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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 176-200 out of 3424.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Oncotarget
Mayo Clinic researchers reveal treasure trove of genes key to kidney cancer
A genomic analysis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma, the most common form of kidney cancer, from 72 patients has uncovered 31 genes that are key to development, growth and spread of the cancer, say researchers from Mayo Clinic in Florida.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Kevin Punsky
904-953-0746
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
UCLA awarded $7 million to unravel mystery genetic diseases
The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA is one of six institutions nationwide chosen by the National Institutes of Health to join their effort in tackling the most difficult-to-solve medical cases and develop ways to diagnose rare genetic disorders.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Elaine Schmidt
eschmidt@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2272
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Medicare-backed breast cancer screenings skyrocket, but do patients benefit?
Breast cancer screening costs for Medicare patients skyrocketed between 2001 and 2009, but the increase did not lead to earlier detection of new breast cancer cases, according to a study published by Yale School of Medicine researchers in the July 1 Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, P30 Cancer Center Support Grant

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Clinical Cancer Research
New approach identifies cancer mutations as targets of effective melanoma immunotherapy
A new approach demonstrated that the recognition of unique cancer mutations appeared to be responsible for complete cancer regressions in two metastatic melanoma patients treated with a type of immunotherapy called adoptive T-cell therapy. This new approach may help develop more effective cancer immunotherapies, according to a study published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Adelson Medical Research Foundation, Milstein Family Foundation, European Research Council

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Research team pursues techniques to improve elusive stem cell therapy
Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Boston Children's Hospital recently found that transplanting mesenchymal stem cells along with blood vessel-forming cells naturally found in circulation improves transplantation results. The finding was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Joseph Caputo
joseph_caputo@harvard.edu
617-496-1491
Harvard University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Nature Methods
Using geometry, researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to organize themselves
By confining colonies of human embryonic stem cells to tiny circular patterns on glass plates, researchers have for the first time coaxed them into organizing themselves just as they would under natural conditions.
New York Stem Cell Foundation, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Human Frontier Science Program

Contact: Zach Veilleux
zveilleux@rockefeller.edu
212-327-8982
Rockefeller University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Circulation
Adults can undo heart disease risk
The heart is more forgiving than you may think -- especially to adults who try to take charge of their health, a new Northwestern Medicine study has found. When adults in their 30s and 40s decide to drop unhealthy habits that are harmful to their heart and embrace healthy lifestyle changes, they can control and potentially even reverse the natural progression of coronary artery disease, scientists found.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Erin White
ewhite@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
First pediatric autism study conducted entirely online
UC San Francisco researchers have completed the first Internet-based clinical trial for children with autism, establishing it as a viable and cost effective method of conducting high-quality and rapid clinical trials in this population.
Simons Foundation, NIH/National Center for Research Resources, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Juliana Bunim
juliana.bunim@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Nature Genetics
Studies provide important new information on genetic risk of sudden cardiac death
Two international research studies, both led by investigators affiliated with Massachusetts General Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, have uncovered new information about genes that may increase the risk of serious cardiac arrhythmias.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sue McGreevey
smcgreevey@partners.org
617-724-2764
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
New research study shows huge savings for health care
Recently published findings in Annals of Internal Medicine by Steven Lipshultz, M.D., Wayne State University professor and chair of pediatrics and pediatrician-in-chief at the Children's Hospital of Michigan, part of the Detroit Medical Center, and colleagues could help to reduce health care charges while also protecting childhood cancer survivors from heart ailments caused by drug therapy.
Lance Armstrong Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Evolutionary Biology
In human evolution, changes in skin's barrier set Northern Europeans apart
The popular idea that Northern Europeans developed light skin to absorb more UV light so they could make more vitamin D -- vital for healthy bones and immune function -- is questioned by UC San Francisco researchers in a new study published online in the journal Evolutionary Biology.
San Francisco VA Medical Center, US Department of Defense, National Institutes of Health, Lundbeck Foundation

Contact: Peter Farley
peter.farley@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Neuron
Potential drug target for PTSD prevention
Scientists have identified a drug that appears to make memories of fearsome events less durable in mice. The finding may accelerate the development of treatments for preventing PTSD. The drug, called osanetant, targets a distinct group of brain cells in a region of the brain that controls the formation and consolidation of fear memories.
National Institute of Mental Health, Burroughs Wellcome, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Insulin, other drugs may do more harm than good for some type 2 diabetes patients
Many patients with type 2 diabetes may be overtreated with insulin and other glucose-lowering drugs.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Veterans Affairs, Quality Enhancement Research Initiative

