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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3538.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Clipping proteins that package genes may limit abnormal cell growth in tumors
Changes to the structure of the protein histone H3.3 may play a key role in silencing genes that regulate cancer cell growth.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, University of Cambridge, Cancer Research UK, Hutchinson Whampoa and the Human Frontier Science Program, Ellison Medical Foundation, Developmental Research Pilot Project Program at Mount Sinai

Contact: Lucia Lee
lucia.lee@mountsinai.org
212-241-7445
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
AIDS
Research shows anti-HIV medicines can cause damage to fetal hearts
Just-published findings in the journal AIDS raise concern about potential long-term harmful impact of 'antiretroviral therapy' on in-utero infants whose mothers are HIV-positive, but who are not infected with HIV themselves.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Obesity-attributable absenteeism among US workers costs the nation more than $8 billion annually
Obesity costs the US $8.65 billion per year as a result of absenteeism in the workplace -- more than 9 percent of all absenteeism costs. The consequences of obesity among the working population go beyond healthcare and create a financial challenge not only for the nation but for individual states as well. The study is the first to provide state-level estimates of obesity-attributable costs of absenteeism among working adults in the US.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
More genetic clues found in a severe food allergy
Scientists have identified four new genes associated with the severe food allergy eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Because the genes appear to have roles in other allergic diseases and in inflammation, the findings may point toward potential new treatments for EoE.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Food Phight for Eosinophilic Esophagitis, Adele S. and Daniel S. Kubert Estate

Contact: John Ascenzi
ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
eLife
Life's extremists may be an untapped source of antibacterial drugs
Life's extremists, a family of microbes called Archaea, may be an untapped source of new antibacterial drugs. That conclusion arises from the discovery of the first antibacterial gene in this ancient lineage.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Researchers tease out glitches in immune system's self-recognition
In order to distinguish self from other, the immune system processes proteins from inside and outside the body in different ways. A new study revises understanding of how the process works and sheds light on autoimmune disease.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Nail stem cells prove more versatile than press ons
There are plenty of body parts that don't grow back when you lose them. Nails are an exception, and a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science reveals some of the reasons why.
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Contact: Cristy Lytal
lytal@med.usc.edu
323-442-2172
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Neuron
TSRI researchers find how mutant gene can cause deafness
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute have discovered how one gene is essential to hearing, uncovering a cause of deafness and suggesting new avenues for therapies.
National Institutes of Health, Dorris Neuroscience Center, Skaggs Insitute for Chemical Biology, Bundy Foundation

Contact: Madeline McCurry Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
PLOS Computational Biology
Mass. General-developed system reveals how our brains and bodies change as we fall asleep
Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have developed a system to accurately track the dynamic process of falling asleep, something has not been possible with existing techniques. In their report in the October issue of the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology, the research team describes how combining key physiologic measurements with a behavioral task that does not interfere with sleep onset gives a better picture of the gradual process of falling asleep.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Terri Ogan
togan@partners.org
617-726-0954
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Journal of American College of Cardiology
Study: Obesity fuels silent heart damage
Using an ultrasensitive blood test to detect the presence of a protein that heralds heart muscle injury, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that obese people without overt heart disease experience silent cardiac damage that fuels their risk for heart failure down the road.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epeshev1@jhmi.edu
410-502-9433
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Moffitt researchers use evolutionary principles to model cancer mutations
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are taking a unique approach to understanding and investigating cancer by utilizing evolutionary principles and computational modeling to examine the role of specific genetic mutations in the Darwinian struggle among tumor and normal cells during cancer growth.
Physical Sciences in Oncology Centers, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Kim Polacek
kim.polacek@moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
Halting the hijacker: Cellular targets to thwart influenza virus infection
In a comprehensive new study published today in the journal Cell Host and Microbe, the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Yoshihiro Kawaoka and a team of researchers have revealed methods for thwarting influenza viruses by shutting down the cellular machinery they need, like cutting the fuel line on a bank robber's getaway car.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease Public Health Service, ERATO, Strategic Basic Research Programs of Japan Science and Technology Agency

Contact: Yoshihiro Kawaoka
kawaokay@svm.vetmed.wisc.edu
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
NeuroImage
Imagination, reality flow in opposite directions in the brain
As real as that daydream may seem, its path through your brain runs opposite reality. Aiming to discern discrete neural circuits, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have tracked electrical activity in the brains of people who alternately imagined scenes or watched videos.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Barry Van Veen
vanveen@engr.wisc.edu
608-265-2488
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
FASEB Journal
Antiangiogenic treatment improves survival in animal model of ovarian cancer
Coupling an antiangiogenic treatment with low-dose chemotherapy results in improved survival rates in an animal model of ovarian cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Canadian Institutes for Health Research, Ovarian Cancer Canada, BIDMC CAO Pilot Grant

