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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 176-200 out of 3609.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Epidemics
Urging HPV vaccine for boys could protect more people at same price
Whether vaccinating US boys against HPV in addition to girls is worth the cost has been hotly debated. But with HPV-related cancers in men on the rise, and coverage in girls stagnating below the levels needed to ensure that most people are protected, research suggests that devoting a portion of HPV funding to boys -- rather than merely attempting to improve female coverage -- may protect more people for the same price.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Duke University

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Contraception
Religion and support for birth control health coverage can mix
Religious affiliation doesn't necessarily predict a woman's views on reproductive health care policies like contraceptive coverage.
Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, Department of Veterans Affairs, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Program on Women's Health Care Effectiveness Research

Contact: Beata Mostafavi
bmostafa@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Nature
Length matters
Mutations in the MECP2 gene are the cause of the devastating childhood neurological disorder Rett Syndrome. Despite intense efforts spanning several decades the precise function of MECP2 has been difficult to pin down. Research primarily funded by the Rett Syndrome Research Trust and NINDS, and published today in Nature reveals important information that could lead to new treatment approaches. The study, led by Michael Greenberg, Ph.D., Chairman of the Department of Neurobiology at Harvard University, shows that MECP2 dampens the expression of long genes.
Rett Syndrome Research Trust, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, William Randolph Hearst, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and others

Contact: Monica Coenraads
monica@rsrt.org
203-445-0041
Rett Syndrome Research Trust

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Cell Host & Microbe
Swine flu outbreak in India raises concern
An MIT study finds evidence that a new strain of H1N1 may carry dangerous mutations.
National Institutes of Health, National Research Foundation through the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology, Skolkovo Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Cell Host & Microbe
Scripps Research Institute study shows 2 new flu strains do not yet easily infect humans
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have analyzed a key protein from two influenza strains that recently began causing sporadic infections among people in China and Taiwan. The analyses suggest that the flu viruses, variants of subtypes H10N8 and H6N1, have not acquired changes that would allow them to infect people easily and cause a much-feared pandemic.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Cancer Prevention Research
Naproxen plus acid-blocking drug shows promise in preventing bladder cancer
Researchers used the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole, a commonly used acid inhibitor, in combination with naproxen and found it was effective at preventing bladder cancer in an animal model.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
NYU scientists develop computer model explaining how brain learns to categorize
NYU researchers have devised a computer model to explain how a neural circuit learns to classify sensory stimuli into discrete categories, such as 'car vs. motorcycle.' Their findings shed new light on the brain processes underpinning judgments we make on a daily basis.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, The Swartz Foundation

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
American Journal of Transplantation
Study shows even injured kidneys can be used for transplants
Kidneys from deceased donors that have acute injuries are frequently discarded instead of being used for transplant. However, a Yale-led study finds that such kidneys may be more viable than previously thought, and should be considered to meet the growing demand for organ transplants.
American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ziba Kashef
ziba.kashef@yale.edu
203-436-9317
Yale University

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Nature
Scientists use X-ray vision to probe early stages of DNA 'photocopying'
Scientists have created a 3-D model of a complex protein machine, ORC, which helps prepare DNA to be duplicated. Like an image of a criminal suspect, the intricate model of ORC has helped build a 'profile' of the activities of this crucial protein. But the new information has uncovered another mystery: ORC's structure reveals that it is not always 'on' as was previously thought, and no one knows how it turns on and off.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Cancer Institute, University of California -- Berkeley, Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
PLOS ONE
Molecules in prostate tumors might predict whether RT can help prevent recurrence
A new study has identified a group of molecules in prostate-cancer cells that doctors might one day use to distinguish which patients should be treated with radiation therapy if rising PSA levels indicate their cancer has recurred after surgical removal of the prostate.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Nature
'Quantum jitters' could form basis of evolution, cancer
Duke researchers have discovered 'quantum jitters,' in which DNA's four basic building blocks temporarily change shapes, fooling DNA-replication machinery into making a copying mistake. This shape-shifting is exceedingly rare and only flickers into existence for a thousandth of a second. But these jitters occur with the same frequency as DNA copying mistakes, a hint that this might be the basis of the genetic mutations that drive evolution and diseases like cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Agilent Thought Leader Award

