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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 3599.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical
Motor proteins prefer slow, steady movement
A new theoretical approach clarifies interactions between motor proteins and yields the discovery that both weak and strong forces influence how they keep a cell's transport system robust.
National Institutes of Health, Welch Foundation, Rice's Center for Theoretical Biological Physics

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Nature Medicine
Molecular link between obesity and type 2 diabetes reveals potential therapy
Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that the inflammatory molecule LTB4 promotes insulin resistance, a first step in developing type 2 diabetes. What's more, the team found that genetically removing the cell receptor that responds to LTB4, or blocking it with a drug, improves insulin sensitivity in obese mice. The study is published Feb. 23 by Nature Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Merck, Inc.

Contact: Heather Buschman
hbuschman@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
Epigenome orchestrates embryonic development
Studying zebrafish embryos, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that the epigenome plays a significant part in guiding development in the first 24 hours after fertilization. The research, which appears in the journal Nature Communications, may deepen understanding of congenital defects and miscarriage.
Washington University McDonnell International Scholars Program, Kwanjeong Educational Foundation, National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, March of Dimes Foundation, American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Scientists find a key protein that allows Plavix to conquer platelets
UNC School of Medicine researchers found that the blood platelet protein Rasa3 is critical to the success of the common anti-platelet drug Plavix, which breaks up blood clots during heart attacks and other arterial diseases. The discovery details how Rasa3 is part of a cellular pathway crucial for platelet activity during clot formation. Understanding the protein's role could also prove vital in the development of new compounds aimed at altering platelet function.
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, European Hematology Association, International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unch.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Nature Neuroscience
How brain waves guide memory formation
MIT researchers found that two brain regions that are key to learning -- the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex -- use two different brain-wave frequencies to communicate as the brain learns to associate unrelated objects.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, The Picower Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Neuron
Brain makes decisions with same method used to break WW2 Enigma code
When making simple decisions, neurons in the brain apply the same statistical trick used by Alan Turing to help break Germany's Enigma code during World War II.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lucky Tran
lt2549@cumc.columbia.edu
212-305-3689
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Antioxidants and Redox Signaling
Study sheds light on a 'guardian' protein of brain function
The critical role of CHIP was reported recently in the journal Antioxidants and Redox Signaling by researchers at Vanderbilt University. Their report has spurred efforts to develop CHIP-enhancing drugs to help speed recovery from strokes and following neurosurgery, and prevent development of neurodegenerative disorders.
Walter and Suzanne Scott Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Scott Foundation, Dan Marino Foundation

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
American Journal of Human Genetics
Researchers pin down genetic pathways linked to CF disease severity
Mutation of one gene is all it takes to get cystic fibrosis, but disease severity depends on many other genes and proteins. For the first time, UNC researchers identified genetic pathways that play major roles in why one person with CF might have severe symptoms while another person might not.
National Institutes of Health, US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and CF Canada

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unch.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Stem Cells Translational Medicine
Wisdom teeth stem cells can transform into cells that could treat corneal scarring
Stem cells from the dental pulp of wisdom teeth can be coaxed to become cells of the eye's cornea and could one day be used to repair corneal scarring due to infection or injury, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The findings, published online today in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, indicate they also could become a new source of corneal transplant tissue made from the patient's own cells.
National Institutes of Health, Research to Prevent Blindness, Eye and Ear Foundation of Pittsburgh

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
SrikamAV@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Small loop in human prion protein prevents chronic wasting disease
Chronic wasting disease affects North American elk and deer, but has not been observed in humans. Using a mouse model that expresses an altered form of the normal human prion protein, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have determined why the human proteins aren't corrupted when exposed to the elk prions. Their study identifies a small loop in the human prion protein that confers resistance to chronic wasting disease.
National Institutes of Health, Government of Spain, Morris Animal Foundation

Contact: Heather Buschman
hbuschman@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Small molecule might help reduce cancer in at-risk population, Stanford study finds
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that by changing the selectivity of an enzyme, a small molecule could potentially be used to decrease the likelihood of alcohol-related cancers in an at-risk population.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rosanne Spector
manishma@stanford.edu
650-725-5374
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Customized DNA rings aid early cancer detection in mice, Stanford study finds
Stanford University School of Medicine investigators administered a customized genetic construct consisting of tiny rings of DNA, called DNA minicircles, to mice. The scientists then showed that mice with tumors produced a substance that tumor-free mice didn't make. The substance was easily detected 48 hours later by a simple blood test.
Canary Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Ben and Catherine Ivy Foundation, Sir Peter Michael Foundation

Contact: Bruce Goldman
goldmanb@stanford.edu
650-725-2106
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Feb-2015
2015 AAAAI Annual Meeting
Breastfeeding, other factors help shape immune system early in life
Henry Ford Hospital researchers say that breastfeeding and other factors influence a baby's immune system development and susceptibility to allergies and asthma by what's in their gut.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: David Olejarz
David.Olejarz@hfhs.org
313-874-4094
Henry Ford Health System