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
UH cancer study receives $1.5 million grant from NIH
After earning her medical degree in China, Qian Lu, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Houston, believed she could help patients more by treating the mind as well as the body. She then decided to pursue a doctorate in psychology in the US.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Melissa Carroll
mcarroll@uh.edu
713-743-8153
University of Houston

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Immunity
The STING of radiation
A team of researchers led by Ludwig Chicago's Yang-Xin Fu and Ralph Weichselbaum has uncovered the primary signaling mechanisms and cellular interactions that drive immune responses against tumors treated with radiotherapy. Published in the current issue of Immunity, their study suggests novel strategies for boosting the effectiveness of radiotherapy, and for combining it with therapies that harness the immune system to treat cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Ludwig Cancer Research, The Foglia Foundation

Contact: Rachel Steinhardt
rsteinhardt@licr.org
212-450-1582
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Mount Sinai researchers awarded grant to find new stem cell therapies for vision recovery
The National Eye Institute, a division of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai a five-year grant totaling $1 million that will support an effort to re-create a patients' ocular stem cells and restore vision in those blinded by corneal disease.
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Jessica Mikulski
jmikulski@nyee.edu
212-979-4274
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science
University of Kentucky reports HIV/AIDS drugs could be repurposed to treat AMD
A new study released by the University of Kentucky today reports that drugs that have been used for the past 30 years to treat HIV/AIDS, could be repurposed to treat the dry form of age-related macular degeneration.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ann Blackford
ann.blackford@uky.edu
859-323-6442
University of Kentucky

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics
When vaccines are imperfect
The control of certain childhood diseases is difficult, despite high vaccination coverage in many countries. One of the possible reasons for this is 'imperfect vaccines,' that is, vaccines that fail either due to 'leakiness,' lack of effectiveness on certain individuals in a population, or shorter duration of potency. In a paper publishing today in the SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, Felicia Magpantay et al. use a mathematical model to determine the consequences of vaccine failure and resulting disease dynamics.
Research and Policy in Infectious Disease Dynamics program, US Department of Homeland Security, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karthika Swamy Cohen
karthika@siam.org
267-350-6383
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Immunity
Every step you take: STING pathway key to tumor immunity
A protein complex known as STING plays a crucial role in detecting the presence of tumor cells and promoting an aggressive anti-tumor response by the body's innate immune system, according to two separate studies in Immunity. The results have major implications for the growing field of cancer immunotherapy.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Ludwig Cancer Research, Foglia Family Foundation

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
For women, job authority adds to depression symptoms
Job authority increases symptoms of depression among women, but decreases them among men, according to a new study of more than 1,300 middle-aged men and 1,500 middle-aged women published in the December issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.
NIH/National Institute of Aging

Contact: David Ochsner
dochsner@austin.utexas.edu
512-626-0788
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Genetics in Medicine
Panel-based genetic diagnostic testing for inherited eye disease proves highly accurate
Gene panel-based tests for inherited eye disorders have been previously reported, but none of these have been as thoroughly characterized with regard to their performance in a diagnostic setting as the GEDi test. Mass. Eye and Ear researchers put GEDi to the test.
National Institutes of Health, March of Dimes, Foundation Fighting Blindness

Contact: Mary Leach
Mary_Leach@meei.harvard.edu
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
New computer model predicts gut metabolites to better understand gastrointestinal disease
Tufts University School of Engineering researchers and collaborators from Texas A&M University have published the first research to use computational modeling to predict and identify the metabolic products of gastrointestinal tract microorganisms. Understanding these metabolic products, or metabolites, could influence how clinicians diagnose and treat GI diseases, as well as many other metabolic and neurological diseases increasingly associated with compromised GI function.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katie Cinnamond Benoit
katherine.cinnamond@tufts.edu
617-627-4703
Tufts University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
PLOS Genetics
New study reveals why some people may be immune to HIV-1
Doctors have long been mystified as to why HIV-1 rapidly sickens some individuals, while in others the virus has difficulties gaining a foothold. Now, a study of genetic variation in HIV-1 and in the cells it infects reported by University of Minnesota researchers in this week's issue of PLOS Genetics has uncovered a chink in HIV-1's armor that may, at least in part, explain the puzzling difference -- and potentially open the door to new treatments.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Stephanie Xenos
sxenos@umn.edu
612-624-8723
University of Minnesota

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Cell
Penn researchers unwind the mysteries of the cellular clock
Underlying circadian rhythms is a clock built of transcription factors that control the oscillation of genes, serving as the wheels and springs of the clock. But, how does a single clock keep time in multiple phases at once? A genome-wide survey found that circadian genes and regulatory elements called enhancers oscillate daily in phase with nearby genes -- both the enhancer and gene activity peak at the same time each day.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3538.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

     
   

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