NIH Director Page NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIH Social Media and Outreach
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Videos
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 3555.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Cancer Cell
Research on a rare cancer exposes possible route to new treatments
Researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah discovered the unusual role of lactate in the metabolism of alveolar soft part sarcoma and also confirmed that a fusion gene is the cancer-causing agent in this disease.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Linda Aagard
801-587-7639
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Current Biology
Elderly brains learn, but maybe too much
Learning requires both mental flexibility, or 'plasticity,' and stability. A new study finds that in learning a visual task, older people exhibited a surprising degree of plasticity, but had trouble filtering out irrelevant information, suggesting that their learning was not as stable.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Genome Research
Bioengineering study finds two-cell mouse embryos already talking about their future
Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego have discovered that mouse embryos are contemplating their cellular fates in the earliest stages after fertilization when the embryo has only two to four cells, a discovery that could upend the scientific consensus about when embryonic cells begin differentiating into cell types. Their research, which used single-cell RNA sequencing to look at every gene in the mouse genome, was published recently in the journal Genome Research.
National Institutes of Health, March of Dimes Foundation

Contact: Catherine Hockmuth
chockmuth@ucsd.edu
858-822-1359
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
UTMB part of national research group awarded $20 million HIV grant
The University of Texas Medical Branch is part of a collaboration led by the Oak Crest Institute of Science that received a $20 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a novel intravaginal ring capable of delivering powerful antiretroviral drugs to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted HIV in women. The total award to University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston is approximately $2.5 million.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Journal of Neurotrauma
Penn researchers identify protein that predicts post-concussion severity in professional athletes
New Penn Medicine research has found that elevated levels in the blood of the brain-enriched protein calpain-cleaved αII-spectrin N-terminal fragment, known as SNTF, shortly after sports-related concussion can predict the severity of post-concussion symptoms in professional athletes. The complete findings were released today in the Journal of Neurotrauma.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lee-Ann Donegan
leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5660
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Science Signaling
New insights into breast cancer spread could yield better tests and treatments
A study combining patients' tumor cells with a laboratory model of blood vessel lining provides the most compelling evidence so far that a specific trio of cells is required for the spread of breast cancer. The findings could lead to better tests for predicting whether a woman's breast cancer will spread. The study, led by researchers at the NCI-designated Albert Einstein Cancer Center and Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care, published today in Science Signaling.
National Institutes of Health, Breast Cancer Alliance, Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, Einstein Integrated Imaging Program

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Vaccine
Powdered measles vaccine found safe in early clinical trials
A measles vaccine made of fine dry powder and delivered with a puff of air triggered no adverse side effects in early human testing and it is likely effective, according to a paper to be published Nov. 28 in the journal Vaccine. The paper is now available online.
National Institutes of Health, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Robert Sievers
Bob.Sievers@colorado.edu
303-492-7943
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Cell Reports
A link between DNA transcription and disease-causing expansions
Scientists have believed that the lengthening of those repeats occur during DNA replication when cells divide or when the cellular DNA repair machinery gets activated. Recently, however, Tufts scientists have discovered another process called transcription, which is copying the information from DNA into RNA, could also been involved.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Alex Reid
alexander.reid@tufts.edu
617-627-4173
Tufts University

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Vegetable oil ingredient key to destroying gastric disease bacteria
The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is strongly associated with gastric ulcers and cancer. To combat the infection, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Jacobs School of Engineering developed LipoLLA, a therapeutic nanoparticle that contains linolenic acid, a component in vegetable oils. In mice, LipoLLA was safe and more effective against H. pylori infection than standard antibiotic treatments.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Heather Buschman
hbuschman@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A hybrid vehicle that delivers DNA
A new hybrid vehicle is under development. Its performance isn't measured by the distance it travels, but rather the delivery of its cargo: vaccines that contain genetically engineered DNA to fight HIV, cancer, influenza and other maladies. Described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the technology could help unleash the potential of DNA vaccines, which despite two decades of research, have yet to make a significant impact in the treatment of major illnesses.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Biological Psychiatry
Researchers shed new light on the genetics of memory performance
In the largest study of the genetics of memory ever undertaken, an international researcher team including scientists from Boston University School of Medicine, have discovered two common genetic variants that are believed to be associated with memory performance. The findings, which appear in the journal Biological Psychiatry, are a significant step towards better understanding how memory loss is inherited.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute-Framingham Heart Study, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Aging

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association
Vanderbilt team uses e-health records to search for hidden drug benefits
With research and development costs for many drugs reaching well into the billions, pharmaceutical companies want more than ever to determine whether their drugs already at market have any hidden therapeutic benefits that could warrant putting additional indications on the label and increase production.
National Institutes of Health, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
BMC Public Health
International team reveals barriers to public health data-sharing; life-saving solutions
Barriers to the sharing of public health data hamper decision-making efforts on local, national and global levels, and stymie attempts to contain emerging global health threats, an international team led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health announced today.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Female color perception affects evolution of male plumage in birds
The expression of a gene involved in female birds' color vision is linked to the evolution of colorful plumage in males, reports a new study from the University of Chicago. The findings, published Nov. 26 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, confirm the essential role of female color perception in mate selection and sexual dimorphism.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Web-savvy older adults who regularly indulge in culture may better retain 'health literacy'
Older people who are active Internet users and who regularly indulge in a spot of culture may be better able to retain their health literacy, and therefore maintain good health, suggests research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
NIH/National Institute of Aging

