Dr. S. James Gates, Jr. talks about how physics is magical <I>Science</I> Podcasts

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Showing multimedia 61-70 out of 3939.

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Secret to Regrowing Cartilage Might Be Found in the Nose

Secret to Regrowing Cartilage Might Be Found in the Nose
Animation describes how specialized cells from the nose can, once implanted, regrow cartilage in the knee. This animation relates to a paper that appeared in the Aug. 27, 2014, issue of Science ...

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Sakis Playing

Sakis Playing
Sakis play the group service game.

Contact: Judith Burkart
Judith.burkart@aim.uzh.ch
41-446-355-402
University of Zurich

How Hummingbirds Regained a Sweet Tooth (6 of 6)

How Hummingbirds Regained a Sweet Tooth (6 of 6)
Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) reject most artificial sweeteners. Birds drink from sucrose-containing feeders (500mM, feeders 3 and 6) but reject aspartame (15mM, feeder 1). Video is slowed...

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

How Hummingbirds Regained a Sweet Tooth (5 of 6)

How Hummingbirds Regained a Sweet Tooth (5 of 6)
Hummingbirds discriminate between water and sucrose rapidly. High-speed video (slowed for viewing) of a ruby-throated hummingbird rejecting water presented in the top feeder after three tongue licks (...

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

For Polio, Two Vaccines Are Better than One

For Polio, Two Vaccines Are Better than One
This animation highlights a study that explains how combined use of two different polio vaccines could help speed the global eradication of polio. This material relates to a paper that appeared in the...

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Saran Cracking

Saran Cracking
As a piece of plastic wrap is stretched, the new algorithms identify the location (in red) where it is weakening, which is where the material eventually breaks.

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Developmental Plasticity and the Origin of Tetrapods

Developmental Plasticity and the Origin of Tetrapods
Polypterus senegalus walks across a sandy substrate. Fish use their fins and body in combination to move across a terrestrial substrate. Fins are planted one after the other to lift the head ...

Contact: Cynthia Lee
cynthia.lee@mcgill.ca
514-398-6754
McGill University

Two-Mass Model for Human Running Vertical Forces

Two-Mass Model for Human Running Vertical Forces
The two-mass model theorizes that running vertical force-time waveforms consist of two components, each corresponding to the motion of a portion of the body's mass. A smaller component corresponds to ...

Contact: Margaret Allen
mallen@smu.edu
214-768-7664
Southern Methodist University

Elite Sprinter Force Data vs. Simple-Spring Model

Elite Sprinter Force Data vs. Simple-Spring Model
The contemporary view of running mechanics has been heavily influenced by the simple spring-mass model, a theory first formulated in the late 1980s. The spring-mass model assumes the legs work ...

Contact: Margaret Allen
mallen@smu.edu
214-768-7664
Southern Methodist University

Electrically Stimulating Brain Boosts Memory

Electrically Stimulating Brain Boosts Memory
Stimulating a region in the brain with non-invasive electrical current using magnetic pulses (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation) improves memory, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study in ...

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Showing multimedia 61-70 out of 3939.

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