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
Science Advances
New research pinpoints crucial protein that keeps the heart beating on time
The average heart beats 35 million times a year -- 2.5 billion times over a lifetime. Those beats must be precisely calibrated; even a small divergence from the metronomic rhythm can cause sudden death. For decades, scientists have wondered exactly how the heart stays so precisely on rhythm. Now, researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have helped identify how a particular protein plays a central role in this astonishing consistency. This is the first time the mechanism has been described.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Kohn
dkohn@som.umaryland.edu
410-706-7590
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
Science Advances
Keeping the heart's engine in sync: Contractions' efficiency depends on critical protein
Researchers have identified a remarkable protein that helps choreograph the highly specific series of events that ensure the heart beats consistently and accurately. Called myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), this protein performs its masterpiece inside the sarcomere, a part of the heart muscle tissue that is one-fiftieth the diameter of a human hair. Trillions or more sarcomeres must contract simultaneously in order for the heart to maintain its beat. Problems with this protein can cause sudden death via a condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jennifer Nachbur
jennifer.nachbur@uvm.edu
802-656-7875
University of Vermont

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
LSU researcher receives $1.8 million NIH grant to study proteins in rickettsial species
Juan J. Martinez, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Pathobiological Sciences at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, has been awarded a five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease to further understand the contribution of a family of outer-membrane proteins termed surface cell antigens, expressed by pathogenic rickettsial species to the initiation and progression of disease in animals and humans.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease

Contact: Ginger Guttner
ginger@lsu.edu
225-578-9922
Louisiana State University

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
American College of Sports Medicine Northwest Regional Chapter Meeting
MARC travel awards announced for: The ACSM Northwest Regional Chapter Meeting
FASEB MARC (Maximizing Access to Research Careers) Program has announced the travel award recipients for the American College of Sports Medicine Northwest Regional Chapter Meeting from Feb. 27-28, 2015 in Bend, Ore.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kelly Husser
khusser@faseb.org
301-634-7109
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
Genetics Society of America 56th Annual Drosophila Research Conference
MARC Travel Awards announced for the GSA 56th Annual Drosophila Research Conference
FASEB MARC (Maximizing Access to Research Careers) Program has announced the travel award recipients for the Genetics Society of America 56th Annual Drosophila Research Conference from March 4-8, 2015, in Chicago, Ill.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kelly Husser
khusser@faseb.org
301-634-7109
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities 2015 Annual Meeting
MARC Travel Awards Announced for ABRF 2015 Annual Meeting
FASEB MARC (Maximizing Access to Research Careers) Program has announced the travel award recipients for the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities 2015 Annual Meeting from March 28-31, 2015, in St. Louis, Mo.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kelly Husser
khusser@faseb.org
301-634-7109
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
Molecular Therapy
Reducing energy efficiency boosts calorie burning in muscle
Scientist at the University of Iowa and the Iowa City VA Medical Center have developed a targeted approach that overrides muscles' intrinsic energy efficiency and allows muscle to burn more energy, even during low to moderate exercise. The new findings might provide the basis of a therapy that could help people get a head start on losing weight by helping to overcome the body's natural resistance to weight loss.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease, Department of Veterans Affairs

Contact: Jennifer Brown
jennifer-l-brown@uiowa.edu
319-356-7124
University of Iowa Health Care

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
Mayo researchers identify gene that pushes normal pancreas cells to change shape
A research team led by investigators from Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Fla., and the University of Oslo, Norway, have identified a molecule that pushes normal pancreatic cells to transform their shape, laying the groundwork for development of pancreatic cancer -- one of the most difficult tumors to treat.
American Association for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Mayo Clinic SPORE for Pancreatic Cancer

Contact: Kevin Punsky
punsky.kevin@mayo.edu
904-953-0746
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Alcohol places Hispanics at a much greater risk of developing alcoholic liver disease
Alcoholic liver disease is a common liver ailment in the US that varies significantly by ethnicity. A new study looks the role of ethnicity in the age of onset, severity, and risk factors for progression of ALD. Results indicate that ethnicity is a major factor affecting the age and severity of different subtypes of ALD.
National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at UC Davis

Contact: Karen Finney
karen.finney@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9064
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 19-Feb-2015
PLOS ONE
New target for prostate cancer treatment discovered by Keck Medicine of USC researchers
Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California scientists have found a promising new therapeutic target for prostate cancer. The findings offer evidence that a newly discovered member of a family of cell surface proteins called G-protein coupled receptors promotes prostate cancer cell growth.
National Institutes of Health, Robert E. and May R. Wright Foundation

Contact: Leslie Ridgeway
lridgewa@usc.edu
323-442-2823
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 19-Feb-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
Johns Hopkins Helps to lead discovery on efficacy and safety of 3 drugs for treating DME
A researcher from Johns Hopkins Medicine helped lead colleagues from across the country in a government-sponsored study by the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network to discover that three drugs -- Eylea, Avastin and Lucentis -- used to treat diabetic macular edema are all effective. They also discovered that Eylea outperformed the other two drugs when vision loss was moderate to severe.
National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marin Hedin
mhedin2@jhmi.edu
410-502-9429
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 19-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
Penn researchers develop new technique for making molybdenum disulfide
University of Pennsylvania researchers have made an advance in manufacturing molybdenum disulphide, a 2-D material that could compete with graphene for replacing silicon in next-generation electronics. By growing flakes of the material around 'seeds' of molybdenum oxide, they have made it easier to control the size, thickness and location of the material.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Army Research Office

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Showing releases 101-125 out of 3599.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

     
   

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