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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3673.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting
Lancet Psychiatry
Victims of bullying fare worse in the long run than maltreated children
Children who have been bullied by peers have similar or worse long-term mental health outcomes than children maltreated by adults, according to a study to be presented Tuesday, April 28, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego, and to be published in The Lancet Psychiatry at the same time.
Economic and Social Research Council, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression, William T. Grant Foundation

Contact: Debbie Jacobson
djacobson@aap.org
847-434-7084
American Academy of Pediatrics

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Effective sleep apnea treatment lowers diabetes risk
Using a continuous positive airway pressure device for eight hours a night to treat sleep apnea can help people with prediabetes improve their blood sugar levels and may reduce the risk of progressing to diabetes.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-702-0025
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Nature
How an RNA gene silences a whole chromosome
Researchers at Caltech have discovered how an abundant class of RNA genes, called lncRNAs can regulate key genes. By studying an important lncRNA, called Xist, the scientists identified how this RNA gathers a group of proteins and ultimately prevents women from having an extra functional X-chromosome -- a condition in female embryos that leads to death in early development. These findings mark the first time that researchers have uncovered the mechanism of action for lncRNA genes.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Beckman Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rose Hills Foundation, Edward Mallinckrodt Foundation, Sontag Foundation, Searle Scholars Program

Contact: Brian Bell
bpbell@caltech.edu
626-395-5832
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Journal of Virology
UTMB study shows that augmenting a gas naturally in our bodies fights RSV infection
A new study from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston is the first to show that hydrogen sulfide, a gas produced naturally within our bodies, reduces the severity of respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV. When someone has a RSV infection, his or her body is less able to produce the protective hydrogen sulfide. The UTMB study found that a drug that triggers a steady release of this gas decreases the virus's ability to multiply and reduces inflammation of the airways.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, UTMB John Sealy Memorial Endowment Fund, UTMB Center for Tropical Diseases Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Heroin use spikes among whites who abuse prescription painkillers
Researchers looked at the frequency of nonmedical prescription opioid use and the risk of heroin-related behaviors and found that past-year heroin use rose among individuals taking opioids like oxycontin and these increases varied by race and ethnicity. The most significant rise in heroin use was among Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites, where the rate of heroin use for the latter group increased by 75 percent in 2008-2011 compared to earlier years.
NIH/National Institute of Drug Abuse, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child and Human Development

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Nature Neuroscience
Finding the body clock's molecular reset button
An international team of scientists has discovered what amounts to a molecular reset button for our internal body clock. Their findings reveal a potential target to treat a range of disorders, from sleep disturbances to other behavioral, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities, commonly associated with jet lag, shift work and exposure to light at night, as well as with neuropsychiatric conditions such as depression and autism.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé, Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Chris Chipello
christopher.chipello@mcgill.ca
514-398-4201
McGill University

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Nature Methods
Neuronal positioning system: A GPS to navigate the brain
Scientists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Harvard University have announced a 'Neuronal Positioning System' (NPS) that maps the brain's circuitry similar to how a Global Positioning System (GPS) triangulates our location on the planet. The new brain mapping method will help scientists understand the organizational principles of neuronal circuits and learn how their wiring changes during development and in a variety of pathological conditions.
Humans Frontiers Science Foundation, European Research Council/European Union's Seventh Framework Programme, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Dov Smith
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82844
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology
Study finds cardiorespiratory fitness contributes to successful brain aging
Cardiorespiratory fitness may positively impact the structure of white matter in the brains of older adults. These results suggest that exercise could be prescribed to lessen age-related declines in brain structure.
Rehabilitation Research & Development Service, US Department of Veterans Affairs, Clinical Science Research & Development Service, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
TSRI study: Nerve cells and blood vessels in eye 'talk' to prevent disease
A new study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute shows that nerve cells and blood vessels in the eye constantly 'talk' to each other to maintain healthy blood flow and prevent disease.
NIH/National Eye Institute, Lowy Medical Research Foundation, Manpei Suzuki Diabetes Foundation, Alcon Japan Hida Memorial Award

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Nature Neuroscience
Neurons constantly rewrite their DNA
Johns Hopkins scientists have discovered that neurons are risk takers: they use minor 'DNA surgeries' to toggle their activity levels all day, every day. Since these activity levels are important in learning, memory and brain disorders, the researchers think their finding will shed light on a range of important questions.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Simons Foundation, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, Maryland Stem Cell Research Foundation, and others

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Frontiers in Neuroscience
Bats use both sides of brain to listen -- just like humans
Researchers have shown that, like humans, mustached bats use the left and right sides of their brains to process different aspects of sounds. Aside from humans, no other animal that has been studied, not even monkeys or apes, has proved to use such hemispheric specialization for sound processing -- meaning that the left brain is better at processing fast sounds, and the right processing slow ones.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Communication Disorders, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Circulation
Atrial fibrillation increases risk of only 1 type of heart attack
Refining the results of a 2013 study, researchers have found that atrial fibrillation, or irregular heartbeat, is associated with only one type of heart attack -- the more common of the two types.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, American Heart Association

