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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 3531.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
International Journal of Obesity
Taking antibiotics during pregnancy increases risk for child becoming obese
A study just released by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found that children who were exposed to antibiotics in the second or third trimester of pregnancy had a higher risk of childhood obesity at age 7. The research also showed that for mothers who delivered their babies by a cesarean section, whether elective or non-elective, there was a higher risk for obesity in their offspring.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, US Environmental Protection Agency, Educational Foundation of America, John and Wendy Neu Family Foundation, New York Community Trust, Trustees of the Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Fund

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Big data study identifies new potential target coating for drug-eluting stents
A new study has identified an FDA approved cancer drug, crizotinib, as a possible new coating for drug-eluting stents. Researchers found that crizotinib in mice helped prevent the narrowing of blood vessels after stenting without affecting the blood vessel lining. Results of this study were published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Judy Romero
jromero@crf.org
Cardiovascular Research Foundation

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Two sensors in one
MIT chemists have developed new nanoparticles that can simultaneously perform magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescent imaging in animals.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, National Science Foundation, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
The role DNA methylation plays in aging cells
Although every person's DNA remains the same throughout their lives, scientists know that it functions differently at different ages.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Institute of Aging

Contact: Marguerite Beck
marbeck@wakehealth.edu
336-716-2415
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
New measurement of HDL cholesterol function provides information about cardiovascular risk
Groundbreaking research from UTSW shows that cholesterol efflux capacity -- cholesterol efflux -- appears to be a superior indicator of cardiovascular risk and a better target for therapeutic treatments than standard measurements of HDL.
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, Investigator Initiated Studies Program of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp

Contact: Cathy Frisinger
cathy.frisinger@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
New England Journal of Medicine
New treatment for Marfan syndrome shows promise
An investigational treatment for Marfan syndrome is as effective as the standard therapy at slowing enlargement of the aorta, the large artery of the heart that delivers blood to the body, new research shows. The findings indicate a second treatment option for Marfan patients, who are at high risk of sudden death from tears in the aorta.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, US Food and Drug Administration, Marfan Foundation, Merck & Co. Inc., Teva Canada Ltd.

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
PLOS Biology
Cells' natural response to chronic protein misfolding may do more harm than good
'Protein misfolding' diseases such as cystic fibrosis and Alzheimer's may be seriously exacerbated by the body's own response against that misfolding, according to a new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute.
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics, National Institutes of Health, WKZ Research Fund, NCFS HIT-CF program, American Health Assistance Foundation, Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council, Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Premature infants benefit from early sodium supplementation according to new research
Early sodium supplementation for very premature infants can enhance weight gain according to a recent study by researchers at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.
NIH/National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Troy Petenbrink
media@nutritioncare.org
202-297-1703
American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.)

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Lancet
Paradox lost: Speedier heart attack treatment saves more lives after all, study suggests
A national effort to shave minutes off emergency heart attack treatment time has increased the chance that each patient will survive, a new study suggests. But yet the survival rate for all patients put together hasn't budged. It seems like a paradox. But wait, say the authors of the new report: The paradox vanishes with more detailed analysis of exactly who has been getting this treatment.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Neuroscience 2014
High-fructose diet in adolescence may exacerbate depressive-like behavior
When animals consume a diet high in fructose throughout adolescence, it can worsen depressive- and anxiety-like behavior and alter how the brain responds to stress.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Seniors draw on extra brainpower for shopping
Holiday shopping can be mentally exhausting for anyone. But a new study finds that older adults seem to need extra brainpower to make shopping decisions -- especially ones that rely on memory. The Duke University study, appearing Nov. 19 in the Journal of Neuroscience, suggests that older shoppers draw on resources from an additional brain area to remember competing consumer products and choose the better one.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Childhood adversity hinders genetic protection against problem drinking in white men
The alcohol metabolizing gene ADH1B is strongly linked to risk for alcohol use disorders (AUDs). The His allele at ADHD1B-rs1229984 is considered protective against AUDs. Experiencing adverse events during childhood -- physical or sexual abuse or witnessing violence -- is a risk factor for AUDs. Research has found that under conditions of childhood adversity, the ADH1B His allele does not exert its protective effects against problem drinking in European-American men.
National Institutes of Health, Robert E. Leet and Clara Guthrie Patterson Trust, APA/Merck Early Academic Career Award Program, VA CT and Philadelphia VA Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Centers

