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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 3724.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Digestive Disease Week
Study finds non-invasive colon cancer screening may be promising for African-Americans
In a first-of-its-kind clinical trial, physician-scientists at University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine found that a new non-invasive technology for colon cancer screening is a promising alternative to colonoscopy for African-Americans. The study recruited patients to compare the effectiveness of stool DNA testing with colonoscopy for detecting large colon polyps.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Alicia Reale
alicia.reale@uhhospitals.org
University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Microclinics help keep Kenyan HIV patients in care
The results showed that microclinics cut in half the normal rate of disengagement from care, which was defined as missing a clinic appointment by 90 days or more, when compared to the control group, and reduced the perceived stigma of HIV by 25 percent within the larger community.
Tides Foundation, Craigslist Foundation, Mulago Foundation, Rise Up Foundation, Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, Segal Family Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and others

Contact: Jeff Sheehy
jeff.sheehy@ucsf.edu
415-845-1132
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Nature Immunology
UCSF-led study explains how early childhood vaccination reduces leukemia risk
A team led by UCSF researchers has discovered how a commonly administered vaccine protects against acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common type of childhood cancer.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, William Lawrence and Blanche Hughes Foundation, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Wellcome Trust, Cancer Research UK

Contact: Juliana Bunim
juliana.bunim@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Nature Neuroscience
NYU researchers ID part of the brain for processing speech
A team of NYU neuroscientists has identified a part of the brain exclusively devoted to processing speech, helping settle a long-standing debate about role-specific neurological functions.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Diabetes Care
Early detection and treatment of type 2 diabetes may reduce heart disease and mortality
Screening to identify type 2 diabetes followed by early treatment could result in substantial health benefits, according to new research that combined large scale clinical observations and innovative computer modeling.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Computational design improves potency of a broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibody
A new study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation reveals that increasing the stability of an HIV-1-targeting broadly neutralizing antibody improves efficacy.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Nature Methods
New device successfully captures metastasis-associated circulating tumor cell clusters
The latest version of a microfluidic device for capturing rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is the first designed specifically to capture clusters of two or more cells, rather than single cells. These CTC clusters appear gnificantly more likely to cause metastases than single circulating tumor cells.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Stand Up to Cancer, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Prostate Cancer Foundation, Charles Evans Foundation, Johnson and Johnson

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Advanced Materials
Gel filled with nanosponges cleans up MRSA infections
Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego developed a gel filled with toxin-absorbing nanosponges that could lead to an effective treatment for skin and wound infections caused by MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), an antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This 'nanosponge-hydrogel' minimized the growth of skin lesions on mice infected with MRSA -- without the use of antibiotics. The researchers recently published their findings online in dvanced Materials.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How the immune system controls the human biological clock in times of infection
An important link between the human body clock and the immune system has relevance for better understanding inflammatory and infectious diseases. Researchers report how a critical white blood cell called the macrophage, when exposed to bacteria, makes the biological clock inside the macrophage stop, allowing it to become inflamed.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, European Research Council, Science Foundation Ireland

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Sleep Health
Shift work can affect your health
A new study from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health determined that employees who work shifts outside of a 9-to-5 schedule are more likely to be overweight and experience sleep problems, and possibly more likely to develop metabolic disorders, such as diabetes, compared to workers following traditional work schedules.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, UW Wisconsin Partnership, and others

Contact: Jennifer Williams
nsfmedia@sleepfoundation.org
202-631-1205
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Digestive Disease Week
Menopausal hormone therapy increases risk of gastrointestinal bleeding
Current users of menopausal hormone therapy are more than twice as likely than non-users to develop lower gastrointestinal bleeding and ischemic colitis, especially if they use the therapy for longer durations, according to a study that was released today at Digestive Disease Week® 2015.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Aimee Frank
newsroom@gastro.org
301-941-2620
Digestive Disease Week

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Substance abuse risk not greater in those using medical marijuana with prescribed opioids
Among people who use medical cannabis for chronic pain, those who also take prescription pain medications are not at increased risk for serious alcohol and other drug involvement, according to a study in the May issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Lisa Raycraft
raycraft@umich.edu
734-763-9534
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs

