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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 151-175 out of 3775.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Journal of Oncology Practice
Radiation costs vary among Medicare patients with cancer
Cost of radiation therapy among Medicare patients varied most widely because of factors unrelated to a patient or that person's cancer, report University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers in the Journal of Oncology Practice.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Yadira Galindo
ygalindo@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Journal of Infectious Diseases
Hepatitis C infection may fuel heart risk
People infected with the hepatitis C virus are at risk for liver damage, but the results of a new Johns Hopkins study now show the infection may also spell heart trouble.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epeshev1@jhmi.edu
410-502-9433
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
New combination treatment effective against melanoma skin
In findings never before seen in melanoma, a novel combination therapy was found to be highly effective at treating patients with skin metastases, new research from UC Davis has shown.
Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and National Institutes of Health

Contact: Charles Casey
cecasey@ucdavis.edu
916-734-9048
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Journal of Virology
Research advances potential for test and vaccine for genital and oral herpes
Findings from a pair of new studies could speed up the development of a universally accurate diagnostic test for human herpes simplex viruses, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins and Harvard universities and the National Institutes of Health. The work may also lead to the development of a vaccine that protects against the virus.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Marin Hedin
mhedin2@jhmi.edu
410-502-9429
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Journal of Interpersonal Violence
Behaviors linked to adult crime differ between abused boys and girls, study finds
Troubling behaviors exhibited by abused children can predict later criminal activity, and those indicators differ between boys and girls.
NIH/National Institute of Justice, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Deborah Bach
bach2@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Nature Communications
New clues found to vision loss in macular degeneration?
Scientists have identified a pathway that leads to the formation of atypical blood vessels that can cause blindness in people with age-related macular degeneration. The research, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, sheds light on one of the leading causes of blindness in industrialized countries and offers potential targets for treating the disease.
NIH/National Eye Institute, Carl Marshall Reeves and Mildred Almen Reeves Foundation, Research to Prevent Blindness, International Retina Research Foundation, American Health Assistance Foundation

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
SIV shrugs off antibodies in vaccinated monkeys
Experimental vaccines can protect a majority of monkeys from repeated challenge with SIV. But when the virus does get through, it's not clear whether vaccine-induced antibodies were exerting any pressure on the virus.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Lisa Newbern
lisa.newbern@emory.edu
404-727-7709
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics
C-sections could influence babies' ability to focus
Being delivered through a caesarean section influences at least one form of babies' ability to concentrate. It slows their spatial attention, which plays a role in how well they are able to prioritize and focus on a particular area or object that is of interest. These are the findings of Scott Adler and Audrey Wong-Kee-You of York University in Canada, published in Springer's journal Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, York University Faculty of Health

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
JAMA
Georgia dialysis facility referral rate for kidney transplants is low and variable
Although kidney transplantation is known to be the optimal treatment for most patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), only about one in four patients with ESRD in Georgia was referred by a dialysis facility to a transplant center for evaluation within one year of starting dialysis, according to a new study. In addition, there was substantial variation in the percentage of referrals among dialysis facilities.
NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Contact: Holly Korschun
hkorsch@emory.edu
404-727-3990
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
PLOS Pathogens
Could flu someday be prevented without a vaccine?
Researchers have discovered a way to trigger a preventive response to a flu infection without any help from the usual players -- the virus itself or interferon, a powerful infection fighter. The finding, in both mouse and human cells, suggests that manipulating a natural process could someday be an alternative way to not just reduce the severity of the flu, but prevent infection altogether.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jacob Yount
Yount.37@osu.edu
614-688-1639
Ohio State University

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
PLOS Biology
Dartmouth researcher discovers 'brain signature' that predicts human emotions
A Dartmouth researcher and his colleagues have discovered a way to predict human emotions based on brain activity.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
$10M federal grant to JAX will launch Center for Precision Genetics
A five-year, $9,971,936 grant from the National Institutes of Health will establish a new Center for Precision Genomics at The Jackson Laboratory, a major initiative involving several collaborating institutions, with the goal of finding solutions for life-threatening and genetically complex human diseases through new approaches to developing precision models of disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Joyce Peterson
joyce.peterson@jax.org
207-288-6058
Jackson Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Science Signaling
Researchers identify nerve-guiding protein that aids pancreatic cancer spread
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have identified a molecular partnership in pancreatic cancer cells that might help to explain how the disease spreads -- metastasizes -- in some cases. Their findings reveal urgently needed new targets to treat pancreatic cancer, which strikes nearly 50,000 people in the US each year and has only a 5 percent survival rate five years after diagnosis.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Viragh Foundation, Johns Hopkins/Skip Viragh Pancreatic Cancer Center, Lefkofsky Family Foundation, Lustgarten Foundation

