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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 3603.

<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Arthritis & Rheumatology
Seeing the knee in a new light: Fluorescent probe tracks osteoarthritis development
A harmless fluorescent probe injected into a joint may make it easier to diagnose and monitor osteoarthritis, leading to better patient care. A new study led by biomedical researchers at Tufts University reports that such a probe successfully tracked the development of early to moderate osteoarthritis in male mice.
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Science Foundation

Contact: Siobhan Gallagher
Siobhan.gallagher@tufts.edu
617-636-6586
Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Precision medicine in action: Genomic test helps solve medical mystery
Precision medicine is getting a jump-start from a new national initiative announced in President Obama's State of the Union message. One Georgia family has already experienced its benefits: genomic testing called whole exome sequencing helped Mayo Clinic neurologist Zbigniew Wszolek, M.D., solve a medical mystery that had left a boy with painful, jerking spasms that at times prevented him from walking or talking. Dr. Wszolek describes the case in a newly published article in the medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.
Max Kade Foundation, NIH/National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Kevin Punsky
punsky.kevin@mayo.edu
904-953-0746
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Journal of Neuroscience
Cocaine users have impaired ability to predict loss
Cocaine addicted individuals may continue their habit despite unfavorable consequences like imprisonment or loss of relationships because their brain circuits responsible for predicting emotional loss are impaired, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in The Journal of Neuroscience.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Mental Health

Contact: Sasha Walek
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
JAMA
Just knowing isn't enough: Issuing hospital report cards had no impact on surgery outcomes
If you're an older person having a major operation these days, it is very likely that your hospital is receiving a 'report card' on their performance. These reports are designed to prompt hospitals to improve in areas where they perform poorly. That's the good news. The not-so-good news: Those 'report cards' do not seem to be making things better for patients.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Science Signaling
Researchers ID genetic cues for a big heart
An enlarged cardiac muscle can force the heart to work harder to pump blood throughout the body, weakening the organ until it eventually wears out. Duke researchers have uncovered the circuitry of signals that govern the heart's growth in flies, giving insight into a dangerous enlargement of the heart called cardiac hypertrophy that can result from high blood pressure or inherited conditions like Noonan syndrome.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes
1 in 3 people would risk shorter life rather than take daily pill to avoid heart disease
In a survey, one in three adults say they would risk living a shorter life rather than taking a daily pill to prevent cardiovascular disease. About one in five say they were willing to pay $1,000 or more to avoid taking a daily pill for the rest of their lives. Most respondents weren't willing to trade any weeks of life to avoid daily medication.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bridgette McNeill
bridgette.mcneill@heart.org
214-706-1135
American Heart Association

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Journal of Neuroscience
New findings on how the brain ignores distractions
By scanning the brains of people engaged in selective attention to sensations, researchers have learned how the brain appears to coordinate the response needed to ignore distractors. They are now studying whether that ability can be harnessed, for instance to suppress pain.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Journal of Neuroscience
Stanford study ties immune cells to delayed onset of post-stroke dementia
A single stroke doubles a person's risk of developing dementia over the following decade, even when that person's mental ability is initially unaffected. In experiments using both mouse models of stroke and brain-tissue samples from humans, Stanford University School of Medicine researchers have linked the delayed onset of post-stroke dementia to the persistent presence, in the brain, of specialized immune cells that shouldn't be there at all.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bruce Goldman
goldmanb@stanford.edu
650-725-2106
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Researchers determine how the brain controls robotic grasping tools
Grasping an object involves a complex network of brain functions. First, visual cues are processed in specialized areas of the brain. Then, other areas of the brain use these signals to control the hands to reach for and manipulate the desired object. New findings from researchers at the University of Missouri suggest that the cerebellum, a region of the brain that has changed very little over time, may play a critical role. Findings could lead to advancements in assistive technologies benefiting the disabled.
Army Research Laboratory's Army Research Office, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disease

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New mechanism of inheritance could advance study of evolution, disease treatment
UMD geneticist Antony Jose and two of his graduate students are the first to figure out a specific mechanism by which a parent can pass silenced genes to its offspring. Importantly, the team found that this silencing could persist for multiple generations -- more than 25, in the case of this study.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Matthew Wright
mewright@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Environmental Science and Technology
Worms lead way to test nanoparticle toxicity
Rice University scientists use roundworm populations in low-cost, high-throughput toxicity tests for a range of nanoparticles. The tests could cut the cost of determining which nanoparticles should be studied further for applications and for their effects on the environment.
National Institutes of Health, Searle Scholar

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Cell Cycle
Dartmouth researchers discover new mechanism of acquired resistance to breast cancer drugs
In the search for new approaches to treat ERBB2 -- also known as HER2 -- positive breast cancers that have become drug-resistant, Dartmouth investigator Manabu Kurokawa, Ph.D., led a team in discovery of a novel cancer resistance mechanism.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kirk Cassels
kirk.A.Cassels@Hitchcock.org
603-653-6177
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
UI researchers link smoke from fires to tornado intensity
University of Iowa researchers have found that smoke from fires can intensify tornadoes. They examined the effects of smoke -- resulting from spring agricultural land-clearing fires in Central America -- transported across the Gulf of Mexico and encountering tornado conditions already in process in the United States.
NASA, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Institutes of Health, NOAA, Fulbright-CONICYT

