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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 3407.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Annals of Neurology
Commonly available blood-pressure medication prevents epilepsy after severe brain injury
A team of neuroscientists has shown in rats that a drug commonly prescribed for hypertension can nearly eliminate the epilepsy that often follows severe head injury. The drug blocks a receptor on astrocytes, preventing a cascade of signals that lead to inflammation and neuron damage. The experiments, led by Daniela Kaufer of UC Berkeley, Alon Friedman and Uwe Heinemann, also prove that epilepsy results from temporary breaks in the blood-brain barrier following head trauma.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bakar Fellows Program

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Grant to fund research on possible cell contaminants
Scientists at the University of Texas at Dallas have received a federal grant to investigate how tiny carbon structures used in the manufacture of many everyday products might affect human health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Amanda Siegfried
amanda.siegfried@utdallas.edu
972-883-4335
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Science Signaling
A gene within a gene contributes to the aggressiveness of acute myeloid leukemia
A small gene that is embedded in a larger gene plays a much greater role in promoting acute myeloid leukemia than the better-known host gene, according to a new study by Ohio State University cancer researchers. The research also identified a drug that inhibits expression of the smaller gene.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Coleman Leukemia Research Foundation, Pelotonia Fellowship Program

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Penn Medicine researchers uncover hints of a novel mechanism behind general anesthetic action
Despite decades of common use for surgeries of all kinds, the precise mechanism through which general anesthesia works on the body remains a mystery. New research led by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania investigated the common anesthetic sevoflurane and found that it binds at multiple key cell membrane protein locations that may contribute to the induction of the anesthetic response. Their findings will appear online in PNAS.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Lee-Ann Donegan
leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5660
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Scientists target receptor to treat diabetic retinopathy
Like a daily pill to lower cholesterol can reduce heart attack and stroke risk, an easy-to-use agent that reduces eye inflammation could help save the vision of diabetics, scientists say.
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Malfunction in molecular 'proofreader' prevents repair of UV-induced DNA damage
Malfunctions in the molecular 'proofreading' machinery, which repairs structural errors in DNA caused by ultraviolet light damage, help explain why people who have the disease xeroderma pigmentosum are at an extremely high risk for developing skin cancer, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. Their findings will be published in the early online version of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
srikamav@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists find key steps linking dietary fats and colon cancer tumor growth
Scientists have shown new genetic evidence that could strengthen the link between the role of dietary fats with colon cancer progression. The study, led by Arizona State University researcher and physician Dr. Raymond DuBois, M.D., Ph.D., has identified a molecular culprit, called peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta, that, when deleted in a mouse model of colon cancer, stopped key steps required for the initiation and progression of tumor growth.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
joseph.caspermeyer@asu.edu
480-258-8972
Arizona State University

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Safer alternatives to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory pain killers
Building on previous work that showed that deleting an enzyme in the COX-2 pathway in a mouse model of heart disease slowed the development of atherosclerosis, researchers have now extended this observation by clarifying that the consequence of deleting the enzyme mPEGS-1 differs, depending on the cell type in which it is taken away. They are now working on ways to deliver inhibitors of mPGES-1 selectively to the macrophages.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Pediatrics
UCSF study finds codeine often prescribed to children, despite available alternatives
Despite its potentially harmful effects in children, codeine continues to be prescribed in US emergency rooms, according to new research from UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital San Francisco.
NIH/National Institute for Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Juliana Bunim
juliana.bunim@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 20-Apr-2014
Nature Medicine
Study of gut microbes, antibiotics: Clues to improving immunity in premature infants
Mothers give a newborn baby a gift of germs -- germs that help to kick-start the infant's immune system. But antibiotics, used to fight bacterial infection, may paradoxically interrupt a newborn's own immune responses, leaving already-vulnerable premature babies more susceptible to dangerous pathogens
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Alison Fraser
Frasera1@email.chop.edu
267-426-6054
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 20-Apr-2014
Nature Biotechnology
Computational method dramatically speeds up estimates of gene expression
With gene expression analysis growing in importance for both basic researchers and medical practitioners, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Maryland have developed a new computational method that dramatically speeds up estimates of gene activity from RNA sequencing data.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 20-Apr-2014
Nature Cell Biology
Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance
Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a molecule, or biomarker, called CD61 on the surface of drug-resistant tumors that appears responsible for inducing tumor metastasis by enhancing the stem cell-like properties of cancer cells.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Yadira Galindo
ygalindo@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 20-Apr-2014
Nature Chemical Biology
'Chaperone' compounds offer new approach to Alzheimer's treatment
A team of researchers from Columbia University Medical Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Brandeis University has devised a wholly new approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease involving the so-called retromer protein complex. Retromer plays a vital role in neurons, steering amyloid precursor protein (APP) away from a region of the cell where APP is cleaved, creating the potentially toxic byproduct amyloid-beta, which is thought to contribute to the development of Alzheimer's.
National Institiutes of Health, Alzheimer's Association, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Medkoo Biosciences, and others

