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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3514.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
PLOS Genetics
Identifying the source of stem cells
When most animals begin life, cells immediately begin accepting assignments to become a head, tail or a vital organ. However, mammals, including humans, are special. The cells of mammalian embryos get to make a different first choice -- to become the protective placenta or to commit to forming the baby.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
First detailed picture of a cancer-related cell enzyme in action on a chromosome unit
New insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast-cancer protein is published in this week's issue of Nature. The study produced the first detailed working image of an enzyme in a group that is associated with many types of cancer. The researchers obtained the first crystal structure of a gene-regulation enzyme working on a nucleosome. The image reveals previously unknown information about how the enzyme attaches to its nucleosome target.
National Institutes of Health, Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, Penn State University

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Survival rates in pediatric umbilical cord transplants may indicate a new standard of care
A new standard of care for children facing acute myeloid leukemia may be clear, following a multi-year study published in the latest edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Caroline Marin
crmarin@umn.edu
612-624-5680
University of Minnesota Academic Health Center

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Schizophrenia Research
EEG test to help understand and treat schizophrenia
Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have validated an EEG test to study and treat schizophrenia. The findings, published in two separate studies, offer a clinical test that could be used to help diagnose persons at risk for developing mental illness later in life, as well as an approach for measuring the efficacies of different treatment options.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, US Department of Veteran Affairs, and Veterans Medical Research Foundation

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
HIV Research for Prevention (HIV R4P) Conference
Women who took part in VOICE speak up about why they didn't use HIV prevention products
Many of the women at first acted surprised. Some insisted the blood tests were wrong. But then most conveyed to researchers in individual interviews and focus groups why they hadn't used the study products assigned to them as participants in VOICE, a large HIV prevention trial that, as a likely consequence, did not find any of the three products that were tested to be effective, reported the research team at HIV R4P.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lisa Rossi
rossil@upmc.edu
412-916-3315
Microbicide Trials Network

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
In autoimmune diseases, researchers pinpoint genetic risks, cellular culprits
Scores of autoimmune diseases afflicting one in 12 Americans -- ranging from type 1 diabetes, to multiple sclerosis, to rheumatoid arthritis, to asthma -- mysteriously cause the immune system to harm tissues within our own bodies. Now, a new study pinpoints the complex genetic origins for many of these diseases, a discovery that may lead to better diagnosis and ultimately to improved treatments.
National Institutes of Health, National Multiple Sclerosis Society

Contact: Pete Farley
peter.farley@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Affordable Care Act Medicare payment reforms improve patient experiences
Patients enrolled in Accountable Care Organizations reported improved experiences with care compared to the overall Medicare population.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, John and Laura Arnold Foundation, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Beeson Career Development Program

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
Scripps Research Institute scientists make enzyme that could help explain origins of life
Mimicking natural evolution in a test tube, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have devised an enzyme with a unique property that might have been crucial to the origin of life on Earth. Aside from illuminating one possible path for life's beginnings, the achievement is likely to yield a powerful tool for evolving new and useful molecules.
NASA, The Simons Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
Molecular map reveals genetic origins of 21 autoimmune diseases
Scientists have created a molecular map that pinpoints genetic variants that play a role in 21 different autoimmune diseases, they report Oct. 29 in the journal Nature.
National Institutes of Health, National Multiple Sclerosis Society

Contact: Bill Hathaway
william.hathaway@yale.edu
203-432-1322
Yale University

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Four years in, payment model lowers medical spending, improves care
Enrollees in a Massachusetts global budget health care plan had smaller increases in medical spending and larger increases in quality of care over the first four years of the contract when compared to similar individuals in other states.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, National Bureau of Economic Research Fellowship in Aging and Health Economics, Charles H. Hood Foundation

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Contamination likely explains 'food genes in blood' claim
Laboratory contaminants likely explain the results of a recent study claiming that complete genes can pass from foods we eat into our blood, according to a University of Michigan molecular biologist who re-examined data from the controversial research paper.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Autism after high school: Making the transition
The National Institute of Mental Health has awarded a grant to University of Kentucky College of Education Professor Lisa Ruble and a team of co-investigators to find ways to help reduce or eliminate the disconnect from needed services that often occurs when students with autism complete school.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jenny Wells
jenny.wells@uky.edu
859-257-5343
University of Kentucky

