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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 201-225 out of 3417.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Genome Research
Scientists generate 3-D structure for the malaria parasite genome
A research team led by a University of California Riverside scientist has generated a 3-D model of the human malaria parasite genome at three different stages in the parasite's life cycle -- the first time such 3-D architecture has been generated during the progression of the life cycle of a parasite. The team found that genes that need to be highly expressed in the parasite tend to cluster in the same area of the cell nucleus.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Osteoporosis International
Higher social class linked to fewer bone fractures among non-white women
Social class may play a significant role in how likely middle-aged African-American or Asian women are to suffer bone fractures. New research suggests that a higher education level was associated with decreased fracture incidence among non-white women.
University of California's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, National Institutes of Health, others

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Journal of Adolescent Health
Nowhere to hide: Kids, once protected, now influenced by tobacco marketing
New study finds teenagers and young adults are exposed and influenced by direct mail and web coupons from tobacco manufacturers. This direct marketing exposure is translating to increased nicotine use.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Dubuc
donna.M.Dubuc@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-3615
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Lancet
EAGeR medical trial: Low-dose aspirin won't prevent pregnancy loss
The Effects of Aspirin in Gestation and Reproduction medical trial has found that, in general, low-dose aspirin is not beneficial for future pregnancy outcomes in women with prior pregnancy loss.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Pat Donovan
pdonovan@buffalo.edu
716-645-4602
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Math modeling integral to synthetic biology research
A long-standing challenge in synthetic biology has been to create gene circuits that behave in predictable and robust ways. Mathematical modeling experts from the University of Houston collaborated with experimental biologists at Rice University to create a synthetic genetic clock that keeps accurate time across a range of temperatures. Funded by the National Institutes of Health, the findings were published in a recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Antioxidants can protect against omega 6 damage -- or promote it
Given omega 6 fatty acid's reputation for promoting cancer -- at least in animal studies -- researchers are examining the role that antioxidants play in blocking the harmful effects of this culprit, found in many cooking oils. After all, antioxidants are supposed to prevent DNA damage. But employing antioxidants could backfire, say researchers.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Genetic testing beneficial in melanoma treatment
Genetic screening of cancer can help doctors customize treatments so that patients with melanoma have the best chance of beating it, according to the results of a clinical trial by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. The trial, funded by the National Institutes of Health, will be presented Monday at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014.
National Institutes of Health, Bristol-Myers Squibb

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Plant-derived anti-cancer compounds explained at national conference
Compounds derived from plant-based sources -- including garlic, broccoli and medicine plants -- confer protective effects against breast cancer, explain researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), partner with the UPMC CancerCenter. In multiple presentations Sunday at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014, UPCI scientists will update the cancer research community on their National Cancer Institute-funded findings, including new discoveries about the mechanisms by which the plant-derived compounds work.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Disease-free survival estimates for ovarian cancer improve over time
The probability of staying disease-free improves dramatically for ovarian cancer patients who already have been disease-free for a period of time, and time elapsed since remission should be taken into account when making follow-up care decisions, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. The findings will be presented Wednesday at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Journal of National Cancer Institute
Major genetic study links liver disease gene to bladder cancer
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in Journal of the National Cancer Institute (with related research being presented this weekend at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Conference 2014) details the discovery of a new genetic driver of bladder cancer: silencing of the gene AGL.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Current Biology
Ouch! Computer system spots fake expressions of pain better than people
A joint study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego, the University at Buffalo, and the University of Toronto has found that a computer–vision system can distinguish between real or faked expressions of pain more accurately than can humans.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Patricia Donovan
pdonovan@buffalo.edu
716-645-4602
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Genetics
Examination of a cave-dwelling fish finds a possible genetic link to human disorders
Researchers report on an exciting discovery in the prestigious journal, Genetics.
NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Dawn Fuller
dawn.fuller@uc.edu
513-556-1823
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Cell Reports
Tumor suppressor gene TP53 mutated in 90 percent of most common childhood bone tumor
The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital-Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project found mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 in 90 percent of osteosarcomas, suggesting the alteration plays a key role early in development of the bone cancer. The research was published today online ahead of print in the journal Cell Reports.
Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, Kay Jewelers, NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Tully Family Foundation, ALSAC