Contact: Carolyn E. Sartor, Ph.D.
carolyn.sartor@yale.edu
203-937-3894
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Chronic alcohol intake can damage white matter pathways across the entire brain
Chronic misuse of alcohol results in measurable damage to the brain. A new study uses high-resolution structural magnetic resonance scans to compare the brains of individuals with a history of alcoholism versus those of healthy light drinkers. The abstinent alcoholics showed pronounced reductions in frontal and superior white matter tracts.
Veterans Affairs, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Catherine Brawn Fortier, Ph.D.
catherine_fortier@hms.harvard.edu
857-364-4361
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Youths with a family history of substance use disorders have less efficient forebrain
Youths with a family history of alcohol and other drug use disorders have a greater risk of developing substance-use disorders (SUDs) themselves than their peers with no such family histories. A new study examines forebrain activity in youths with and without a family history of SUDs. Findings indicate that youths with a family history have forebrain regions that function less efficiently.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
Trans fat consumption is linked to diminished memory in working-aged adults
Trans fat consumption is adversely linked to memory sharpness in young to middle-aged men. Men under 45 years old who ate higher amounts of trans fats, which are found in processed foods, had significantly reduced ability to recall words. Further studies need to determine whether these effects extend to women under 45 years old.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Carrie Thacker
carrie.thacker@heart.org
214-706-1665
American Heart Association

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Environmental Health Perspectives
U-M-led study adds to understanding of how phthalate exposure impacts pregnancy
In recent years, scientists have linked chemicals known as phthalates with complications of pregnancy and fetal development.
National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health.

Contact: Laurel Thomas Gnagey
ltgnagey@umich.edu
734-647-1841
University of Michigan

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Genome Research
Imperfect system is all that protects you from genetic parasites out to destroy your genes
Brandeis biology professor Nelson Lau and his lab recently published two studies on the PIWI pathway, exploring how PIWI proteins distinguish transposons from normal DNA and how transposable elements slip past and fool the PIWI pathway.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Leah Burrows
lburrows@brandeis.edu
781-736-4027
Brandeis University

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Viruses impaired if their targets have diverse genes
When a viral infection spread through five genetically identical mice in a row, the virus replicated faster and became more virulent or severe. But when the infection spread one-by-one through five genetically diverse mice, the virus had trouble adapting and became less virulent. The University of Utah study suggests that increased genetic diversity should be promoted in livestock and in captive-bred endangered species so as to limit their risk of getting deadly infections.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
U Mass Medical School receives $9.5 million for Fragile X research center
The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $9.5 million grant to investigators at the University of Massachusetts Medical School to establish a Center for Collaborative Research in Fragile X.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Fessenden
james.fessenden@umassmed.edu
508-856-2000
University of Massachusetts Medical School

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Penn engineers efficiently 'mix' light at the nanoscale
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have engineered a nanowire system that could pave the way for photonic computing, combining two light waves to produce a third with a different frequency and using an optical cavity to amplify the intensity of the output to a usable level.
US Army Research Office, National Institutes of Health, Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Scientific Reports
Advances in electron microscopy reveal secrets of HIV and other viruses
UC Davis researchers are getting a new look at the workings of HIV and other viruses thanks to new techniques in electron microscopy developed on campus.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Medicine
Newly discovered hormone with potential treatment for obesity, type 2 diabetes, liver disease
Researchers at the University of Michigan have discovered how a previously unknown hormone serves as a messenger from fat cells to the liver and are investigating the potential of developing a new treatment for metabolic disorders.
National Institutes of Health, Novo Nordisk, American Heart Association

Contact: Laura Williams
laurajw@umich.edu
734-615-4862
University of Michigan

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
'Probiotics' for plants boost detox abilities; untreated plants overdose and die
Scientists using a microbe that occurs naturally in eastern cottonwood trees have boosted the ability of two other plants -- willow and lawn grass -- to withstand the withering effects of the nasty industrial pollutant phenanthrene and take up 25 to 40 percent more of the pollutant than untreated plants.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Byron and Alice Lockwood Endowed Professorship

Contact: Sandra Hines
shines@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
First genetic-based tool to detect circulating cancer cells in blood
Northwestern University scientists have demonstrated the first genetic-based approach that is able to detect live circulating tumor cells out of the complex matrix that is human blood -- no easy feat. The NanoFlare technology potentially could detect cancer cells long before they could settle somewhere in the body and form a dangerous tumor. In a breast cancer study, the NanoFlares easily entered cells and lit up the cell if a biomarker target was present, even if only a trace amount.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Growth factor regenerates damaged nerves without sprouting new blood vessels
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have found that a growth factor can regenerate damaged peripheral nerves without causing the growth of new blood vessels -- making it a unique candidate to treat nerve damage in areas of the body where the proliferation of blood vessels would be a drawback.
NIH/National Eye Institute, Research to Prevent Blindness Career Development Award

Contact: Sharon Parmet
sparmet@uic.edu
312-413-2695
University of Illinois at Chicago

Showing releases 101-125 out of 3531.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

     
   

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