NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIA SeniorHealth.gov NIH Podcast
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Radio
  NIH Podcasts
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3398.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer
Men who show signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice the risk of actually having prostate cancer than those with no inflammation, according to results of a new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Michelle Potter
mpotter8@jhmi.edu
410-614-2914
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Chronic inflammation may be linked to aggressive prostate cancer
The presence of chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue was associated with high-grade, or aggressive, prostate cancer, and this association was found even in those with low prostate-specific antigen levels, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science Translational Medicine
New clues on tissue scarring in scleroderma
A discovery by scientists could lead to potential new treatments for breaking the cycle of tissue scarring in people with scleroderma. The concept for new therapeutic options centers on findings identifying the role that a specific protein plays in promoting fibrosis.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
Multitarget TB drug could treat other diseases, evade resistance
A drug under clinical trials to treat tuberculosis could be the basis for a class of broad-spectrum drugs that act against various bacteria, fungal infections and parasites, yet evade resistance, according to a study by University of Illinois chemists and collaborators. The team determined the different ways the drug SQ109 attacks the tuberculosis bacterium, how the drug can be tweaked to target other pathogens from yeast to malaria -- and how targeting multiple pathways reduces the probability of pathogens becoming resistant.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
CU researchers discover target for treating dengue fever
Two recent papers by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for dengue fever, West Nile virus, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other disease-causing flaviviruses.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mark Couch
mark.couch@ucdenver.edu
303-724-5377
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
The ilk of human kindness
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that older women, plucky individuals and those who have suffered a recent major loss are more likely to be compassionate toward strangers than other older adults.
National Institutes of Health, John A. Hartford Foundation

Contact: Scott Lafee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Live cell imaging reveals distinct alterations of subcellular glutathione potentials
Glutathione is the most abundant cellular redox buffer that both protects cells from oxidative damage and mediates cellular signaling. Perturbation of glutathione balance has been associated with tumorigenesis; however, due to analytical limitations, the underlying mechanisms behind this relationship are poorly understood. Utilizing a recently developed genetically encoded redox-sensitive probe has revealed differentially regulated redox environments within cellular compartments, and evidence of the contributory role of the p53 protein in supporting cytosolic redox poise.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Vladimir L. Kolossov
viadimer@illinois.edu
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Is Parkinson's an autoimmune disease?
The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the way autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis attack the body's cells.
National Institutes of Health, Caja Madrid Foundation, JPB Foundation, Parkinson's Disease Foundation, and others

Contact: Ann Rae Jonas or Doug Levy
cumcnews@columbia.edu
212-305-3900
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
BUSM researchers find anti-seizure drug may reduce alcohol consumption
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine have discovered that the anti-seizure drug ezogabine, reduced alcohol consumption in an experimental model. The findings, reported in the American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, may lead to more effective treatments for alcoholism.
National Institutes of Health, Gennaro Acampora Charitable Trust Fund

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Neuron
Study IDs new cause of brain bleeding immediately after stroke
By discovering a new mechanism that allows blood to enter the brain immediately after a stroke, researchers at UC Irvine and the Salk Institute have opened the door to new therapies that may limit or prevent stroke-induced brain damage.
American Heart Association, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
New MRSA superbug emerges in Brazil
An international research team led by Cesar A. Arias, M.D., Ph.D., at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has identified a new superbug that caused a bloodstream infection in a Brazilian patient. The report appeared in the April 17 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Cahill
Robert.Cahill@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-3030
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Cell Stem Cell
Proper stem cell function requires hydrogen sulfide
Stem cells in bone marrow need to produce hydrogen sulfide in order to properly multiply and form bone tissue, according to a new study from the Center for Craniofacial Molecular Biology at the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC. Principal investigator Songtao Shi and his team demonstrated that mice's osteoporosis-like condition could be rescued by administering small molecules that release hydrogen sulfide inside the body. The results indicate that a similar treatment may have potential to help human patients.
NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Contact: Beth Newcomb
bethdunh@usc.edu
213-740-4279
University of Southern California

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Massage therapy improves circulation, eases muscle soreness
Massage therapy improves general blood flow and alleviates muscle soreness after exercise, according to a study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
Massage Therapy Foundation, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Center for Research Resources

