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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 3457.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Forcing chromosomes into loops may switch off sickle cell disease
Scientists have altered key biological events in red blood cells, causing the cells to produce a form of hemoglobin normally absent after the newborn period. Because this fetal hemoglobin is not affected by the inherited gene mutation that causes sickle cell disease, the cell culture findings may give rise to a new therapy for the debilitating blood disorder.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rachel Salis-Silverman
salis@email.chop.edu
267-426-6063
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Early antibiotic exposure leads to lifelong metabolic disturbances in mice
A new study published today in Cell suggests that antibiotic exposure during a critical window of early development disrupts the bacterial landscape of the gut, home to trillions of diverse microbes, and permanently reprograms the body's metabolism, setting up a predisposition to obesity. Moreover, the study shows that it is altered gut bacteria, rather than the antibiotics, driving the metabolic effects.
National Institutes of Health, Diane Belfer Program in Human Microbial Ecology, Knapp Family Foundation, Daniel Ziff Foundation

Contact: Lorinda Klein
lorindaann.klein@nyumc.org
212-404-3533
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Nano Letters
Novel chip-based platform could simplify measurements of single molecules
Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have developed a new approach for studying single molecules and nanoparticles by combining electrical and optical measurements on an integrated chip-based platform. In a paper published July 9 in Nano Letters, the researchers reported using the device to distinguish viruses from similarly sized nanoparticles with 100 percent fidelity.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Nature
New blood: Tracing the beginnings of hematopoietic stem cells
In a paper published online this week in Nature, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine elaborate upon a crucial signaling pathway and the role of key proteins, which may help clear the way to generate HSCs from human pluripotent precursors, similar to advances with other kinds of tissue stem cells.
California Institute of Regenerative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Statistical model predicts performance of hybrid rice
A research team led by plant geneticists at the University of California, Riverside and Huazhong Agricultural University, China, has used 'genomic prediction' to predict the performance of hybrid rice. Genomic prediction is a new technology that could potentially revolutionize hybrid breeding in agriculture. A statistical approach to predicting the value of an economically important trait in a plant, such as yield or disease resistance, the method works if the trait is heritable and reduces costs.
NIH/National Institute of Food and Agriculture, National Natural Science Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
From eons to seconds, proteins exploit the same forces
Energy landscapes for protein folding operate on evolutionary processes that take eons as well as folding that takes microseconds, according to new research at Rice University.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Center for Theoretical Biological Physics, the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, D.R. Bullard-Welch Chair at Rice

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
Ebola protein blocks early step in body's counterattack on virus
The newly published study explains for the first time how the production by the virus of a protein called Ebola Viral Protein 24 stops the interferon-based signals from ramping up immune defenses.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Greg Williams
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Emerging Microbes & Infections
Researchers uncover clues about how the most important TB drug attacks its target
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they have discovered a new clue to understanding how the most important medication for tuberculosis (TB) works to attack dormant TB bacteria in order to shorten treatment.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Major Project of the Twelfth Five-Year Plan, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Youth football study receives $3.8 million from National Institutes of Health
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has received a $3.8 million, five-year grant from the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health, to continue studying the effects of head impacts in youth league football.
NIH/National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Marguerite Beck
marbeck@gmail.com
336-716-2415
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Exercise associated with reduced risk of breast cancer in African-American women
Regular exercise, including brisk walking, is associated with a decrease in the incidence of breast cancer in African American women. In a recently published study in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, researchers from Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center found strong evidence linking physical exercise to a lower rate of breast cancer in African-American women, a group in which previous evidence has been lacking.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Annals of Emergency Medicine
Why seniors don't eat: It's complicated
More than half of older adults who visit emergency departments are either malnourished or at risk for malnutrition, but not because of lack of access to health care, critical illness or dementia. Despite clear signs of malnutrition or risk of malnutrition, more than three-quarters had never previously been diagnosed with malnutrition, according to the results of a study to be published online tomorrow in Annals of Emergency Medicine ('Malnutrition Among Cognitively Intact, Non-Critically Ill Older Adults in the Emergency Department').
NIH/National Institute on Aging, University of North Carolina's Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship

Contact: Julie Lloyd
jlloyd@acep.org
202-370-9292
American College of Emergency Physicians

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Annals of Neurology
Reduction of tau protein improves symptoms in model of severe childhood epilepsy
Researchers at the Gladstone Institutes have shown that reducing brain levels of the protein tau effectively blocks the development of disease in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome, a severe intractable form of childhood epilepsy.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, S.D. Bechtel Jr. Foundation

Contact: Dana Smith
dana.smith@gladstone.ucsf.edu
415-734-2532
Gladstone Institutes

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Poor sleep quality increases suicide risk for older adults, Stanford researcher finds
Older adults suffering from sleep disturbances are more likely to die by suicide than well-rested adults, according to a study led by a researcher at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation

