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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 3499.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
European Journal of Human Genetics
Gene interacts with stress and leads to heart disease in some people
A new genetic finding from Duke Medicine suggests that some people who are prone to hostility, anxiety and depression might also be hard-wired to gain weight when exposed to chronic stress, leading to diabetes and heart disease.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Nature
Gut bacteria are protected by host during illness
To protect their gut microbes during illness, sick mice produce specialized sugars in the gut that feed their microbiota and maintain a healthy microbial balance. This protective mechanism also appears to help resist or tolerate additional harmful pathogens, and its disruption may play a role in human diseases such as Crohn's disease, report scientists from the University of Chicago in Nature on Oct 1.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Journal of the American Heart Association
Hypertension risk rises closer to major roadways
In a newly published analysis, the risk of high blood pressure among 5,400 post-menopausal women was higher the closer they lived to a major roadway. The result, which accounts for a wide variety of possible confounding factors, adds to concerns that traffic exposure may present public health risks.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Brown University

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Nature
Genetic secrets of the monarch butterfly revealed
Sequencing the genomes of monarch butterflies from around the world, a team of scientists has made surprising new insights into the monarch's genetics. They identified a single gene that appears central to migration -- a behavior generally regarded as complex -- and another that controls pigmentation. The researchers also shed light on the evolutionary origins of the monarch. They report their findings Oct. 1 in Nature.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Drug treats inherited form of intellectual disability in mice
Studying mice with a genetic change similar to what is found in Kabuki syndrome, a inherited disease of humans, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have used an anticancer drug to 'open up' DNA and improve mental function. Along with a potential treatment for the intellectual disability seen in Kabuki syndrome, the study's findings also suggest a new way of thinking about a category of genetic diseases known as Mendelian disorders of the epigenetic machinery, the researchers say.
William S. Smilow Center for Marfan Syndrome Research, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health, American Academy of Pediatrics' Section on Genetics and Birth Defects

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Decreased ability to identify odors can predict death
The inability of older adults to identify scents is a strong predictor of death within five years. Almost 40 percent of those who failed a smelling test died during that period, compared to 10 percent of those with a healthy sense of smell. Olfactory dysfunction predicted mortality better than a diagnosis of heart failure or cancer.
National Institutes of Health, McHugh Otolaryngology Research Fund, American Geriatrics Society, University of Chicago/Institute of Translational Medicine

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
New diagnostic approach for autism in Tanzania
Researchers at Brown University and the University of Georgia have developed and tested an approach for diagnosing autism in Tanzania, where such clinical assessment and intervention services are rare. The assessment battery combines several existing but culturally adapted techniques into a protocol that the researchers tested with 41 children at two Tanzanian sites.
Brown University, National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
UMD receives inaugural BRAIN Initiative award
University of Maryland and National Institutes of Health researchers received a three-year $1.7 million grant from the NIH to develop new imaging technologies and data analysis techniques that will further our understanding of how large networks of neurons in the brain interact to process sensory information. This knowledge will help researchers identify the precise interactions between millions of nerve cells that drive behavior and alterations in these interactions that may be responsible for brain disorders.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Abby Robinson
abbyr@umd.edu
301-405-5845
University of Maryland

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Comprehensive study of allergic deaths in US finds medications are main culprit
Medications are the leading cause of allergy-related sudden deaths in the US, according to an analysis conducted by researchers at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine . The study, published online today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, also found that the risk of fatal drug-induced allergic reactions was particularly high among older people and African-Americans and that such deaths increased significantly in the US in recent years.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Salk scientists receive $3 million for BRAIN Initiative grant
This three-year award will advance a novel approach to understanding the brain.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Nature Immunology
UCI study uncovers important process for immune system development
Research by UC Irvine immunologists reveals new information about how our immune system functions, shedding light on a vital process that determines how the body's ability to fight infection develops.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Heart, Lung & Blood Institute