Contact: Ann Rae Jonas, Doug Levy
cumcnews@columbia.edu
212-305-3900
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Apr-2014
Preventive Medicine
Financial incentives help economically-disadvantaged pregnant smokers quit and improve fetal growth
Smoking prevalence varies by socioeconomic status -- particularly in terms of educational attainment -- putting economically-disadvantaged women at greater risk for smoking during pregnancy and related negative outcomes, including miscarriage, preterm birth, SIDS, and other later adverse effects. An approach using financial incentives has proven effective in increasing quitting and improving fetal growth among this population.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Jennifer Nachbur
jennifer.nachbur@uvm.edu
802-338-8316
University of Vermont

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer
Men who show signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice the risk of actually having prostate cancer than those with no inflammation, according to results of a new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Michelle Potter
mpotter8@jhmi.edu
410-614-2914
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Chronic inflammation may be linked to aggressive prostate cancer
The presence of chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue was associated with high-grade, or aggressive, prostate cancer, and this association was found even in those with low prostate-specific antigen levels, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science Translational Medicine
New clues on tissue scarring in scleroderma
A discovery by scientists could lead to potential new treatments for breaking the cycle of tissue scarring in people with scleroderma. The concept for new therapeutic options centers on findings identifying the role that a specific protein plays in promoting fibrosis.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
Multitarget TB drug could treat other diseases, evade resistance
A drug under clinical trials to treat tuberculosis could be the basis for a class of broad-spectrum drugs that act against various bacteria, fungal infections and parasites, yet evade resistance, according to a study by University of Illinois chemists and collaborators. The team determined the different ways the drug SQ109 attacks the tuberculosis bacterium, how the drug can be tweaked to target other pathogens from yeast to malaria -- and how targeting multiple pathways reduces the probability of pathogens becoming resistant.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
CU researchers discover target for treating dengue fever
Two recent papers by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for dengue fever, West Nile virus, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other disease-causing flaviviruses.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mark Couch
mark.couch@ucdenver.edu
303-724-5377
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
The ilk of human kindness
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that older women, plucky individuals and those who have suffered a recent major loss are more likely to be compassionate toward strangers than other older adults.
National Institutes of Health, John A. Hartford Foundation

Contact: Scott Lafee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Live cell imaging reveals distinct alterations of subcellular glutathione potentials
Glutathione is the most abundant cellular redox buffer that both protects cells from oxidative damage and mediates cellular signaling. Perturbation of glutathione balance has been associated with tumorigenesis; however, due to analytical limitations, the underlying mechanisms behind this relationship are poorly understood. Utilizing a recently developed genetically encoded redox-sensitive probe has revealed differentially regulated redox environments within cellular compartments, and evidence of the contributory role of the p53 protein in supporting cytosolic redox poise.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Vladimir L. Kolossov
viadimer@illinois.edu
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Is Parkinson's an autoimmune disease?
The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the way autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis attack the body's cells.
National Institutes of Health, Caja Madrid Foundation, JPB Foundation, Parkinson's Disease Foundation, and others

Contact: Ann Rae Jonas or Doug Levy
cumcnews@columbia.edu
212-305-3900
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
BUSM researchers find anti-seizure drug may reduce alcohol consumption
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine have discovered that the anti-seizure drug ezogabine, reduced alcohol consumption in an experimental model. The findings, reported in the American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, may lead to more effective treatments for alcoholism.
National Institutes of Health, Gennaro Acampora Charitable Trust Fund

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Neuron
Study IDs new cause of brain bleeding immediately after stroke
By discovering a new mechanism that allows blood to enter the brain immediately after a stroke, researchers at UC Irvine and the Salk Institute have opened the door to new therapies that may limit or prevent stroke-induced brain damage.
American Heart Association, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
New MRSA superbug emerges in Brazil
An international research team led by Cesar A. Arias, M.D., Ph.D., at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has identified a new superbug that caused a bloodstream infection in a Brazilian patient. The report appeared in the April 17 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Cahill
Robert.Cahill@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-3030
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Showing releases 26-50 out of 3407.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

     
   

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