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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3614.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Kids allowed to 'sip' alcohol may start drinking earlier
Children who get a taste of their parents' wine now and then may be more likely than their peers to start drinking by high school, according to a new report in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Clinical Journal of Pain
UF study finds vitamin D can affect pain, movement in obese osteoarthritis patients
If you are overweight and have osteoarthritis, you may want to bone up on vitamin D.
NIH//National Institute on Aging, University of Florida Clinical and Translational Science Institute

Contact: Tracy Wright
tracyb@ufl.edu
352-273-6421
University of Florida

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
3-D human skin maps aid study of relationships between molecules, microbes and environment
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences produced 3-D maps of molecular and microbial variations across the body. These maps provide a baseline for studies of the interplay between the molecules that make up our skin, our microbiomes, our personal hygiene routines and other environmental factors. The study, published March 30 by PNAS, may help further our understanding of the skin's role in human health and disease.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Keck Foundation, San Diego Center for Systems Biology, European Union 7th Framework Programme and Science Without Borders Program

Contact: Heather Buschman
hbuschman@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
OU team receives grant for innovative technique to enhance breast cancer detection
An innovative technique that enhances breast cancer detection while reducing radiation dose has been proposed by a University of Oklahoma research team. In response, the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health has awarded a $3 million grant to the OU team to facilitate the technique, which includes building a patient imaging system and conducting preclinical evaluations and Phase I clinical trials.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jana Smith
jana.smith@ou.edu
405-325-1322
University of Oklahoma

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Depression and Anxiety
Impact of domestic violence on women's mental health
In addition to their physical injuries, women who are victims of domestic violence are also at a greater risk of mental health problems such as depression and psychotic symptoms.
United Kingdom Medical Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council, NIh/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-343-7593
University of Montreal

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Annals of Internal Medicine
BMC study: New Hepatitis C treatments cost-effective, but only for selected patients
A study led by Boston Medical Center researchers demonstrates that while new therapies to treat Hepatitis C Virus are highly effective, they are cost-effective and provide the greatest value in specific groups of HCV-infected patients.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease

Contact: Elissa Snook
elissa.snook@bmc.org
617-638-6823
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Journal of Neurophysiology
Carnegie Mellon researchers create 'Wikipedia' for neurons
To help scientists make sense of 'brain big data,' researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have used data mining to create www.neuroelectro.org, a publicly available website that acts like Wikipedia, indexing physiological information about neurons. The site will help to accelerate the advance of neuroscience research by providing a centralized resource for collecting and comparing data on neuronal function.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, NIH/National Institute for Mental Health, Pennsylvania Department of Health's Commonwealth Universal Research Enhancement Program

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-9982
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Biological Psychiatry
Electroconvulsive therapy changes key areas of the human brain that play a role in memory, emotion
a team of UCLA researchers has shown for the first time in a large cohort of patients that electroconvulsive therapy, sometimes referred to as shock treatment, change certain areas of the brain that play a role in how people feel, learn and respond to positive and negative environmental factors.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Kim Irwin
kirwin@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2262
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Oxygen therapy in COPD patients is associated with burn injury
Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease receiving home oxygen have a higher risk of burn injury. This study was published on March 30 in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.
National Institutes of Health, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Low vitamin D linked to worse prognosis in type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma
A new study found that people with lower vitamin D levels prior to treatment for follicular lymphoma succumb to the disease or face relapse earlier than patients with sufficient vitamin D levels in their blood.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Lydia Fernandez
lydia_fernandez@urmc.rochester.edu
585-276-5788
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Nature Methods
High-tech method allows rapid imaging of functions in living brain
Researchers studying cancer and other invasive diseases rely on high-resolution imaging to see tumors and other activity deep within the body's tissues. Using a new high-speed, high-resolution imaging method, Lihong Wang, Ph.D., and his team at Washington University in St. Louis were able to see blood flow, blood oxygenation, oxygen metabolism and other functions inside a living mouse brain at faster rates than ever before.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Julie Flory
julie.flory@wustl.edu
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Human Reproduction
Eating fruits and vegetables with high pesticide residues linked with poor semen quality
Men who ate fruits and vegetables with higher levels of pesticide residues, such as strawberries, spinach, and peppers, had lower sperm count and a lower percentage of normal sperm than those who ate produce with lower residue levels, according to a new study by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. It is the first study to look at the connection between exposure to pesticide residues from fruits and vegetables and semen quality.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Panel predicts whether rare leukemia will respond to treatment
Patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia have limited treatment options, and those that exist are effective only in fewer than half of patients. Now, a new study identifies a panel of genetic markers that predicted which tumor samples would likely respond to treatment.
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Sass Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute, US Department of Defense, Josie Robertson Investigator Program, Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator Award, The Evans Foundation, The French National Cancer Institute, and others

