NIH Director Page NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIH Social Media and Outreach
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Videos
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 176-200 out of 3603.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2015
Motorized cycling may prime brain for relearning after stroke
Exercise on a motorized stationary bike appeared to give stroke patients an advantage in relearning everyday tasks and improving motor function of their arms. A motorized bike helps patients with limited mobility pedal and achieve a target aerobic heart rate.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Contact: Carrie Thacker
carrie.thacker@heart.org
214-706-1665
American Heart Association

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2015
Dehydration linked to worsening stroke conditions
Patients who are dehydrated and suffer a stroke have worse short-term outcomes than those patients who are well-hydrated at the time of their stroke. Dehydrated patients had nearly a four times higher risk of worsening compared to patients who were adequately hydrated at the time of their stroke. Being well hydrated at the time of a stroke is associated with better outcomes.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Carrie Thacker
carrie.thacker@heart.org
214-706-1665
American Heart Association

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Unlikely pairing -- an antidepressant plus dye -- yields tumor-targeting tool
Scientists stitched together two unrelated molecules to create a drug that targets and suppresses prostate tumors in mice.
Daniel Tsai Family Fund, US Department of Defense, Boyd and Elise Welin Professorship, NIH/National Cancer Center Institute, Board of Governors Endowed Cancer Chair, Margaret E. Early Medical Research Trust Award

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Study: Young adult survivors most distressed after leukemia and lymphoma treatment
45 percent of young adult leukemia and lymphoma survivors report moderate-to-high distress, whereas only 18 percent of older patients report similarly elevated levels.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Diabetes drug spurs host defense
Pioglitazone, a medication approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes, can help bypass genetic defects in chronic granulomatous disease to help white blood cells fight bacterial infections, according to researchers at National Jewish Health.
National Institutes of Health, The Chronic Granulomatous Disorder Society

Contact: William Allstetter
allstetterw@njhealth.org
303-398-1002
National Jewish Health

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Journal of Neuroscience
Epilepsy drug could aid stroke victims
An epilepsy drug also protects the brain against the effects of ischemic stroke, scientists from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio reported.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Transcriptomics identifies genes and signaling pathways that may regulate neurodegeneration
Neuronal death is a normal feature of brain development but also a defining feature of neurodegenerative diseases when improperly regulated. Results of a detailed and comprehensive analysis of transcriptome expression alterations during neuronal death have been reported. A large number of genes previously not linked to neuronal death were identified in the study. Although further functional analyses are needed, some of these genes may be important players in the regulation of neuronal death and represent potential targets for the development of novel therapies.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Dr. Santosh R. D'Mello
sdmello@smu.edu
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Ophthalmology
With generic drugs, eye patients are more likely to take medicine as directed
When patients with glaucoma switched from a brand name drug to its generic counterpart, they were more likely to take their medication as directed compared to those who remained on the brand name drug, according to a new study.
NIH/National Eye Institute, Research to Prevent Blindness

Contact: Betsy Nisbet
bsnisbet@umich.edu
734-647-5586
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
UH team works to help patients with Down syndrome see better
New computer-simulated prescribing strategies for glasses may improve the vision of individuals with Down syndrome, thanks to a team of University of Houston College of Optometry researchers who received a $1.67 million grant from the National Eye Institute.
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Molecular Psychiatry
International study finds meth messes up brains of youths far more than those of adults
In a study with chronic adolescent and adult meth abusers in South Korea, MRI brain scans showed decreased thickness in the gray matter of younger users' frontal cortex, the area of the brain believed to direct people's ability to organize, reason and remember things, known as the executive function.
NIH/National Institute of Drug Addiction

Contact: Phil Sahm
phil.sahm@hsc.utah.edu
801-581-2517
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Protein controls both alcohol craving and organ damage
A University of Iowa study in mice shows that disrupting one protein can simultaneously curb alcohol cravings and protect the heart and liver from alcohol-induced damage. The findings suggest that the RGS6 protein may be a useful drug target both for treating alcoholism and reducing the organ damage caused by chronic alcohol consumption.
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association

Contact: Jennifer Brown
jennifer-l-brown@uiowa.edu
319-356-7124
University of Iowa Health Care

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
IU researcher identifies novel pathway that solid tumor cancer cells activate for growth
A common, yet previously undistinguished protein, which is elevated in many late-stage cancers, may play a strategic role in tumor growth through a non-conventional pathway, researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine report.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Riley Children's Foundation

Contact: Mary Hardin
mhardin@iu.edu
317-274-5456
Indiana University

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
One-two punch catches cancer cells in vulnerable state
Timing may be decisive when it comes to overcoming cancer's ability to evade treatment. By hitting breast cancer cells with a targeted therapeutic immediately after chemotherapy, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital were able to target cancer cells during a transitional stage when they were most vulnerable, killing cells and shrinking tumors in the lab and in pre-clinical models. The team reports its findings in Nature Communications on Feb. 11.
US Department of Defense, National Institutes of Health, American Lung Association, Indo-US Science and Technology Forum, American Cancer Society

