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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3799.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
Researchers surprise mouth fungus with sugary 'Trojan horse' that hides medicine
Scientists from the University at Buffalo School of Dental Medicine will borrow a famous strategy from Greek warfare -- the Trojan horse -- to fight a fungus that exists in the mouths and skin of nearly half of the world's population.
NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Contact: Marcene Robinson
marcener@buffalo.edu
716-645-4595
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
Breast Cancer Research
Researchers identify new cancer marker and possible therapeutic target for breast cancer
A new way to detect - and perhaps treat -- one of the deadliest types of breast cancer has been found. Led by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine, the study appears online in Breast Cancer Research.
Research Promotion Foundation of Cyprus, Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
Brown University to help Ghana build HIV, TB research capacity
With $1.45 million over five years from the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health, a pair of Brown University professors will work with colleagues in Ghana to build the research capacity needed to address the deadly co-epidemics of HIV and tuberculosis.
NIH/Fogarty International Center

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Exercise during adolescence linked to lowered risk of death later
Women who participated in exercise as adolescents had a reduced risk of death from cancer and all causes in their middle and older ages.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lauren Riley
lauren.riley@aacr.org
215-446-7155
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Nature Immunology
How to become a T follicular helper cell
Follicular helper Tcells (TFH cells), a rare type of immune cell that is essential for inducing a strong and lasting antibody response to viruses and other microbes, have garnered intense interest in recent years but the molecular signals that drive their differentiation had remained unclear. Now, a team of researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology has identified a pair of master regulators that control the fate of TFH cells.
La Jolla Institute of Allergy and Immunology, National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society

Contact: Gina Kirchweger
gina@lji.org
858-357-7481
La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Tobacco and Nicotine Research
Novel model developed to predict the amount of nicotine emitted from e-cigarettes
Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center researchers at the VCU Center for the Study of Tobacco Products have developed the first ever, evidence-based model that can predict with up to 90 percent accuracy the amount of nicotine emitted by an electronic cigarettes.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Center for Tobacco Products of the US Food and Drug Administration, Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center

Contact: Stevi Antosh
slantosh@vcu.edu
804-628-4578
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
JAMA Oncology
Mouth rinse could help predict recurrence of HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers
Oropharyngeal cancer patients who were found to have detectable traces of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) in their saliva following cancer treatment are at an increased risk for recurrence, a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found.
Oral Cancer Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Barbara Benham
bbenham1@jhu.edu
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Infection and Immunity
Liver plays role in pneumonia, sepsis susceptibility
New evidence highlights the importance of the liver in immunity against bacterial pneumonia. The study is the first of its kind to directly show such a link between liver-produced molecules and pneumonia susceptibility during sepsis.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
Pharmacists help patients with hypertension
Patients with hypertension benefit from interacting with a medical team that includes a pharmacist. Two studies showed pharmacist-included care teams delivered more hands-on and tailored medication regimens to patients, which yielded more effective blood-pressure control results than for those patients who did not have a pharmacist on hand.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Richard Lewis
richard-c-lewis@uiowa.edu
319-384-0012
University of Iowa

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
New prevention target: IUPUI studies effect of depression treatment on heart attack risk
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis researchers led by Jesse Stewart of the School of Science, have received a $2.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to conduct the first randomized controlled trial to determine whether depression treatment can help prevent the development of cardiovascular disease.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis School of Science

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Molecular Cell
Newly identified mechanism of p53-induced cell death could aid cancer therapy
Research led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital reveals how the tumor suppressor protein p53 works in the cytoplasm to trigger death via apoptosis and identifies a potential cancer treatment strategy.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, ALSAC

Contact: Frannie Marmorstein
frannie.marmorstein@stjude.org
901-595-0221
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Journal of Neurotrauma
Blood test predicts prognosis for traumatic brain injuries
A new blood test could help emergency room doctors quickly diagnose traumatic brain injury and determine its severity. The findings, published July 10 in the Journal of Neurotrauma, could help identify patients who might benefit from extra therapy or experimental treatments.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Science
Newly identified molecular mechanism plays role in type 2 diabetes development
New research from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health describes a molecular mechanism that helps explain how obesity-related inflammation can lead to type 2 diabetes. The findings describe a surprising connection between two molecular processes that are known to be involved in the development of metabolic disease -- inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction -- and suggest that targeting this connection could aid in the development of new therapies.
American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
PLOS Computational Biology
Computer model forecasts flu outbreaks in a subtropical climate
Scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the School of Public Health of Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine at the University of Hong Kong have shown for the first time that it is possible to predict the timing and intensity of influenza outbreaks in subtropical climates like Hong Kong where flu seasons can occur at different times and more than once during a year. Results appear online in PLOS Computational Biology.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Homeland Security, Hong Kong SAR Government, Hong Kong University

