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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 3456.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Infancy: The Official Journal of the International Society on Infant Studies
Parents, listen next time your baby babbles
Parents who try to understand their baby's babbling let their infants know they can communicate, which leads to children forming complex sounds and using language more quickly. Results appear in the journal Infancy.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Sara Agnew
sara-agnew@uiowa.edu
319-384-0073
University of Iowa

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Human Genetics
Dartmouth isolates environmental influences in genome-wide association studies
Model allows researcher to remove false positive findings that plague modern research when many dozens of factors and their interactions are suggested to play a role in causing complex diseases.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Dubuc
Donna.M.Dubuc@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-3615
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Molecular and Cellular Biology
Promising new cancer therapy uses molecular 'Trash Man' to exploit a common cancer defense
While many scientists are trying to prevent the onset of a cancer defense mechanism known as autophagy, researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center are leveraging it in a new therapy that causes the process to culminate in cell death rather than survival.
National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of America

Contact: John Wallace
wallacej@vcu.edu
804-628-1550
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Worms, flies and humans... Our common genomic legacy, key to understanding cell biology
CRG researchers contribute to a project that pointed out key sets of co-expressed genes that may be fundamental for animal cells. Scientists compared the transcriptome of three very evolutionarily distant, yet well studied model organisms: the worm C. elegans, the fly D. melanogaster and the human H. sapiens. They found sets of genes that are co-expressed in each of the three species, all of them mainly involved in development.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Laia Cendrós
laia.cendros@crg.eu
34-933-160-237
Center for Genomic Regulation

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Malaria symptoms fade on repeat infections due to loss of immune cells, UCSF-led team says
Children who repeatedly become infected with malaria often experience no clinical symptoms with these subsequent infections, and a team led by UC San Francisco researchers has discovered that this might be due at least in part to a depletion of specific types of immune cells.
National Institutes of Health, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contact: Jeffrey Norris
jeffrey.norris@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center awarded $18 million grant
Outstanding basic research, a growing focus on translating discoveries into treatments, and a dedication to patient care have earned the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center of Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital an $18 million, five-year Cancer Center Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Lucky Tran
lt2549@columbia.edu
212-305-3689
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Brain networks 'hyper-connected' in young adults who had depression
Functional magnetic resonance imaging may help to better predict and understand depression in young adults.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, UIC Center for Clinical and Translational Science

Contact: Sherri McGinnis Gonzalez
smcginn@uic.edu
312-996-8277
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Orphaned children can do just as well in institutions
The removal of institutions or group homes will not lead to better child well-being and could even worsen outcomes for some orphaned and separated children, according to new findings from a three-year study across five low- and middle-income countries. Children in institutions are as healthy and, in some ways, healthier than those in family-based care, according to the Duke University study.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Kyle Hamilton
kyle.hamilton@chpir.org
919-613-5470
Duke University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Evolution used similar molecular toolkits to shape flies, worms, and humans
Although separated by hundreds of millions of years of evolution, flies, worms, and humans share ancient patterns of gene expression, according to a massive Yale-led analysis of genomic data. Two related studies led by scientists at Harvard and Stanford, also published Aug. 28 in the same issue of the journal Nature, tell a similar story: even though humans, worms, and flies bear little obvious similarity to each other, evolution used remarkably similar molecular toolkits to shape them.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bill Hathaway
william.hathaway@yale.edu
203-432-1322
Yale University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Xenon exposure shown to erase traumatic memories
McLean Hospital researchers are reporting that xenon gas, used in humans for anesthesia and diagnostic imaging, has the potential to be a treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder and other memory-related disorders.
National Institutes of Health Grant, O'Keefe Family Junior Investigator Award, McLean Hospital

Contact: Jenna Brown
jbrown66@partners.org
617-855-2110
McLean Hospital

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Flexing the brain: Why learning tasks can be difficult
Learning a new skill is easier when it is related to an ability we already have. For example, a trained pianist can learn a new melody easier than learning how to hit a tennis serve. Scientists from the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition -- a joint program between Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh -- have discovered a fundamental constraint in the brain that may explain why this happens.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Contact: Shilo Rea
shilo@cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Molecular Therapy
Attacking a rare disease at its source with gene therapy
The two main treatments for MPS I are bone marrow transplantation and intravenous enzyme replacement therapy, but these are only marginally effective or clinically impractical, especially when the disease strikes the central nervous system. Using an animal model, a team has proven the efficacy of a more elegant way to restore aberrant protein levels in the body through direct gene transfer.
National Institutes of Health, ReGenX BioSciences LLC

