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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 3448.

<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Study links autistic behaviors to enzyme
Biomedical scientists at the University of California, Riverside have published a study today that sheds light on the cause of autistic behaviors in Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common cause of autism. They found that an enzyme, MMP-9, plays a critical role. Working on mice, the researchers targeted MMP-9 as a potential therapeutic target in FXS and showed that genetic deletion of MMP-9 favorably impacts key aspects of FXS-associated anatomical and behaviors.
FRAXA Research Foundation, National Institutes of Health, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
The Journal of Neuroscience
Gene inhibitor, salmon fibrin restore function lost in spinal cord injury
A therapy combining salmon fibrin injections into the spinal cord and injections of a gene inhibitor into the brain restored voluntary motor function impaired by spinal cord injury, scientists at UC Irvine's Reeve-Irvine Research Center have found.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Researchers unlock the protein puzzle
By using brightly hued dyes, George Mason University researchers discovered an innovative way to reveal where proteins touch each other, possibly leading to new treatments for cancer, arthritis, heart disease and even lung disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michele McDonald
mmcdon15@gmu.edu
703-993-8781
George Mason University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
Toward an oral therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease: Using a cancer drug
Currently, no cure exists for Alzheimer's disease, the devastating neurological disease affecting more than 5 million Americans. However, scientists are now reporting new progress on a set of compounds, initially developed for cancer treatment, that shows promise as a potential oral therapy for Alzheimer's. Their study appears in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.
National Institutes of Health, Marian S. Ware Alzheimer's program, Penn Medicine Neuroscience Center

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
Vanderbilt-led study identifies genes linked to breast cancer in East Asian women
A new study in East Asian women has identified three genetic changes linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. The research, led by Vanderbilt University investigators, was published in Nature Genetics.
National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

Contact: Dagny Stuart
dagny.stuart@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature
Age of puberty in girls influenced by which parent their genes are inherited from
The age at which girls reach sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes, a small sub-set of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent passes on that gene, according to new research published today in the journal Nature.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Diabetes
UTMB researchers discover that brown fat protects against diabetes and obesity in humans
Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have shown for the first time that people with higher levels of brown fat, or brown adipose tissue, in their bodies have better blood sugar control, higher insulin sensitivity and a better metabolism for burning fat stores.
National Institutes of Health, American Diabetes Association, UTMB/Institute for Translational Sciences, Shriners Hospitals for Children, UTMB/Claude Pepper Older Americans Independence Center, UTMB/Sealy Center on Aging

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature
Age of puberty in girls influenced by which parent their genes are inherited from
The age at which girls reach sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes, a small sub-set of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent passes on that gene, according to new research published in the journal Nature.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Coriell Institute for Medical Research, National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, New South Wales Cancer Council, Victorian Health Promotion Foundation, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Craig Brierley
craig.brierley@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-66205
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature
New view of stomach cancer could hasten better therapies
In a massive effort to catalog the molecular causes of stomach cancer, scientists, including researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, have identified four subtypes of tumors based on shared mutations and other molecular abnormalities. They say the new classification promises to advance clinical research to develop improved therapies for the third-leading cancer killer worldwide.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Science Translational Medicine
UNC researchers find unsuspected characteristics of new CF drugs, offering potential paths to more effective therapies
Last month, the pharmaceutical company Vertex released results from a large phase 3 clinical trial for cystic fibrosis patients, showing that a combination of two new cystic fibrosis drugs modestly improved lung function and offered better health outcomes for some patients. Now, scientists at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and the University of North Carolina Marsico Lung Institute have shown that one of these drugs counteracts the intended beneficial molecular effect of the other.
National Institutes of Health, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Else Kröner-Fresenius Foundation

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unchealth.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Combination antiretroviral therapy helps treat HCV in patients co-infected with HIV
Treatment of HIV patients co-infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) with an anti-retroviral drug therapy not only tackles HIV, but also reduces HCV replication, according to a new study lead by a University of Cincinnati researcher.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NHI/National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, Department of Energy