Contact: Jeanne Galatzer-Levy
jgala@uic.edu
312-996-1583
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Developmental Cell
Dual role: Key cell division proteins also power up mitochondria
An international team led by researchers at UC Davis has shown that the cyclin B1/Cdk1 protein complex, which plays a key role in cell division, also boosts the mitochondrial activity to power that process.
DOE Office of Science, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Dorsey Griffith
dorsey.griffith@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9118
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Cell Reports
Surprise: Lost stem cells naturally replaced by non-stem cells, fly research suggests
Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered an unexpected phenomenon in the organs that produce sperm in fruit flies: When a certain kind of stem cell is killed off experimentally, another group of non-stem cells can come out of retirement to replace them.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
American Journal of Human Genetics
Refining the language for chromosomes
Brigham and Women's Hospital proposes a new classification system that may standardize how structural chromosomal rearrangements are described.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-525-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Novel stapled peptide nanoparticle combination prevents RSV infection, study finds
A new preclinical study by teams at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's/Harvard and James A. Haley VA Hospital/University of South Florida suggests that a combination of advanced technologies may lead to a therapy to prevent or treat respiratory syncytial virus, a potentially lethal respiratory infection affecting infants, young children and the elderly.
National Institutes of Health, US Deptartment of Veterans Affairs, Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award

Contact: Anne DeLotto Baier
abaier@health.usf.edu
813-974-3300
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
Connecting sleep deficits among young fruit flies to disruption in mating later in life
Mom always said you need your sleep, and it turns out, she was right. According to a new study published in Science, the lack of sleep in young fruit flies profoundly diminishes their ability to do one thing they do really, really well -- make more flies.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Molecular Cell
Discovery could lead to novel therapies for Fragile X syndrome
Scientists studying the most common form of inherited mental disability -- a genetic disease called 'Fragile X syndrome' -- have uncovered new details about the cellular processes responsible for the condition that could lead to the development of therapies to restore some of the capabilities lost in affected individuals.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
PLOS Genetics
Deadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequenced
A ten-year effort by an international team has sequenced the entire genome and all the RNA products of the most important pathogenic lineage of Cryptococcus neoformans, a strain called H99.These genetic instructions can give valuable insight into why a fungus responsible for a million cases of pneumonia and meningitis every year is so malleable and dangerous.
National Institutes of Health, French National Research Agency, National Health and Medical Research

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Neuron
Neurons in the brain tune into different frequencies for different spatial memory tasks
Your brain transmits information about your current location and memories of past locations over the same neural pathways using different frequencies of a rhythmic electrical activity called gamma waves, report neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Austin. The research, published in the journal Neuron on April 17, may provide insight into the cognitive and memory disruptions seen in diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's, in which gamma waves are disturbed.
Klingenstein Fund, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Developmental Science
IU cognitive scientists use 'I spy' to show spoken language helps direct children's eyes
In a new study, Indiana U. cognitive scientists demonstrate that children spot objects more quickly when prompted by words than if they are only prompted by images. Spoken language taps into children's cognitive system, enhancing their ability to learn and to navigate cluttered environments. As such the study opens up new avenues for research into the way language might shape the course of developmental disabilities such as ADHD, difficulties with school, and other attention-related problems.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Development

Contact: Liz Rosdeitcher
rosdeitc@indiana.edu
812-855-4507
Indiana University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Biomedical Optics Express
New technique detects microscopic diabetes-related eye damage
Indiana University researchers have detected new early-warning signs of the potential loss of sight associated with diabetes. This discovery could have far-reaching implications for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, potentially impacting the care of over 25 million Americans.
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Tracy James
traljame@iu.edu
812-855-0084
Indiana University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
High-level NIH grant goes to professor Nicolas Doucet of INRS
Professor Nicolas Doucet of the Centre INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier has just received a research grant from the National Institutes of Health in the amount of nearly $600,000. The five-year grant is to pursue cutting-edge research in the workings of tiny proteins called RNases and to explore their biomedical potential in the field of oncology as well as in inflammation and asthma.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gisèle Bolduc
gisele.bolduc@adm.inrs.ca
418-654-2501
INRS

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Neuron
Researchers track down cause of eye mobility disorder
In a paper published in the April 16 print issue of the journal Neuron, University of Iowa researchers Bernd Fritzsch and Jeremy Duncan and their colleagues at Harvard Medical School, along with investigator and corresponding author Elizabeth Engle, describe how their studies on mutated mice mimic human mutations.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steve Kehoe
steve-kehoe@uowa.edu
319-335-1050
University of Iowa

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3398.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2014 by AAAS, the science society.