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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 176-200 out of 3759.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Dengue mosquitoes hitch rides on Amazon river boats
The urban mosquito that carries the dengue fever virus is expanding its range by hitching rides on river boats connecting the Amazonian town of Iquitos, Peru, with rural areas.
National Institutes of Health, Achievement Rewards for College Students Global Health Impact Award, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Carol Clark
carol.clark@emory.edu
404-727-0501
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Nutrition Reviews
Nut consumption associated with reduced risk of some types of cancer
Nut consumption has long been hypothesized to have a role in preventing both of these diseases, but until now evidence has been inconsistent. A new systematic review and meta-analysis published in Nutrition Reviews on June 16 shows that nut consumption is, indeed, associated with a decreased risk of certain types of cancer, but not type 2 diabetes.
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: Molly Grote
molly.grote@oup.com
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
New target may increase odds of successful mosquito-based malaria vaccine
Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have located a new -- and likely more promising, they say -- target for a potential vaccine against malaria, a mosquito-borne illness that kills as many as 750,000 people each year.
Bloomberg Family Foundation, PATH-Malaria Vaccine Initiative, NIH/National Center for Research Resources

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Translational Psychiatry
Early behavior problems may be linked to 'aging' biomarkers in preschoolers
Preschoolers with oppositional defiant behavior are more likely to have shorter telomeres, a hallmark of cellular aging, which in adults is associated with increased risk for chronic diseases and conditions like diabetes, obesity and cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Hellman Family Foundation, Robert Wood Johnson, NASPGHAN Foundation, UCSF CTSI-SOS Award

Contact: Suzanne Leigh
suzanne.leigh@uscf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
TGen and Phoenix Children's Hospital research new ways to store, transport blood samples
The Translational Genomics Research Institute and Phoenix Children's Hospital are developing new economical methods of preserving, storing and transporting high-quality blood plasma proteins for use in diagnosing and treating disease. Under a $698,502 three-year grant from the National Institutes of Health, the Phoenix Children's Hospital Biorepository and TGen's Proteomics Division are using special filter papers to devise a test that is highly accurate, yet simple enough that patients could provide their own blood samples from home.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Journal of Neuroscience
Redrawing the brain's motor map
Neuroscientists at Emory have refined a map showing which parts of the brain are activated during head rotation, resolving a decades-old puzzle. Their findings may help in the study of movement disorders affecting the head and neck.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Office of Rare Diseases Research

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Journals of Gerontology: Medical Sciences
Existing drug used in transplants causes older rats to lose weight
Aging can cause many changes to the body, including obesity and a loss of lean mass. Now, a group of University of Florida Health researchers has discovered that an existing drug reduces body fat and appetite in older rats, which has intriguing implications for aging humans.
National Institutes of Health, Medical Research Service of the Department of Veterans Affairs

Contact: Doug Bennett
dougbennett@ufl.edu
352-273-5706
University of Florida

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Nature Chemical Biology
Researchers discover new enzyme, link to iron in vitamin A synthesis
A research team's discovery of new information about how plants synthesize carotenoids, precursors for vitamin A that are essential for plant development and survival, and human health, could help scientists increase the levels of provitamin A in food crops and reduce global vitamin A deficiency.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: LaTina Emerson
lemerson1@gsu.edu
404-413-1353
Georgia State University

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Nature Medicine
'Crosstalk' gives clues to diabetes
Sometimes, listening in on a conversation can tell you a lot. UC Davis diabetes researcher Mark Huising is listening in on crosstalk between the cells that control the body's response to sugar, helping us to understand, and perhaps ultimately treat, diabetes.
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Clayton Medical Research Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
BMJ Open
Researchers correlate rheumatoid arthritis and giant cell arteritis with solar cycles
A rare collaboration of physicists and medical researchers finds a correlation between rheumatoid arthritis and giant cell arteritis and solar cycles.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Mutation in zinc transport protein may inhibit successful breastfeeding
Zinc plays an important role in a woman's ability to successfully breastfeed her child, according to health researchers.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Victoria M. Indivero
vmi1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Journal of Marriage and Family
Love and money: How low-income dads really provide
Low-income fathers who might be labeled 'deadbeat dads' often spend as much on their children as parents in formal child-support arrangements, but they choose to give goods like food and clothing rather than cash.
Russell Sage Foundation, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Jill Rosen
jrosen@jhu.edu
443-997-9906
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Journal of Investigative Dermatology
Temple researchers look into the brains of chronic itch patients
Researchers at Temple University School of Medicine may be closer to understanding why scratching evokes a rewarding and pleasurable sensation in patients with chronic itch. Using advanced fMRI, they looked at brain activity while chronic itch patients and healthy subjects scratched. They found areas of the brain involved in motor control and reward processing were more activated in chronic itch patients while they scratched. This may help explain the addictive scratching experienced by these patients.
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Contact: Jeremy Walter
Jeremy.Walter@tuhs.temple.edu
267-838-0398
Temple University Health System

