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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3461.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
Scientists call for investigation of mysterious cloud-like collections in cells
About 50 years ago, electron microscopy revealed the presence of tiny blob-like structures that form inside cells, move around and disappear. But scientists still don't know what they do -- even though these shifting cloud-like collections of proteins are believed to be crucial to the cell, and therefore could offer a new approach to disease treatment. Now, researchers are issuing a call to investigators to focus their attention on the role of these formations.
Burroughs Wellcome Clinical Scientist Award in Translational Research, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
A nucleotide change could initiate fragile X syndrome
Researchers reveal how the alteration of a single nucleotide -- the basic building block of DNA -- could initiate fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited form of intellectual disability.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Empire State Stem Cell Fund, Starr Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
PLOS Pathogens
The early cost of HIV
Researchers at UC Davis have made some surprising discoveries about the body's initial responses to HIV infection.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, University of California - Davis RISE, California HIV Research Program, NIH/Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health

Contact: Carole Gan
carole.gan@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9047
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Bone
Revealing a novel mode of action for an osteoporosis drug
Raloxifene is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for decreasing fracture risk in osteoporosis. While raloxifene is as effective at reducing fracture risk as other current treatments, this works only partially by suppressing bone loss. X-ray studies revealed an additional mechanism underlying raloxifene action, providing an explanation for how this drug can achieve equivalent clinical benefit.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
PLOS Computational Biology
Assortativity signatures of transcription factor networks contribute to robustness
The assortativity signature of transcription factor networks is an indication of robustness.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Dubuc
Donna.M.Dubuc@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-3615
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
$1.25 million NIH grant to aid research on impact of heroin use
The University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work is the recipient of a 5-year, $1.25 million grant from the National Institute of Drug Abuse at the National Institutes of Health to study the long-term use and health consequences of heroin use. Additionally, the grant provides resources to create the infrastructure that will support future research endeavors.
NIH/National Institute of Drug Abuse

Contact: Marisa Ramirez
mrcannon@uh.edu
713-743-8152
University of Houston

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Mice study shows efficacy of new gene therapy approach for toxin exposures
New research led by Charles Shoemaker, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Infectious Disease and Global Health at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, shows that gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention and treatment of botulism exposure over current methods. The findings of the National Institutes of Health funded study appear in the Aug. 29 issue of PLOS ONE.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Rushmie A Nofsinger
rushmie.nofsinger@tufts.edu
508-839-7910
Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
'K-to-M' histone mutations: How repressing the repressors may drive tissue-specific cancers
A paper from a laboratory at the Stowers Institute of Medical Research reports the first animal model created to assess the molecular effects of two different histone H3.3 mutations in the fruit fly Drosophila. The study from a team led by Investigator Ali Shilatifard, Ph.D. published in the Aug. 29, 2014, issue of Science, strongly suggests that these mutations actually could drive cancer and identifies interacting partners and pathways that could be targeted for the treatment of cancer.
Stowers Institute for Medical Research, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Kim Bland, Ph.D.
ksb@stowers.org
816-926-4015
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Cell
Prions can trigger 'stuck' wine fermentations, researchers find
A biochemical communication system that crosses from bacteria to yeast, making use of prions, has been discovered. It is responsible for a chronic winemaking problem known as 'stuck fermentation' and may also have implications for better understanding metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, in humans.
G. Harold and Leila Y. Mathers Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Patricia Bailey
pjbailey@ucdavis.edu
530-752-9843
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
ACS Chemical Biology
Drug shows promise against Sudan strain of Ebola in mice
Researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and other institutions have developed a potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV), one of the two most lethal strains of Ebola. A different strain, the Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV), is now devastating West Africa. First identified in 1976, SUDV has caused numerous Ebola outbreaks -- most recently in 2012 -- that have killed more than 400 people in total. The findings were reported in ACS Chemical Biology.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Canadian Institutes for Health Research, Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Cell
Yale study identifies possible bacterial drivers of IBD
Yale University researchers have identified a handful of bacterial culprits that may drive inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, using patients' own intestinal immune responses as a guide.
Blavatnik Family Foundation, Netherlands Organization of Scientific Research, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Cancer Research Institute Irvington Fellowship Program

Contact: Jim Shelton
james.shelton@yale.edu
203-432-3881
Yale University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
MARC travel awards announced for GSA: Mouse Molecular Genetics Conference
FASEB MARC (Maximizing Access to Research Careers) Program has announced the travel award recipients for the Genetics Society of America's 27th Annual Mouse Molecular Genetics Conference from Sept. 29-Oct. 3, 2014, in Pacific Grove, Calif.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kelly Husser
khusser@faseb.org
301-634-7109
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Cell Reports
UMN researchers find animal model for understudied type of muscular dystrophy
Researchers at the University of Minnesota have developed an animal research model for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) to be used for muscle regeneration research as well as studies of the effectiveness of potential therapies for FSHD. The research is published in the current edition of the journal Cell Reports.
National Institutes of Health, Dr. Bob and Jean Smith Foundation, Friends of FSH Research, FSH Society

