NIH Director Page NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIH Social Media and Outreach
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Videos
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 3513.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
mBio
Once CD8 T cells take on one virus, they'll fight others too
CD8 T cells are known for becoming attuned to fight a specific pathogen ('adaptive immunity'), but a new study shows that in that process they also become first-responders that can fend off a variety of other invaders ('innate immunity'). The findings suggest that innate immunity changes with the body's experience and that the T cells are more versatile than thought.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
PLOS Biology
Flexibility in disease outbreak management could save lives and money
Research by a team of epidemiologists from the United Kingdom and the United States has proposed a new approach for responding to and managing disease outbreaks. They say lives and money could be saved if decisions are adapted to relevant information about the dynamics of the current crisis and not based on retrospective analyses of prior crises, trials and interventions.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Homeland Security, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Lindsay Brooke
lindsay.brooke@nottingham.ac.uk
44-011-595-15751
University of Nottingham

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Smoking interferes with neurocognitive recovery during abstinence from alcohol
Researchers know that alcohol-dependent individuals sustain neurocognitive impairment even after detoxification. A new study examines specific domains of cognitive recovery in conjunction with smoking status. Findings show that smoking status influenced the rate and level of neurocognitive recovery during eight months of abstinence in the ALC group.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Timothy C. Durazzo
timothy.durazzo@ucsf.edu
415-221-4810 x4157
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Bar attendance supports heavy drinking by young adults in the US-Mexico border region
Mexico is a nearby destination where younger US residents can legally drink heavily. However, high levels of drinking on the US side are not always linked to recent travel to Mexico. New findings show that higher levels of drinking among US-Mexico border youth are closely linked to their patterns of bar attendance, but not to how they think about drinking.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Britain A. Mills
britain.mills@utsouthwestern.edu
817-677-8557
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Understanding drinking behaviors among women with unwanted pregnancies
Most women reduce or stop drinking alcohol upon discovery of pregnancy. A new study looks at changes in alcohol use, and factors contributing to these changes, among women with unwanted pregnancies. Findings indicate that most women with unwanted pregnancies quit or reduce alcohol consumption once they discover their pregnancies, and that some may be substituting alcohol for drugs once they discover their pregnancies.
Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation, William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Laura Kurtzman
laura.kurtzman@ucsf.edu
415-476-3163
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Researchers identify new cell signaling pathway thought to play role in rheumatoid arthritis
A study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery identifies a new cell signaling pathway that contributes to the development of inflammatory bone erosion, which occurs in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The study was published online in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. Focusing on a certain variant in a gene called RBP-J, the scientists found that the expression level of this gene in RA patients is significantly lower than that in healthy controls.
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Contact: Robin Frank
FrankR@hss.edu
516-773-0319
Hospital for Special Surgery

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
OHSU, partners Kineta, UW, VGTI Florida awarded NIH contract to develop vaccine adjuvants
Oregon Health & Science University's Vaccine & Gene Therapy Institute has been awarded a $10 million contract from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Todd Murphy
murphyt@ohsu.edu
503-494-8231
Oregon Health & Science University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Annals of Epidemiology
Largest study of Hispanics/Latinos finds depression and anxiety rates vary widely among groups
Rates of depression and anxiety vary widely among different segments of the US Hispanic and Latino population, with the highest prevalence of depressive symptoms in Puerto Ricans, according to a new report from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. The researchers' findings also suggest that depression and anxiety may be undertreated among Hispanics and Latinos, particularly if they are uninsured. The study was published online in Annals of Epidemiology.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tarantula toxin is used to report on electrical activity in live cells
A novel probe that reports on the electrical activity of cells, made by fusing tarantula toxin with a fluorescent compound, is described in a paper today by scientists from the University of California, Davis; the Neurobiology course at the Marine Biological Laboratory; and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, Milton L. Shifman Endowed Scholarship for MBL Neurobiology Course

Contact: Diana Kenney
dkenney@mbl.edu
508-289-7139
Marine Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Trastuzumab continues to show life for HER2-positve early stage breast cancer
After following breast cancer patients for an average of eight-plus years, researchers say that adding trastuzumab to chemotherapy significantly improved the overall and disease-free survival of women with early stage HER2-positive breast cancer.
National Institutes of Health, National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Genentech

Contact: Paul Scotti
scotti.paul@mayo.edu
904-953-0199
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mental rest and reflection boost learning, study suggests
A new study, which may have implications for approaches to education, finds that brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they've learned before may boost later learning.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Department of Defense