Contact: Margarita Gallardo
mjgallardo@stanford.edu
650-723-7897
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
New research offers hope for HIV vaccine development
In a scientific discovery that has significant implications for HIV vaccine development, collaborators at the Boston University School of Medicine and Duke University School of Medicine have uncovered novel properties of special HIV antibodies. The paper, published in Cell Host and Microbe, describes how some HIV antibodies experience an unusual type of mutation, a phenomenon that allows them to neutralize many different strains of HIV.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Stimuli-responsive drug delivery system prevents transplant rejection
A global collaboration including researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital; Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine in Bangalore, India; and University Hospital of Bern, Switzerland, have developed a way to deliver immunosupressant drugs locally and when prompted, with the use of a biomaterial that self-assembles into a hydrogel (jello-like) material. The novel system is able to deliver targeted, controlled release of medication where and when it is needed.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-534-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Treatment with lymph node cells controls dangerous sepsis in animal models
An immune-regulating cell present in lymph nodes may be able to halt severe cases of sepsis, an out-of-control inflammatory response that can lead to organ failure and death.
National Institutes of Health, Shriners Hospitals for Children

Contact: Sue McGreevey
smcgreevey@partners.org
617-724-2764
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Clinical Psychological Science
Passengers who survived terrifying Air Transat flight in 2001 help psychologists uncover new clues about post-traumatic stress vulnerability
An extraordinary opportunity to study memory and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a group of Air Transat passengers who experienced 30 minutes of unimaginable terror over the Atlantic Ocean in 2001 has resulted in the discovery of a potential risk factor that may help predict who is most vulnerable to PTSD.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Kelly Connelly
kconnelly@baycrest.org
416-785-2432
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
Gut flora influences HIV immune response
Normal microorganisms in the intestines appear to play a pivotal role in how the HIV virus foils a successful attack from the body's immune system, according to new research from Duke Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
University of Alaska Fairbanks awarded $18.8 million for biomedical research, education
The University of Alaska Fairbanks received an $18.8 million award from the National Institutes of Health to fund statewide biomedical research and student training focused on the interface of health, disease and the environment in people and animals. The five-year award continues support for an NIH Institutional Development Award Network of Biomedical Research Excellence linking university-based researchers and students from Alaska's main campuses to meet research and workforce needs of Alaska's cities and rural communities.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Marie Thoms
methoms@alaska.edu
907-474-7412
University of Alaska Fairbanks

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Annals of the American Thoracic Society
UTMB researchers develop model to predict COPD hospital readmission
Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have identified predictors of early rehospitalization among patients hospitalized for complications of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In a nationwide analysis of more than 8,000 commercially insured adult patients with COPD, UTMB researchers concluded that several modifiable factors, such as appropriate prescriptions upon discharge and early follow up after discharge from the hospital, were associated with lower likelihood of early readmission.
National Institutes of Health, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, University of Texas System

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
A gene linked to disease found to play a critical role in normal memory development
A study from The Scripps Research Institute's Florida campus and Columbia University shows the huntingtin gene plays a critical role in long-term memory.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health, Whitehall Foundation, State of Florida

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Kessler Foundation scientists identify predictors of prospective memory deficit post TBI
Kessler Foundation scientists have identified predictors of prospective memory impairment after traumatic brain injury. Findings were epublished on July 28 by the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. The article, 'Rule monitoring ability predicts event-based prospective memory performance in individuals with TBI,' is authored by Jessica Paxton, Ph.D., and Nancy Chiaravalloti, Ph.D., of Kessler Foundation. This is the first study to examine the role of rule monitoring, an executive function, post-TBI.
NIH/National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation Research

Contact: Carolann Murphy
cmurphy@kesslerfoundation.org
973-324-8382
Kessler Foundation

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
mBIO
Mouth bacteria can change its diet, supercomputers reveal
Mouth bacteria can change their metabolism in disease versus health. The Stampede and Lonestar supercomputers compared gene expression of 160,000 genes in healthy and diseased periodontal communities. Research paves way for biomarkers to predict illness from wide-ranging diseases such as periodontitis, diabetes, and Crohn's disease. The Stampede supercomputer is funded by the National Science Foundation through award ACI-1134872.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Faith Singer-Villalobos
faith@tacc.utexas.edu
512-663-7237
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Decline in daily functioning related to decreased brain activity in Alzheimer's
Decline in daily functioning associated with Alzheimer's disease is related to alterations in activity in certain regions of the brain, according to a study published in the August 2014 issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-534-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
NIH awards $20 million grant to Oak Crest Institute of Science
Researchers at the Oak Crest Institute of Science have been awarded a $20 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to systematically develop an intravaginal ring capable of delivering powerful antiretroviral drugs to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted HIV in women. This Program will allow researchers, for the first time, to rigorously test a large group of antiretroviral drugs in a systematic fashion so that they can determine the best-performing candidates in order to advance them rapidly into clinical trials.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Marc Baum
info@oak-crest.org
626-817-0883
Oak Crest Institute of Science

Showing releases 101-125 out of 3457.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

     
   

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