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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 2876-2900 out of 3810.

<< < 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 > >>

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
UCI scientists identify lesion-healing mechanism in psoriasis
A UC Irvine-led study has revealed the underlying genetic factors that help repair skin lesions caused by psoriasis, which could engender new methods of controlling the lingering condition.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Nature
Team discovers how microbes build a powerful antibiotic
Researchers report in the journal Nature that they have made a breakthrough in understanding how a powerful antibiotic agent is made in nature. Their discovery solves a decades-old mystery, and opens up new avenues of research into thousands of similar molecules, many of which are likely to be medically useful.
National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health, Ford Foundation

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Nature
Activity in dendrites is critical in memory formation
Northwestern University researchers have discovered how neurons in the brain might allow some experiences to be remembered while others are forgotten. Using a unique microscope, they peered into the brain of a living animal navigating a virtual reality maze. Images of individual neurons called place cells showed that, surprisingly, the activity of the cell body and its dendrites can be different. A lasting memory of an experience was not formed by neurons when cell bodies were activated but dendrites were not.
Klingenstein Foundation, Whitehall Foundation, Chicago Biomedical Consortium, Northwestern University, National Institutes of Health, Life Sciences Research Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Nature Genetics
Unsuspected gene found frequently mutated in colorectal, endometrial cancers
Scientists say they have identified in about 20 percent of colorectal and endometrial cancers a genetic mutation that had been overlooked in recent large, comprehensive gene searches. With this discovery, the altered gene, called RNF43, now ranks as one of the most common mutations in the two cancer types.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Nature Methods
Real-time readout of neurochemical activity
Scientists have created cells with fluorescent dyes that change color in response to specific neurochemicals. By implanting these cells into living mammalian brains, they have shown how neurochemical signaling changes as a food reward drives learning.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Hoffman-La Roche

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Dietary flavanols reverse age-related memory decline
Dietary cocoa flavanols -- naturally occurring bioactives found in cocoa -- reversed age-related memory decline in healthy older adults, according to a study led by Columbia University Medical Center scientists.
National Institutes of Health, James S. McDonnell Foundation, McKnight Brain Research Foundation, Mars Inc.

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@columbia.edu
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Genetics in Medicine
Clues to genetics of congenital heart defects emerge from Down syndrome study
The largest genetic study of congenital heart defects in individuals with Down syndrome found a connection to rare, large genetic deletions affecting cilia.
NIH/Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
New compounds reduce debilitating inflammation
Six Case Western Reserve scientists are part of an international team that has discovered two compounds that show promise in decreasing inflammation associated with diseases such as ulcerative colitis, arthritis and multiple sclerosis. The compounds, dubbed OD36 and OD38, appear to curtail inflammation-triggering signals from RIPK2. RIPK2 is an enzyme that activates high-energy molecules to prompt the immune system to respond with inflammation. The findings of this research appear in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, Burroughs Wellcome Career Award

Contact: Jeannette Spalding
jeannette.spalding@case.edu
216-368-3004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Genes & Development
A new dent in HIV-1's armor
Salk scientists identify a promising target for HIV/AIDS treatment.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Center for Research Resources, Blasker-Rose-Miah Fund Margaret T. Morris Foundation

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Butler researcher aims to broaden understanding of gamma knife radiosurgery for OCD
Supported by a $750,000 K23 Career Development Award from the National Institutes of Health, Butler Hospital neuropsychologist Nicole McLaughlin, Ph.D., is conducting a first-of-its-kind study of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder undergoing gamma knife radiosurgery. Though this procedure has been used to treat OCD for decades, the mechanisms of action remain virtually unstudied.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Holly Brown-Ayers
hbrownayers@carene.org
401-455-6501
Care New England

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Stem Cells
Scientists engineer toxin-secreting stem cells to treat brain tumors
Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have devised a new way to use stem cells in the fight against brain cancer. A team led by neuroscientist Khalid Shah, M.S., Ph.D., who recently demonstrated the value of stem cells loaded with cancer-killing herpes viruses, now has a way to genetically engineer stem cells so that they can produce and secrete tumor-killing toxins.
National Institutes of Health, James S. McDonnell Foundation

Contact: Joseph Caputo
joseph_caputo@harvard.edu
617-496-1491
Harvard University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Clinical Cancer Research
Dartmouth study measures breast cancer tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy
A Dartmouth study suggests that it may be possible to use Diffuse Optical Spectroscopic Tomographic imaging to predict which patients will best respond to chemotherapy used to shrink breast cancer tumors before surgery. These findings could eliminate delays in effective early treatment for tumors unlikely to respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Robin Dutcher
Robin.Dutcher@hitchcock.org
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
Experimental breast cancer drug holds promise in combination therapy for Ewing sarcoma
Ewing sarcoma tumors disappeared and did not return in more than 70 percent of mice treated with combination therapy that included drugs from a family of experimental agents developed to fight breast cancer, reported St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation for Childhood Cancer, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Tully Family Foundation, ALSAC

