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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 151-175 out of 3803.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
MCW Medical Scientist Training Program receives federal funding
The Medical College of Wisconsin has received a five-year, $1.5 million training grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of General Medicine Sciences to fund MCW's Medical Scientist Training Program. The MSTP provides clinical and research training as an educational foundation for future academic physician scientists.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Maureen Remmel
mremmel@mcw.edu
414-955-4744
Medical College of Wisconsin

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Infants use expectations to shape their brains
Infants can use their expectations about the world to rapidly shape their developing brains, researchers have found. A series of experiments with infants ages 5 to 7 months has shown that portions of babies' brains responsible for visual processing respond not just to the presence of visual stimuli, but also to the mere expectation of visual stimuli, according to the researchers from Princeton University, the University of Rochester and the University of South Carolina.
NIH/National Institutes of Child Health and Development

Contact: Michael Hotchkiss
mh14@princeton.edu
609-258-9522
Princeton University

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Yale leads NIH-funded autism biomarkers study of pre-school and school-aged children
Yale School of Medicine researchers will lead a national multi-center study of preschool and school-aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorders to identify non-invasive biological markers (biomarkers) that could help physicians diagnose, track, and assess treatments in autism patients.
NIH/National Institutes of Mental Health, Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative, Yale Clinical and Translational Science Award

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Journal of Adolescent Health
Teens' overall substance use declining, but marijuana use rising
Marijuana use in teenagers is on the rise, while cigarette and alcohol use are stable or declining, according to health statistics researchers. In particular, black teens are using more marijuana than in recent decades.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Victoria Indiverno
vmi1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Nature Neuroscience
Mayo Clinic study uncovers key differences among ALS patients
Researchers on Mayo Clinic's Florida campus have identified key differences between patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease) and those with the most common genetic form of ALS, a mutation in the C9orf72 gene.
National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Defense, Mayo Clinic Foundation; Mayo Clin

Contact: Kevin Punsky
punsky.kevin@mayo.edu
904-953-0746
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
8th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention
HPTN 052 demonstrates sustained benefit of early antiretroviral therapy
Antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection provides lasting protection against the sexual transmission of the virus from infected men and women to their HIV-uninfected sexual partners, investigators from the HIV Prevention Trials Network reported today at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention in Vancouver, Canada.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Eric Miller
EMiller@fhi360.org
919-384-6465
FHI360

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
8th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention
HPTN 067 demonstrates high-risk populations adhere well to daily PrEP regimen
Results from HPTN 067, a Phase II, randomized, open-label study, demonstrate most study participants had higher coverage of sex events and better adherence when they were assigned to the daily dosing arm, investigators from the HIV Prevention Trials Network reported today at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention in Vancouver, Canada. HPTN 067, also known as the ADAPT Study, was designed to evaluate the feasibility of non-daily pre-exposure prophylaxis regimens.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health and NIH/Office of AIDS Research

Contact: Eric Miller
EMiller@fhi360.org
919-384-6465
FHI360

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Nature Medicine
Patients' own genetically altered immune cells show promise in fighting blood cancer
In recent years, immunotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment for certain cancers. Now this strategy, which uses patients' own immune cells, genetically engineered to target tumors, has shown significant success against multiple myeloma, a cancer of the plasma cells that is largely incurable. The results appeared in a study published online today in Nature Medicine.
National Institutes of Health, Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, Adaptimmune

Contact: Karen Warmkessel
kwarmkessel@umm.edu
410-328-8919
University of Maryland Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Human Molecular Genetics
Novel treatments emerging for human mitochondrial diseases
Using existing drugs, such as lithium, to restore basic biological processes in human cells and animal models, researchers may have broken a long-standing logjam in devising effective treatments for human mitochondrial diseases. The researchers are planning early-stage clinical trials.
National Institutes of Health, Kelsey Wright Foundation, Juliet's Cure Mitochondrial Disease Research Fund

Contact: John Ascenzi
ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Nature Medicine
Stanford team links gene expression, immune system with cancer survival rates
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have compiled a database that integrates gene expression patterns of 39 types of cancer from nearly 18,000 patients with data about how long those patients lived.
Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, National Institutes of Health, B&J Cardan Oncology Research Fund, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, US Department of Defense, Siebel Stem Cell Institute, Thomas and Stacey Siebel Foundation

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
650-725-5371
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Nature Medicine
T-cell receptor therapy achieves encouraging clinical responses in multiple myeloma
Results from a clinical trial investigating a new T cell receptor therapy that uses a person's own immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells demonstrated a clinical response in 80 percent of multiple myeloma patients with advanced disease after undergoing autologous stem cell transplants.
National Institutes of Health, Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, Adaptimmune