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehlau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Genetics
Scientists emphasize metabolites' role in understanding disease
Overreliance on genetic-centered approaches in predicting, diagnosing and treating disease will lead to few future scientific breakthroughs, cautioned a University of Alabama researcher who co-authored an article in an early online issue of Genetics that advocates for a greater emphasis on the body's metabolites in understanding illnesses.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Christopher James Bryant
cbryant@ur.ua.edu
205-348-8323
University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Technology
An ultrathin collagen matrix biomaterial tool for 3-D microtissue engineering
A novel ultrathin collagen matrix assembly allows for the unprecedented maintenance of liver cell morphology and function in a microscale 'organ-on-a-chip' device that is one example of 3-D microtissue engineering.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Chew Munkit
mkchew@wspc.com.sg
656-466-5775
World Scientific

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
JAMA Ophthalmology
Higher total folate intake may be associated with lower risk of exfoliation glaucoma
Researchers designed a prospective cohort study using more than 20 years of follow-up data from the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. They observed that higher total folate intake was associated with a lower risk for exfoliation glaucoma/suspected exfoliation glaucoma (SEG), supporting a possible causal role of homocysteine in EG/SEG.
National Institutes of Health, Arthur Ashley Foundation, Harvard Medical School/Department of Ophthalmology Glaucoma Center of Excellence

Contact: Mary Leach
Mary_Leach@meei.harvard.edu
617-573-4170
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Molecular Cell
Cancer and the Goldilocks effect
Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine have found that too little or too much of an enzyme called SRPK1 promotes cancer by disrupting a regulatory event critical for many fundamental cellular processes, including proliferation.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Science
New data show the immediate value of scientific research
University research is a key component of the US economic ecosystem, returning the investment through enormous public value and impact on employment, business, and manufacturing nationwide.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation

Contact: Barbara McFadden Allen
bmallen@staff.cic.net
217-766-1425
Committee on Institutional Cooperation

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Study shows fertility drugs do not increase breast cancer risk
Women who took clomiphene citrate (brand name Clomid) or gonadotropins as a part of fertility treatment did not experience an increased risk for breast cancer over 30 years of follow-up, compared with women who were not treated with these medications, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jeremy Moore
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
A brain region for resisting alcohol's allure
When a region of the brain called the lateral habenula is chronically inactivated in rats, they repeatedly drink to excess and are less able to learn from the experience. The study, published online in PLOS ONE on April 2 has implications for understanding behaviors that drive alcohol addiction.
National Institutes of Health, March of Dimes Foundation, University of Utah

Contact: Julie Kiefer
jkiefer@neuro.utah.edu
801-597-4258
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Cancer
Team identifies novel biomarker for head and neck cancer, non-small cell lung cancer
A biomarker is linked to better outcomes in patients with head and neck cancers and non-small cell lung cancer.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Head and Neck Society

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
215-862-2689
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Journal of American College of Cardiology
Lifespan researcher develops first blood test to predict risk of sudden cardiac death
A researcher at the Cardiovascular Institute at Rhode Island, The Miriam and Newport hospitals has found that a simple blood test can predict a person's risk for sudden cardiac death, enabling physicians to more quickly and accurately assess a patient's need for an implantable cardiac defibrillator. That paper by Samuel C. Dudley, M.D., Ph.D., chief of cardiology at the CVI, is published online in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
National Institutes of Health, National Center for Research Resources/National Center for Advancing

Contact: Ellen Slingsby
eslingsby@lifespan.org
401-444-6421
Lifespan

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Critical Care Medicine
Longer stay in hospital ICU has lasting impact on quality of life
Patients have substantial physical impairments even two years after being discharged from the hospital after a stay in an intensive care unit, new Johns Hopkins research suggests.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Infection and Immunity
Strain-specific Lyme disease immunity lasts for years, Penn research finds
A new study led by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania shows that humans appear to develop immunity against specific strains of the Lyme disease that can last six to nine years.
National Institutes of Health, Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Physics in Medicine and Biology
An easier, safer, and more accurate treatment for pancreatic cancer
Dartmouth scientists develop 3-D imaging for PDT treatment of pancreatic cancer to help make it a safer, more effective treatment.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Dubuc
donna.M.Dubuc@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-3615
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Showing releases 201-225 out of 3417.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

     
   

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