Press Releases

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Showing releases 976-1000 out of 1682.

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Public Release: 28-May-2015
First Eastern Pacific tropical depression runs ahead of dawn
The first tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific hurricane season formed during the early morning of Thursday, May 28, 2015, well southwest of Mexico. An image of the storm taken from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows the depression in infrared light as it was born in the early morning hours before sunrise.

Contact: Rob Gutro
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-May-2015
New study shows influence on climate of fresh water during last ice age
A new study shows how huge influxes of fresh water into the North Atlantic Ocean from icebergs calving off North America during the last ice age had an unexpected effect -- they increased the production of methane in the tropical wetlands.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Rachael Rhodes
Oregon State University

Public Release: 28-May-2015
Current Biology
Genetic analysis of the American eel helps explain its decline
The numbers of American eels in freshwater areas have been decreasing rapidly but scientists have been puzzled as to why the fish can't recolonize. Now, a new look at eel genetics published in Current Biology finds that there are differences between eels that feed in freshwater and eels that feed in brackish environments that were previously thought to be genetically interchangeable.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
Cell Press

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Nature Geoscience
Reading the Earth's LIPS
An international team of scientists including University of Sydney geophysicists Professor Dietmar Müller, Dr. Simon Williams and Dr. Maria Seton from the School of Geosciences have found a novel way to 'read the Earth's LIPS' -- its Large Igneous Provinces. Their findings are reported in a Nature Geoscience article in which they show for the first time that LIPS have a close working relationship with underwater mountain ranges called mid-ocean ridges.

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
University of Sydney

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Global climate on verge of multi-decadal change
A study, published today in Nature, implies that the global climate is on the verge of a broad-scale change that could last decades. The change is likely to bring drier summers to Britain and Ireland, accelerated sea-level rise along the northeast coast of the USA, and drought in the Sahel region. This new phase could also offer a brief reprise from the rise of global temperatures, as well as fewer hurricanes hitting the USA.
Natural Environmental Research Council

Contact: Holly Peacock
National Oceanography Centre, UK

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Environmental Microbiology
Pinpointing natural cancer drug's true origins brings sustainable production a step closer
For decades, scientists have known that ET-743, a compound extracted from a marine invertebrate called a mangrove tunicate, can kill cancer cells. The drug has been approved for use in patients in Europe and is in clinical trials in the US.
International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups, Fogarty International Center, National Science Foundation, DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Contact: Ian Demsky
University of Michigan

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force releases National Invasive Lionfish Management Plan
An intergovernmental task force just released a new plan to prevent the spread of the invasive lionfish and to help manage lionfish in an effort to prevent further harm to marine ecosystems.

Contact: Connie Barclay
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Invisible helpers of the sea: Marine bacteria boost growth of tiny ocean algae
A common diatom grows faster in the presence of bacteria that release a growth hormone known to benefit plants on land.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
University of Washington

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Scientific Reports
On the trail of the clever snail
Animals, like humans, excel at some tasks but not others according to a new study published in the journal Scientific Reports. Researchers from the Universities of Exeter and Aberystwyth used pond snails to investigate learning and memory. They found that if an individual is good at forming memories about food they are poor at forming memories related to predator threat and vice versa.
Leverhulme Trust

Contact: Jo Bowler
University of Exeter

Public Release: 26-May-2015
Protecting South America's iconic golden dorado fish
A new study launched this month by University of Massachusetts Amherst fisheries biologist Andy J. Danylchuk, in collaboration with Argentina's Ministry of Environment and regional partners including Juramento Fly Fishing, Tigres del Rio, Fish Simply, and Patagonia Inc., is the first to assess the impact of catch-and-release fishing and other human and environmental pressures on the golden dorado, a fish of high economic and recreational value across South America.
Patagonia, Inc., Argentina's Ministry of Environment, Juramento Fly Fishing, Tigres del Rio and Fish Simply

Contact: Janet Lathrop
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 26-May-2015
Wrasse project offers production boost to Scottish salmon industry
Aquaculture experts from the University of Stirling, Scotland, are leading the research behind a £4 million project to boost production in the Scottish salmon farming industry. Scientists from the University's internationally acclaimed Institute of Aquaculture have helped to develop the potential of wrasse, a cleaner fish which supports the efficient production of salmon. Stirling researchers are using wrasse as part of a sustainable, integrated pest management strategy.
Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre, Marine Harvest, Scottish Sea Farms, BioMar, University of Stirling

Contact: David Christie
University of Stirling

Public Release: 26-May-2015
UN Secretary-General's Scientific Advisory Board
Top challenges for the future of humanity and the planet
Leading global experts serving on the UN Secretary-General's Scientific Advisory Board have identified key scientific challenges that must be addressed to ensure the sustainability of humanity on Earth.

