EurekAlert! - Marine Science Portal
  EurekAlert! Login | Main Page | Press Releases | Press Release Archive | Multimedia Gallery | Resources | Calendar | EurekAlert!
{TOPLEFTPHOTOALTTEXT}

Main Page
Press Releases
Multimedia Gallery
Resources
Calendar
EurekAlert! Home
EurekAlert! Login

 Search News Archive:
   
 Advanced Search
Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 976-1000 out of 1262.

<< < 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 > >>

Public Release: 17-Jul-2013
Nature Climate Change
The best defense against catastrophic storms: Mother Nature, say Stanford researchers
Stanford researchers say that natural habitats such as dunes and reefs are the best protection against storms and rising sea levels along the US coastline.

Contact: Elizabeth Rauer
Elizabeth.Rauer@stanford.edu
650-724-3108
Stanford University

Public Release: 17-Jul-2013
Gift creates Rosenberg Institute for Marine Biology and Environmental Science
San Francisco State University announced the creation of a new institute at the Romberg Tiburon Center (RTC), funded by Barbara and Richard Rosenberg. The Barbara and Richard Rosenberg Institute for Marine Biology and Environmental Science will help RTC showcase its extraordinary research potential and commitment to public engagement.

Contact: Nan Broadbent
nbroadbe@sfsu.edu
415-338-7108
San Francisco State University

Public Release: 17-Jul-2013
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Researchers reveal great white sharks' fuel for oceanic voyages: Liver oil
New research shows that great white sharks power their nonstop journeys of more than 2,500 miles with energy stored as fat and oil in their massive livers. The findings provide novel insights into the biology of these ocean predators.

Contact: Rob Jordan
rjordan@stanford.edu
650-721-1881
Stanford University

Public Release: 17-Jul-2013
NASA sees Tropical Storm Cimaron pass between Taiwan and the Philippines
Tropical Depression 08W strengthened into a tropical storm and was renamed Cimaron by the morning of July 17.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Jul-2013
Dissertations and Features
Stop marine pollution to protect kelp forests
University of Adelaide marine biologists have found that reducing nutrient pollution in coastal marine environments should help protect kelp forests from the damaging effects of rising CO2.

Contact: Dr. Bayden Russell
bayden.russell@adelaide.edu.au
61-404-845-919
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 16-Jul-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Family tree of fish yields surprises
The mighty tuna is more closely related to the delicate seahorse than to a marlin or sailfish. That is one of the surprises from the first comprehensive family tree, or phylogeny, of the "spiny-rayed fish," a group that includes about a third of all living vertebrate species. The work is published July 15 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 16-Jul-2013
New phosphorus book on sustaining an element essential to human life
Phosphorus enables high-yield agriculture and sustains life. Yet phosphate fertilizer is produced by mining non-renewable deposits located in just a few countries. And the same element that enables crops to flourish can also pollute waterways and create algae blooms that kill fish.

Contact: Julie Newberg
Julie.Newberg@asu.edu
480-727-3116
Arizona State University

Public Release: 16-Jul-2013
Geophysical Research Letters
AGU journal highlights -- July 16, 2013
Featured in this release are research papers on the following topics: "Why freshwater organisms survived the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs," "Constraining bubbling of methane from thermokarst lakes," "Low-cost solution optimizes water quality of reservoir effluent," "Characterizing the dynamics of geyser eruptions," "Seismic studies provide new detail on transition zone below western US," and "New global maps of surface ocean currents made from drifter data."

Contact: Mary Catherine Adams
mcadams@agu.org
202-777-7530
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 16-Jul-2013
Environmental Science and Technology
Study determines source of oil sheens near the site of Deepwater Horizon
A chemical analysis of oil sheens recently found floating at the ocean's surface near the site of the Deepwater Horizon disaster indicates that the source is pockets of oil trapped within the wreckage of the sunken rig.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ia.ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 16-Jul-2013
Collection that may hold key to ocean's mysteries looks to expand in new waterfront home
Ocean Genome Legacy, New England Biolabs Inc., and Northeastern University have reached an agreement that will bring a collection of tissue from the world's most rare, strange, and remarkable ocean creatures to the Marine Science Center in Nahant, Mass.

Contact: Dan Distel
distel@oglf.org
978-380-7425
Northeastern University College of Science

