Press Releases

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Showing releases 976-1000 out of 1740.

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Public Release: 29-Sep-2015
2016 International Congress of Entomology
Cuba's Dr. Juan Bisset to speak at the 2016 International Congress of Entomology in Orlando
Dr. Juan Andrés Bisset, one of Cuba's leading entomologists, will be a featured speaker at the 2016 International Congress of Entomology (ICE 2016) in Orlando, Florida.

Contact: Richard Levine
rlevine@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Monsoon mission: A better way to predict Indian weather?
To better understand global weather patterns and increase scientific collaboration between the US and India, researchers supported by the Office of Naval Research have completed a month-long cruise studying summer monsoon conditions in the Bay of Bengal.

Contact: Bob Freeman
onrpublicaffairs@navy.mil
703-696-5031
Office of Naval Research

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
NASA satellites dissect Typhoon Dujuan affecting Taiwan
NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites provided visible and infrared data on Typhoon Dujuan's clouds while NASA's RapidScat instrument analyzed the storm's powerful winds as it approached Taiwan.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
NASA's RapidScat spots Tropical Storm Niala's waning winds
The RapidScat instrument saw the strongest winds in the Central Pacific Ocean's Tropical Storm Niala were on the northwestern side, facing the Big Island of Hawaii while the rest of the storm was below tropical-storm strength.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
NASA views new Atlantic tropical depression in infrared
The eleventh tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean formed early on Sept. 28 over 400 miles southwest of Bermuda as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and looked at the storm in infrared light.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
NASA's RapidScat sees the end of Tropical Storm Ida
The RapidScat instrument saw former Tropical Storm Ida's waning winds when the International Space Station passed over the remnant low pressure area on Sept. 25, 2015.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Marty along west coast of Mexico
NASA's RapidScat instrument provided a look at the tropical-storm force winds within Tropical Storm Marty as it continued to hug the coast of western Mexico. The seventeenth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific formed around 5 p.m. EDT on Sept. 26 and by 11 p.m. EDT had strengthened into Tropical Storm Marty.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Nature Geoscience
How ocean circulation changed atmospheric CO2
Changes to overturning circulation in the Southern Ocean as a result of temperatures over Antarctica play key role in carbon uptake by the oceans.

Contact: Alvin Stone
alvin.stone@unsw.edu.au
61-241-861-7366
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Nature Climate Change
Gone fishing: Loss of ocean predators has impact on climate change strategies
As Australia engages in debate over shark culling, new research says unsustainable harvesting of larger fish will affect how we tackle climate change.

Contact: Michael Jacobson
m.jacobson@griffith.edu.au
61-075-552-9250
Griffith University

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
University of South Florida researchers battle red tide with two new grants
Scientists from the University of South Florida and colleagues have received a total of more than $750,000 in two separate grants to further the development and implementation of new technologies to forecast occurrences of 'red tide' and to identify Karenia brevis, the organism that lies at the root of the toxic blooms.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Bob Weisberg
weisberg@usf.edu
727-553-1568
University of South Florida (USF Innovation)

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Nature Geoscience
Scientists solve deep ocean carbon riddle
New research involving scientists from University of Southampton and the National Oceanography Centre Southampton has identified a crucial process behind the reason why dissolved organic carbon levels in the deep oceans are constant despite a continuous supply from the surface ocean.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
NYC risks future flooding during hurricanes
Whether or not a coastal city floods during a hurricane depends on the storm, tide and sea level, and now a team of climate scientists show that the risk of New York City flooding has increased dramatically during the industrial era as a result of human-caused climate change.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Flood risk on rise for New York City and New Jersey coast, study finds
For the first time, climate researchers compared both sea-level rise rates and storm surge heights in prehistoric and modern eras and found that the combined increases of each have raised the likelihood of a devastating 500-year flood occurring as often as every 25 years.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Science Foundation

Contact: Ken Branson
kbranson@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0580
Rutgers University

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Nature Geoscience
Ocean circulation rethink solves climate conundrum
Researchers from the University of Exeter believe they have solved one of the biggest puzzles in climate science. The new study, published in Nature Geoscience, explains the synchrony observed during glacial periods when low temperatures in the Southern Ocean correspond with low levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide.
Royal Society Wolfson Foundation, National Science Foundation, and others

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-139-272-2062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
King crabs threaten Antarctic ecosystem due to warming ocean
King crabs may soon become high-level predators in Antarctic marine ecosystems where they haven't played a role in tens of millions of years, according to a new study led by Florida Institute of Technology.