Contact: Haley Bridger
hbridger@partners.org
617-525-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
PLOS Genetics
R2d2 beats Mendel: Scientists find selfish gene that breaks long-held law of inheritance
UNC School of Medicine researchers discovered a gene called R2d2 -- Responder to meiotic drive 2 -- that breaks Gregor Mendel's century-old 'law of segregation,' which states that you have an equal probability of inheriting each of two copies of every gene from both parents.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unch.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
PLOS ONE
UCI, Italian scientists limit accelerated cellular aging caused by methamphetamine use
The ravaged faces of methamphetamine addicts tell a terrible tale -- abusing the drug dramatically accelerates aging. Now scientists from UC Irvine and the Italian Institute of Technology have discovered how this occurs at the cellular level and identified methods to limit the process.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-285-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2015
Lower systolic blood pressure reduces risk of stroke
Keeping the top blood pressure number below 140 mm Hg is linked to a lower risk of stroke for people older than 60 who do not have diabetes or chronic kidney disease. The study challenges a report published in JAMA in 2014 that recommends the systolic blood pressure target be raised from 140 mm Hg to 150 mm Hg in treating these patients. The lower threshold may be especially important in minimizing stroke risk for Hispanics, blacks and women.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Karen Astle
karen.astle@heart.org
214-706-1396
American Heart Association

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Child Development
Elementary teachers' depression symptoms related to students' learning
A new study has found that teachers who report having more symptoms of depression had classrooms that were of lesser quality, and that students in these classrooms had fewer performance gains. Researchers looked at 27 teachers and their 523 third-grade students in a Florida school district. Teachers reported the frequency of their symptoms of clinical depression, and students' basic reading and math skills were assessed throughout the year.
US Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
ACS Chemical Biology
Einstein scientists develop novel technique for finding drugs to combat malaria
Each year nearly 600,000 people -- mostly children under age five and pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa -- die from malaria, caused by single-celled parasites that grow inside red blood cells. The most deadly malarial species -- Plasmodium falciparum -- has proven notoriously resistant to treatment efforts. A novel approach developed by scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, researchers can readily screen thousands of drugs to find those potentially able to kill P. falciparum.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Deirdre Branley
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Gut
Unwanted impact of antibiotics broader, more complex than previously known
Researchers have discovered that antibiotics have an unwanted impact on the microorganisms that live in an animal's gut that's more broad and complex than previously known. A study has helped to explain these processes, which are now believed to affect everything from the immune system to glucose metabolism, food absorption, obesity, stress and behavior.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andrey Morgun
andriy.morgun@oregonstsate.edu
541-737-8047
Oregon State University

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
UTSW receives key NCI funding to plan first US Center for Heavy Ion Radiation Therapy Research
The National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health awarded UT Southwestern a $1 million planning grant to establish the country's first National Center for Heavy Ion Radiation Therapy.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Lori Soderbergh
lori.soderbergh@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
EMBO Molecular Medicine
TSRI scientists find new cellular pathway defect in cystinosis
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified a new cellular pathway that is affected in cystinosis, a rare genetic disorder that can result in eye and kidney damage. The findings could eventually lead to new drug treatments for reducing or preventing the onset of renal failure in patients.
Cystinosis Research Foundation, US Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Developmental Cell
Epigenetic breakthrough: A first of its kind tool to study the histone code
University of North Carolina scientists have created a new research tool, based on the fruit fly, to help crack the histone code. This research tool can be used to better understand the function of histone proteins, which play critical roles in the regulation of gene expression in animals and plants.
National Institutes of Health, University of North Carolina

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unchealth.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Temple researchers receive $7.4 million grant to explore brain impairment in HIV patients
Researchers at Temple University School of Medicine have been awarded a $7.4 million, five-year grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to determine how cocaine and HIV-1 interact to cause brain impairment in patients infected with HIV. Kamel Khalili, Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Neuroscience and Director of Temple's Comprehensive NeuroAIDS Center, will lead a team examining how cocaine worsens the neurological deficits that can plague HIV patients as they age.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jeremy Walter
Jeremy.Walter@tuhs.temple.edu
215-707-7882
Temple University Health System

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Journal of Neuroscience
Dartmouth study shows brain area involved in eye movements, heading
An area of the brain involved in eye movements also plays an important role in establishing our direction and navigating our environment, a Dartmouth College study finds.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Environmental Health Perspectives
Exposure to mercury, seafood associated with risk factor for autoimmune disease
Mercury in seafood -- even at low levels generally considered safe -- was associated with autoimmunity.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Beata Mostafavi
bmostafa@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Showing releases 176-200 out of 3603.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2015 by AAAS, the science society.