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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 3466.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
MARC travel awards announced for GSA: Mouse Molecular Genetics Conference
FASEB MARC (Maximizing Access to Research Careers) Program has announced the travel award recipients for the Genetics Society of America's 27th Annual Mouse Molecular Genetics Conference from Sept. 29-Oct. 3, 2014, in Pacific Grove, Calif.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kelly Husser
khusser@faseb.org
301-634-7109
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Cell Reports
UMN researchers find animal model for understudied type of muscular dystrophy
Researchers at the University of Minnesota have developed an animal research model for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) to be used for muscle regeneration research as well as studies of the effectiveness of potential therapies for FSHD. The research is published in the current edition of the journal Cell Reports.
National Institutes of Health, Dr. Bob and Jean Smith Foundation, Friends of FSH Research, FSH Society

Contact: Caroline Marin
crmarin@umn.edu
612-624-5680
University of Minnesota Academic Health Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
MARC travel awards announced for: American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting
FASEB MARC (Maximizing Access to Research Careers) Program has announced the travel award recipients for the American Society of Human Genetics from Oct. 18-22, 2014 in San Diego, Calif. These awards are meant to promote the entry of students, post doctorates and scientists from underrepresented groups into the mainstream of the basic science community and to encourage the participation of young scientists at the American Society of Human Genetics. This year MARC conferred 16 awards totaling $29,600.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kelly Husser
khusser@faseb.org
301-634-7109
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
MARC travel awards announced for: 2014 ASBMR annual meeting
FASEB MARC Program has announced the travel award recipients for the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research from Sept. 12-15, 2014 in Houston, Texas. These awards are meant to promote the entry of students, post doctorates and scientists from underrepresented groups into the mainstream of the basic science community and to encourage the participation of young scientists at the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. This year MARC conferred 2 awards totaling $3,200.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kelly Husser
khusser@faseb.org
301-634-7109
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Infectious Diseases
New analysis of old HIV vaccines finds potentially protective immune response
Applying the benefit of hindsight, researchers at Duke Medicine have reanalyzed the findings of two historic pediatric HIV vaccine trials with encouraging results. The vaccines had in fact triggered an antibody response -- now known to be associated with protection in adults -- that was previously unrecognized in the infants studied in the 1990s.
Duke University Center for AIDS Research, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
MARC travel awards announced for: ACSM Conference on Integrative Physiology of Exercise
FASEB MARC Program has announced the travel award recipients for the American College of Sports Medicine's Conference on Integrative Physiology of Exercise from Sept. 17-20, 2014 in Miami, Fla.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Kelly Husser
khusser@faseb.org
301-634-7109
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Pharmaceutics
Sensory-tested drug-delivery vehicle could limit spread of HIV, AIDS
A unique method for delivering compounds that could positively impact the global battle against HIV and AIDS may be possible, thanks to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Penn-NIH team discover new type of cell movement
In a new study from the University of Pennsylvania and National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, scientists used an innovative technique to study how cells move in a three-dimensional matrix, similar to the structure of certain tissues, such as the skin. They discovered an entirely new type of cell movement whereby the nucleus helps propel cells through the matrix like a piston in an engine.
NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Synthesis produces new antibiotic
Scientists at Rice University synthesize a natural, fungus-derived antibiotic that could someday help wage the battle against resistant superbugs.
National Institutes of Health, Skaggs Institute of Research, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, Welch Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Ebola vaccine trials fast-tracked by international consortium
A candidate Ebola vaccine could be given to healthy volunteers in the UK, The Gambia and Mali as early as September, as part of an series of safety trials of potential vaccines aimed at preventing the disease that has killed more than 1,400 people in the current outbreak in West Africa.
Wellcome Trust, Medical Research Council, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, UK Department for International Development

Contact: Christopher Hardwick
chardwick@som.umaryland.edu
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Molecular Cell
Research shows how premalignant cells can sense oncogenesis and halt growth
What happens inside cells when they detect the activation of a cancer-inducing gene? Sometimes, cells are able to signal internally to stop the cell cycle. Such cells are able to enter, at least for a time, a protective non-growth state. CSHL experiments now show how cells can respond to an activated RAS gene by entering a quiescent state called senescence.
National Institutes of Health, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Cancer Center Support Grant, Fonds de Recherche de l'Institut de Cardiologie de Montréal; Heart and Stroke Foundation-Québec

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Home is where the microbes are
A study published today in Science reports provides a detailed analysis of the microbes that live in houses and apartments. The study was conducted by researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Science Foundation