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Penn researchers untangle the biological effects of blue light
Blue light can both set the mood and set in motion important biological responses. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Medicine and School of Arts and Sciences have teased apart the separate biological responses of the human eye to blue light, revealing an unexpected contest for control.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lee-Ann Donegan
leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5660
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
eLife
Scientists restore hearing in noise-deafened mice, pointing way to new therapies
Scientists have restored the hearing of mice partly deafened by noise, using advanced tools to boost the production of a key protein in their ears. By demonstrating the importance of the protein, called NT3, in maintaining communication between the ears and brain, these new findings pave the way for research in humans that could improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise exposure and normal aging.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Hearing Health Foundation

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
See-through sensors open new window into the brain
Developing invisible implantable medical sensor arrays, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has overcome a major technological hurdle in researchers' efforts to understand the brain. The team described its technology, which has applications in fields ranging from neuroscience to cardiac care and even contact lenses, in the Oct. 20 issue of the online journal Nature Communications.
US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, National Institutes of Health, US Office of Naval Research

Contact: Justin Williams
jwilliams@engr.wisc.edu
608-265-3952
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
International Society for Computational Biology's Seventh Annual RECOMB/ISCB Conference
MARC travel awards announced for: RECOMB/ISCB conference
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Maximizing Access to Research Careers Program has announced the travel award recipients for the International Society for Computational Biology's Seventh Annual RECOMB/ISCB Conference on Regulatory and Systems Genomics from November 9-14, 2014 in San Diego, CA
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kelly Husser
khusser@faseb.org
301-634-7109
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Stress-related inflammation may increase risk for depression
Preexisting differences in the sensitivity of a key part of each individual's immune system to stress confer a greater risk of developing stress-related depression or anxiety
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Johnson and Johnson International Mental Health Research Organization, Irma T. Hirschl/Monique Weill-Caulier Trust, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Brain and Behavior Research Organization

Contact: Elizabeth Dowling
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
AMP 2014 Annual Meeting and 20th Anniversary Celebration
MARC travel awards announced for: AMP 2014 Meeting
The FASEB MARC Program has announced the travel award recipients for the AMP 2014 Annual Meeting in National Harbor, Md. These awards are meant to promote the entry of students, post doctorates and scientists from underrepresented groups into the mainstream of the basic science community and to encourage the participation of young scientists at the AMP 2014 Annual Meeting. This year MARC conferred 3 awards totaling $5,550.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kelly Husser
khusser@faseb.org
301-634-7109
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
For prescription drug addiction treatment, buprenorphine maintenance trumps detoxification
For treating patients with prescription opioid dependence in primary care, buprenorphine maintenance therapy is superior to detoxification, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers published in the Oct. 20 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
See-through, one-atom-thick, carbon electrodes powerful tool to study brain disorders
A graphene, one-atom-thick microelectrode now solves a major problem for investigators looking at brain circuitry. Pinning down the details of how individual neural circuits operate in epilepsy and other brain disorders requires real-time observation of their locations, firing patterns, and other factors.
National Institutes of Health, Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy, Mirowski Family Foundation

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Psychological Science
Positive subliminal messages on aging improve physical functioning in elderly
Older individuals who are subliminally exposed to positive stereotypes about aging showed improved physical functioning that can last for several weeks, a new study led by the Yale School of Public Health has found.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Patrick and Catherine Weldon Donaghue Medical Research Foundation

Contact: michael.greenwood@yale.edu
michael.greenwood@yale.edu
203-737-5151
Yale University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Grant awarded for development of therapy for Sanfilippo disease
There is no therapy or treatment for Sanfilippo disease. Phoenix Nest will partner with LA BioMed to investigate the development of a therapy for treating the devastating inherited disorder.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Laura Mecoy
Lmecoy@labiomed.org
310-546-5860
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed)

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
ACG 2014
Males with IBS report more social stress than females, UB study finds
One of the few studies to examine gender differences among patients with irritable bowel syndrome has found that males with the condition experience more interpersonal difficulties than do females with the condition.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ellen Goldbaum
goldbaum@buffalo.edu
716-645-4605
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association
Seeing doctor twice a year helps keep blood pressure under control
People who visited their doctor at least twice a year had better blood pressure control. Having healthcare insurance and getting treated for high cholesterol also increased the likelihood of controlling blood pressure.
National Institutes of Health, US Army, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, State of South Carolina

Contact: Maggie Francis
maggie.francis@heart.org
214-706-1382
American Heart Association

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Three-minute assessment successfully identifies delirium in hospitalized elders
Investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have developed a three-minute diagnostic assessment for delirium and shown it is extremely accurate in identifying the condition in older hospital patients.
NIH/National Institute of Aging

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Medicine
Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells
At least 2 percent of people over age 40 and 5 percent of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Caroline Arbanas
arbanasc@wustl.edu
314-286-0109
Washington University School of Medicine

Showing releases 101-125 out of 3513.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2014 by AAAS, the science society.