Public Release: 16-Jul-2013
NASA sees newborn Tropical Depression 08W in infrared
Infrared satellite data helps identify cloud top and sea-surface temperatures, and the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured those when it flew over Tropical Depression 08W in the western North Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Jul-2013
Environmental Science & Technology
Study identifies source of oil sheens near Deepwater Horizon site
A chemical analysis indicates that the source of oil sheens recently found floating at the ocean's surface near the site of the Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon oil spill is pockets of oil trapped within the wreckage of the sunken rig.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 16-Jul-2013
Environmental Science and Technology
Study identifies Deepwater Horizon debris as likely source of Gulf of Mexico oil sheens
A chemical analysis of oil sheens found floating recently at the ocean's surface near the site of the Deepwater Horizon disaster indicates that the source is pockets of oil trapped within the wreckage of the sunken rig. Both the Macondo well and natural oil seeps common to the Gulf of Mexico were confidently ruled out.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Press Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 16-Jul-2013
Coastal Engineering
Long-forgotten seawall protected New Jersey homes from Hurricane Sandy's powerful storm surges
Two beachfront communities in New Jersey were hit hard by Hurricane Sandy, but one fared much better than the other thanks to a long-forgotten seawall buried beneath the sand. Virginia Tech coastal engineers and geoscientists say the finding illustrates the need for multi-levels of beach protection in oceanfront communities.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Pastor
jdpastor@vt.edu
540-231-5646
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 16-Jul-2013
ZooKeys
Where's Waldo? A new alien-like species discovered off California
A strange alien-like animal has been discovered in deep water off the coast of California. The new species is a type of bivalve mollusk (clams, mussels, oysters and their kin). However instead of a thick shell, it has long, probing tentacles and a thick outer skin (called a mantle). After years of study, scientists have deduced that this new creature belongs in the genus "Waldo." The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Paul Valentich-Scott
pvscott@sbnature2.org
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 16-Jul-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Each degree of global warming might ultimately raise global sea levels by more than 2 meters
Greenhouse gases emitted today will cause sea level to rise for centuries to come. Each degree of global warming is likely to raise sea level by more than 2 meters in the future, a study now published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows.

Contact: Mareike Schodder
press@pik-potsdam.de
49-331-288-2507
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)

Public Release: 16-Jul-2013
PeerJ
The Line Islands Collection -- Microbial dynamics of coral reef robustness and decline
Coral reefs face serious threats primarily arising from climate change, unsustainable fishing, and pollution. To better understand the underlying processes, a multidisciplinary series of studies is being conducted by researchers, investigating variability in coral reef community structure and microbial dynamics across gradients of natural and anthropogenic stress. Their results are published in the new PeerJ "Line Islands Collection -- Microbial dynamics of coral reef robustness and decline" (named after their upcoming expedition to the Line Islands).

Contact: Forest Rohwer
frohwer@gmail.com
619-594-1336
PeerJ

Public Release: 15-Jul-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists outline long-term sea-level rise in response to warming of planet
A new study estimates that global sea levels will rise about 2.3 meters, or more than seven feet, over the next several thousand years for every degree (Celsius) the planet warms. This is one of the first analyses to combine four major contributors to potential sea level rise into a collective estimate, and compare it with evidence of past sea-level responses to global temperature changes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Clark
clarkp@geo.oregonstate.edu
541-740-5237
Oregon State University

Public Release: 15-Jul-2013
PLOS ONE
Nesting Gulf loggerheads face offshore risks
Threatened loggerhead sea turtles in the northern Gulf of Mexico can travel distances up to several hundred miles and visit offshore habitats between nesting events in a single season, taking them through waters impacted by oil and fishing industries.
US Geological Survey

Contact: Hannah Hamilton
hhamilton@usgs.gov
703-648-4356
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 15-Jul-2013
Radio Science
Distorted GPS signals reveal hurricane wind speeds
Researchers have found a way to do something completely different with GPS: Measure and map the wind speeds of hurricanes. The new technique could help meteorologists better predict storm severity, how storms form, and where they might be headed. Test flights on "Hurricane Hunter" aircraft show that the system provides valuable information at little additional cost, say authors of a paper to be published in Radio Science, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

Contact: Thomas Sumner
tsumner@agu.org
202-777-7516
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 15-Jul-2013
Nature Communications
Phytoplankton social mixers
Scientists at MIT and Oxford University have shown that the motility of phytoplankton also helps them determine their fate in ocean turbulence.
Human Frontier Science Program, National Science Foundation, MIT MISTI-France Program

Contact: Denise Brehm
brehm@MIT.EDU
617-253-8069
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 14-Jul-2013
Nature Geoscience
Is the ice in Greenland in growing decline?
Researchers conclude that predictions of the contribution of both ice shields to the sea level up to the year 2100 may be more than 35 cm too high or too low.

Contact: F.Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
Helmholtz Association

Public Release: 14-Jul-2013
Nature Geoscience
Scientists solve a 14,000-year-old ocean mystery
At the end of the last Ice Age, as the world began to warm, a swath of the North Pacific Ocean came to life. During a brief pulse of biological productivity 14,000 years ago, this stretch of the sea teemed with phytoplankton, amoeba-like foraminifera and other tiny creatures, who thrived in large numbers until the productivity ended -- as mysteriously as it began -- just a few hundred years later.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 12-Jul-2013
Satellite views Chantal's remnants over Bahamas
NOAA's GOES-13 satellite spotted the remnant clouds and showers from former Tropical Storm Chantal lingering over the Bahamas on July 12.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Jul-2013
NASA sees Soulik's eye reopen on Taiwan approach
Typhoon Soulik's eyewall appears to have rebuilt as evidenced in NASA satellite imagery.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 976-1000 out of 1262.

<< < 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 > >>


HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US    TOP
Copyright ©2014 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science