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Electric current to brain boosts memory
Stimulating a region in the brain via non-invasive delivery of electrical current using magnetic pulses, called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, improves memory. The discovery opens a new field of possibilities for treating memory impairments caused by conditions such as stroke, early-stage Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury, cardiac arrest and the memory problems that occur in healthy aging.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Cell
NYU researchers ID process producing neuronal diversity in fruit flies' visual system
NYU biologists have identified a mechanism that helps explain how the diversity of neurons that make up the visual system is generated.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Cell
Circulating tumor cell clusters more likely to cause metastasis than single cells
Circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters -- clumps of from two to 50 tumor cells that break off a primary tumor and are carried through the bloodstream -- appear to be much more likely to cause metastasis than are single CTCs, according to a study from investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center.
Janssen Diagnostics, Stand Up to Cancer, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, National Foundation for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, ESSCO Breast Cancer Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Genomic sequencing reveals mutations, insights into 2014 Ebola outbreak
In response to an ongoing, unprecedented outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa, a team of researchers from the Broad Institute and Harvard University, in collaboration with the Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation and researchers across institutions and continents, has rapidly sequenced and analyzed more than 99 Ebola virus genomes. Their findings could have important implications for rapid field diagnostic tests. The team reports its results online in the journal Science.
Common Fund, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, US Department of Health and Human Services, National Science Foundation, European Union Seventh Framework Programme, Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Haley Bridger
hbridger@broadinstitute.org
617-714-7968
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Circulation
Protein in 'good cholesterol' may be a key to treating pulmonary hypertension
A new study at UCLA demonstrates that oxidized lipids may contribute to pulmonary hypertension. Using a rodent model, the researchers showed that a peptide mimicking part of the main protein in HDL cholesterol, may help reduce the production of oxidized lipids in pulmonary hypertension. They also found that reducing the amount of oxidized lipids improved the rodents' heart and lung function.
American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health, UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Iris Cantor-UCLA Women's Health Center

Contact: Rachel Champeau
rchampeau@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2270
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Brain Imaging and Behavior
Kessler Foundation researchers publish first study of brain activation in MS using fNIRS
Using functional near infrared spectroscopy, Kessler Foundation researchers showed differential brain activation patterns between people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls. This is first MS study to examine brain activation using fNIRS during a cognitive task. 'Neuroimaging and cognition using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in multiple sclerosis' published online June 11 by Brain Imaging and Behavior.
National MS Society, National Institutes of Health, Kessler Foundation

Contact: Carolann Murphy
CMurphy@KesslerFoundation.org
973-324-8382
Kessler Foundation

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Encyclopedia of how genomes function gets much bigger
A big step in understanding the mysteries of the human genome was unveiled today in the form of three analyses that provide the most detailed comparison yet of how the genomes of the fruit fly, roundworm, and human function. The analyses will likely offer insights into how the information in the human genome regulates development, and how it is responsible for diseases.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Drug Metabolism and Disposition
Dosage of HIV drug may be ineffective for half of African-Americans
Many African-Americans may not be getting effective doses of the HIV drug maraviroc. The initial dosing studies included mostly European-Americans, who generally lack a protein that is key to removing maraviroc from the body, resulting in higher concentrations of the drug in the blood. The current study shows that people with maximum levels of the protein CYP3A5 -- including nearly half of African-Americans -- end up with lower levels of maraviroc in their bodies.
Johns Hopkins Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, NIH/National Center for Research Resources, Pendleton Foundation Trust

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Biological Psychiatry
Scripps Research Institute scientists link alcohol-dependence gene to neurotransmitter
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have solved the mystery of why a specific signaling pathway can be associated with alcohol dependence. This signaling pathway is regulated by a gene, called neurofibromatosis type 1 (Nf1), which TSRI scientists found is linked with excessive drinking in mice. The new research shows Nf1 regulates gamma-aminobutyric acid, a neurotransmitter that lowers anxiety and increases feelings of relaxation.
National Institutes of Health, Pearson Center for Alcoholism and Addiction Research, NIH/Genes, Environment and Health Initiative, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Stop and listen: Study shows how movement affects hearing
When we want to listen carefully to someone, the first thing we do is stop talking. The second thing we do is stop moving altogether. The interplay between movement and hearing has a counterpart deep in the brain. A new Duke study, published in Nature, used optogenetics to reveal exactly how the motor cortex, which controls movement, can tweak the volume control in the auditory cortex, which interprets sound.
Helen Hay Whitney Foundation, Holland-Trice Graduate Fellowship in Brain Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Infancy: The Official Journal of the International Society on Infant Studies
Parents, listen next time your baby babbles
Parents who try to understand their baby's babbling let their infants know they can communicate, which leads to children forming complex sounds and using language more quickly. Results appear in the journal Infancy.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Sara Agnew
sara-agnew@uiowa.edu
319-384-0073
University of Iowa

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Human Genetics
Dartmouth isolates environmental influences in genome-wide association studies
Model allows researcher to remove false positive findings that plague modern research when many dozens of factors and their interactions are suggested to play a role in causing complex diseases.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Dubuc
Donna.M.Dubuc@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-3615
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Molecular and Cellular Biology
Promising new cancer therapy uses molecular 'Trash Man' to exploit a common cancer defense
While many scientists are trying to prevent the onset of a cancer defense mechanism known as autophagy, researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center are leveraging it in a new therapy that causes the process to culminate in cell death rather than survival.
National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of America

Contact: John Wallace
wallacej@vcu.edu
804-628-1550
Virginia Commonwealth University

Showing releases 226-250 out of 3466.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

     
   

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