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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 3498.

<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Journal of Nutrition
Pica in pregnant teens linked to low iron
In a study of 158 pregnant teenagers in Rochester, N.Y., nearly half engaged in pica -- the craving and intentional consumption of ice, cornstarch, vacuum dust, baby powder and soap, and other nonfood items, reports a new Cornell study. Moreover, such teens had significantly lower iron levels as compared with teens who did not eat nonfood substances.
US Department of Agriculture, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Pitt analysis questions use of acute hemodialysis treatment
A common approach to treating kidney failure by removing waste products from the blood did not improve survival chances for people who suddenly developed the condition, in an analysis led by experts at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rick Pietzak
PietzakR@upmc.edu
412-864-4151
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Maturing brain flips function of amygdala in regulating stress hormones
In contrast to evidence that the amygdala stimulates stress responses in adults, Yerkes researchers have found that the amygdala has an inhibitory effect on stress hormones during the early development of nonhuman primates. Adds to evidence for a developmental switch in amygdala function and connectivity.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
$14.5 million grant awarded to continue anthrax studies
The National Institutes of Health has awarded the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation a five-year, $14.5 million grant to continue its research on anthrax and the bacteria's effects on humans. Studies will focus on three areas: parts of the anthrax bacteria that cause inflammation and human pathology of the disease, the anthrax vaccine that is administered to US military personnel, and testing human components that contribute to inflammation accompanying bacterial infections.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Shari Hawkins
shari-hawkins@omrf.org
405-271-8537
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Regular blood transfusions can stave off repeat strokes in children with sickle cell disease
Monthly blood transfusions can substantially reduce the risk of recurrent strokes in children with sickle cell disease who have already suffered a silent stroke, according to the results of an international study by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, Vanderbilt University and 27 other medical institutions.
The National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epeshev1@jhmi.edu
410-502-9433
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Journal of Pediatrics
Teen sleeplessness piles on risk for obesity
Teenagers who don't get enough sleep may wake up to worse consequences than nodding off during chemistry class. According to new research, risk of being obese by age 21 was 20 percent higher among 16-year-olds who got less than six hours of sleep a night, compared with their peers who slumbered more than eight hours.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Timothy Paul
tim.paul@gmail.com
917-743-8004
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Cell Reports
Vanderbilt researchers find that coronary arteries hold heart-regenerating cells
Endothelial cells residing in the coronary arteries can function as cardiac stem cells to produce new heart muscle tissue, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered.
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health, Certificate Program in Molecular Medicine

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
The internet was delivered to the masses; parallel computing is not far behind
The groundwork for Virginia Tech's Wu Feng's big data research in a 'cloud' began in the mid-2000s with a multi-institutional effort to identify missing gene annotations in genomes. Today, this work is being formalized and extended as part of an National Science Foundation/Microsoft Computing in the Cloud grant that seeks to commoditize biocomputing in the cloud.
National Science Foundation, Microsoft, National Institutes of Health, US Air Force

Contact: Lynn Nystrom
tansy@vt.edu
540-231-4371
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Combined drugs and therapy most effective for severe nonchronic depression
The odds that a person who suffers from severe, nonchronic depression will recover are improved by as much as 30 percent if they are treated with a combination of cognitive therapy and antidepressant medicine rather than by antidepressants alone. However, a person with chronic or less severe depression does not receive the same additional benefit from combining the two.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Early bottlenecks in developing biopharmaceutical products delay commercialization
An analysis of patented university inventions licensed to biotechnology firms has revealed early bottlenecks on the path to commercialization. To open these roadblocks, the researchers suggest that better communication of basic research results during the discovery stage could lead to faster commercialization down the road.
Office of Science Policy Analysis, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
How lizards regenerate their tails: Researchers discover genetic 'recipe'
By understanding the secret of how lizards regenerate their tails, researchers may be able to develop ways to stimulate the regeneration of limbs in humans. Now, a team of researchers from Arizona State University is one step closer to solving that mystery. The scientists have discovered the genetic 'recipe' for lizard tail regeneration, which may come down to using genetic ingredients in just the right mixture and amounts.
National Institutes of Health, Arizona Biomedical Research Commission

Contact: Sandra Leander
sandra.leander@asu.edu
480-965-9865
Arizona State University

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Severing nerves may shrink stomach cancers: Botox injections slow growth of tumors in mice
Research from Columbia University Medical Center shows that nerves may play a critical role in stomach cancer growth and that blocking nerve signals using surgery or Botox could be an effective treatment for the disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lucky Tran
lt2549@cumc.columbia.edu
212-305-3689
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Nature
New research shows seals and sea lions likely spread tuberculosis to humans
Scientists who study tuberculosis have long debated its origins. New research shows that tuberculosis likely spread from humans in Africa to seals and sea lions that brought the disease to South America and transmitted it to Native people there before Europeans landed on the continent.
National Science Foundation, European Research Council, Smithsonian Institution, Swiss National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Wenner-Gren Foundation, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Julie Newberg
480-727-3116
Arizona State University