Contact: Tim Paul
tp2111@columbia.edu
212-305-2676
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Cell Reports
Genetic tug of war in the brain influences behavior
Researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine report on a version of genetic parental control that is more nuanced, and specialized, than classic genomic imprinting. Published in Cell Reports, so-called noncanonical imprinting is particularly prevalent in the brain, and skews the genetic message in subpopulations of cells so that mom, or dad, has a stronger say. The mechanism can influence offspring behavior, and because it is observed more frequently than classic imprinting, appears to be preferred.
New York Stem Cell foundation, National Institutes of Health, Swiss National Science Foundation, The Klarman Foundation for Eating Disorders

Contact: Julie Kiefer
jkiefer@neuro.utah.edu
801-597-4258
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Cell
Gene variants modifying Huntington's symptom onset may lead to new therapeutic strategies
A study that took a novel approach to investigating factors affecting the emergence of symptoms of Huntington's disease has identified at least two genome sites that house variants that can hasten or delay symptom onset.
CHDI Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Medical Research Council

Contact: Terri Ogan
togan@partners.org
617-726-0954
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Cell
Changing clocks and changing seasons: Scientists find role for neuronal plasticity
A team of scientists has linked changes in the structure of a handful of central brain neurons to understanding how animals adjust to changing seasons. Its findings enhance our understanding of the mechanisms vital to the regulation of our circadian system, or internal clock.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Seniors get mental health drugs at twice the rate of other adults, see psychiatrists less
Older Americans receive prescriptions for mental health drugs at more than twice the rate that younger adults do, but they're much less likely to be getting their mental health care from a psychiatrist, a new study shows. Some seniors could be at risk of problems caused interactions between drugs.
Beeson Career Development Award Program, National Institutes of Health, AFAR, The John A. Hartford Foundation, The Atlantic Philanthropies

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Academic Medicine
Teaching med students about health disparities builds their confidence
An innovative three-month elective course has helped make some first-year medical students at Albert Einstein College of Medicine more confident about dealing with health disparities they'll likely encounter as physicians, according to a follow-up study published online today in the journal Academic Medicine.
Health Resources and Service Administration, National Institutes of Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Amos Medical Faculty Development Program

Contact: Deirdre Branley
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Study of 'senior citizen' marine snails uncovered how nerve cells fail during learning
A new research study on marine snails uncovered the first cells in the nervous system to fail during aging. The University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researchers' findings are important to better understanding the underlying mechanisms of age-related memory loss in humans.
National Institutes of Health, Maytag Foundation, Korein Foundation

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
New pig model will provide insights into early detection, new treatments of cancers
A new study from University of Illinois researchers and other collaborators, recently published in PLOS ONE, reports the creation of a pig model that accurately reflects the types of cancer seen in human cells, reflecting the gene mutations and pathways most often observed in human cancer. The model will aid researchers in finding new early-detection screenings and treatments.
China Scholarship Council, Brazilian Scholarship Program, National Counsel of Technological and Scientific Development, American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Stephanie Henry
slhenry@illinois.edu
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Type 1 diabetes patients have lower blood levels of 4 proteins that protect against immune attack
Patients with type 1 diabetes have significantly lower blood levels of four proteins that help protect their tissue from attack by their immune system, scientists report.
National Institutes of Health, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Targeted therapy shows effectiveness against a subtype of the brain tumor medulloblastoma
A subset of medulloblastoma tumors briefly stopped growing or disappeared entirely during treatment with vismodegib; St. Jude Children's Hospital led the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium trials in children and adults.
National Institutes of Health, Noyes Brain Tumor Foundation, Musicians Against Childhood Cancer, ALSAC

Contact: Frannie Marmorstein
frannie.marmorstein@stjude.org
901-595-0221
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Researchers illuminate key role of NOX proteins in liver disease
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have demonstrated a direct connection between two signaling proteins and liver fibrosis, a scarring process underlying chronic liver disease, the 12th leading cause of death in the United States.
Natural Science Foundation of China, Zhujiang Technology New Star of Guangzhou City, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bonnie Ward
bjward@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
American Journal of Public Health
Early prosocial behavior good predictor of kids' future
Kindergarteners' social-emotional skills are a significant predictor of their future education, employment and criminal activity, among other outcomes, according to Penn State researchers.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, US Department of Education, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention

Contact: Victoria M. Indivero
vmi1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3799.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

     
   

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