NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIA SeniorHealth.gov NIH Podcast
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Radio
  NIH Podcasts
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 3398.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Pediatrics
Educational interventions at Early Head Start led to decline in pediatric emergency visits
Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center found that integrating an educational intervention regarding upper respiratory infections into Early Head Start programs led to a significant decrease in pediatric emergency visits and adverse care practices among predominantly Latino families, who have been shown to be at high risk for limited health literacy.
NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Health Affairs
Cognitive impairment common among community and nursing-home resident elderly
More than 70 percent of elderly Medicare beneficiaries experience cognitive impairment or severe dementia near the end-of-life and may need surrogate decision makers for healthcare decisions. Advance care planning for older adults with dementia may be particularly important for individuals who do not reside in a nursing home or a long-term care facility, according to an article published in the April issue of Health Affairs.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Susan Murrow
smurrow@jhsph.edu
410-955-7624
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists uncover startlingly new functional details of common anti-diabetic drugs
Scientists thought they basically knew how the most common drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes worked, but a new study from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute reveals unexpected new aspects of the process. These findings could eventually lead to more potent anti-diabetic drugs with fewer serious side effects.
Florida Department of Health, National Institutes of Health, James and Esther King Biomedical Research Program, State of Florida

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Nature Immunology
La Jolla Institute discovers new mechanism for unleashing immune system against cancer
A major discovery that brings a new drug target to the increasingly exciting landscape of cancer immunotherapy was published yesterday by researchers from La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology and their collaborators from other institutes.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bonnie Ward
contact@liai.org
619-303-3160
La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Health Affairs
Doctor's specialty predicts feeding tube use
Subspecialists are much more likely than hospitalists or generalists to insert a feeding tube in hospitalized elderly patients with advanced dementia, according to a new study in Health Affairs. The study helps to explain why the practice persists, in such frail, terminal patients.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Health Affairs
Alzheimer's disease may be more prevalent and manifests itself differently among African-Americans
A new study by researchers at Rush University Medical Center reviews research that suggests that the risk for developing Alzheimer's disease among older African-Americans may be two to three times greater than in the non-Hispanic white population and that they differ from the non-Hispanic white population in risk factors and disease manifestation. The study results will be published in the April 7 issue of Health Affairs.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Illinois Department of Public Health

Contact: Nancy DiFiore
nancy_difiore@rush.edu
312-942-5159
Rush University Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genetic predisposition to liking amphetamine reduces risk of schizophrenia and ADHD
Genetic variants associated with enjoying the effects of d-amphetamine -- the active ingredient in Adderall -- are also associated with a reduced risk for developing schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, report scientists from the University of Chicago in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on April 7. The results support a long-standing hypothesis that dopamine, the neurotransmitter connected with the euphoric effects of amphetamine, is related to schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
Nature Genetics
Gene sequencing project discovers mutations tied to deadly brain tumors in young children
The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital-Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project has identified new mutations in pediatric brain tumors known as high-grade gliomas, which most often occur in the youngest patients. The research appears today as an advance online publication in the scientific journal Nature Genetics.
Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, Kay Jewelers, National Institutes of Health, Cure Starts Now Found, Smile for Sophie Forever Found

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
Nature
Columbia scientists identify key cells in touch sensation
In a study published in the April 6 online edition of the journal Nature, a team of Columbia University Medical Center researchers led by Ellen Lumpkin, Ph.D., associate professor of somatosensory biology, solve an age-old mystery of touch: how cells just beneath the skin surface enable us to feel fine details and textures.
National Institutes of Health, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Research Fellowship for Young Scientists

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
Nature Genetics
Scientists find potential drug targets in deadly pediatric brain tumors
Researchers studying a rare, always fatal brain tumor in children have found several molecular alterations that drive the cancer, according to a new study from scientists at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and McGill University. The findings identify potential new targets for drug treatments. The new research -- published April 6 in Nature Genetics -- could help physicians choose targeted agents with a better chance of combating pediatric high-grade astrocytomas.
National Institutes of Health, others

