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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 151-175 out of 3607.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Nature
Roadmap Epigenomics project releases latest 'annotations' to the human genome
The human genome project captured the public imagination when its first draft was published 14 years ago this week in the international science journal Nature, but the epigenome may hold the real promise for conquering disease.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Nancy DiFiore
nancy_difiore@rush.edu
312-942-5159
Rush University Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
Best drug to improve poor vision in diabetes
A national study shows that the drug Eylea is superior for improving the eyesight of persons with poor vision due to diabetic macular edema, a major cause of vision loss from diabetes.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
Northwestern University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Keeping atherosclerosis in-check with novel targeted inflammation-resolving nanomedicines
Nanometer-sized 'drones' that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries could become a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis, according to a study in pre-clinical models by scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Columbia University Medical Center. These findings are published in the Feb. 18 online issue of Science Translational Medicine.
National Institutes of Health, Wellcome Trust, David Koch-Prostate Cancer Foundation

Contact: Haley Bridger
hbridger@partners.org
617-525-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Development of personalized cellular therapy for brain cancer
Immune cells engineered to seek out and attack a type of deadly brain cancer were found to be both safe and effective at controlling tumor growth in mice that were treated with these modified cells. The results paved the way for a newly opened clinical trial for glioblastoma patients at Penn.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Society of Clinical Oncology Conquer Cancer Foundation Young Investigator Award, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research

Contact: Holly Auer
holly.auer@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5659
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Precision nano 'drones' deliver healing drug to subdue atherosclerosis
Nanometer-sized 'drones' that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries could become a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis.
Program of Excellence in Nanotechnology, National Institutes of Health, Welcome Trust, David Koch-Prostate Cancer Foundation

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@columbia.edu
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Nature
Mulling the marijuana munchies: How the brain flips the hunger switch
The 'munchies,' or that uncontrollable urge to eat after using marijuana, appear to be driven by neurons in the brain that are normally involved in suppressing appetite, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers in the Feb. 18 issue of the journal Nature.
National Institutes of Health, American Diabetes Association, The Klarmann Family Foundation, Helmholtz Society Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Nature
New insights into 3-D genome organization and genetic variability
While genomics is the study of all of the genes in a cell or organism, epigenomics is the study of all the genomic add-ons and changes that influence gene expression but aren't encoded in the DNA sequence. A variety of new epigenomic information is now available in a collection of studies published Feb. 19 in Nature by the National Institutes of Health Roadmap Epigenomics Program.
NIH/Roadmap Epigenomics Program, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Ludwig Cancer Research

Contact: Heather Buschman
hbuschman@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Journal of the American Heart Association
Older adults with limited mobility may lessen heart problems with activity
Every minute of physical activity may lower risk of heart attack or coronary death in older adults with limited mobility. The amount of activity appeared more important to predicted heart risk than the intensity of the activity.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Akeem Ranmal
t-akeem.ranmal@heart.org
214-706-1755
American Heart Association

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Ecological Engineering
UI engineers find switchgrass removes PCBs from soils
University of Iowa researchers have found a type of grass that was once a staple of the American prairie can remove soil laden with PCBs, toxic chemicals once used for cooling and other industrial purposes.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program, fellowship for Yi Liang from the Comment Center for Biocatalysis and Bioprocessing at the University of Iowa

Contact: Gary Galluzzo
gary-galluzzo@uiowa.edu
319-384-0009
University of Iowa

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists use MRI to visualize pancreas inflammation in type 1 diabetes
A pilot study led by researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center has revealed that it is possible to use magnetic resonance imaging to 'see' the inflammation in the pancreas that leads to type 1 diabetes.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and others

Contact: Jeff Bright
jeff.bright@joslin.harvard.edu
Joslin Diabetes Center

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
BMC receives NIDDK grant to study non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
Boston Medical Center has received a $1.5 million grant to study non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The grant, awarded by the National Institutes of Health's National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases, will allow researchers to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved with this common, chronic metabolic disease and to identify novel treatments for the disease.
NIH/National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Science
Science: Chromosome 'bumper repair' gene predicts cancer patient outcomes
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the journal Science shows that levels of mRNA for the gene TERT predict patient outcomes in bladder cancer. Results may help doctors and researchers mark especially aggressive bladder cancers, allowing them to recommend appropriate treatments and improve patient outcomes.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Molecular Psychiatry
Tau-associated MAPT gene increases risk for Alzheimer's disease
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has identified the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) gene as increasing the risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). The MAPT gene encodes the tau protein, which is involved with a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease and AD. These findings provide novel insight into Alzheimer's neurodegeneration, possibly opening the door for improved clinical diagnosis and treatment.
National Institutes of Health, Research Council of Norway, South East Norway Health Authority, Norwegian Health Association, KG Jebsen Foundation