Contact: Adam Lowenstein
adam@fit.edu
321-674-8964
Florida Institute of Technology

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Journal of Applied Ecology
Offshore wind farms could be more risky for gannets than previously thought, study shows
Offshore wind farms which are to be built in waters around the UK could pose a greater threat to protected populations of gannets than previously thought, according to a new study by researchers at the universities of Leeds, Exeter and Glasgow.
UK Department of Energy and Climate Change, Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Ben Jones
B.P.Jones@leeds.ac.uk
44-113-343-8059
University of Leeds

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
Typhoon Dujuan gives NASA an eye-opening performance
Former Tropical Storm Dujuan strengthened into a typhoon and when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead it got a clear look at the storm's new large eye.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
NASA sees wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Niala
NASA's Aqua satellite saw wind shear was affecting newborn Tropical Storm Niala as it continued moving through the Central Atlantic Ocean. Despite wind shear, Tropical Depression 6C formed about 500 miles southeast of Hilo, Hawaii, at 11 p.m. EDT on Sept. 24, 2015. By 11 a.m. EDT, the depression strengthened into a tropical storm and was renamed Tropical Storm Niala.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
NASA's GPM measures meandering Tropical Depression Ida's precipitation
The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core observatory satellite had another good view of meandering tropical storm Ida located in the central Atlantic Ocean and measured rainfall rates within the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Deep-diving whales could hold answer for synthetic blood
The ultra-stable properties of the proteins that allow deep-diving whales to remain active while holding their breath for up to two hours could help Rice University biochemist John Olson and his colleagues finish a 20-year quest to create lifesaving synthetic blood for human trauma patients.
National Institutes of Health, Welch Foundation

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
Scientists to explore whether the loss of CO2 caused Earth to cool 3 million years ago
Scientists at the University of Rochester expect to learn more about the role of CO2 in climate change through a study of reverse global warming -- by researching the first ice sheets formed in the Northern Hemisphere.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Iglinski
peter.iglinski@rochester.edu
585-273-4726
University of Rochester

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
Scientific Reports
I've got your back -- fishes really do look after their mates!
When it comes to helping each other out, it turns out that some fish are better at it than previously thought. New research from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University has found that pairs of rabbitfishes will cooperate and support each other while feeding.
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
Science Advances
Extreme Pacific sea level events to double in future
Many tropical Pacific island nations are struggling to adapt to gradual sea level rise stemming from warming oceans and melting ice caps. Now they may also see much more frequent extreme sea level swings. The culprit is a projected behavioral change of the El Niño phenomenon and its characteristic Pacific wind response, according to recent computer modeling experiments and tide-gauge analysis by scientists at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa and CSIRO in Australia.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 24-Sep-2015
One giant leap: ONR delivers new research vessel to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
On Sept. 23, ONR delivered the new R/V Neil Armstrong to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Woods Hole will operate the state-of-the-art research vessel under a charter agreement with ONR.

Contact: Bob Freeman
onrpublicaffairs@navy.mil
703-696-5031
Office of Naval Research

Public Release: 24-Sep-2015
Science Advances
UAF model used to estimate Antarctic ice sheet melting
To see how burning up the Earth's available fossil fuels might affect the Antarctic ice sheet, scientists turned to a computer program developed at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute. The ice would disappear, they found, and that conclusion is making headlines across the world.

Contact: Meghan Murphy
mmmurphy3@alaska.edu
907-474-7541
University of Alaska Fairbanks

Showing releases 976-1000 out of 1740.

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