NIH Director Page NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIH Social Media and Outreach
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Videos
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3575.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Graying, but still golden
Getting old doesn't spell doom when it comes to making important financial decisions, a team of researchers led by a University of California, Riverside assistant professor report in a just published paper.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, National Endowment for Financial Education

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Psychoneuroendocrinology
Oregon study links physical violence, stress hormone in women
A new study links physical violence against women by male partners to a disruption of a key steroid hormone that opens the door potentially to a variety of negative health effects.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Risk for leukemia after treatment for early-stage breast cancer higher than reported
The risk of developing leukemia after radiation therapy or chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer remains very small, but it is twice as high as previously reported, according to results of a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Susan G. Komen for the Cure

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
New non-invasive method can detect Alzheimer's disease early
Northwestern University researchers have developed a noninvasive MRI approach that can detect the Alzheimer's disease in a living animal, well before typical Alzheimer's symptoms appear. The research team developed an MRI probe that pairs a magnetic nanostructure with an antibody that seeks out the amyloid beta brain toxins responsible for onset of the disease. The accumulated toxins, because of the associated magnetic nanostructures, show up as dark areas in MRI scans of the brain.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Baxter Healthcare

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Acoustic tweezers manipulate cell-to-cell contact
Sound waves can precisely position groups of cells for study without the danger of changing or damaging the cells, according to a team of Penn State researchers who are using surface acoustic waves to manipulate cell spacing and contact.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Light-emitting e-readers detrimentally shift circadian clock
You may think your e-reader is helping you get to sleep at night, but it might actually be harming your quality of sleep, according to researchers.
National Institutes of Health, National Center for Research Resources

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Cancer Research
Suppressing a protein reduces cancer spread in mice
In a new study, researchers found that a specific protein called 'chitinase 3-like-1' appears key in enabling malignant melanoma or breast cancer to spread to the lungs of mice. Decreasing its levels or blocking the protein dramatically reduced that spread.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Tissue Engineering, Parts A, B, C
New technology makes tissues, someday maybe organs
A new device for building large tissues from living components of three-dimensional microtissues borrows on ideas from electronics manufacturing. The Bio-Pick, Place, and Perfuse is a step toward someday making whole organs. A new grant from the National Science Foundation will allow for major improvements including automation.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Blocking excessive division of cell powerhouses reduces liver cell death in cholestasis
The power plants that fuel liver cells rapidly splinter when exposed to bile salts that aid digestion, prompting cell death, but blocking this excessive fission appears to protect the liver, scientists report.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Clinical Pediatrics
Fast-food consumption linked to lower test score gains in 8th graders
The amount of fast food children eat may be linked to how well they do in school, a new nationwide study suggests.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Kelly Purtell
Purtell.15@osu.edu
614-688-1896
Ohio State University

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Lancet Haematology
Test predicts response to treatment for complication of leukemia stem cell treatment
A new test may reveal which patients will respond to treatment for graft versus host disease (GVHD), an often life-threatening complication of stem cell transplants (SCT) used to treat leukemia and other blood disorders, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online today in the journal Lancet Haematology and in print in the January issue.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Doris Duke Charitable Fund, American Cancer Society, Judith Devries Fund

Contact: Lucia Lee
lucia.lee@mountsinai.org
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Lancet
The Lancet: Trial confirms Ebola vaccine candidate safe and equally immunogenic in Africa
Two experimental DNA vaccines to prevent Ebola virus and the closely related Marburg virus are safe, and generated a similar immune response in healthy Ugandan adults as reported in healthy US adults earlier this year. The findings, from the first trial of filovirus vaccines in Africa, are published in The Lancet.
DOD/Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program, National Institutes of Health Intramural Research Program

Contact: NIAID Press Office
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
The Lancet

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Modern genetics confirm ancient relationship between fins and hands
Efforts to connect the evolutionary transition from fish fins to wrist and fingers with the genetic machinery for this adaptation have fallen short because they focused on the wrong fish. Now, researchers describe the genetic machinery for autopod assembly in a non-model fish, the spotted gar.
The Brinson Foundation, National Science Foundation, Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development, National Institutes of Health, Volkswagen Foundation, The Alexander von Humboldt-Foundation