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
High-powered X-ray laser unlocks mechanics of pain relief without addiction
Scientists have solved the structure of a bifunctional peptide bound to a neuroreceptor that offers pain relief without addiction.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation, and others

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Broca's area is the brain's script writer where words take shape, study finds
A study conducted at Johns Hopkins using recordings from the brain surface shows Broca's area is active early in the process of forming sentences and ends its work before a word is spoken. Scientists have theorized that Broca's area is like a play's director, controlling how an actor pronounces each line. But the research published in PNAS suggests Broca's area is writing the script -- organizing the string of sounds that express the playwright's ideas.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Nielsen Corporation

Contact: Heather Dewar
hdewar@jhmi.edu
410-502-9463
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Fast-replicating HIV strains drive inflammation and disease progression
The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mutates very rapidly and circulates in many different strains. The strain of HIV someone is first infected with, and its capacity to replicate in the body, can have a lasting influence on how the virus disrupts the immune system.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, Action Cycling Atlanta

Contact: Holly Korschun
hkorsch@emory.edu
404-727-3990
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Nucleic Acids Research
Synthetic biology yields new approach to gene therapy
Bioengineers at the University of Texas at Dallas have created a novel gene-delivery system that shuttles a gene into a cell, but only for a temporary stay, providing a potential new gene-therapy strategy for treating disease. The approach offers distinct advantages over other types of gene therapies currently under investigation, said Richard Taplin Moore, a doctoral student in bioengineering and lead author of a study describing the new technique.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Amanda Siegfried
amanda.siegfried@utdallas.edu
972-883-4335
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Journal of Communication Disorders
Crowdsourcing a valid option for gathering speech ratings
Crowdsourcing -- where responses to a task are aggregated across a large number of individuals recruited online -- can be an effective tool for rating sounds in speech disorders research, according to a study by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@nyu.edu
212-998-6797
New York University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Seasonal flu vaccine induces antibodies that protect against H7N9 avian flu
Antibodies that protect against H7N9 avian flu, which emerged in China in 2013 and sparked fears of a global pandemic, have been isolated in individuals who received seasonal flu vaccinations. These antibodies account for a small percentage of the total immune response, but appear to broadly neutralize H7 viruses and represent promising new targets for therapeutic development against a wide range of influenza strains.
National Institutes of Health, Gwen Knapp Center for Lupus and Immunology Research, Center for Research on Influenza Pathogenesis

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Journal of Neuroscience
Tadpole model links drug exposure to autism-like effects
In utero exposure to the epilepsy drug VPA appears to elevate the risk to babies of developing an autism spectrum disorder. A new Brown University study used a tadpole model to investigate VPA's effects on developing neural physiology and behavior. Researchers now hope to use the model to develop an intervention and to learn more about the underlying causes of neurodevelopmental disorders more broadly.
NIH/National Eye Institute, National Science Foundation, Brown University

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Oncology Nursing Forum
Cancer experience presents time for lifestyle changes in both survivors and family members
After studying cancer survivors and their family caregivers, researchers at Case Western Reserve University conclude that the period between the final cancer treatment and first post-treatment checkup may be an ideal time for the entire household to jumpstart a healthy lifestyle.
National Institutes of Health and National Cancer Institute's Prevention Research Educational Postdoctoral Training Program

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
American Economic Review
Unhealthy choices boosted mortality rates for blacks who migrated north
Millions of African-Americans left the rural South during the 20th century in search of greater opportunities for work, education and overall quality of life in the urban North, Midwest and West. But the gains many made were clouded by an increased mortality rate, likely the result of unhealthy habits picked up by vices common in the big city, finds a new study led by Duke University.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Steve Hartsoe
steve.hartsoe@duke.edu
919-681-4515
Duke University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
CWRU receives $2.5 million NIDA grant to study prenatal cocaine exposure on young adults
Since 1994, researchers at Case Western Reserve University's Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences have studied children prenatally exposed to cocaine and their mothers to track their development from birth through adolescence. With a four-year, $2.5 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health, those children -- now young adults -- enter the next phase of the long-term study, called Project Newborn.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Mayo Clinic: Molecule that provides cellular energy found key to aggressive thyroid cancer
Cancer researchers at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida, have identified a molecule they say is important to survival of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma -- a lethal tumor with no effective therapies. The molecule also seems to play a role in a wide range of cancers.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Florida Department of Health Bankhead-Coley Cancer Research Program, Mr. and Mrs. Ompal Chauhan Research Fund, Scheidel Foundation, Fraternal Order of Eagles Florida State Auxiliary

Contact: Kevin Punsky
punsky.kevin@mayo.edu
904-953-0746
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Nature Medicine
Anti-inflammatory mechanism of dieting and fasting revealed
Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have found that a compound produced by the body when dieting or fasting can block a part of the immune system involved in several inflammatory disorders such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Showing releases 151-175 out of 3607.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

     
   

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