Contact: Gary Galluzzo
gary-galluzzo@uiowa.edu
319-384-0009
University of Iowa

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Laying a foundation for treating ALS, spinal cord injury
Su-Chun Zhang, a professor of neuroscience and neurology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Waisman Center, and his research team have published a unique model for learning more about the role of human astrocytes in the Journal of Clinical Investigation today. The findings may lay a foundation for the treatment of a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) and debilitating spinal cord injuries.
National Institutes of Health, Bleser Family Foundation, Busta Foundation, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Su-Chun Zhang
zhang@waisman.wisc.edu
608-265-2543
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
PLOS ONE
Moffitt researchers discover biological markers associated with high-risk pancreatic lesions
Pancreatic cancer affects approximately 46,000 people each year in the United States and ranks fourth among the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Only about 6 percent of individuals with pancreatic cancer will live five years after their diagnosis. One reason for this high mortality rate is the lack of effective tools to detect pancreatic cancer early enough to allow its surgical removal. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are now one step closer to devising an approach to detect pancreatic cancer earlier.
American Chemical Society, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Kim Polacek
kim.polacek@moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
Peptide shows promise in penetrating heart attack scar tissue to regenerate cardiac nerves
Case Western Reserve's chemical compound aimed at restoring spinal cord function may have an additional purpose: stopping potentially fatal arrhythmias after heart attack. A special peptide could address a critical cardiac issue by penetrating heart attack scar tissue to regenerate cardiac nerves. The results of the research appear in the Feb. 2 edition of Nature Communications.
NIH/National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute, NIH/National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke, American Heart Association, Oregon Brain Institute Neurobiology of Disease Fellowship

Contact: Jeannette Spalding
jeannette.spalding@case.edu
216-368-3004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Nature Immunology
New TSRI study shows how immune cells hone their skills to fight disease
A new study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute helps explain how booster shots prompt immune 'memory' to improve, an important step toward the development of more effective, longer-lasting vaccines.
National Institutes of Health, Foundation Bettencourt-Schueller, Swiss National Science Foundation, Novartis Jubliaeumsstiftung, Roche Research Foundation

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
UMass Medical School, WPI developing smartphone app to address stress eating
Researchers at UMass Medical School and Worcester Polytechnic Institute are developing a stress-eating smartphone app that will help users better understand why they overeat, with the support of a $2 million award from the National Institutes of Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Megan Bard
megan.bard@umassmed.edu
508-856-2296
University of Massachusetts Medical School

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Identification of much-needed drug target against MRSA, gram-positive infections
Scientists at the University of Utah and the University of Georgia have uncovered a pharmacological target that could enable development of novel drugs against antibiotic-resistant pathogens, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Vancomycin-resistant enterococci and other infectious Gram-positive organisms such as Listeria and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The target was revealed upon discovery of a Gram-positive bacteria-specific pathway for making heme, an essential iron-carrying molecule. The findings were reported in the journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julie Kiefer
jkiefer@neuro.utah.edu
801-597-4258
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
A simple method to monitor β cell death in individuals at-risk for type 1 diabetes
A new study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation reveals that a DNA biomarker can be used to evaluate the extent of β cell death and type 1 diabetes risk.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Nature Neuroscience
Scientists view effect of whisker tickling on mouse brains
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University have succeeded in peering into the brains of live mice with such precision that they were able to see how the position of specific proteins changed as memories were forged. The technique has broad applications for future studies on learning and on what goes wrong in disorders like autism, Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
JAMA Internal Medicine
Preventive strategies protect against delirium
Delirium can increase a person's risk of falls, lead to prolonged hospital stays and may contribute to over $164 billion in healthcare costs. A new study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research suggests that delirium is also preventable, and that non-medication strategies can reduce risk and improve outcomes. This meta-analysis of 14 studies involving multi-component non-pharmacologic interventions is published this week in JAMA Internal Medicine.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Haley Bridger
hbridger@partners.org
617-525-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Nature Neuroscience
New reset button discovered for circadian clock
A team of Vanderbilt University biologists have found a way to use a laser and an optical fiber to reset an animal's master biological clock: A discovery that could in principle be used therapeutically to treat conditions like seasonal affect disorder, reduce the adverse health effects of night shift work and possibly even cure jet lag.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Cancer Prevention Research
Metformin may lower lung cancer risk in diabetic nonsmokers
Among nonsmokers who had diabetes, those who took the diabetes drug metformin had a decrease in lung cancer risk.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Too many heart failure patients are treated with IV fluids, study finds
Many patients hospitalized with severe heart failure are receiving potentially harmful treatment with intravenous fluids, a Yale-led study has found.
Patrick and Catherine Weldon Donaghue Medical Research Foundation, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Ziba Kashef
ziba.kashef@yale.edu
203-436-9317
Yale University

Showing releases 276-300 out of 3603.

<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>

     
   

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