NIH Director Page NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIH Social Media and Outreach
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Videos
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 201-225 out of 3776.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Nature
Decoding the genome of an alien
OIST researchers and collaborators have sequenced and analyzed an octopus genome, making it the first cephalopod to be decoded.
Molecular Genetics Unit of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kaoru Natori
kaoru.natori@oist.jp
81-989-662-389
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Journal of Nutrition
Children who are leaner report eating more polyunsaturated fatty acids
Children who report eating more polyunsaturated fatty acids, found in tree nuts, seeds and fatty fish, and consume a higher ratio of PUFA: saturated fatty acids, were found to be leaner, have less body fat and less abdominal adiposity.
National Institutes of Health, National Institutes of Health Cancer Prevention and Control Training Program, National Institutes of Health CURE supplement Cancer Prevention and Control Training Program, National Institutes of Health NIDDK

Contact: Marcia Neville
marcia.neville@ucdenver.edu
303-656-8362
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Nature
Octopus genome reveals cephalopod secrets
Researchers from UC Berkeley, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University and University of Chicago sequenced and annotated the first cephalopod genome, the California two-spot octopus. They found widespread rearrangements of genes and a dramatic expansion of a family of genes involved in neuronal development that was once thought to be unique to vertebrates. Study of this and other cephalopod genomes will help reveal the genetic basis for these creatures' unusual behavior and physiology.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
PLOS ONE
Computer scientists find mass extinctions can accelerate evolution
Computer scientists have found that robots evolve more quickly and efficiently after a virtual mass extinction modeled after real-life disasters such as the one that killed off the dinosaurs. Beyond implications for artificial intelligence, the research supports the idea that mass extinctions actually speed up evolution by unleashing new creativity in adaptations.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Nature
Photoredox catalyst unlocks new pathways for nickel chemistry
Using a light-activated catalyst, researchers at Princeton have unlocked a new pathway in nickel chemistry to construct carbon-oxygen bonds that would be highly valuable to pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Services

Contact: Tien Nguyen
tienn@princeton.edu
609-258-6523
Princeton University

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
Fetal ECG during labor offers no advantage over conventional fetal heart rate monitoring
A recent study found that fetal electrocardiogram ST segment analysis, or STAN, which is largely used in Europe to measure fetal heart activity, does not improve outcomes during labor and delivery or decrease cesarean deliveries compared with conventional fetal heart rate monitoring.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Johnston Farrow
jrfarrow@utmb.edu
409-772-8785
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Nature
Octopus genome sequenced
The first whole genome analysis of an octopus reveals unique genomic features that likely played a role in the evolution of traits such as large complex nervous systems and adaptive camouflage. The findings are published in Nature on Aug. 12, 2015.
National Science Foundation, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health, the Molecular Genetics Unit of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Developing a targeted hydrogel to treat inflammatory bowel disease
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and collaborators from Massachusetts General Hospital and MIT set out to find a better way to deliver medicine using a gel-like material created in the lab. The team reports in Science Translational Medicine this week that their hydrogel material was able to stick to sites of inflammation and slowly deliver medicine over time, a breakthrough that has the potential to offer a more targeted enema-based therapy for patients in the future.
Harvard Institute of Translational Immunology Pilot Grants in Crohn's Disease from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Haley Bridger
hbridger@partners.org
617-525-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Cancer Discovery
Blood vessel 'doorway' lets breast cancer cells spread through blood stream
Using real-time, high-resolution imaging, scientists have identified how a 'doorway' in the blood vessel wall allows cancer cells to spread from breast tumors to other parts of the body. The findings support emerging tests that better predict if breast cancer will spread, which could spare women from unnecessary treatments and lead to new anti-cancer therapies. The research from Albert Einstein Cancer Center and Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care published today in Cancer Discovery.
Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, National Institutes of Health, Einstein's Integrated Imaging Program

Contact: Deirdre Branley
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Structure
Illinois researchers construct atomic model of an immature retrovirus
Researchers from the Theoretical and Computational Biophysics Group at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois have constructed an atomic model of the immature retrovirus RSV in order to understand and block the virus.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Maeve Reilly
mjreilly@illinois.edu
217-244-7316
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Immunity
Penn study details 'rotten egg' gas' role in autoimmune disease
A new study led by Songtao Shi of the University of Pennsylvania has demonstrated how regulatory T cells can themselves be regulated, by an unexpected source: hydrogen sulfide, a gas produced by the body's muscle cells and one often associated with the smell of rotten eggs.
NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, Ministry of Science and Technology, China, Department of Health and Human Services

