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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 151-175 out of 3518.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Cancer Cell
Human cancer prognosis is related to newly identified immune cell
A newly discovered population of immune cells in tumors is associated with less severe cancer outcomes in humans, and may have therapeutic potential, according to a new UC San Francisco study of 3,600 human tumors of 12 types, as well as mouse experiments.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeffrey Norris
jeffrey.norris@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
New research center to focus on family caregivers of elderly, disabled
The University of Illinois at Chicago has received a five-year, $4.3 million grant from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research and the Administration for Community Living to establish a new, multi-institutional center to study the needs of families caring for people with disabilities.
NIH/National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Administration for Community Living

Contact: Sharon Parmet
sparmet@uic.edu
312-413-2695
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
NYU Langone Medical Center to lead multi-institutional MRSA research funded by the NIH
NYU Langone Medical Center will lead National Institutes of Health funded research to discover the functional immunology and microbial genetics of staphylococcus aureus, one of the most common pathogens leading to life-threatening blood-borne infections.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jim Mandler
jim.mandler@nyumc.org
212-404-3525
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
AIDS and Behavior
Study models ways to cut Mexico's HIV rates
A new study projects that increasing condom use or antiretroviral therapy among Mexico City's male sex workers would produce a significant advance against the nation's HIV epidemic by reducing the rate of infections among the sex workers' partners.
National Institutes of Health, The Mexican National Center for HIV/AIDS Control and Prevention, Brown University

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Genes and Development
Key moment mapped in assembly of DNA-splitting molecular machine
Scientists reveal crucial steps and surprising structures in the genesis of the enzyme that divides the DNA double helix during cell replication.
National Institutes of Health, United Kingdom Medical Research Council

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
American Society of Clinical Oncology
Subsidies help breast cancer patients adhere to hormone therapy
A federal prescription-subsidy program for low-income women on Medicare significantly improved their adherence to hormone therapy to prevent the recurrence of breast cancer after surgery.
American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sharon Parmet
sparmet@uic.edu
312-413-2695
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Analytical Chemistry
Dolphin 'breathalyzer' could help diagnose animal and ocean health
Alcohol consumption isn't the only thing a breath analysis can reveal. Scientists have been studying its possible use for diagnosing a wide range of conditions in humans -- and now in the beloved bottlenose dolphin. In a report in the American Chemical Society journal Analytical Chemistry, one team describes a new instrument that can analyze the metabolites in breath from dolphins, which have been dying in alarming numbers along the Atlantic coast this year.
Office of Naval Research, Hartwell Foundation, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
eLife
Researchers look to exploit females' natural resistance to infection
Researchers have linked increased resistance to bacterial pneumonia in female mice to an enzyme activated by the female sex hormone estrogen.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Jennifer Mitchell
j.mitchell@elifesciences.org
44-012-238-55373
eLife

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
eLife
Scientists 'must not become complacent' when assessing pandemic threat from flu viruses
As our ability to assess the pandemic risk from strains of influenza virus increases with the latest scientific developments, we must not allow ourselves to become complacent that the most substantial threats have been identified, argue an international consortium of scientists.
DHS/Research and Policy for Infectious Disease Dynamics, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Craig Brierley
craig.brierley@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-66205
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Nature
UNC researchers boost the heart's natural ability to recover after heart attack
UNC researchers discovered that fibroblasts, which normally give rise to scar tissue after a heart attack, can be turned into endothelial cells, which generate blood vessels to supply oxygen and nutrients to the injured regions of the heart, greatly reducing the damage done following heart attack.
American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unchealth.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Psychological Science
Teens' science interest linked with knowledge, but only in wealthier nations
It seems logical that a student who is interested in science as an academic subject would also know a lot about science, but new findings show that this link depends on the overall wealth of the country that the teen calls home. The research suggests that individual science achievement may be influenced as much by broad national-level resources as it is by personal interest and motivation.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
JAMA Dermatology
Uncontrolled hypertension highest among patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis
Patients with moderate and severe psoriasis have the greatest likelihood of uncontrolled hypertension compared to patients without psoriasis.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Contact: Katie Delach
katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5964
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Nature
Discovery of heart's repair process suggests new treatment strategy for heart attack
UCLA researchers have discovered that some scar-forming cells in the heart have the ability to become cells that form blood vessels. The early finding in mice could point the way toward a new strategy for treating people who have suffered a heart attack, because increasing the number of blood vessels in the heart boosts its ability to heal after injury.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rachel Champeau
rchampeau@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2270
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
JAMA Dermatology
Penn Medicine researchers zero in on psoriasis-hypertension link
Patients with more severe psoriasis are also more likely to have uncontrolled hypertension, according to new research by a team at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Through a cross-sectional study using information collected from a medical records database, the results provide further evidence of a strong link between psoriasis and hypertension. Full results are now available in JAMA Dermatology.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Contact: Katie Delach
katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5964
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Cancer Research
Two-faced gene: SIRT6 prevents some cancers but promotes sun-induced skin cancer
SIRT6 -- a protein that inhibits the growth of liver and colon cancers -- can promote the development of skin cancers by turning on an enzyme that increases inflammation, proliferation and survival of sun-damaged skin cells. This suggests that SIRT6 could provide a useful target for cancer prevention.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, University of Chicago Cancer Research Center

