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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3428.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Health Psychology
Expressive writing may help breast cancer survivors
Writing down fears, emotions and the benefits of a cancer diagnosis may improve health outcomes for Asian-American breast cancer survivors, according to a study conducted by a researcher at the University of Houston.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Melissa Carroll
mcarroll@uh.edu
713-743-8153
University of Houston

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
JAMA Ophthalmology
A map for eye disease
Vision specialists at the University of Iowa have created the most detailed molecular map of a region of the human eye associated with disease, including age-related macular degeneration. The map catalogs more than 4,000 proteins in each of three areas of the choroid. Results appear in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology.
Bright Focus Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Richard Lewis
richard-c-lewis@uiowa.edu
319-384-0012
University of Iowa

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Immunity
'Normal' bacteria vital for keeping intestinal lining intact
Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found that bacteria that aid in digestion help keep the intestinal lining intact. The findings, reported online in the journal Immunity, could yield new therapies for inflammatory bowel disease and a wide range of other disorders.
National Institutes of Health, Damon Runyon Foundation Clinical Investigator Award

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Jailed family member increases risks for kids' adult health
People whose childhood included a member of the household becoming imprisoned have an 18-percent greater risk of reporting lower overall health quality in adulthood, a new study finds. The risk is independent of other childhood adversity.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Cancer Research
Recent use of some birth control pills may increase breast cancer risk
Women who recently used birth control pills containing high-dose estrogen and a few other formulations had an increased risk for breast cancer, whereas women using some other formulations did not, according to data published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Clues to curbing obesity found in neuronal 'sweet spot'
Preventing weight gain, obesity, and ultimately diabetes could be as simple as keeping a nuclear receptor from being activated in a small part of the brain, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scripps Research Institute scientists find new calorie-burning switch in brown fat
Biologists at the Scripps Research Institute have identified a signaling pathway that switches on a powerful calorie-burning process in brown fat cells.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Madeline McCurry Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Educational Researcher
Unintended consequences: More high school math, science linked to more dropouts
As US high schools beef up math and science requirements for graduation, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have found that more rigorous academics drive some students to drop out.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Washington University Institute for Public Health

Contact: Judy Martin
drydenj@wustl.edu
314-750-2413
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Sleep
Study of twins discovers gene mutation linked to short sleep duration
Researchers who studied 100 twin pairs have identified a gene mutation that may allow the carrier to function normally on less than six hours of sleep per night. The genetic variant also appears to provide greater resistance to the effects of sleep deprivation.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Institutional Development Fund from the Center for Applied Genomics at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Contact: Lynn Celmer
lcelmer@aasmnet.org
630-737-9700
American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment
NYU CDUHR researchers look at prescription opioid abuse among young adults in NYC
The study explores within a social context the drug-use and sexual experiences of young adult nonmedical PO users as they relate to risk for HIV and HCV transmission.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: christopher james
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Cell
Strict genomic partitioning by biological clock separates key metabolic functions
Much of the liver's metabolic function is governed by circadian rhythms -- our own body clock -- and UC Irvine researchers have now found two independent mechanisms by which this occurs.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Ear and Hearing
UT Dallas study reveals effect of loud noises on brain
Prolonged exposure to loud noise alters how the brain processes speech, potentially increasing the difficulty in distinguishing speech sounds, according to neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Dallas.
NIH/National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Contact: Ben Porter
ben.porter@utdallas.edu
972-883-2193
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
$1.6 million NCI grant to CWRU trains nurses to increase participation in clinical trials
Case Western Reserve University medical and nursing school researchers hope to drastically increase the number of qualified cancer patients who participate in clinical trials, a critical step in testing and developing new treatments and preventions.
NIH/National Institute of Cancer

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Cell
Master HSF supports reprogramming of normal cells to enable tumor growth and metastasi
Long associated with enabling the proliferation of cancer cells, the ancient cellular survival response regulated by Heat-Shock Factor 1 can also turn neighboring cells in their environment into co-conspirators that support malignant progression and metastasis. The finding, reported by Whitehead Institute scientists this week in the journal Cell, lends new insights into tumor biology with significant implications for the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of cancer patients.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, V Foundation, Komen Foundation, Human Frontiers Science Program, Fulbright Program, Jared Branfman Sunflowers for Life Fund, Israel National Postdoctoral Award Program for Women in Science