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Nature
Tetanus shot improves patient survival with brain tumor immunotherapy
An innovative approach using a tetanus booster to prime the immune system enhances the effect of a vaccine therapy for lethal brain tumors, dramatically improving patient survival, according to a study led by Duke Cancer Institute researchers.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
Clinical trial sponsors fail to report results to participants, public
Despite legal and ethical mandates for disclosure, results from most clinical trials of medical products are not reported promptly on a registry specifically created to make results of human studies publicly available, according to Duke Medicine researchers.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology
Telemedicine allows UTHealth to enroll patients remotely into acute stroke trial
For the first time in the world, researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston were able to enroll patients at other hospitals into an acute stroke clinical trial.
Lone Star Consortium, UTHealth Center for Clinical and Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health Clinical and Translational Award

Contact: Deborah Lake
deborah.m.lake@uth.tmc.edu
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
Cancer Cell
Study explains control of cell metabolism in patient response to breast cancer drugs
Researchers identify a control mechanism for glutamine uptake in breast cancer cells and its importance for response to select chemotherapies.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Susan Gammon
sgammon@sanfordburnham.org
858-795-5012
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
World Obesity
More weight-loss strategies needed for people with neurological disabilities
A review of nutrition and weight-loss interventions for people with impaired mobility found strategies are sorely lacking for people with neurological disabilities, according to a team of researchers from Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Clinic.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
Science Translational Medicine
An injectable UW polymer could keep soldiers, trauma patients from bleeding to death
University of Washington researchers have developed a new injectable polymer that strengthens blood clots, called PolySTAT. Administered in a simple shot, the polymer can seek out unseen or internal injuries and potentially help trauma patients survive long enough to reach medical care.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jennifer Langston
jlangst@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Disease poses risk to chimpanzee conservation, Gombe study finds
Infectious disease spillover, including from humans to animals, poses risk to the chimpanzees of Gombe Stream National Park, where Jane Goodall began her pioneering behavioral research in 1960.
Morris Animal Foundation, Emory University Global Health Institute, The Arcus Foundation, The Leo Guthman Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Carol Clark
carol.clark@emory.edu
404-727-0501
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
JAMA
Stopping the revolving door: Sepsis survivors return to hospital for preventable reasons
They're alive thanks to the most advanced care modern hospitals can provide. But for survivors of sepsis, the hospital door often looks like a revolving one, a new study shows. And many of the conditions that send them back to a hospital bed should be preventable.
National Institutes of Health, Veterans Affairs Health Service Research and Development Service

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics
Clinical trial suggests combination therapy is best for low-grade brain tumors
New clinical-trial findings provide further evidence that combining chemotherapy with radiation therapy is the best treatment for people with a low-grade form of brain cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
eLife
Scientists show proteins critical in day-night cycles also protect cells from mutations
New research from The Scripps Research Institute shows that two proteins critical for maintaining healthy day-night cycles also protect against mutations that could lead to cancer. The new study shows that the two proteins have an unexpected role in DNA repair, possibly protecting cells from cancer-causing mutations triggered by UV radiation.
Searle Scholars Fund, Sidney Kimmel Foundation for Cancer Research, Lung Cancer Research Foundation, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
Immunity
Keck School of Medicine of USC scientists open door for asthma cure
Scientists led by molecular immunologists at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California have identified a way to target a recently discovered cell type that causes asthma, paving the way to cure the chronic respiratory disease that affects 25 million Americans.
National Institutes of Health, American Association of Immunology

Contact: Alison Trinidad
alison.trinidad@usc.edu
323-442-3941
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes
'Perfect storm' of stress, depression may raise risk of death, heart attack for heart patients
High stress and deep depression among heart patients may up the risk of death or heart attack by 48 percent. The findings validate the concept of a 'psychosocial perfect storm' for heart patients. Researchers say behavioral interventions may be needed to help heart patients manage both stress and depression.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Bridgette McNeill
Bridgette.mcneill@heart.org
214-706-1135
American Heart Association

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
Molecular Psychiatry
Gene networks for innate immunity linked to PTSD risk
Researchers at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System and University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in New York and the United Kingdom, have identified genetic markers, derived from blood samples that are linked to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The markers are associated with gene networks that regulate innate immune function and interferon signaling.
Naval Medical Research Center, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Gerber Foundation, Sidney R. Baer, Jr. Foundation, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
Journal of Neuroscience
Bioelectricity plays key role in brain development and repair
Embryonic cells communicate, even across long distances, using bioelectrical signals, and they use this information to know where to form a brain and how big that brain should be. These signals are more than an on/off switch; rather they function like software that enables a computer to carry out complex activities. Manipulating these signals can repair genetic defects and induce development of healthy brain tissue where it would not ordinarily grow.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, G. Harold and Leila Y. Mathers Charitable Foundation

Contact: Kim Thurler
kim.thurler@tufts.edu
617-627-3175
Tufts University

Showing releases 176-200 out of 3609.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

     
   

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