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Patent awarded to Kansas State University preclinical cancer detection test platform
A US patent has been awarded to a Kansas State University technology that quickly detects the early stages of cancer before physical symptoms ever appear. Results are produced in about 30 minutes and the technology has a 95 percent success rate at detecting cancer at stage one and beyond.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Johnson Cancer Research Center at Kansas State University

Contact: Stefan Bossmann
sbossman@k-state.edu
785-532-6817
Kansas State University

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Journal of Gerontology
Existing drug used in transplants causes older rats to lose weight
Aging can cause many changes to the body, including obesity and a loss of lean mass. Now, a group of University of Florida Health researchers has discovered that an existing drug reduces body fat and appetite in older rats, which has intriguing implications for aging humans.
National Institutes of Health, Medical Research Service of the Department of Veterans Affairs

Contact: Rossana Passaniti
passar@shands.ufl.edu
352-273-8569
University of Florida

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Research may provide new targets for IBD therapies
Modifying the small white blood cells that protect against disease might help treat immune disorders, according to a study published in Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association.
Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rachel Steigerwald
media@gastro.org
301-272-1603
American Gastroenterological Association

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Mouse with weaker bones, stronger metabolism points toward new diabetes therapies
One mouse with weak bones appears to have a strong metabolism, even on a high-fat diet, scientists report.
National Institutes of Health, Minnesota Obesity Center, Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Cancer Prevention Research
UA researchers discover component of cinnamon prevents colorectal cancer in mice
A study conducted by University of Arizona researchers from the College of Pharmacy and the UA Cancer Center proved that adding cinnamaldehyde, the compound that gives cinnamon its distinctive flavor and smell, to the diet of mice protected the mice against colorectal cancer.
National Institutes of Health, the University of Arizona Cancer Center

Contact: Karin Lorentzen
lorentzen@pharmacy.arizona.edu
520-626-3725
University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
USF biologists: Biodiversity reduces human, wildlife diseases and crop pests
With infectious diseases increasing worldwide, the need to understand how and why disease outbreaks occur is becoming increasingly important. Looking for answers, a team of University of South Florida (USF) biologists and colleagues found broad evidence that supports the controversial 'dilution effect hypothesis,' which suggests that biodiversity limits outbreaks of disease among humans and wildlife.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Agriculture, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: David Civitello
civitello@usf.edu
813-974-4694
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Clinical Cancer Research
Blood antibodies may predict HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer survival
The presence of certain human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 antibodies in the blood was associated with improved rates of survival among patients with HPV-related oropharyngeal carcinoma.
National Institutes of Health, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Arizona State University, NIH/NCI Early Detection Research Network, Stiefel Oropharyngeal Research Fund

Contact: Lauren Riley
lauren.riley@aacr.org
215-446-7155
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Gene therapy prevents Parkinson's disease in animal model, says Pitt study
Gene therapy to reduce production of a brain protein prevented development of Parkinson's disease in an animal study, said researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The findings, published online today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, could lead to new understanding of how genetic and environmental factors converge to cause the disease, and the development of effective treatments to prevent disease progression.
US Department of Veterans Affairs, National Institutes of Health, Blechman Foundation, Parkinson's Chapter of Greater Pittsburgh

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
SrikamAV@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Nature Genetics
Vulnerabilities in genome's 'dimmer switches' should shed light on many complex diseases
Up to one-fifth of human DNA act as dimmer switches for nearby genes, but scientists have been unable to identify precisely which mutations in these control regions really matter in causing common diseases. Now, a decade of work at Johns Hopkins has yielded a computer formula that predicts which mutations are likely to have the largest effect on the activity of the dimmer switches, suggesting new targets for diagnosis and treatment of many diseases.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Nature Medicine
Body's response to injury and inflammation may hinder wound healing in diabetes
In a study published online in Nature Medicine, scientists from the hospital's Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine (PCMM) found they could speed up wound healing in diabetic mice by keeping immune cells called neutrophils from producing bacteria-trapping neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).
American Diabetes Association, NIH/ National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH/ National Cancer Institute, NIH/ National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, GlaxoSmithKline/Immune Disease Institute Alliance Fellowship

Contact: Keri Stedman
keri.stedman@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
Boston Children's Hospital

Public Release: 12-Jun-2015
NMR in Biomedicine
Cell density remains constant as brain shrinks with age
New, ultra-high-field magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the brain by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago provide the most detailed images to date to show that while the brain shrinks with age, brain cell density remains constant.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sharon Parmet
sparmet@uic.edu
312-413-2695
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 12-Jun-2015
The secrets of bone marrow: What leads to healthy blood cell production?
The Medical College of Wisconsin has received a five-year, $635,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to identify new potential treatments for diseases that inhibit the growth of blood cells and diseases in which the blood cells develop abnormally.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Maureen Mack
mmack@mcw.edu
414-955-4744
Medical College of Wisconsin

Showing releases 176-200 out of 3759.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

     
   

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