Contact: Matt Fearer
fearer@wi.mit.edu
617-452-4630
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Chemistry & Biology
Molecule enhances copper's lethal punch against microbes
Harnessing a natural process in the body that pumps lethal doses of copper to fungi and bacteria shows promise as a new way to kill infectious microbes, a team of scientists at Duke University report.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Cell Reports
'Rewired' mice show signs of longer lives with fewer age-related illnesses
While developing a new cancer drug, researchers at The Wistar Institute discovered that mice lacking a specific protein live longer lives with fewer age-related illnesses. The mice, which lack the TRAP-1 protein, demonstrated less age related tissue degeneration, obesity, and spontaneous tumor formation when compared to normal mice. Their findings could change how scientists view the metabolic networks within cells.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, US Department of Defense

Contact: Greg Lester
glester@wistar.org
215-898-3943
The Wistar Institute

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery
Blood and saliva tests help predict return of HPV-linked oral cancers
Physicians at Johns Hopkins have developed blood and saliva tests that help accurately predict recurrences of HPV-linked oral cancers in a substantial number of patients. The tests screen for DNA fragments of the human papillomavirus shed from cancer cells lingering in the mouth or other parts of the body. A description of the development is published in the July 31 issue of JAMA Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Neuron
New mapping approach lets scientists zoom in and out as the brain processes sound
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have mapped the sound-processing part of the mouse brain in a way that keeps both the proverbial forest and the trees in view. Their imaging technique allows zooming in and out on views of brain activity within mice, and it enabled the team to watch brain cells light up as mice 'called' to each other. The results represent a step toward better understanding how our own brains process language.
Robert J. Kleberg, Jr. and Helen C. Kleberg Foundation, NIH/National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/Medical Scientist Training Program, NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Cell Reports
Birthday matters for wiring-up the brain's vision centers
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have evidence suggesting that neurons in the developing brains of mice are guided by a simple but elegant birth order rule that allows them to find and form their proper connections.
NIH/National Eye Institute, E. Matilda Ziegler Foundation for the Blind Inc., Pew Charitable Trusts

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Transplantation shown to be highly effective in treating immune deficiency in children
Babies who are born with severe combined immunodeficiency can be successfully treated with a transplant of blood-forming stem cells, according to experts led by Memorial Sloan Kettering's Richard J. O'Reilly, M.D.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Courtney DeNicola Nowak
denicolc@mskcc.org
212-639-3573
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Veterans' alcohol problems linked to stress on the home front
Regardless of traumatic events experienced during deployment, returning National Guard soldiers were more likely to develop a drinking problem if faced with civilian life setbacks, including job loss, legal problems, divorce, and serious financial and legal problems -- all commonplace in military families. Results of the study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health are published online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
US Department of Defense, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Angela J. Beck
ajpmmedia@elsevier.com
734-764-8775
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Vets' alcohol problems linked to stress on the home front
Regardless of traumatic events experienced during deployment, returning National Guard soldiers were more likely to develop a drinking problem if faced with civilian life setbacks, including job loss, legal problems, divorce, and serious financial and legal problems -- all commonplace in military families. Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found having at least one civilian stressor or a reported incident of sexual harassment during deployment raised the odds of alcohol use disorders.
US Department of Defense, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Nature
Key to aging immune system is discovered
The immune system ages and weakens with time, making the elderly prone to life-threatening infection and other maladies, and a UC San Francisco research team now has discovered a reason why.
California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeffrey Norris
jeffrey.norris@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Cell Reports
Biologists describe mechanism promoting multiple DNA mutations
The finding that cancer development often involves multiple mutations arising in clusters and in regions where chromosomal rearrangement takes place may one day lead to new cancer therapies.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gary Galluzzo
gary-galluzzo@uiowa.edu
319-384-0009
University of Iowa

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Kessler funded as satellite site for NIH Stroke Trials Network
NIH StrokeNet brings together teams of research experts specializing in prevention, treatment and recovery. Working with the broader stroke community, they identify priorities for stroke research protocols and provide training for stroke researchers. Kessler Foundation, which specializes in research in stroke rehabilitation and neuroimaging, connects with the new network via Columbia University in New York City, one of the regional centers in NIH StrokeNet.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Carolann Murphy
CMurphy@KesslerFoundation.org
973-324-8382
Kessler Foundation

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3428.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

     
   

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