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Thyroid
New guidelines for treatment of hypothyroidism endorse current therapy
Levothyroxine is considered the gold standard therapy for an underactive thyroid gland, and a new review of therapies for the condition -- including combining levothyroxine with another agent -- has not altered that assessment, say a team of investigators.Their analysis, published as a set of guidelines in the journal Thyroid (available free online), finds insufficient consistent data exist to recommend a change in use of levothyroxine -- whether generic, or sold under various trade names, such as Synthroid -- as the only drug needed to treat hypothyroidism.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
NIH taps lab to develop sophisticated electrode array system to monitor brain act
The National Institutes of Health awarded Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory a grant today to develop an electrode array system that will enable researchers to better understand how the brain works through unprecedented resolution and scale.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Integrative Biology
High-speed drug screen
Massachusetts Institute of Technology engineers have devised a way to rapidly test hundreds of different drug-delivery vehicles in living animals, making it easier to discover promising new ways to deliver a class of drugs called biologics, which includes antibodies, peptides, RNA, and DNA, to human patients.
National Institutes of Health, Packard Award in Science and Engineering, Sanofi Pharmaceuticals, Foxconn Technology Group, Hertz Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Dermatology and Therapy
Antioxidant found in grapes uncorks new targets for acne treatment
UCLA researchers have demonstrated how resveratrol, an antioxidant derived from grapes and found in wine, works to inhibit growth of the bacteria that causes acne. The team also found that combining resveratrol with a common acne medication, benzoyl peroxide, may enhance the drug's ability to kill the bacteria and could translate into new treatments.
Women's Dermatologic Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rachel Champeau
rchampeau@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2270
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
NEJM: Crizotinib effective in Phase 1 trial against ROS1 lung cancer
In this multi-center study of 50 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer testing positive for ROS1 gene rearrangement, the response rate was 72 percent, with 3 complete responses and 33 partial responses. Median progression-free survival was 19.2 months.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Four Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists will contribute to President Obama's BRAIN Initiative under new NIH grants
Four scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory will perform research in President Obama's BRAIN Initiative under two new Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory grants announced in Washington today.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Pitt team searches for genetic roots of cleft lip, palate
An $11.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health will help University of Pittsburgh researchers explore the genetic roots of craniofacial disorders, including cleft lip and palate, and expand these efforts to populations in Colombia, Nigeria, the Philippines and Pennsylvania.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
SrikamAV@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
CWRU researchers receives $2.06 million to study how patients make end-of-life decisions
The choice to die at home surrounded by loved ones comes too late for some cancer patients. Why that happens and how to change the process so that more patients may die as they wish is the focus of new research the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University will pursue with a four-year, $2.06 million grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research.
NIH/National Institute of Nursing Research

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Genes and Development
New genetic 'operating system' facilitated evolution of 'bilateral' animals
The evolution of worms, insects, vertebrates and other 'bilateral' animals -- those with distinct left and right sides -- from less complex creatures like jellyfish and sea anemones with 'radial' symmetry may have been facilitated by the emergence of a completely new 'operating system' for controlling genetic instructions in the cell.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Clinical Psychological Science
Alcohol makes smiles more 'contagious,' but only for men
Consuming an alcoholic beverage may make men more responsive to the smiles of others in their social group, according to new research in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings suggest that, for men, alcohol increases sensitivity to rewarding social behaviors like smiling, and may shed light on risk factors that contribute to problem drinking among men.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Sleep
Study shows that tongue size and fat may predict sleep apnea risk in obese adults
A new study of obese adults is the first to show that those who have obstructive sleep apnea have a significantly larger tongue with a higher percentage of fat than obese controls. This may provide a mechanistic explanation for the relationship between obesity and sleep apnea.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Lynn Celmer
lcelmer@aasmnet.org
630-737-9700
American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Endoscopists recommend frequent colonoscopies, leading to its overuse
A retrospective study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital, has found an overuse of colonoscopies for colorectal cancer screening and surveillance. The study demonstrated that endoscopists commonly recommended shorter follow-up intervals than established guidelines support, and these recommendations were strongly correlated with subsequent colonoscopy overuse.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-525-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Journal of the American Heart Association
Low social support linked to poor health in young heart attack survivors
Lower social support is associated with poorer health and quality of life and more depressive symptoms in young men and women a year after having a heart attack.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Cathy Lewis
cathy.lewis@heart.org
214-706-1324
American Heart Association

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
PLOS Biology
At dusk and dawn: Scientists pinpoint biological clock's synchronicity
Scientists have uncovered how pacemaker neurons are synchronized at dusk and dawn in order to maintain the proper functioning of their biological clocks. Their findings enhance our understanding of how sleep-wake cycles are regulated and offer promise for addressing related afflictions.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Showing releases 251-275 out of 3499.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

     
   

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