Contact: Marguerite Beck
marbeck@wakehealth.edu
336-716-2415
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Your adolescent brain on alcohol: Changes last into adulthood
Repeated alcohol exposure during adolescence results in long-lasting changes in the region of the brain that controls learning and memory, according to a research team at Duke Medicine that used a rodent model as a surrogate for humans.
NIH/National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-724-5343
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Nature Neuroscience
How to short circuit hunger
Researchers discover a brain circuit that both eliminates gnawing hunger pangs and leads to feelings of fullness, providing a promising new target for the development of weight-loss drugs.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Boston Area Diabetes Endocrinology Research Center, University of Edinburgh Chancellor's Fellowship, American Diabetes Association

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
JAMA Pediatrics
Musculoskeletal outcomes from study on adolescent bariatric surgery safety
Outcomes regarding musculoskeletal disease among severely obese adolescents participating in the 'Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery' (Teen-LABS) study were published this week in JAMA Pediatrics.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Gina Bericchia
gina.bericchia@nationwidechildrens.org
614-355-0487
Nationwide Children's Hospital

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting
Detection of critical heart disease before birth lags among poor
While prenatal ultrasounds are doing a good job of identifying critical congenital heart disease, those living in poor or rural communities are less likely to find out their baby has heart disease before birth than those in more affluent or urban communities, according to research to be presented Monday, April 27, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego.
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Debbie Jacobson
djacobson@aap.org
847-434-7084
American Academy of Pediatrics

Public Release: 26-Apr-2015
Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting
Electronic cigarettes gaining in popularity among teens
Teens no longer smoke just cigarettes. They have branched out to using alternative tobacco products such as electronic cigarettes, hookahs and little cigars. In fact, e-cigarette use is rising rapidly among both cigarette smokers and nonsmokers, according to a study to be presented Sunday, April 26, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Debbie Jacobson
djacobson@aap.org
847-434-7084
American Academy of Pediatrics

Public Release: 26-Apr-2015
Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting
We are family: Adult support reduces youths' risk of violence exposure
Adults can have a bigger influence on youths growing up in poor, violent neighborhoods than they may realize, according to a study to be presented Sunday, April 26 at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Debbie Jacobson
djacobson@aap.org
847-434-7084
American Academy of Pediatrics

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Journal of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Mental disorders don't predict future violence
Most psychiatric disorders -- including depression -- do not predict future violent behavior, reports a new longitudinal study of delinquent youth. The only exception is substance abuse and dependence.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
International Journal of Health Promotion and Education
Texas A&M study finds we think better on our feet, literally
A study from the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health finds students with standing desks are more attentive than their seated counterparts. In fact, preliminary results show 12 percent greater on-task engagement in classrooms with standing desks, which equates to an extra seven minutes per hour of engaged instruction time.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Debbie Field
field@tamhsc.edu
512-341-4935
Texas A&M University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
Study sheds new light on brain's source of power
New research published today in the journal Nature Communications represents a potentially fundamental shift in our understanding of how nerve cells in the brain generate the energy needed to function. The study shows neurons are more independent than previously believed and this research has implications for a range of neurological disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Novo Nordisk Foundation

Contact: Mark Michaud
mark_michaud@urmc.rochester.edu
585-273-4790
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Global Mental Health
Orphaned boys as vulnerable to abuse as girls
Orphaned children in low- and middle-income countries face a high risk of physical and sexual abuse and boys are as vulnerable as girls. Researchers from Duke and UNC-Chapel Hill found that physical and sexual abuse affects 12 percent of girls and 14 percent of boys in institution-based care and 19 percent of girls and 20 percent of boys in family-based care annually.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Susan Gallagher
susan.gallagher@duke.edu
919-681-7817
Duke University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Journal of Cell Biology
New insight into how brain makes memories
Vanderbilt researchers have identified the role that a key protein associated with autism and the co-occurrence of alcohol dependency and depression plays in forming the spines that create new connections in the brain.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Brain
Stem-cell-based therapy promising for treatment of breast cancer metastases in the brain
Harvard Stem Cell Institute researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have developed an imageable mouse model of brain-metastatic breast cancer and shown the potential of a stem-cell-based therapy to eliminate metastatic cells from the brain and prolong survival. The study published online in the journal Brain also describes a strategy of preventing the potential negative consequences of stem cell therapy.
National Institutes of Health, James McDonald Foundation

Contact: B. D. Colen
bd_colen@harvard.edu
617-413-1224
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Brain
Stem-cell-based therapy promising for treatment of breast cancer metastases in the brain
Investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have developed an imageable mouse model of brain-metastatic breast cancer and shown the potential of a stem-cell-based therapy to eliminate metastatic cells from the brain and prolong survival. The study published online in the journal Brain also describes a strategy of preventing the potential negative consequences of stem cell therapy.
National Institutes of Health, James McDonald Foundation

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Showing releases 1-25 out of 3673.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

     
   

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