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Royal Society Interface
New technology may identify tiny strains in body tissues before injuries occur
Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have developed algorithms to identify weak spots in tendons, muscles and bones prone to tearing or breaking. The technology, which needs to be refined before it is used in patients, one day may help pinpoint minor strains and tiny injuries in the body's tissues long before bigger problems occur.
NIH/National Institute on Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Introducing the multi-tasking nanoparticle
Kit Lam and colleagues from UC Davis and other institutions have created dynamic nanoparticles that could provide an arsenal of applications to diagnose and treat cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, US Department of Defense, Prostate Cancer Foundation, Veterans Administration, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Contact: Dorsey Griffith
dorsey.griffith@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9118
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sorting cells with sound waves
Researchers from MIT, Pennsylvania State University, and Carnegie Mellon University have devised a new way to separate cells by exposing them to sound waves as they flow through a tiny channel.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Science
Unprecedented detail of intact neuronal receptor offers blueprint for drug developers
Scientists succeeded in obtaining an unprecedented view of a type of brain-cell receptor that is implicated in a range of neurological illnesses, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, schizophrenia, autism, and ischemic injuries associated with stroke.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors
Study finds less domestic violence among married couples who smoke pot
New research findings from a study of 634 couples found that the more often they smoked marijuana, the less likely they were to engage in domestic violence.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Cathy Wilde
cwilde@ria.buffalo.edu
716-887-3365
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Hebew SeniorLife researcher receives $4.5 million grant to test videos for advance directives
A new NIH-funded project will assess whether videos can help nursing home residents, family members and staff have the difficult but important conversations about advanced directives for care.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jennifer Davis
jdavis@hsl.harvard.edu
617-363-8282
Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
National Science Review
Bombarded by explosive waves of information, scientists review new ways to process and analyze Big Data
Big Data presents information-bombarded society with the potential for new levels of scientific discovery, but also delivers challenges to data scientists. While holding promise to detect intricate population patterns, Big Data's massive sample size and high dimensionality introduce unique hurdles to processing this information. Scientists at Princeton University and at Johns Hopkins state that to meet these challenges, it is urgent to develop more robust statistical and computational methods, and a more advanced computing architecture.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jianqing Fan
jqfan@princeton.edu
Science China Press

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
JAMA
Collaborative care improves depression in teens
How best to care for the many adolescents who have depression? In a collaborative care intervention, a care manager continually reached out to teens -- delivering and following up on treatment in a primary-care setting. Depression outcomes after a year were significantly better with this approach than with usual care, according to a JAMA report of a randomized controlled trial from Seattle Children's, Group Health, and the University of Washington.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Rose Ibarra (Egge)
rose.ibarra@seattlechildrens.org
206-987-7334
Group Health Research Institute

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
New estrogen-based compound suppresses binge-like eating behavior in female mice
Researchers at the USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital found that the hormone estrogen can specifically trigger brain serotonin neurons to inhibit binge eating in female mice in a report today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, American Diabetes Association

Contact: Glenna Picton
picton@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Alcoholics have an abnormal CD8 T cell response to the influenza virus
Chronic drinking is associated with an increased incidence and severity of respiratory infections. A reduced CD8 T cell response was previously implicated in increased disease severity due to influenza virus infections. New rodent findings indicate that only some CD8 T cell functions are damaged while others remain intact.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin L. Legge
kevin-legge@uiowa.edu
319-335-6744
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Prenatal alcohol exposure is associated with later excess weight/obesity during adolescence
Growth deficiency is a defining feature of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). A new study has found that rates of excess weight/obesity are elevated in adolescents with partial fetal alcohol syndrome (pFAS). Females with FASD may be at a greater risk for excess weight/obesity than males during adolescence.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeffrey R. Wozniak, Ph.D.
jwozniak@umn.edu
612-273-9741
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
ChemBioChem
Cancer-fighting drugs might also stop malaria early
Scientists searching for new drugs for malaria have identified a number of compounds -- some of which are in clinical trials to treat cancer -- that could lead to new ways to fight the disease. Researchers identified 31 enzyme-blocking molecules, called protein kinase inhibitors, that curb malaria before symptoms start. By focusing on treatments that act early, the researchers hope to give drug-resistant strains less time to spread.
Duke University, Harvard Medical School, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Endocrinology
Exposure to toxins makes great granddaughters more susceptible to stress
According to a new study by researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and Washington State University, male and female rats are affected differently by ancestral exposure to a common fungicide, vinclozolin. Female rats whose great grandparents were exposed to vinclozolin become much more vulnerable to stress, becoming more anxious and preferring the company of novel females to familiar females.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Showing releases 26-50 out of 3456.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

     
   

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