Public Release: 17-May-2015
American Thoracic Society International Conference
New England Journal of Medicine
Study validates effectiveness of genomic test for lung cancer detection
A new test co-developed by a Boston University School of Medicine researcher will allow patients suspected of having lung cancer to be subjected to fewer and less-invasive tests to determine if they have the disease.
Allegro Diagnostics Corp., National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 15-May-2015
Cell Reports
UTHealth research: Grass plants can transport infectious prions
Grass plants can bind, uptake and transport infectious prions, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. The research was published online in the latest issue of Cell Reports.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Deborah Mann Lake
deborah.m.lake@uth.tmc.edu
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Public Release: 15-May-2015
Nature Chemistry
Solving streptide from structure to biosynthesis
Bacteria speak to one another using peptide signals in a soundless language known as quorum sensing. In a step towards translating bacterial communications, researchers at Princeton University have revealed the structure and biosynthesis of streptide, a peptide involved in the quorum sensing system common to many streptococci.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tien Nguyen
tienn@princeton.edu
609-258-6523
Princeton University

Public Release: 15-May-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Antiviral compound may protect brain from pathogens, West Nile virus study shows
Researchers have found that an antiviral compound may protect the brain from invading pathogens. Studying West Nile virus infection in mice, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis showed that interferon-lambda tightens the blood-brain barrier, making it harder for the virus to invade the brain.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Judy Martin Finch
martinju@wustl.edu
314-286-0105
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-May-2015
Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Penn research points to omega-3 as an intervention for childhood behavioral problems
A new study by Penn researchers now suggests that omega-3, a fatty acid commonly found in fish oil, may have long-term neurodevelopmental effects that ultimately reduce antisocial and aggressive behavior problems in children.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 15-May-2015
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Cancer survivors have evolving information needs
Judging by the nature and topics of their information seeking, cancer patients' information needs appear to differ depending on the type of cancer they have and where they are in their survivorship.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development, University of Minnesota Deborah E. Powell Center for Women's Health

Contact: Jacquie Posey
jposey@asc.upenn.edu
215-898-6460
University of Pennsylvania Annenberg School for Communication

Public Release: 15-May-2015
Journal of the American Heart Association
Activity after ICD implantation may predict survival
Patients who stayed active following ICD implantation had better survival rates. Information collected by ICD devices may one day help clinicians identify and help patients at higher risk for adverse outcomes.
Paul B. Beeson Career Development Award in Aging Research, NIH/National Institute on Aging, Boston Scientific

Contact: Bridgette McNeill
bridgette.mcneill@heart.org
214-706-1135
American Heart Association

Public Release: 14-May-2015
PLOS Pathogens
Antibody's unusual abilities might inspire vaccine strategies
The recent discovery of a novel antibody that works in an unusual way could inspire new vaccine strategies. The antibody appears to have properties that might keep bacteria like disease-causing E. coli from adhering to human cell surfaces and also dislodge those already attached. Among the common pathogens for which researchers are seeking more effective methods to prevent adherence to human cell surfaces are the forms of E. coli that cause urinary tract infections.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Leila Gray
leilag@uw.edu
206-685-0381
University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

Public Release: 14-May-2015
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism
Diabetes drug may reduce heart attack risk in HIV patients
A diabetes drug may have benefits beyond lower blood sugar in patients with HIV. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests the drug may prevent cardiovascular problems because it works to reduce inflammation that is linked to heart disease and stroke in these patients. The drug both improved metabolism and reduced inflammation in HIV-positive adults on antiretroviral therapy.
Merck Pharmaceuticals, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 14-May-2015
International Journal of Epidemiology
Genome-wide DNA study shows lasting impact of malnutrition in early pregnancy
Children whose mothers were malnourished at famine levels during the first 10 weeks of pregnancy had changes in DNA methylation known to suppress genes involved in growth, development, and metabolism documented at age 59. This is the first study to look at prenatal nutrition and genome-wide DNA patterns in adults exposed to severe under-nutrition at different periods of gestation.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 14-May-2015
Structure
Findings reveal clues to functioning of mysterious 'mimivirus'
Researchers have discovered the structure of a key protein on the surface of an unusually large virus called the mimivirus, aiding efforts to determine its hosts and unknown functions.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 14-May-2015
Cancer Research
Revealing kidney cancer's secret
An international team of scientists, led by UC Davis nephrologist Robert Weiss, have used a sophisticated combination of proteomics and metabolomics to show how renal cell carcinoma reprograms its metabolism and evades the immune system.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Veterans' Affairs, LLNL-UCDCC Fitzpatrick Award, Paula Moss Trust, J. Randall and Kathleen L. MacDonald Research Fund

Contact: Dorsey Griffith
dgriffith@ucdavis.edu
916-734-9118
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 14-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Georgia State research paves way for early detection of liver cancer
Led by Georgia State University, researchers have developed the first robust and noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer and liver metastases, in addition to other liver diseases, such as cirrhosis and liver fibrosis.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Brian Mullen
bmullen@gsu.edu
404-413-5464
Georgia State University

Showing releases 126-150 out of 3724.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

     
   

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