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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 3461.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Nature
New research shows seals and sea lions likely spread tuberculosis to humans
Scientists who study tuberculosis have long debated its origins. New research shows that tuberculosis likely spread from humans in Africa to seals and sea lions that brought the disease to South America and transmitted it to Native people there before Europeans landed on the continent.
National Science Foundation, European Research Council, Smithsonian Institution, Swiss National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Wenner-Gren Foundation, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Julie Newberg
480-727-3116
Arizona State University

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Regular blood transfusions can reduce repeat strokes in children with sickle cell disease
Vanderbilt-led research, as part of an international, multicenter trial, found regular blood transfusion therapy significantly reduces the recurrence of silent strokes and strokes in children with sickle cell anemia who have had pre-existing silent strokes, according to study results released today in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Ashley Culver
ashley.culver@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
'Deep sequencing' picks up hidden causes of brain disorders
A study from Boston Children's Hospital used a 'deep sequencing' technique and was able to identify subtle somatic mutations -- those affecting just a percentage of cells -- in patients with brain disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, University of Washington, Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Science

Contact: Keri Stedman
keri.stedman@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
Boston Children's Hospital

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Science Translational Medicine
UTMB researchers develop treatment effective against lethal Marburg virus
For the first time, researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, in collaboration with Tekmira Pharmaceuticals, have protected nonhuman primates against Marburg virus -- Angola hemorrhagic fever. Their treatment was shown to be effective at a point when animals have detectable levels of the virus in their system and begin to show symptoms of the disease. The study appears in the Aug. 20 edition of the journal Science Translational Medicine.
US Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Neurology
Common infections tied to some stroke risk in kids
A new study suggests that colds and other minor infections may temporarily increase stroke risk in children. The study found that the risk of stroke was increased only within a three-day period between a child's visit to the doctor for signs of infection and having the stroke.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Juliana Bunim
juliana.bunim@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Study identifies protein that helps prevent active tuberculosis in infected patients
A UCLA-led study has identified a protein that appears to play a key role in protecting people infected with the tuberculosis bacteria from developing the active form of the disease. The findings could help doctors identify people who are at the greatest risk for developing disease as well as target new treatment strategies. The study also demonstrates a unique role for vitamin D -- the protein can only kill the bacteria when there are adequate levels of this vitamin present.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Rachel Champeau
rchampeau@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2270
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Brain
Research helps explain why elderly have trouble sleeping
As people grow older, they often have trouble falling asleep and staying asleep. Now a new study helps explain why sleep becomes more fragmented with age.
National Institutes of Health, Dana Foundation, Canadian Institutes of Health, Illinois Department of Public Health, Robert C. Borwell Endowment Fund

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
JAHA: Journal of the American Heart Association
Exercise may protect older women from irregular heartbeat
Both normal weight and obese older women can reduce their risk of developing a life-threatening irregular heartbeat by doing more physical activity. Despite earlier research suggestions, strenuous physical activity doesn't raise the risk of atrial fibrillation in older women.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, US Department of Health and Human Services, American Heart Association

Contact: Darcy Spitz
darcy.spitz@heart.org
212-878-5940
American Heart Association

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Treating gastric cancer -- with Botox
In an article published in the Aug. 20 edition of Science Translational Medicine, a team of international researchers reports that gastric cancer growth could be suppressed by eliminating the signals sent by nerves that are linked to cancer stem cells. The use of Botox to cut the connection between the nerves and the stem cells made the treatment cheap, safe and efficient.
Research Council of Norway, National Institutes of Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, St. Olavs University Hospital

Contact: Duan Chen
duan.chen@ntnu.no
47-984-09675
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Public Health Nutrition
Guiding stars
Can nutrition rating systems be used in supermarkets to encourage healthier spending habits? A new study by Cornell University researchers sought to answer that very question by tracking the purchasing records in a supermarket chain that uses the Guiding Stars System to rate the nutritional value of foods for sale.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sandra Cuellar
foodandbrandlab@cornell.edu
607-254-4960
Cornell Food & Brand Lab

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Neuro-Oncology
Markey researchers develop web-based app to predict glioma mutations
A new web-based program developed by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers will provide a simple, free way for healthcare providers to determine which brain tumor cases require testing for a genetic mutation.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Peter and Carmen Lucia Buck Training Program in Translational Clinical Oncology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine Physician Scientist Program

Contact: Allison Perry
allison.perry@uky.edu
859-323-2399
University of Kentucky

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Journal of Pediatrics
In-utero methadone, subutex exposure could alter gene expression, cause severe neonatal abstience syndrome
Some infants born with neonatal abstinence syndrome secondary to in-utero opioid exposure have a more difficult time going through withdrawal than others, but the underlying reasons are not well understood. While genetic and epigenetic (when genes are turned on or off) changes have recently been identified as potential factors, researchers at Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center conducted a first of its kind study to identify some of these epigenetic changes that may influence symptom severity.
National Institutes of Health, Tufts Medical Center, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, Toomim Family Fund, Boston University, Alpert Foundation