Contact: Emma Dickinson
edickinson@bmj.com
44-207-383-6529
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Johns Hopkins scientists link gene to tamoxifen-resistant breast cancers
After mining the genetic records of thousands of breast cancer patients, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have identified a gene whose presence may explain why some breast cancers are resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used hormone treatment generally used after surgery, radiation and other chemotherapy.
Department of Defense's Breast Cancer Research Program, Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute, Avon Foundation, Stetler Fund, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, National Institutes of Health, National Institutes of Health Cancer Center Support Grant

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Boy moms more social in chimpanzees
Four decades of chimpanzee observations reveals the mothers of sons are 25 percent more social than the mothers of daughters, spending about two hours more per day with other chimpanzees than the girl moms did. Researchers from Duke and George Washington University believe mothers are giving young males the opportunity to observe males in social situations to help them develop the social skills they'll need to thrive in adult male competition.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Harris Steel Group, Windibrow Foundation, Carnegie Corporation, University of Minnesota, Duke University, National Geographic Society

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Narrow time window exists to start HIV therapy, study shows
HIV-1 infected US military members and beneficiaries treated with antiretroviral therapy soon after infection were half as likely to develop AIDS and were more likely to reconstitute their immune-fighting CD4+ T-cells to normal levels, researchers reported Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.
US Department of Veterans Affairs, National Institutes of Health, Doris Duke Foundation, Elisabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Muscle relaxant may be viable treatment for rare form of diabetes
A commonly prescribed muscle relaxant may be an effective treatment for a rare but devastating form of diabetes, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report. The drug, dantrolene, prevents the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in animal models of Wolfram syndrome and in cells taken from patients who have the illness.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, American Diabetes Association, Team Alejandro, Team Ian, Ellie White Foundation for Rare Genetic Disorders

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Pain and itch in a dish
A team led by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute has found a simple method to convert human skin cells into the specialized neurons that detect pain, itch, touch and other bodily sensations. These neurons are also affected by spinal cord injury and involved in Friedreich's ataxia, a devastating and currently incurable neurodegenerative disease that largely strikes children.
Dorris Neuroscience Center, California Institute of Regenerative Medicine, Baxter Family Foundation, Del Webb Foundation, Norris Foundation, Las Patronas, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, and others

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Sleep apnea linked to poor aerobic fitness
People with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea may have an intrinsic inability to burn high amounts of oxygen during strenuous aerobic exercise, according to a new study led by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.
American Sleep Medicine Foundation PSTA Program of Distinction, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Cancer
Survivors of childhood eye cancer experience normal cognitive functioning as adults
Most long-term survivors of retinoblastoma, particularly those who had been diagnosed with tumors by their first birthdays, have normal cognitive function as adults, according to a St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study. The research, which appears in the current issue of the journal Cancer, found that the vast majority of survivors work full time, live independently and fulfill other milestones of adult life.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, ALSAC

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehlau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
JAX research team identifies new mechanism for misfolded proteins in heart disease
A Jackson Laboratory research team has found that the misfolded proteins implicated in several cardiac diseases could be the result not of a mutated gene, but of mistranslations during the 'editing' process of protein synthesis.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, aTyr Pharma Inc., National Foundation for Cancer Research, American Health Assistance Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Joyce Peterson
joyce.peterson@jax.org
207-288-6058
Jackson Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
ACS Nano
ASU, IBM move ultrafast, low-cost DNA sequencing technology a step closer to reality
A team of scientists from Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute and IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center have developed a prototype DNA reader that could make whole genome profiling an everyday practice in medicine. "Our goal is to put cheap, simple and powerful DNA and protein diagnostic devices into every single doctor's office," said Stuart Lindsay, an ASU physics professor and director of Biodesign's Center for Single Molecule Biophysics. Such technology could help usher in the age of personalized medicine.
Roche, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
joseph.caspermeyer@asu.edu
480-727-0369
Arizona State University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Wireless electronic implants stop staph, then dissolve
For the first time, researchers have demonstrated a resorbable electronic implant that eliminated bacterial infection in mice by delivering heat to infected tissue when triggered by a remote wireless signal. The silk and magnesium devices then harmlessly dissolved. This is an important step forward for future development of on-demand medical devices that can be turned on remotely to perform a therapeutic function, such as managing post-surgical infection, and then degrade in the body.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Thurler
kim.thurler@tufts.edu
617-627-3175
Tufts University

Showing releases 251-275 out of 3555.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2014 by AAAS, the science society.