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Emerging Infectious Diseases
Genome sequenced of enterovirus D68 circulating in St. Louis
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have sequenced the genome of enterovirus D68 sampled from patients treated at St. Louis Children's Hospital. Nationwide, the virus has spread rapidly in recent months and caused severe respiratory illness in young children, with some patients requiring hospitalization.
National Institutes of Health, Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Distinguished Professorship at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Animal study suggests heavy drinking in adolescence associated with lasting brain changes
Heavy drinking during adolescence may lead to structural changes in the brain and memory deficits that persist into adulthood, according to an animal study published October 29 in The Journal of Neuroscience. The study found that, even as adults, rats given daily access to alcohol during adolescence had reduced levels of myelin -- the fatty coating on nerve fibers that accelerates the transmission of electrical signals between neurons.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Emily Ortman
media@sfn.org
202-962-4090
Society for Neuroscience

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Adolescent binge drinking reduces brain myelin, impairs cognitive and behavioral control
Binge drinking can have lasting effects on brain pathways that are still developing during adolescence, say neuroscience researcher Heather N. Richardson and her colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Louisiana State University. Results of their study using a rodent model of adolescent drinking appear in the Oct. 29 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience,
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
New study will track factors in early menopause
The estimated 10 percent of women in Western nations who enter menopause before age 45 have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as lower fertility. Now epidemiologist Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is conducting the first large study to investigate whether vitamin D deficiency, inflammatory factors, hormones and other factors are associated with risk of early menopause, funded by the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UC Davis scientists discover exact receptor for DEET that repels mosquitoes
The odorant receptor that makes DEET repellant to mosquitoes has been identified by a research team led by the University of California, Davis.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Pat Bailey
pjbailey@ucdavis.edu
530-752-9843
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Grant awarded for device to detect newborn heart problems
A grant was awarded for a device to detect heart abnormalities in newborns.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Laura Mecoy
Lmecoy@labiomed.org
310-546-5860
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed)

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
American Journal of Gastroenterology
IU researchers: Blood test may help to diagnose pancreatic cancer
Indiana University cancer researchers have found that a simple blood test might help diagnose pancreatic cancer, one of the most deadly forms of the disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michael Schug
maschug@iupui.edu
317-278-0953
Indiana University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
NIH's ORDR-NCATS RDCRN & NICHD awards U54 cooperative agreement for natural history study
National Institute of Health announced awards to expand the Office of Rare Diseases Research part of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences collaborative Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network. Through the network, physician scientists at 22 consortia will work with 98 patient advocacy groups to advance clinical research and investigate new treatments for patients with rare diseases. The collaborations are made possible by $29 million in fiscal 2014 funding from NIH.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steven Kaminsky
skaminsky@rettsyndrome.org
301-514-4068
International Rett Syndrome Foundation

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Nucleic Acids Research
Technique uses bacteria's own CRISPR-Cas system to turn off gene
Researchers have developed a technique that co-opts an immune system already present in bacteria and archaea to turn off specific genes or sets of genes -- creating a powerful tool for future research on genetics and related fields.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
HIV Research for Prevention (HIV R4P) Conference
New results from VOICE associates tenofovir gel use with lower HSV-2 risk in women
The risk of acquiring herpes simplex virus type 2 was reduced by half among women in the VOICE trial who used a vaginal gel containing the antiretroviral drug tenofovir regularly, according to researchers from the Microbicide Trials Network who conducted the study. The findings provide additional evidence that tenofovir gel, a product developed to protect against HIV, could potentially help prevent one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections affecting women in sub-Saharan Africa.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lisa Rossi
rossil@upmc.edu
412-916-3315
Microbicide Trials Network

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Compensation and punishment: 'Justice' depends on whether or not we're a victim
We're more likely to punish wrongdoing as a third party to a non-violent offense than when we're victimized by it, according to a new study by New York University psychology researchers. The findings may offer insights into how juries differ from plaintiffs in seeking to restore justice.
NIH/National Institute of Aging

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Social host laws tied to less underage drinking
Teenagers who live in communities with strict 'social host' laws are less likely to spend their weekends drinking at parties, according to a study in the November issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Mallie J. Paschall
paschall@PREV.org
510-883-5753
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Radiology
Screening with tomosynthesis and mammography is cost-effective
Adding tomosynthesis to biennial digital mammography screening for women with dense breasts is likely to improve breast cancer detection at a reasonable cost relative to biennial mammography screening alone, according to a new study.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3514.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

     
   

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