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Identification of drug combinations that reverse HIV-1 latency
A new study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation reports on the development of a multifaceted approach for identifying drug combinations that reverse HIV-1 latency.
Martin Delaney CARE and DARE Collaboratories, National Institutes of Health, amFAR , Johns Hopkins Center for AIDS Research, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
DNA alterations may predict treatment response in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia patients
A new study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation identifies a molecular signature that is predictive of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia patient response to the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine.
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Sass Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Josie Robertson Investigator Program, Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator Award, Evans Foundation, French National Cancer Institute

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Human Reproduction
Pesticides in fruit and vegetables linked to semen quality
The first study to investigate the relationship between eating fruit and vegetables containing pesticide residues and the quality of men's semen has shown a link with lower sperm counts and percentages of normally-formed sperm. The study is published in Human Reproduction journal and an accompanying editorial says the findings have important implications for human health.
US National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
The Lancet Infectious Diseases
Scientists link unexplained childhood paralysis to enterovirus D68
A research team led by UC San Francisco scientists has found the genetic signature of enterovirus D68 in half of the California and Colorado children diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis -- sudden, unexplained muscle weakness and paralysis -- between 2012 and 2014, with most cases occurring during a nationwide outbreak of severe respiratory illness from EV-D68 last fall.
National Institutes of Health, University of California Discovery Award, Abbott Viral Discovery Award, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Emerging Infections Program

Contact: Laura Kurtzman
laura.kurtzman@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Nature Medicine
Researchers develop new potential drug for rare leukemia
Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have developed a new drug that shows potential in laboratory studies against a rare type of acute leukemia. And additional studies suggest the same compound could play a role in prostate cancer treatment as well.
National Institutes of Health, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society; American Cancer Society, Prostate Cancer Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, US Department of Defense

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Blood-based biomarkers could enable simple, accurate TB tests for diagnosis and monitoring
Researchers have identified blood-based biomarkers in patients with active tuberculosis that could lead to new blood-based diagnostics and tools for monitoring treatment response and cure.
National Institutes of Health, Emory Center for AIDS Research, Emory Global Health Institute, Yerkes National Primate Research Center

Contact: Holly Korschun
hkorsch@emory.edu
404-727-3990
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Nature Neuroscience
Family income, parental education related to brain structure in children and adolescents
Characterizing associations between socioeconomic factors and children's brain development, a team of investigators reports correlative links between family income and brain structure. Relationships between the brain and family income were strongest in the lowest end of the economic range -- suggesting that interventional policies aimed at these children may have the largest societal impact.
National Institutes of Health, Annie E. Casey Foundation, GH Sergievsky Center

Contact: Debra Kain
dkain@chla.usc.edu
323-361-7628
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New drug stalls estrogen receptor-positive cancer cell growth and shrinks tumors
An experimental drug rapidly shrinks most tumors in a mouse model of human breast cancer, researchers report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. When mice were treated with the experimental drug, BHPI, 'the tumors immediately stopped growing and began shrinking rapidly,' said University of Illinois biochemistry professor and senior author David Shapiro. 'In just 10 days, 48 out of the 52 tumors stopped growing, and most shrank 30 to 50 percent.'
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Journal of Cell Biology
New molecular clues about mysterious brain blood vessel disorder
Yale researchers have uncovered new details about the relationship between two proteins associated with the formation of cerebral cavernous malformations, a little understood neurovascular disorder.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, National Science Foundation, American Heart Association

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 29-Mar-2015
Osteoporosis International
Prevention of costly hip fractures should be a priority in UK
A new study presented today at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases reveals the high cost of first and subsequent hip fractures to the healthcare system in the UK. Hip fractures account for an estimated £1.1 billion in hospital costs annually.
NIH/National Institute for Health Research

Contact: Charanjit K. Jagait, Ph.D.
cjagait@iofbonehealth.org
41-798-745-208
International Osteoporosis Foundation

Public Release: 27-Mar-2015
NYU developing HIV antibodies and RNA test in a single POC
NYU College of Dentistry has received a sub-award in the amount of $335,000 from a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II grant from NIH to complete the development of a fully automated self-confirming assay that can simultaneously detect HIV/AIDS antibodies and viral RNA from the AIDS virus in a single specimen.
NIH/Small Business Innovation Research Phase II Grant

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 27-Mar-2015
Neuron
When attention is a deficit
During tasks that require our attention, we might become so engrossed in what we are doing that we fail to notice there is a better way to get the job done. A new study published today in the journal Neuron explores the question of how the brain switches from an ongoing strategy to a new and potentially more efficient one.
National Institutes of Health, International Max Planck Research School LIFE, Italian Ministry of University, German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, German Research Foundation

Contact: Catherine Zandonella
czandone@princeton.edu
609-258-0541
Princeton University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3614.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

     
   

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