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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3525.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
RSNA 2014 100th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting
Trial shows new imaging system may cut X-ray exposure for liver cancer patients
Johns Hopkins researchers report that their test of an interventional X-ray guidance device approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2013 has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure of patients undergoing intra-arterial therapy for liver cancer.
Max Kade Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Philips Research North America

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Brain
SLU researcher finds an off switch for pain
Researchers have discovered a way to block a pain pathway in animal models of chronic neuropathic pain suggesting a promising new approach to pain relief.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Carrie Bebermeyer
bebermcl@slu.edu
314-977-8015
Saint Louis University

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Copper on the brain at rest
A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers has shown that proper copper levels are essential to the health of the brain at rest.
National Institutes of Health and Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Penn Medicine team develops cognitive test battery for spaceflight
Penn Medicine researchers have developed a cognitive test battery, known as Cognition, for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute to measure the impact of typical spaceflight stressors (like microgravity, radiation, confinement and isolation, exposure to elevated levels of CO2, and sleep loss) on cognitive performance. This computer-based test has already been tested by astronauts on Earth. It will be performed for the first time in a pilot study on the International Space Station (ISS) on Nov. 28.
National Space Biomedical Research Institute, NASA, National Institutes of Health, Office of Naval Research, The McDonnell Foundation

Contact: Greg Richter
gregory.richter@uphs.upenn.edu
215-614-1937
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
Carnegie Mellon researchers identify brain regions that encode words, grammar, story
Carnegie Mellon University scientists have produced the first integrated computational model of reading, identifying which parts of the brain are responsible for such sub-processes as parsing sentences, determining the meaning of words and understanding relationships between characters. They based their results on brain scan of people reading a Harry Potter book.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
56th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
New England Journal of Medicine
Two studies identify a detectable, pre-cancerous state in the blood
Researchers from the Broad Institute, Harvard Medical School, and Harvard-affiliated hospitals have uncovered an easily detectable, 'pre-malignant' state in the blood that significantly increases the likelihood that an individual will go on to develop blood cancers such as leukemia, lymphoma, or myelodysplastic syndrome. The discovery, which was made independently by two research teams affiliated with the Broad and partner institutions, opens new avenues for research aimed at early detection and prevention of blood cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Gabrielle's Angel Foundation, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Wellcome Trust, and others

Contact: Veronica Meade-Kelly
veronica@broadinstitute.org
617-714-7113
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Neurology
Why do so many seniors with memory loss and dementia never get tested?
Despite clear signs that their memory and thinking abilities have gone downhill, more than half of seniors with these symptoms haven't seen a doctor about them, a new study finds. The researchers say their findings suggest that as many as 1.8 million Americans over the age of 70 with dementia are not evaluated for cognitive symptoms by a medical provider.
University of Michigan, NIH/National Institute on Aging, University of Utah

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Cell Reports
Enzyme may be key to cancer progression in many tumors
A new University of Iowa study provided a deeper understanding of how KRAS turns off tumor suppressor genes and identifies a key enzyme in the process. The findings, published online Nov. 26 in the journal Cell Reports, suggest that this enzyme, known as TET1, may be an important target for cancer diagnostics and treatment.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jennifer Brown
jennifer-l-brown@uiowa.edu
319-621-5266
University of Iowa Health Care

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Cancer Cell
Research on a rare cancer exposes possible route to new treatments
Researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah discovered the unusual role of lactate in the metabolism of alveolar soft part sarcoma and also confirmed that a fusion gene is the cancer-causing agent in this disease.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Linda Aagard
801-587-7639
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Current Biology
Elderly brains learn, but maybe too much
Learning requires both mental flexibility, or 'plasticity,' and stability. A new study finds that in learning a visual task, older people exhibited a surprising degree of plasticity, but had trouble filtering out irrelevant information, suggesting that their learning was not as stable.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Genome Research
Bioengineering study finds two-cell mouse embryos already talking about their future
Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego have discovered that mouse embryos are contemplating their cellular fates in the earliest stages after fertilization when the embryo has only two to four cells, a discovery that could upend the scientific consensus about when embryonic cells begin differentiating into cell types. Their research, which used single-cell RNA sequencing to look at every gene in the mouse genome, was published recently in the journal Genome Research.
National Institutes of Health, March of Dimes Foundation