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Personalized cellular therapy achieves complete remission in 90 percent of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients studied
Ninety percent of children and adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who had relapsed multiple times or failed to respond to standard therapies went into remission after receiving an investigational personalized cellular therapy, CTL019, developed at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The results are published this week in The New England Journal of Medicine.
National Institutes of Health, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Stand Up To Cancer-St. Baldrick's Pediatric Dream Team Translational Research Grant

Contact: Holly Auer
holly.auer@uphs.upenn.edu
215-200-2313
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Cancer Research
Prostate cancer's penchant for copper may be a fatal flaw
Like discriminating thieves, prostate cancer tumors scavenge and hoard copper that is an essential element in the body. But such avarice may be a fatal weakness.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Genome Biology
House fly genome reveals expanded immune system
Scientists have sequenced the house fly genome for the first time, revealing robust immune genes, as one might expect from an insect that thrives in pathogen-rich dung piles and garbage heaps. The research, published Oct. 14 in the journal Genome Biology, will increase understanding of house fly genetics and biology and of how flies quickly adapt to resist insecticides, which could lead to novel control methods.
National Institutes of Health, Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station's USDA Hatch funds

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
vpk6@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Biological Psychiatry
Orphanage care linked to thinner brain tissue in regions related to ADHD
Psychological studies of children who began life in Romanian orphanages shows that institutionalization is linked to physical changes in brain structure in areas related to working memory and attention.
John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Hannah Hickey
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Scripps Research Institute team receives $6.6 million to investigate deadly Lassa virus
Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded $6.6 million from the National Institutes of Health to lead an investigation of Lassa fever virus, the most prevalent virus-induced hemorrhagic fever disease in Africa. The study aims to understand how Lassa fever virus causes disease and why some patients die, while others survive the inflection.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Stem Cell Reports
Stem cell discovery challenges dogma on how fetus develops; holds insights for liver cancer and reg
A Mount Sinai-led research team has discovered a new kind of stem cell that can become either a liver cell or a cell that lines liver blood vessels, according to a study published today in the journal Stem Cell Reports.
Black Family Stem Cell Institute, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Greg Williams
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
The neuroscience of holding it
Scientists are surprised to find an involuntary link in the brain between the pelvic floor and other muscles.
NIH/National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, USC Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, Loma Linda University Physical Therapy Department

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Protein found in insect blood that helps power pests' immune responses
By studying a protein called beta-1,3-glucan recognition protein in the blood of a caterpillar, researchers have found a genetic mechanism that may help trigger an insect's immune system into killing pathogens in the insect's blood.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michael Kanost
kanost@k-state.edu
785-532-6964
Kansas State University

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
eLife
Researchers identify potential drug that could help treat cystic fibrosis
By screening over 2,000 approved drugs and natural products, scientists have shown that tannic acid may help ease the impact of bacterial lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Tests completed using experimentally modified frog oocytes show that tannic acid counteracts the harmful effect of an enzyme produced by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). However, more research is needed to find out if tannic acid can help treat S. aureus infections in humans.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Jennifer Mitchell
j.mitchell@elifesciences.org
44-012-238-55373
eLife

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Sexual Medicine
Side effects of cancer prevention surgery can be helped with education program
More women are having ovary-removing surgery as a cancer prevention measure, but many are often unaware of sexual or psychological side effects of the procedure. A new study by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute shows a half-day educational program can help successfully deal with these issues by educating women on how to address them.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Showing releases 151-175 out of 3518.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

     
   

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