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-301-5221
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New tool for investigating RNA gone awry
RNA is a fundamental ingredient in all known forms of life -- so when RNA goes awry, a lot can go wrong. A new technology developed by Northwestern University scientists offers the first real-time method to track and observe the dynamics of RNA distribution as it is transported inside living cells. 'Sticky-flares' have the potential to help scientists understand the complexities of RNA better than any analytical technique to date and observe and study the biological and medical significance of RNA misregulation.
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Stanford researchers find prawn solution to spread of deadly disease
New Stanford research shows that the river prawn, a natural predator of parasite-carrying snails, proves effective at curbing the spread of schistosomiasis in West Africa.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation and Grand Challenges Canada, Stanford Woods Institute Environmental Venture Projects

Contact: Susanne H. Sokolow
831-247-427-183-1515
Stanford University

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Circulation
African-Americans face twice the rate of sudden cardiac arrest, compared to Caucasians
Compared to Caucasians, African-Americans face twice the rate of sudden cardiac arrest, according to a new study from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Sandy Van
sandy@prpacific.com
808-526-1708
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Mayo Clinic Proceedings
UTMB study finds that testosterone therapy is not linked with blood clot disorders in veins
A new study from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston of more than 30,000 commercially insured men is the first large comparative analysis to show that there is no link between testosterone therapy and blood clots in veins. The study found that middle-aged and older men who receive testosterone therapy are not at increased risk of this illness. The findings are detailed in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Pediatrics
Antibiotic exposure could increase the risk of juvenile arthritis
Taking antibiotics may increase the risk that a child will develop juvenile arthritis, according to a study from Rutgers University, University of Pennsylvania and Nemours A.I. duPont Hospital for Children published today in Pediatrics. Researchers found that children who were prescribed antibiotics had twice the risk of developing juvenile arthritis compared to children the same age who were not prescribed antibiotics. The more courses of antibiotics prescribed, the higher the associated risk, they found.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Dory Devlin
ddevlin@ucm.rutgers.edu
908-872-6979
Rutgers University

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
American Journal of Managed Care
Most chronic pain patients use alternative therapies, but many don't tell their doctors
More than half of chronic pain patients in a managed care setting reported using chiropractic care or acupuncture or both, but many of these patients didn't discuss this care with their primary care providers. These study results, published today in the American Journal of Managed Care, suggest that better care coordination is needed among patients and physicians.
NIH/National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Contact: Navneet Miller
Navneet.Miller@creation.io
415-262-5972
Kaiser Permanente

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
JAMA Pediatrics
Child's home address predicts hospitalization risk for common respiratory diseases
Children who require hospitalization for several common respiratory illnesses tend to live in inner-city neighborhoods with less than optimal socioeconomic conditions, according to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center researchers.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: Jim Feuer
jim.feuer@cchmc.org
513-636-4656
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association
Blacks are at greater risk for sudden cardiac arrest
Blacks are more likely to experience sudden cardiac arrest, and at a much younger age, than whites. In adults with sudden cardiac arrest, the rate of diabetes, high blood pressure, and chronic kidney failure was greater in blacks than whites.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Akeem Ranmal
akeem.ranmal@heart.org
214-706-1755
American Heart Association

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
Nature Communications
Lymphomas tied to metabolic disruption
Researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found direct links between disrupted metabolism and an often fatal type of lymphoma.
National Institutes of Health, Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
8th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention
Cholesterol metabolism in immune cells linked to HIV progression, may lead to new therapy
Enhanced cholesterol metabolism in certain immune cells may help some people infected with HIV naturally control disease progression, according to new research from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Allison Hydzik
HydzikAM@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
Scientists receive $2.8 million to develop innovative approach to latent HIV infection
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute Florida campus have been awarded a pair of grants totaling nearly $2.8 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health to develop a new therapeutic agent to reduce latent levels of HIV that hide from the immune system in infected individuals.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
eLife
New findings hint toward reversing hearing loss
Studying mice, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified two signaling molecules that are required for the proper development of a part of the inner ear called the cochlea. Without both signals, the embryo does not produce enough of the cells that eventually make up the adult cochlea, resulting in a shortened cochlear duct and impaired hearing.
Action on Hearing Loss Foundation, the Office of Naval Research, the March of Dimes Foundation, the Hearing Health Foundation; and the National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
Twin Research and Human Genetics
Some like it sweet, others not so much: It's partly in the genes
A new study from the Monell Center and collaborating institutions suggests that a single set of genes accounts for approximately 30 percent of person-to-person variance in sweet taste perception, regardless of whether the sweetener is a natural sugar or a non-caloric sugar substitute.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Australian National Health and Medical Research Council

Contact: Leslie Stein
stein@monell.org
267-519-4707
Monell Chemical Senses Center

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
Alzheimer's & Dementia
Study IDs traits of those who screen positive for dementia but refuse diagnostic testing
Two thirds of individuals 65 and older who screened positive for cognitive impairment refused subsequent evaluation according to the first study of its kind to examine older adults' willingness to undergo diagnostic assessment. The Indiana University Center for Aging Research, Regenstrief Institute and Eskenazi Health study of approximately 500 older adults found that individuals living alone were the least likely to agree to diagnostic assessment following a positive screening test for dementia.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Showing releases 151-175 out of 3803.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

     
   

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