Contact: Summer Freeman
summer.freeman@stjude.org
901-595-3061
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Boston College professor to lead $19 million NIH mentoring network
Boston College Biologist David Burgess and other leaders in the field will develop the National Research Mentoring Network through a five-year, $19 million grant from the NIH to increase diversity within the ranks of the nation's biomedical workforce.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ed Hayward
ed.hayward@bc.edu
617-552-4826
Boston College

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
NIH awards Detroit colleges $21.2 million to improve student diversity in biomed research
A consortium of Marygrove College, University of Detroit Mercy, Wayne County Community College District and Wayne State University has been awarded $21.2 million over five years by the National Institutes of Health to implement a program encouraging more undergraduate students from underrepresented and economically disadvantaged backgrounds to pursue careers in biomedical research.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Depression and Anxiety
Pre-enlistment mental disorders and suicidality among new US Army soldiers
Two new reports show that new soldiers and civilians do not differ in their probability of having at least one lifetime mental disorder but that some mental disorders are more common among new soldiers than civilians. In addition, the rates of pre-enlistment suicidality among new soldiers are comparable to matched civilians.
US Department of the Army, US Department of Health and Human Services, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Dispositional mindfulness associated with better cardiovascular health
A new study that measured 'dispositional mindfulness' along with seven indicators of cardiovascular health found that persons reporting higher degrees of awareness of their present feelings and experiences had better health. The research suggests that interventions to improve mindfulness could benefit cardiovascular health, an idea researchers can test.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Lancet Infectious Diseases
Without swift influx of substantial aid, Ebola epidemic in Africa poised to explode
The Ebola virus disease epidemic already devastating swaths of West Africa will likely get far worse in the coming weeks and months unless international commitments are significantly and immediately increased, new research led by Yale researchers predicts.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1345
Yale University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
New insight on why people with Down syndrome invariably develop Alzheimer's disease
Researchers discover the cell events in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome that lead to the amyloid pathology observed in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease. The findings support a novel approach to treating and preventing both diseases.
National Institutes of Health, Alzheimer's Association, Global Down Syndrome Foundation, American Assistance Foundation

Contact: Susan Gammon
sgammon@sanfordburnham.org
858-795-5012
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Florida lizards evolve rapidly, within 15 years and 20 generations
Scientists working on islands in Florida have documented the rapid evolution of a native lizard species -- in as little as 15 years -- as a result of pressure from an invading lizard species, introduced from Cuba.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Christine Sinatra
christine.sinatra@austin.utexas.edu
512-853-0506
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Lancet Infectious Diseases
The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Study predicts that current international commitments will not contain Ebola outbreak in Montserrado, Liberia
New modeling research, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal, has found that the number of Ebola treatment center beds and other measures needed to control the epidemic in Montserrado County, Liberia substantially exceeds the total pledged by the international community to date.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Caroline Brogan
c.brogan@lancet.com
The Lancet

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
JAMA Ophthalmology
Progression of age-related macular degeneration in one eye then fellow eye
Having age-related macular degeneration in one eye was associated with an increased incidence of age-related macular degeneration and accelerated progression of the debilitating disease in the other eye.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Emily Kumlien
EKumlien@uwhealth.org
608-265-8199
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Diabetes Care
Mother's gestational diabetes linked to daughters being overweight later
Women who developed gestational diabetes and were overweight before pregnancy were at a higher risk of having daughters who were obese later in childhood, according to new research published today in Diabetes Care. Based on long-term research that included a multi-ethnic cohort of 421 girls and their mothers (all members of Kaiser Permanente Northern California), the study is among the first to directly link maternal hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) to offspring being overweight later.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Center for Research Resources

Contact: Cyrus Hedayati
chedayati@golin.com
415-318-4377
Kaiser Permanente

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Chemistry and Biology
New TSRI studies bring scientists closer to combating dangerous unstable proteins
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute have discovered a way to decrease deadly protein deposits in the heart, kidney and other organs associated with a group of human diseases called the systemic amyloid diseases.
Arlene & Arnold Goldstein, Ellison Medical Foundation, Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology at TSRI, Lita Annenberg Hazen Foundation, Scripps Research Institute, American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell
Thyroid cancer genome analysis finds markers of aggressive tumors
A new comprehensive analysis of thyroid cancer from the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has identified markers of aggressive tumors, which could allow for better targeting of appropriate treatments to individual patients.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Showing releases 2876-2900 out of 3810.

<< < 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 > >>

     
   

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