Contact: Cedric Ricks
cedric.ricks@uc.edu
513-558-4657
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Oral Oncology
Anti-pain agent shrinks oral cancers, leaves healthy tissues alone
Oral cancers strike thousands of Americans annually, inflicting pain and shortening their lives. New research out of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio showed that an agent called capsazepine reduced the oral tumors in mice without damaging surrounding tissues. It's a hopeful start with more work to go.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Psychosomatic Research
In asthma, it's not just what you smell, but what you think you smell
New research from the Monell Center reveals that simply believing that an odor is potentially harmful can increase airway inflammation in asthmatics for at least 24 hours following exposure. The findings highlight the role that expectations can play in health-related outcomes.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Contact: Leslie Stein
stein@monell.org
267-519-4707
Monell Chemical Senses Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UI study finds potential genetic link between epilepsy and neurodegenerative disorders
A new University of Iowa study, published online July 14 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveals a potential link between epilepsy and neurodegenerative disorders.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gary Galluzzo
gary-galluzzo@uiowa.edu
319-384-0009
University of Iowa

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
The AAPS Journal
Researchers create vaccine for dust-mite allergies
University of Iowa researchers have created a vaccine for dust-mite allergies. In lab tests and animal trials, the nano-sized vaccine package was readily absorbed by immune cells and dramatically lowered allergic responses. Results appear in the The AAPS Journal.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society

Contact: Richard Lewis
richard-c-lewis@uiowa.edu
319-384-0012
University of Iowa

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Vanderbilt study shows therapeutic bacteria prevent obesity in mice
A probiotic that prevents obesity could be on the horizon. Bacteria that produce a therapeutic compound in the gut inhibit weight gain, insulin resistance and other adverse effects of a high-fat diet in mice, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Leigh MacMillan
leigh.macmillan@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
VCU receives grant to study molecular marks left by childhood adverse experiences
Virginia Commonwealth University has received a five-year, $3 million grant to study how adverse experiences such as severe illnesses, neglect and maltreatment during childhood leave molecular marks in DNA that predict health risks later in life.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Eric Peters
petersem@vcu.edu
804-828-0563
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Room for improvement in elementary school children's lunches and snacks from home
Open a child's lunch box and you're likely to find that the lunches and snacks inside fall short of federal guidelines, report researchers from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Boston Obesity Research Center

Contact: Andrea Grossman
andrea.grossman@tufts.edu
617-636-3728
Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Nature
LSUHSC contributes to work identifying new DNA regions associated with schizophrenia
Nancy Buccola, assistant professor of clinical nursing at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Nursing, contributed samples used in a study reporting new locations of genetic material associated with schizophrenia and also suggesting a possible link between the immune system and schizophrenia.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Leslie Capo
lcapo@lsuhsc.edu
504-568-4806
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Social Problems
African-American homeownership increasingly less stable and more risky
A new study from sociologists at Rice University and Cornell University found that African-Americans are 45 percent more likely than whites to switch from owning their homes to renting them.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Pediatrics
Low-income students in charter high schools less likely to engage in risky behavior
Low-income minority adolescents who were admitted to high-performing public charter high schools in Los Angeles were significantly less likely to engage in risky health behaviors than their peers who were not admitted to those schools. These students also scored significantly better on California state standardized math and English tests.
NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nano Letters
Penn study: Understanding graphene's electrical properties on an atomic level
For the first time, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have used a cutting-edge microscope to study the relationship between the atomic geometry of a ribbon of graphene and its electrical properties.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy, Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique, South Korea's Ministry of Education, Science and Technology and National Research Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Parents rank their obese children as 'very healthy'
A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine-led study suggests that parents of obese children often do not recognize the potentially serious health consequences of childhood weight gain or the importance of daily physical activity in helping their child reach a healthy weight.
Hasbro Children's Hospital Research Award, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Molecular Psychiatry
UCI researchers find epigenetic tie to neuropsychiatric disorders
Dysfunction in dopamine signaling profoundly changes the activity level of about 2,000 genes in the brain's prefrontal cortex and may be an underlying cause of certain complex neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, according to UC Irvine scientists.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Studying estrogens made by the brain may offer new insights in learning and memory
New studies being launched by neurobiologist Luke Remage-Healey at the University of Massachusetts Amherst will investigate how estrogens produced in the brains of young birds enhance their ability to learn songs during a critical window during development. This period has a parallel to universal language development in human children.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Showing releases 276-300 out of 3448.

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