Contact: Beata Mostafavi
bmostafa@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
BMC study: Treat patients with addiction during, after hospitalization
The results of a new study demonstrate that starting hospitalized patients who have an opioid addiction on buprenorphine treatment in the hospital and seamlessly connecting them with an outpatient office based treatment program can greatly reduce whether they relapse after they are discharged.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
HIV-positive people with early-stage cancer up to 4 times more likely to go untreated for cancer
HIV-infected people diagnosed with cancer are two to four times more likely to go untreated for their cancer compared to uninfected cancer patients, according to a new, large retrospective study from researchers in Penn Medicine's Abramson Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute published online ahead of print in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists engineer nanoparticles to prevent bone cancer, strengthen bones
A research collaboration between Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has utilized nanomedicine technologies to develop a drug-delivery system that can precisely target and attack cancer cells in the bone, as well as increase bone strength and volume to prevent bone cancer progression.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-534-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Clot-building nanoparticles raise survival rate following blast trauma
In preclinical tests led by a Case Western Reserve University researcher, artificial platelets, called 'hemostatic nanoparticles,' when injected after blast trauma increased survival rates to 95 percent from 60 percent, and showed no signs of interfering with healing or causing other complications weeks afterward.
US Department of Defense, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-368-4442
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
It may take guts to cure diabetes
By switching off a single gene, scientists at Columbia University's Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center have converted human gastrointestinal cells into insulin-producing cells, demonstrating in principle that a drug could retrain cells inside a person's GI tract to produce insulin. The new research was reported today in the online issue of the journal Nature Communications.
National Institutes of Health, Manpei Suzuki Diabetes Foundation, Swedish Society for Medical Research

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@cumc.columbia.edu
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 29-Jun-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Noninvasive brain control
MIT engineers have now developed the first light-sensitive molecule that enables neurons to be silenced noninvasively, using a light source outside the skull.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Human Frontiers Science Program, IET A. F. Harvey Prize, MIT McGovern Institute, New York Stem Cell Foundation, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Wallace H. Coulter Foundation, others

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 29-Jun-2014
Nature Medicine
Massachusetts General-developed protocol could greatly extend preservation of donor livers
A system developed by investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine allowed successful transplantation of rat livers after preservation for as long as four days, more than tripling the length of time organs currently can be preserved.
National Institutes of Health, Shriners Hospitals for Children

Contact: Cassandra Aviles
cmaviles@partners.org
617-724-6433
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 29-Jun-2014
Nature Chemical Biology
Marine bacteria are natural source of chemical fire retardants
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a widely distributed group of marine bacteria that produce compounds nearly identical to toxic man-made fire retardants.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 29-Jun-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Watching individual neurons respond to magnetic therapy
Duke researchers have developed a method to record an individual neuron's response to transcranial magnetic stimulation therapy. The advance will help researchers understand the underlying physiological effects of TMS -- a procedure used to treat psychiatric disorders -- and optimize its use as a therapeutic treatment.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Ken Kingery
ken.kingery@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

Public Release: 29-Jun-2014
Nature Genetics
A single gene separates aggressive and non-aggressive lymphatic system cancer
For a rare form of cancer called thymoma, researchers have discovered a single gene defining the difference between a fast-growing tumor requiring aggressive treatment and a slow-growing tumor that doesn't require extensive therapy.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Herpes virus infection drives HIV infection among non-injecting drug users in New York
The study conducted among drug users entering the Mount Sinai Beth Israel drug treatment programs in NYC found that HIV infection among non-injecting drug users doubled over the last two decades.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Potential Alzheimer's drug prevents abnormal blood clots in the brain
The brains of Alzheimer's mice treated with the compound RU-505 showed less inflammation and improved blood flow than those of untreated mice. The treated mice also performed better on memory tests.
National Institutes of Health, Thome Memorial Medical Foundation, Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation, Woodbourne Foundation, and others

Contact: Zach Veilleux
zveilleux@rockefeller.edu
212-327-8982
Rockefeller University

Showing releases 176-200 out of 3424.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

     
   

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