Space Center

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Rivers might constitute just 20 percent of continental water flowing into oceans
The Amazon, Nile and Mississippi are mighty rivers, but they and all their worldwide brethren might be a relative trickle compared with an unseen torrent below the surface. New research shows that rivers might constitute as little as 20 percent of the water that flows yearly into the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific Oceans from the continents. The rest flows through what is termed the 'subterranean estuary,' which some researchers think supply the lion's share of terrestrial nutrients to the oceans.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Steven Powell
spowell2@mailbox.sc.edu
803-777-1923
University of South Carolina

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
ICES Journal of Marine Science
Spiny lobster abundance study at Glover's Reef, Belize finds fishery in good shape
A recent study conducted in the waters of Glover's Reef Marine Reserve in Belize by the Wildlife Conservation Society and its partners has revealed good news for spiny lobsters: the abundance of these commercially valuable crustaceans should support local fisheries into the future, an indication that no-take areas and other regulations are protecting the nation's marine resources.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
NASA catches speedy Tropical Cyclone Eunice transitioning
Tropical Cyclone Eunice has been spinning around in the Southern Indian Ocean for the last week and by Feb. 1 as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead, the storm was transitioning into an extra-tropical cyclone.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
NASA satellite sees wind shear affecting Tropical Cyclone Ola
NASA's Terra satellite captured a picture of Tropical Cyclone Ola on Feb. 1 that showed northeasterly wind shear was pushing the clouds and showers southwest of the center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study finds deep ocean is source of dissolved iron in Central Pacific
A new study led by scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution points to the deep ocean as a major source of dissolved iron in the central Pacific Ocean. This finding highlights the vital role ocean mixing plays in determining whether deep sources of iron reach the surface-dwelling life that need it to survive.
WHOI Postdoctoral Scholar Program, Doherty Foundation, Natural Environment Research Council, European Research Council, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Freshwater Science
Researchers introduce a macrosystems approach to study stream ecology
Scientists have developed the Stream Biome Gradient Concept, a new method for studying a variety of streams across continents. It allows comparisons of streams in different climates and different continents and can improve how researchers study streams worldwide. The method is introduced in the Freshwater Science article 'The Stream Biome Gradient Concept: factors controlling lotic systems across broad biogeographic scales', available online now and published in the March 2015 issue of the journal.
National Science Foundation, Konza Long-Term Ecological Research program, International Grasslands Center

Contact: Emily Murphy
emurphy@press.uchicago.edu
773-702-7521
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
Science of the Total Environment
Arsenic stubbornly taints many US wells, say new reports
Naturally occurring arsenic in private wells threatens people in many US states and parts of Canada, according to a package of a dozen scientific papers to be published next week. The studies, focused mainly on New England but applicable elsewhere, say private wells present continuing risks due to almost nonexistent regulation in most states, homeowner inaction and inadequate mitigation measures.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program

Contact: Kevin Krajick
kkrajick@ei.columbia.edu
212-854-9729
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
NASA gathers wind, rain, cloud data on major Tropical Cyclone Eunice
NASA's RapidScat, GPM and Terra satellite have been actively providing wind, rain and cloud data to forecasters about Tropical Cyclone Eunice. The storm reached Category 5 status on the Saffir-Simpson scale on Jan. 30.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
PLOS ONE
Population genomics unveil seahorse domain
In a finding vital to effective species management, a team including City College of New York biologists has determined that the lined seahorse (Hippocampus erectus) is more a permanent resident of the western mid-Atlantic Ocean than a vagrant.

Contact: Office of Communications and Marketing
communications@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-5310
City College of New York

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
Ecosphere
Blue mussels not yet the bellwether of NE coastal environment
Mussels could be the perfect 'sentinel' species to signal the health of coastal ecosystems. But a new study of blue mussels in estuary ecosystems along 600 kilometers of coastline in the Northeast uncovered three key mysteries that will have to be solved first.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
International Journal of Remote Sensing
Scientists trial system to improve safety at sea
New satellite imaging concept proposed by University of Leicester-led team could significantly reduce search areas for missing boats and planes.
US Navy Office of Naval Research-Global

Contact: Dr. Nigel Bannister
nb101@le.ac.uk
44-011-622-31043
University of Leicester

Showing releases 976-1000 out of 1571.

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