Contact: Terry Collins
UNESCO and Malaysian Industry-Government Group for High Technology

Public Release: 25-May-2015
Nature Climate Change
Climate engineering may save coral reefs, study shows
Geoengineering of the climate may be the only way to save coral reefs from mass bleaching, according to new research.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Duncan Sandes
University of Exeter

Public Release: 22-May-2015
Ecology Letters
An evolutionary heads-up
Animals with large brains are considered to be more intelligent and more successful than those with smaller brains. Researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna and Stockholm University have provided the first experimental evidence that large brains provide an evolutionary advantage. Large-brained female fish have a higher survival rate than those with small brains when faced with a predator, although brain size surprisingly did not influence male survival. The results were published in Ecology Letters.

Contact: Susanna Kautschitsch
University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna

Public Release: 22-May-2015
The Biological Bulletin
Estuaries protect Dungeness crabs from deadly parasites
Parasitic worms can pose a serious threat to the Dungeness crab, a commercially important fishery species found along the west coast of North America. The worms are thought to have caused or contributed to the crash of the crab fishery of central California during the last half century. New research shows that infected crabs can rid themselves of parasites by moving into the less salty water of estuaries. Low salinity kills the worms creating a parasite refuge for the crabs.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 21-May-2015
ICES Journal of Marine Science
New model predicts fish population response to dams, other ecological factors
Researchers have developed a model to assess how dams affect the viability of sea-run fish species that need to pass dams as they use both fresh and marine waters during their lifetimes. NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center and Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office have partnered on this project to test how varying passage efficiency at dams related to survival rates for these species, using a model of endangered Atlantic salmon as a case study.
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 21-May-2015
For pollock surveys in Alaska, things are looking up
Scientists from NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center have turned their view of the nation's largest fishery upside down with upward-facing sonar systems that are mounted to the seafloor and monitor the passage of fish above. They just completed their first experimental deployment of the new system, and the data, though upside down, looked great. In the future, these systems might augment traditional, ship-based acoustic surveys.

Contact: Marjorie Mooney-Seuss
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 21-May-2015
CloudSat analyzed the eye of Typhoon Dolphin
When Dolphin was a typhoon on May 16, NASA's CloudSat satellite completed a stunning eye overpass of Typhoon Dolphin in the West Pacific at 0412 UTC (12:12 a.m. EDT). By May 22, Dolphin's remnants were moving through the Northern Pacific.

Contact: Rob Gutro
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-May-2015
Planktonic world: The new frontier
On May 22, in a special issue of Science, an international, team of scientists maps the biodiversity of a wide range of planktonic organisms, exploring their interactions - mainly parasitic, and how they impact and are affected by their environment, primarily the temperature. Based on a portion of the 35000 samples collected from all the world's oceans during the 2009-2013 expedition on board the schooner TARA, this data provides the scientific community with unprecedented resources.

Contact: Isabelle Kling
European Molecular Biology Laboratory

Public Release: 21-May-2015
New insights into global ocean microbe-virus interactions, drivers of Earth's ecosystems
Ocean microbes are vital to the Earth's ecosystems, and their interactions with ocean viruses can have dramatic effects on processes ranging from oxygen production to food supply. A UA-led international team has uncovered new information about the way marine viruses and microbes interact on a global scale, which may allow researchers to predictively model their complex interactions. The study is featured in a special issue of Science covering work from the Tara Oceans Expeditions.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Daniel Stolte
University of Arizona

Public Release: 21-May-2015
Scientists announce top 10 new species for 2015
A cartwheeling spider, a bird-like dinosaur and a fish that wriggles around on the sea floor to create a circular nesting site are among the species identified by the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry as the Top 10 New Species for 2015.

Contact: Claire B. Dunn
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Public Release: 21-May-2015
Sudden onset of ice loss in Antarctica detected
A group of scientists, led by a team from the University of Bristol, UK has observed a sudden increase of ice loss in a previously stable region of Antarctica. The research is published today in Science.

Contact: Hannah Johnson
University of Bristol

Public Release: 20-May-2015
The Auk
Arctic ducks combine nutrients from wintering and breeding grounds to grow healthy eggs
It takes a lot of nutrients to build an egg. One of the big questions among researchers who study the eggs of migratory birds is where those nutrients come from -- does the mother make the egg directly out of what she eats during the breeding season, or does she save up nutrients consumed on her wintering grounds? The answer appears to be both for Common Eiders, large, sea-going ducks that breed in the Arctic.

Contact: Keith Hobson
Central Ornithology Publication Office

Public Release: 20-May-2015
NASA sees Extra-Tropical Storm Dolphin moving toward Sea of Okhotsk
Tropical Storm Dolphin transitioned into an extra-tropical storm and NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the storm on its way toward the Sea of Okhotsk.

Contact: Rob Gutro
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-May-2015
NASA analyzed the winds of Tropical Storm Ana
In mid-May 2015, Ana became the first named tropical storm of the North Atlantic hurricane season. May is early to see large storms in the Atlantic; the season begins in earnest on June 1.

Contact: Rob Gutro
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 976-1000 out of 1682.

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