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Obesity
Weight training appears key to controlling belly fat
Healthy men who did 20 minutes of daily weight training had less of an increase in age-related abdominal fat compared with men who spent the same amount of time doing aerobic activities, according to a new study by Harvard School of Public Health researchers and colleagues. Combining weight training and aerobic activity led to the most optimal results. Aerobic exercise by itself was associated with less weight gain compared with weight training.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Nature
Scientists uncover new, fundamental mechanism for how resveratrol provides health benefits
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute have found that resveratrol, the red-wine ingredient once touted as an elixir of youth, powerfully activates an evolutionarily ancient stress response in human cells. The finding should dispel much of the mystery and controversy about how resveratrol really works.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Foundation for Cancer Research, Tyr Pharma Inc.

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
Researchers discover new genetic anomalies in lung cancer
By analyzing the DNA and RNA of lung cancers, researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center found that patients whose tumors contained a large number of gene fusions had worse outcomes than patients with fewer gene fusions. In addition, the researchers identified several new genetic anomalies that occur in lung cancer, including in patients with a history of smoking.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Dermatology Foundation, Spanish Society of Medical Oncology Fellowship, China Scholarship Council Award, National Science Foundation

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists find drug that helps Huntington's disease-afflicted mice -- and their offspring
A new study from scientists at the Scripps Research Institute suggests therapies that change gene expression in parents could help their children. The research showed that the offspring of mice treated with a drug also had delayed onset and reduced symptoms of Huntington's disease, an inherited, degenerative disease that causes a loss of motor skills, cognitive impairment and death.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Startling benefit of cardiology meetings
High-risk patients with certain acute heart conditions are more likely to survive than other similar patients if they are admitted to the hospital during national cardiology meetings, when many cardiologists are away from their regular practices.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Diverse autism mutations lead to different disease outcomes
People with autism have a wide range of symptoms, with no two people sharing the exact type and severity of behaviors. Now a large-scale analysis of hundreds of patients and nearly 1,000 genes has started to uncover how diversity among traits can be traced to differences in patients' genetic mutations.
Simons Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lucky Tran
lt2549@cumc.columbia.edu
212-305-3689
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Light-emitting e-readers before bedtime can adversely impact sleep
Use of a light-emitting electronic device (LE-eBook) in the hours before bedtime can adversely impact overall health, alertness, and the circadian clock which synchronizes the daily rhythm of sleep to external environmental time cues, according to researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital who compared the biological effects of reading an LE-eBook compared to a printed book.
National Institutes of Health, National Center for Research Resources

Contact: Elaine St. Peter
estpeter@partners.org
617-525-6375
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study: Extra income boosts health of elderly in poor countries
Boosting the incomes of poor, elderly residents in developing countries can significantly improve their health and well-being, particularly in lung function and memory, a new study shows.
State of Yucatan, NIH/National Institute on Aging, RAND Corporation

Contact: Merrill Balassone
balasson@usc.edu
213-740-6156
University of Southern California

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Radiology
Radiologist recommendations for chest CT have high clinical yield
A substantial percentage of patients who receive radiologist recommendations for chest CT to evaluate abnormal findings on outpatient chest X-rays have clinically relevant findings, including cancer, according to a new study.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
National trial first to focus on long-term complications associated with chronic kidney disease
UT Southwestern will lead the first National Institutes of Health-funded, multicenter, clinical trial to address interventions for patients with multiple chronic conditions centered around kidney disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Russell Rian
russell.rian@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Neuropsychopharmacology
Early exposure to antidepressants affects adult anxiety and serotonin transmission
Now, a UCLA team has studied early developmental exposure to two different antidepressants, Prozac and Lexapro, in a mouse model that mimics human third trimester medication exposure. They found that, although these serotonin-selective reuptake inhibiting antidepressants were thought to work the same way, they did not produce the same long-term changes in anxiety behavior in the adult mice.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, Shirley and Stefan Hatos Foundation, UCLA Weil Endowment Fund

Contact: Kim Irwin
kirwin@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2262
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
New technique reveals immune cell motion
Neutrophils, cells recruited by the immune system to fight infection, need to move through a great variety of tissues. New research shows how neutrophils move through confined spaces in the body. A new system can mimic tissues of different densities and stiffness, enabling improved development and testing of drugs.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3575.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2014 by AAAS, the science society.