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Journal of Oncology Practice
Radiation costs vary among Medicare patients with cancer
Cost of radiation therapy among Medicare patients varied most widely because of factors unrelated to a patient or that person's cancer, report University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers in the Journal of Oncology Practice.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Yadira Galindo
ygalindo@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Journal of Infectious Diseases
Hepatitis C infection may fuel heart risk
People infected with the hepatitis C virus are at risk for liver damage, but the results of a new Johns Hopkins study now show the infection may also spell heart trouble.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epeshev1@jhmi.edu
410-502-9433
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
New combination treatment effective against melanoma skin
In findings never before seen in melanoma, a novel combination therapy was found to be highly effective at treating patients with skin metastases, new research from UC Davis has shown.
Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and National Institutes of Health

Contact: Charles Casey
cecasey@ucdavis.edu
916-734-9048
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Journal of Virology
Research advances potential for test and vaccine for genital and oral herpes
Findings from a pair of new studies could speed up the development of a universally accurate diagnostic test for human herpes simplex viruses, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins and Harvard universities and the National Institutes of Health. The work may also lead to the development of a vaccine that protects against the virus.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Marin Hedin
mhedin2@jhmi.edu
410-502-9429
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Journal of Interpersonal Violence
Behaviors linked to adult crime differ between abused boys and girls, study finds
Troubling behaviors exhibited by abused children can predict later criminal activity, and those indicators differ between boys and girls.
NIH/National Institute of Justice, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Deborah Bach
bach2@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Nature Communications
New clues found to vision loss in macular degeneration?
Scientists have identified a pathway that leads to the formation of atypical blood vessels that can cause blindness in people with age-related macular degeneration. The research, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, sheds light on one of the leading causes of blindness in industrialized countries and offers potential targets for treating the disease.
NIH/National Eye Institute, Carl Marshall Reeves and Mildred Almen Reeves Foundation, Research to Prevent Blindness, International Retina Research Foundation, American Health Assistance Foundation

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
SIV shrugs off antibodies in vaccinated monkeys
Experimental vaccines can protect a majority of monkeys from repeated challenge with SIV. But when the virus does get through, it's not clear whether vaccine-induced antibodies were exerting any pressure on the virus.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Lisa Newbern
lisa.newbern@emory.edu
404-727-7709
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics
C-sections could influence babies' ability to focus
Being delivered through a caesarean section influences at least one form of babies' ability to concentrate. It slows their spatial attention, which plays a role in how well they are able to prioritize and focus on a particular area or object that is of interest. These are the findings of Scott Adler and Audrey Wong-Kee-You of York University in Canada, published in Springer's journal Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, York University Faculty of Health

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
JAMA
Georgia dialysis facility referral rate for kidney transplants is low and variable
Although kidney transplantation is known to be the optimal treatment for most patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), only about one in four patients with ESRD in Georgia was referred by a dialysis facility to a transplant center for evaluation within one year of starting dialysis, according to a new study. In addition, there was substantial variation in the percentage of referrals among dialysis facilities.
NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Contact: Holly Korschun
hkorsch@emory.edu
404-727-3990
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
PLOS Pathogens
Could flu someday be prevented without a vaccine?
Researchers have discovered a way to trigger a preventive response to a flu infection without any help from the usual players -- the virus itself or interferon, a powerful infection fighter. The finding, in both mouse and human cells, suggests that manipulating a natural process could someday be an alternative way to not just reduce the severity of the flu, but prevent infection altogether.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jacob Yount
Yount.37@osu.edu
614-688-1639
Ohio State University

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
PLOS Biology
Dartmouth researcher discovers 'brain signature' that predicts human emotions
A Dartmouth researcher and his colleagues have discovered a way to predict human emotions based on brain activity.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
$10M federal grant to JAX will launch Center for Precision Genetics
A five-year, $9,971,936 grant from the National Institutes of Health will establish a new Center for Precision Genomics at The Jackson Laboratory, a major initiative involving several collaborating institutions, with the goal of finding solutions for life-threatening and genetically complex human diseases through new approaches to developing precision models of disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Joyce Peterson
joyce.peterson@jax.org
207-288-6058
Jackson Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Science Signaling
Researchers identify nerve-guiding protein that aids pancreatic cancer spread
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have identified a molecular partnership in pancreatic cancer cells that might help to explain how the disease spreads -- metastasizes -- in some cases. Their findings reveal urgently needed new targets to treat pancreatic cancer, which strikes nearly 50,000 people in the US each year and has only a 5 percent survival rate five years after diagnosis.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Viragh Foundation, Johns Hopkins/Skip Viragh Pancreatic Cancer Center, Lefkofsky Family Foundation, Lustgarten Foundation

Contact: Amy Mone
amone@jhmi.edu
410-614-2915
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scripps Florida scientists determine how antibiotic gains cancer-killing sulfur atoms
In a discovery with implications for future drug design, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have shown an unprecedented mechanism for how a natural antibiotic with antitumor properties incorporates sulfur into its molecular structure, an essential ingredient of its antitumor activity.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Showing releases 201-225 out of 3776.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2015 by AAAS, the science society.