Contact: Catherine Hockmuth
chockmuth@ucsd.edu
858-822-1359
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
UTMB part of national research group awarded $20 million HIV grant
The University of Texas Medical Branch is part of a collaboration led by the Oak Crest Institute of Science that received a $20 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a novel intravaginal ring capable of delivering powerful antiretroviral drugs to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted HIV in women. The total award to University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston is approximately $2.5 million.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Journal of Neurotrauma
Penn researchers identify protein that predicts post-concussion severity in professional athletes
New Penn Medicine research has found that elevated levels in the blood of the brain-enriched protein calpain-cleaved αII-spectrin N-terminal fragment, known as SNTF, shortly after sports-related concussion can predict the severity of post-concussion symptoms in professional athletes. The complete findings were released today in the Journal of Neurotrauma.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lee-Ann Donegan
leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5660
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Science Signaling
New insights into breast cancer spread could yield better tests and treatments
A study combining patients' tumor cells with a laboratory model of blood vessel lining provides the most compelling evidence so far that a specific trio of cells is required for the spread of breast cancer. The findings could lead to better tests for predicting whether a woman's breast cancer will spread. The study, led by researchers at the NCI-designated Albert Einstein Cancer Center and Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care, published today in Science Signaling.
National Institutes of Health, Breast Cancer Alliance, Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, Einstein Integrated Imaging Program

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Vaccine
Powdered measles vaccine found safe in early clinical trials
A measles vaccine made of fine dry powder and delivered with a puff of air triggered no adverse side effects in early human testing and it is likely effective, according to a paper to be published Nov. 28 in the journal Vaccine. The paper is now available online.
National Institutes of Health, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Robert Sievers
Bob.Sievers@colorado.edu
303-492-7943
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Cell Reports
A link between DNA transcription and disease-causing expansions
Scientists have believed that the lengthening of those repeats occur during DNA replication when cells divide or when the cellular DNA repair machinery gets activated. Recently, however, Tufts scientists have discovered another process called transcription, which is copying the information from DNA into RNA, could also been involved.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Alex Reid
alexander.reid@tufts.edu
617-627-4173
Tufts University

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Vegetable oil ingredient key to destroying gastric disease bacteria
The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is strongly associated with gastric ulcers and cancer. To combat the infection, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Jacobs School of Engineering developed LipoLLA, a therapeutic nanoparticle that contains linolenic acid, a component in vegetable oils. In mice, LipoLLA was safe and more effective against H. pylori infection than standard antibiotic treatments.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Heather Buschman
hbuschman@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A hybrid vehicle that delivers DNA
A new hybrid vehicle is under development. Its performance isn't measured by the distance it travels, but rather the delivery of its cargo: vaccines that contain genetically engineered DNA to fight HIV, cancer, influenza and other maladies. Described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the technology could help unleash the potential of DNA vaccines, which despite two decades of research, have yet to make a significant impact in the treatment of major illnesses.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Biological Psychiatry
Researchers shed new light on the genetics of memory performance
In the largest study of the genetics of memory ever undertaken, an international researcher team including scientists from Boston University School of Medicine, have discovered two common genetic variants that are believed to be associated with memory performance. The findings, which appear in the journal Biological Psychiatry, are a significant step towards better understanding how memory loss is inherited.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute-Framingham Heart Study, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Aging

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association
Vanderbilt team uses e-health records to search for hidden drug benefits
With research and development costs for many drugs reaching well into the billions, pharmaceutical companies want more than ever to determine whether their drugs already at market have any hidden therapeutic benefits that could warrant putting additional indications on the label and increase production.
National Institutes of Health, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
BMC Public Health
International team reveals barriers to public health data-sharing; life-saving solutions
Barriers to the sharing of public health data hamper decision-making efforts on local, national and global levels, and stymie attempts to contain emerging global health threats, an international team led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health announced today.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Female color perception affects evolution of male plumage in birds
The expression of a gene involved in female birds' color vision is linked to the evolution of colorful plumage in males, reports a new study from the University of Chicago. The findings, published Nov. 26 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, confirm the essential role of female color perception in mate selection and sexual dimorphism.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Web-savvy older adults who regularly indulge in culture may better retain 'health literacy'
Older people who are active Internet users and who regularly indulge in a spot of culture may be better able to retain their health literacy, and therefore maintain good health, suggests research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
NIH/National Institute of Aging

Contact: Emma Dickinson
edickinson@bmj.com
44-207-383-6529
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Johns Hopkins scientists link gene to tamoxifen-resistant breast cancers
After mining the genetic records of thousands of breast cancer patients, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have identified a gene whose presence may explain why some breast cancers are resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used hormone treatment generally used after surgery, radiation and other chemotherapy.
Department of Defense's Breast Cancer Research Program, Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute, Avon Foundation, Stetler Fund, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, National Institutes of Health, National Institutes of Health Cancer Center Support Grant

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Boy moms more social in chimpanzees
Four decades of chimpanzee observations reveals the mothers of sons are 25 percent more social than the mothers of daughters, spending about two hours more per day with other chimpanzees than the girl moms did. Researchers from Duke and George Washington University believe mothers are giving young males the opportunity to observe males in social situations to help them develop the social skills they'll need to thrive in adult male competition.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Harris Steel Group, Windibrow Foundation, Carnegie Corporation, University of Minnesota, Duke University, National Geographic Society

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3525.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

     
   

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