Contact: Amy Mone
amone@jhmi.edu
410-614-2915
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scripps Florida scientists determine how antibiotic gains cancer-killing sulfur atoms
In a discovery with implications for future drug design, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have shown an unprecedented mechanism for how a natural antibiotic with antitumor properties incorporates sulfur into its molecular structure, an essential ingredient of its antitumor activity.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Science
Traitors in our midst: Bacteria use toxins to turn our own bodies against us
Researchers who have revealed a highly efficient way that bacteria use toxins to interrupt the immune response say that until now, the trickery of these toxins has been underappreciated in science.
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, Ohio State University

Contact: Dmitri Kudryashov
Kudryashov.1@osu.edu
614-292-4848
Ohio State University

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Case Western Reserve receives $2.3 million NIH grant to fund nutritious food access study
The National Institutes of Health has awarded $2.3 million to Case Western Reserve to lead a collaborative study of how changes in food options affect residents' nutritional choices and health over time. Called the Future of Food in Your Neighborhood Study (dubbed foodNEST), the three-year study is led by the university's Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods and Center for Reducing Health Disparities.
US Department of Agriculture, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeannette Spalding
Jeannette.Spalding@case.edu
216-368-3004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
KCI/WSU among lead centers in nationwide NCI MATCH trial
The Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, in partnership with Wayne State University School of Medicine, is one of the lead academic centers participating in the National Cancer Institute's MATCH Trial in the United States, set to begin in the next few weeks. Of the more than 2,000 National Cancer Trial Network or NCI Community Oncology Research Program sites participating in the MATCH Trial, only 30 are lead academic centers.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bioengineers identify the key genes and functions for sustaining microbial life
A new study led by bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego defines the core set of genes and functions that a bacterial cell needs to sustain life. The research, which answers the fundamental question of what minimum set of functions bacterial cells require to survive, could lead to new cell engineering approaches for E. coli and other microorganisms, the researchers said.
National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Novo Nordisk Foundation, European Commission's 7th Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Free Radical Biology and Medicine
Receptor that helps protect brain cells has important role in support cells for the retina
A receptor that is already a target for treating neurodegenerative disease also appears to play a key role in supporting the retina, scientists report.
NIH/National Eye Institute, James and Jean Culver Vision Discovery Institute at GRU

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Nature
Atomic-level defense secrets revealed
New research in the current issue of Nature, however, has revealed the molecular secrets of plants' defense mechanisms at the atomic level. The study, led by Michigan State University and Van Andel Research Institute, focuses on the plant hormone jasmonate and its interaction with three key proteins. The findings could help scientists develop dream crops that are better equipped to fend off pests, diseases and future challenges created by fluctuating climate.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, National Institutes of Health, MSU AgBioResearch, Jay and Betty Van Andel Foundation

Contact: Beth Hinshaw Hall
Beth.HinshawHall@vai.org
616-234-5519
Van Andel Research Institute

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Journal of Neurotrauma
Study suggests altered brain development among former NFL players
Former National Football League players who started playing tackle football before the age of 12 were found to have a higher risk of altered brain development compared to those who started playing at a later age. The study is the first to demonstrate a link between early exposure to repetitive head impacts and later life structural brain changes.
National Institutes of Health, JetBlue Airlines, National Football League

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Places with more marijuana dispensaries have more marijuana-related hospitalizations
People who live in areas of California with a higher density of marijuana dispensaries experience a greater number of hospitalizations involving marijuana abuse and dependence, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health analysis discovered.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Allison Hydzik
HydzikAM@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Vaccine
Developing a better flu vaccine
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say they have developed a method that could make a nasal spray flu vaccine effective for those under two and over 49 -- two groups for which the vaccine is not approved.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute on Aging, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, IDSA Young Investigator Award in Geriatrics

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
American Journal of Public Health
Study examines how and why states adopt drunk driving laws
A study by researchers at NYU Steinhardt finds that the severity of drunk driving within a state is not the most important predictor of whether states adopt new laws to restrict drunk driving -- nor is the political makeup of the state government. Instead, the two strongest predictors of states adopting their first drunk driving laws were having a large population of young people and a neighboring state with similar driving laws.
NIH/National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@nyu.edu
212-998-6797
New York University

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Nature Genetics
New computational method predicts genes likely to be causal in disease
A new computational method improves the detection of genes that are likely to be causal for complex diseases and biological traits. The method, PrediXcan, estimates gene expression levels across the whole genome -- a better measure of biological action than single mutations -- and integrates it with genome-wide association study data. PrediXcan has the potential to identify gene targets for therapeutic applications faster and with greater accuracy than traditional methods.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Showing releases 151-175 out of 3775.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

     
   

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