Contact: Caroline Marin
crmarin@umn.edu
612-624-5680
University of Minnesota Academic Health Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
MARC travel awards announced for: American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting
FASEB MARC (Maximizing Access to Research Careers) Program has announced the travel award recipients for the American Society of Human Genetics from Oct. 18-22, 2014 in San Diego, Calif. These awards are meant to promote the entry of students, post doctorates and scientists from underrepresented groups into the mainstream of the basic science community and to encourage the participation of young scientists at the American Society of Human Genetics. This year MARC conferred 16 awards totaling $29,600.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kelly Husser
khusser@faseb.org
301-634-7109
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
MARC travel awards announced for: 2014 ASBMR annual meeting
FASEB MARC Program has announced the travel award recipients for the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research from Sept. 12-15, 2014 in Houston, Texas. These awards are meant to promote the entry of students, post doctorates and scientists from underrepresented groups into the mainstream of the basic science community and to encourage the participation of young scientists at the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. This year MARC conferred 2 awards totaling $3,200.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kelly Husser
khusser@faseb.org
301-634-7109
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Infectious Diseases
New analysis of old HIV vaccines finds potentially protective immune response
Applying the benefit of hindsight, researchers at Duke Medicine have reanalyzed the findings of two historic pediatric HIV vaccine trials with encouraging results. The vaccines had in fact triggered an antibody response -- now known to be associated with protection in adults -- that was previously unrecognized in the infants studied in the 1990s.
Duke University Center for AIDS Research, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
MARC travel awards announced for: ACSM Conference on Integrative Physiology of Exercise
FASEB MARC Program has announced the travel award recipients for the American College of Sports Medicine's Conference on Integrative Physiology of Exercise from Sept. 17-20, 2014 in Miami, Fla.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Kelly Husser
khusser@faseb.org
301-634-7109
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Pharmaceutics
Sensory-tested drug-delivery vehicle could limit spread of HIV, AIDS
A unique method for delivering compounds that could positively impact the global battle against HIV and AIDS may be possible, thanks to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Penn-NIH team discover new type of cell movement
In a new study from the University of Pennsylvania and National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, scientists used an innovative technique to study how cells move in a three-dimensional matrix, similar to the structure of certain tissues, such as the skin. They discovered an entirely new type of cell movement whereby the nucleus helps propel cells through the matrix like a piston in an engine.
NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Synthesis produces new antibiotic
Scientists at Rice University synthesize a natural, fungus-derived antibiotic that could someday help wage the battle against resistant superbugs.
National Institutes of Health, Skaggs Institute of Research, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, Welch Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Ebola vaccine trials fast-tracked by international consortium
A candidate Ebola vaccine could be given to healthy volunteers in the UK, The Gambia and Mali as early as September, as part of an series of safety trials of potential vaccines aimed at preventing the disease that has killed more than 1,400 people in the current outbreak in West Africa.
Wellcome Trust, Medical Research Council, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, UK Department for International Development

Contact: Christopher Hardwick
chardwick@som.umaryland.edu
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Molecular Cell
Research shows how premalignant cells can sense oncogenesis and halt growth
What happens inside cells when they detect the activation of a cancer-inducing gene? Sometimes, cells are able to signal internally to stop the cell cycle. Such cells are able to enter, at least for a time, a protective non-growth state. CSHL experiments now show how cells can respond to an activated RAS gene by entering a quiescent state called senescence.
National Institutes of Health, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Cancer Center Support Grant, Fonds de Recherche de l'Institut de Cardiologie de Montréal; Heart and Stroke Foundation-Québec

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Home is where the microbes are
A study published today in Science reports provides a detailed analysis of the microbes that live in houses and apartments. The study was conducted by researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Science Foundation

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Electric current to brain boosts memory
Stimulating a region in the brain via non-invasive delivery of electrical current using magnetic pulses, called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, improves memory. The discovery opens a new field of possibilities for treating memory impairments caused by conditions such as stroke, early-stage Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury, cardiac arrest and the memory problems that occur in healthy aging.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Cell
NYU researchers ID process producing neuronal diversity in fruit flies' visual system
NYU biologists have identified a mechanism that helps explain how the diversity of neurons that make up the visual system is generated.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3461.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

     
   

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