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Regular blood transfusions can reduce repeat strokes in children with sickle cell disease
Vanderbilt-led research, as part of an international, multicenter trial, found regular blood transfusion therapy significantly reduces the recurrence of silent strokes and strokes in children with sickle cell anemia who have had pre-existing silent strokes, according to study results released today in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Ashley Culver
ashley.culver@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
'Deep sequencing' picks up hidden causes of brain disorders
A study from Boston Children's Hospital used a 'deep sequencing' technique and was able to identify subtle somatic mutations -- those affecting just a percentage of cells -- in patients with brain disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, University of Washington, Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Science

Contact: Keri Stedman
keri.stedman@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
Boston Children's Hospital

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Science Translational Medicine
UTMB researchers develop treatment effective against lethal Marburg virus
For the first time, researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, in collaboration with Tekmira Pharmaceuticals, have protected nonhuman primates against Marburg virus -- Angola hemorrhagic fever. Their treatment was shown to be effective at a point when animals have detectable levels of the virus in their system and begin to show symptoms of the disease. The study appears in the Aug. 20 edition of the journal Science Translational Medicine.
US Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Neurology
Common infections tied to some stroke risk in kids
A new study suggests that colds and other minor infections may temporarily increase stroke risk in children. The study found that the risk of stroke was increased only within a three-day period between a child's visit to the doctor for signs of infection and having the stroke.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Juliana Bunim
juliana.bunim@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Study identifies protein that helps prevent active tuberculosis in infected patients
A UCLA-led study has identified a protein that appears to play a key role in protecting people infected with the tuberculosis bacteria from developing the active form of the disease. The findings could help doctors identify people who are at the greatest risk for developing disease as well as target new treatment strategies. The study also demonstrates a unique role for vitamin D -- the protein can only kill the bacteria when there are adequate levels of this vitamin present.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Rachel Champeau
rchampeau@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2270
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Brain
Research helps explain why elderly have trouble sleeping
As people grow older, they often have trouble falling asleep and staying asleep. Now a new study helps explain why sleep becomes more fragmented with age.
National Institutes of Health, Dana Foundation, Canadian Institutes of Health, Illinois Department of Public Health, Robert C. Borwell Endowment Fund

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
JAHA: Journal of the American Heart Association
Exercise may protect older women from irregular heartbeat
Both normal weight and obese older women can reduce their risk of developing a life-threatening irregular heartbeat by doing more physical activity. Despite earlier research suggestions, strenuous physical activity doesn't raise the risk of atrial fibrillation in older women.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, US Department of Health and Human Services, American Heart Association

Contact: Darcy Spitz
darcy.spitz@heart.org
212-878-5940
American Heart Association

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Treating gastric cancer -- with Botox
In an article published in the Aug. 20 edition of Science Translational Medicine, a team of international researchers reports that gastric cancer growth could be suppressed by eliminating the signals sent by nerves that are linked to cancer stem cells. The use of Botox to cut the connection between the nerves and the stem cells made the treatment cheap, safe and efficient.
Research Council of Norway, National Institutes of Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, St. Olavs University Hospital

Contact: Duan Chen
duan.chen@ntnu.no
47-984-09675
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Public Health Nutrition
Guiding stars
Can nutrition rating systems be used in supermarkets to encourage healthier spending habits? A new study by Cornell University researchers sought to answer that very question by tracking the purchasing records in a supermarket chain that uses the Guiding Stars System to rate the nutritional value of foods for sale.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sandra Cuellar
foodandbrandlab@cornell.edu
607-254-4960
Cornell Food & Brand Lab

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Neuro-Oncology
Markey researchers develop web-based app to predict glioma mutations
A new web-based program developed by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers will provide a simple, free way for healthcare providers to determine which brain tumor cases require testing for a genetic mutation.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Peter and Carmen Lucia Buck Training Program in Translational Clinical Oncology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine Physician Scientist Program

Contact: Allison Perry
allison.perry@uky.edu
859-323-2399
University of Kentucky

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Journal of Pediatrics
In-utero methadone, subutex exposure could alter gene expression, cause severe neonatal abstience syndrome
Some infants born with neonatal abstinence syndrome secondary to in-utero opioid exposure have a more difficult time going through withdrawal than others, but the underlying reasons are not well understood. While genetic and epigenetic (when genes are turned on or off) changes have recently been identified as potential factors, researchers at Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center conducted a first of its kind study to identify some of these epigenetic changes that may influence symptom severity.
National Institutes of Health, Tufts Medical Center, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, Toomim Family Fund, Boston University, Alpert Foundation

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Biomarker in an aggressive breast cancer is identified
Northwestern University scientists have identified a biomarker strongly associated with basal-like breast cancer, a highly aggressive carcinoma that is resistant to many types of chemotherapy. The biomarker, a protein called STAT3, provides a smart target for new therapeutics designed to treat this often deadly cancer. Using patient data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, the researchers used bioinformatics techniques and found that a small number of genes are activated by STAT3 protein signaling in basal-like breast cancers but not in luminal breast cancers.
H Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Showing releases 276-300 out of 3498.

<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>

     
   

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