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Biomarker in an aggressive breast cancer is identified
Northwestern University scientists have identified a biomarker strongly associated with basal-like breast cancer, a highly aggressive carcinoma that is resistant to many types of chemotherapy. The biomarker, a protein called STAT3, provides a smart target for new therapeutics designed to treat this often deadly cancer. Using patient data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, the researchers used bioinformatics techniques and found that a small number of genes are activated by STAT3 protein signaling in basal-like breast cancers but not in luminal breast cancers.
H Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Antibacterial soap exposes health workers to high triclosan levels
Handwashing with antibacterial soap exposes hospital workers to significant and potentially unsafe levels of triclosan, a widely-used chemical currently under review by the US Food and Drug Administration, according to a study led by researchers from University of California San Francisco.
Passport Foundation, Science Innovation Fund, Natural Resource Defense Council, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kristen Bole
kristen.bole@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Engineering new bone growth
Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers find that coated tissue scaffolds help the body grow new bone to repair injuries or congenital defects.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Infection and Immunity
New vaccine shows promise as stronger weapon against both tuberculosis and leprosy
A new University of California Los Angeles-led study finds that a recombinant variant of the century-old vaccine Bacille Calmette-Guerin is superior to Bacille Calmette-Guerin in protecting against tuberculosis in animal models, and also cross protects against leprosy. In addition, the researchers found that boosting that variant, called rBCG30, with a particular protein found in both tuberculosis and leprosy provides considerably stronger protection against leprosy.
National Institutes of Health, National Hansen's Disease Programs, University of California Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Center for AIDS Research

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Journal of the Americal Chemical Society
Moving single cells around -- accurately and cheaply
Scientists have figured out how to pick up and transfer single cells using a pipette -- a common laboratory tool that's been tweaked slightly. They describe this engineering feat and preliminary test results in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.
National Institutes of Health, Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas, Golfers Against Cancer Foundation

Contact: David Bricker
dmbricker@houstonmethodist.org
832-667-5811
Houston Methodist

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
2014 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
How parents juggle work hours may influence kids' weight
The way parents balance their work schedules may affect their adolescent children's eating habits, according to Penn State researchers.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Contact: Matt Swayne
mls29@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Using physics to design better drugs: Albert Einstein College of Medicine awarded $9 million NIH grant
The National Institutes of Health has awarded $9 million to renew a grant headed by Robert Callender, Ph.D., professor of biochemistry at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. He and his fellow researchers are working to develop drugs by considering the dynamics -- including specific atomic motions --of the enzymes that those drugs target.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
VCU Massey Cancer Center receives $4.4 million NCORP grant
Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center was awarded a $4.4 million, 5-year, renewable grant from the National Cancer Institute to support a statewide network for cancer clinical research in Virginia that brings state-of-the-art clinical trials to patients in their own communities and emphasizes the inclusion of minorities in clinical trials and a focus on research that addresses cancer disparities.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jenny Owen
jrowen2@vcu.edu
804-229-7575
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
JAMA
UCSF-led study finds SCID previously underdiagnosed in infants with fatal infections
Severe combined immunodeficiency, a potentially life-threatening, but treatable, disorder affecting infants, is twice as common as previously believed, according to a new study that is the first to examine the national impact of this newborn screening test.
National Institutes of Health, Jeffrey Modell Foundation, Perkin Elmer Genetics

Contact: Juliana Bunim
juliana.bunim@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
JAMA
Extended support helps patients stay smoke-free after hospital discharge
A Massachusetts General Hospital study in the Aug. 20 issue of JAMA describes a program that increased the proportion of hospitalized smokers who successfully quit smoking after discharge by more than 70 percent. The system used interactive voice response technology to provide support and stop-smoking medication for three months after smokers left the hospital.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Terri Ogan
togan@partners.org
617-726-0954
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Physically fit kids have beefier brain white matter than their less-fit peers
A new study of 9- and 10-year-olds finds that those who are more aerobically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter tracts in the brain than their peers who are less fit. 'White matter' describes the bundles of axons that carry nerve signals from one brain region to another. More compact white matter is associated with faster and more efficient nerve activity.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Training the next generation of cancer nanomedicine scientists
Northeastern University has received a five-year, $1.15 million grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute to train the next generation of cancer nanomedicine scientists and clinicians through a unique experiential learning program.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Casey Bayer
c.bayer@neu.edu
617-373-2592
Northeastern University

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Hope for healthy hearts revealed in naked mole rat studies
The naked mole rat, the longest lived of rodents, shows superior cardiovascular function to old age in two studies released in 2014. The research is from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and collaborating institutions.
American Heart Association, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Showing releases 101-125 out of 3461.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

     
   

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