Contact: Irene Sege
irene.sege@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-7379
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
Nature
Scripps Research Institute scientists provide new grasp of soft touch
A study led by scientists at the Scripps Research Institute has helped solve a long-standing mystery about the sense of touch.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 5-Apr-2014
PLOS Genetics
Cleft palate discovery in dogs to aid in understanding human birth defect
Discovery of a genetic mutation that causes a form of cleft palate in a retriever breed provides the first dog model for this craniofacial defect and offers a tool for better understanding cleft palate in humans.
UC Davis Center for Companion Animal Healtlh, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Patricia Bailey
pjbailey@ucdavis.edu
530-752-9843
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Genome Research
Scientists generate 3-D structure for the malaria parasite genome
A research team led by a University of California Riverside scientist has generated a 3-D model of the human malaria parasite genome at three different stages in the parasite's life cycle -- the first time such 3-D architecture has been generated during the progression of the life cycle of a parasite. The team found that genes that need to be highly expressed in the parasite tend to cluster in the same area of the cell nucleus.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Osteoporosis International
Higher social class linked to fewer bone fractures among non-white women
Social class may play a significant role in how likely middle-aged African-American or Asian women are to suffer bone fractures. New research suggests that a higher education level was associated with decreased fracture incidence among non-white women.
University of California's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, National Institutes of Health, others

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Journal of Adolescent Health
Nowhere to hide: Kids, once protected, now influenced by tobacco marketing
New study finds teenagers and young adults are exposed and influenced by direct mail and web coupons from tobacco manufacturers. This direct marketing exposure is translating to increased nicotine use.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Dubuc
donna.M.Dubuc@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-3615
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Lancet
EAGeR medical trial: Low-dose aspirin won't prevent pregnancy loss
The Effects of Aspirin in Gestation and Reproduction medical trial has found that, in general, low-dose aspirin is not beneficial for future pregnancy outcomes in women with prior pregnancy loss.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Pat Donovan
pdonovan@buffalo.edu
716-645-4602
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Math modeling integral to synthetic biology research
A long-standing challenge in synthetic biology has been to create gene circuits that behave in predictable and robust ways. Mathematical modeling experts from the University of Houston collaborated with experimental biologists at Rice University to create a synthetic genetic clock that keeps accurate time across a range of temperatures. Funded by the National Institutes of Health, the findings were published in a recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Antioxidants can protect against omega 6 damage -- or promote it
Given omega 6 fatty acid's reputation for promoting cancer -- at least in animal studies -- researchers are examining the role that antioxidants play in blocking the harmful effects of this culprit, found in many cooking oils. After all, antioxidants are supposed to prevent DNA damage. But employing antioxidants could backfire, say researchers.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Genetic testing beneficial in melanoma treatment
Genetic screening of cancer can help doctors customize treatments so that patients with melanoma have the best chance of beating it, according to the results of a clinical trial by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. The trial, funded by the National Institutes of Health, will be presented Monday at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014.
National Institutes of Health, Bristol-Myers Squibb

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Plant-derived anti-cancer compounds explained at national conference
Compounds derived from plant-based sources -- including garlic, broccoli and medicine plants -- confer protective effects against breast cancer, explain researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), partner with the UPMC CancerCenter. In multiple presentations Sunday at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014, UPCI scientists will update the cancer research community on their National Cancer Institute-funded findings, including new discoveries about the mechanisms by which the plant-derived compounds work.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Disease-free survival estimates for ovarian cancer improve over time
The probability of staying disease-free improves dramatically for ovarian cancer patients who already have been disease-free for a period of time, and time elapsed since remission should be taken into account when making follow-up care decisions, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. The findings will be presented Wednesday at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Journal of National Cancer Institute
Major genetic study links liver disease gene to bladder cancer
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in Journal of the National Cancer Institute (with related research being presented this weekend at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Conference 2014) details the discovery of a new genetic driver of bladder cancer: silencing of the gene AGL.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Current Biology
Ouch! Computer system spots fake expressions of pain better than people
A joint study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego, the University at Buffalo, and the University of Toronto has found that a computer–vision system can distinguish between real or faked expressions of pain more accurately than can humans.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Patricia Donovan
pdonovan@buffalo.edu
716-645-4602
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Genetics
Examination of a cave-dwelling fish finds a possible genetic link to human disorders
Researchers report on an exciting discovery in the prestigious journal, Genetics.
NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Dawn Fuller
dawn.fuller@uc.edu
513-556-1823
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Cell Reports
Tumor suppressor gene TP53 mutated in 90 percent of most common childhood bone tumor
The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital-Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project found mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 in 90 percent of osteosarcomas, suggesting the alteration plays a key role early in development of the bone cancer. The research was published today online ahead of print in the journal Cell Reports.
Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, Kay Jewelers, NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Tully Family Foundation, ALSAC

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehlau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Showing releases 101-125 out of 3398.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2014 by AAAS, the science society.