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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 2876-2900 out of 3405.

<< < 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 > >>

Public Release: 24-Jun-2013
AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting
Rural women less likely to get radiation therapy after lumpectomy for breast cancer
Rural women with breast cancer are less likely than their urban counterparts to receive recommended radiation therapy after having a lumpectomy, a breast-sparing surgery that removes only tumors and surrounding tissue, a study by Mayo Clinic and others found. The difference is one of several rural disparities in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment the researchers discovered. The findings are being presented at the AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting in Baltimore.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Shelly Plutowski
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 24-Jun-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
2 mutations triggered an evolutionary leap 500 million years ago
A research team led by a University of Chicago scientist has discovered two key mutations that sparked a hormonal revolution 500 million years ago. In a feat of "molecular time travel," the researchers resurrected and analyzed the functions of the ancestors of genes that play key roles in modern human reproduction, development, immunity and cancer.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Kevin Jiang
Kevin.Jiang@UCHospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Jun-2013
Nature Biotechnology
Enhancing RNA interference
Helping RNA escape from cells' recycling process could make it easier to shut off disease-causing genes, says new study from MIT.
Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 24-Jun-2013
Nature
Reading DNA, backward and forward
MIT biologists reveal how cells control the direction in which the genome is read.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 24-Jun-2013
Journal of Organic Chemistry
Oregon chemists moving forward with tool to detect hydrogen sulfide
University of Oregon chemists have developed a selective probe that detects hydrogen sulfide (H2S) levels as low as 190 nanomolar (10 parts per billion) in biological samples. They say the technique could serve as a new tool for basic biological research and as an enhanced detection system for H2S in suspected bacterially contaminated water sources.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 24-Jun-2013
Pediatrics
Pediatric practices can offer smoking cessation assistance to parents of their patients
A study in the journal Pediatrics shows that it is feasible for pediatric practices to incorporate into their normal routine efforts to inform patients' parents about services available to help them quit smoking.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality

Contact: Kory Dodd Zhao
kzhao2@partners.org
617-726-0274
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 24-Jun-2013
Obesity
Pleasure response from chocolate: You can see it in the eyes
The brain's pleasure response to tasting food can be measured through the eyes using a common, low-cost ophthalmological tool, according to a Drexel University-led study just published in the journal Obesity. If validated, this method could be useful for research and clinical applications in food addiction and obesity prevention.
New York Obesity Nutrition Research Center, St. Luke's/Roosevelt Hospital Center, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Rachel Ewing
raewing@drexel.edu
215-895-2614
Drexel University

Public Release: 24-Jun-2013
International Journal of Cancer
Targeted viral therapy destroys breast cancer stem cells in preclinical experiments
A promising new treatment for breast cancer has been shown in cell culture and in animal models to selectively kill cancer stem cells at the original tumor site and in distant metastases with no toxic effects on healthy cells, including normal stem cells. Cancer stem cells are critical to a cancer's ability to recur following conventional chemotherapies and radiation therapy because they can quickly multiply and establish new tumors that are often therapy resistant.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: John Wallace
wallacej@vcu.edu
804-628-1550
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 24-Jun-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Computer models shed new light on sickle cell crisis
Sickle cell crisis, a painful blood blockage common in people with sickle cell disease, isn't just about sickle-shaped red blood cells that block capillaries. According to computer models developed by Brown University researchers, a second, stickier kind of red blood cell starts the obstruction, making it difficult for sickle cells to flow past.
National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 24-Jun-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
NMR advance brings proteins into the open
A key protein interaction, common across all forms of life, had eluded scientists' observation until a team of researchers cracked the case by combining data from four different techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 24-Jun-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Giving children non-verbal clues about words boosts vocabularies
The clues that parents give toddlers about words can make a big difference in how deep their vocabularies are when they enter school, new research at the University of Chicago shows. By using words to reference objects in the visual environment, parents can help young children learn new words, according to the research.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: William Harms
w-harms@uchicago.edu
773-702-8356
University of Chicago

Public Release: 23-Jun-2013
Nature Biotechnology
Powerful gene-editing tool appears to cause off-target mutations in human cells
A team of Massachusetts General Hospital researchers has found a significant limitation to the use of CRISPR-Cas RGNs, production of unwanted DNA mutations at sites other than the desired target, which indicates a need to improve the specificity of the nucleases.
National Institutes of Health, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Jim and Ann Orr Massachusetts General Hospital Research Scholar Award

Contact: Sue McGreevey
smcgreevey@partners.org
617-724-2764
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 23-Jun-2013
Nature Materials
Unexpected discovery of the ways cells move could boost understanding of complex diseases
A new discovery about how cells move may provide scientists with crucial information about disease mechanisms such as the spread of cancer or the constriction of airways caused by asthma. Led by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health and the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia investigators found that epithelial cells move in a group, propelled by forces both from within and from nearby cells, to fill any unfilled spaces they encounter.
Spanish Ministry for Science and Innovation, Swiss National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 21-Jun-2013
MARC travel awards announced for the June 2013 FASEB science research conferences
The FASEB MARC (Maximizing Access to Research Careers) Program has announced the travel award recipient for the FASEB Science Research Conferences held in June 2013. These awards are meant to promote the entry of underrepresented minority students, postdoctorates and scientists into the mainstream of the basic science community and to encourage the participation of young scientists at the FASEB Science Research Conferences. This year MARC conferred five awards totaling $8,000.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Gail Pinder
gpinder@faseb.org
301-634-7021
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 21-Jun-2013
Grant initiates new stem cell research for patients suffering with corneal blindness
A $1.25 million grant from the National Eye Institute initiates new stem cell research for patients suffering with corneal blindness, an issue affecting 8 million people worldwide. Researchers hope to use this grant to further investigate a transplant treatment that will help previously untreatable patients suffering with corneal blindness.
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Cara Lasala
cara.lasala@cshs.org
310-423-7798
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Jun-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Study shows a solitary mutation can destroy critical 'window' of early brain development
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have shown in animal models that brain damage caused by the loss of a single copy of a gene during very early childhood development can cause a lifetime of behavioral and intellectual problems.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 20-Jun-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Compound enhances SSRI antidepressant's effects in mice
A synthetic compound is able to turn off "secondary" vacuum cleaners in the brain that take up serotonin, resulting in the "happy" chemical being more plentiful, scientists from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio have discovered. Their study, released June 18 by The Journal of Neuroscience, points to novel targets to treat depression.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 20-Jun-2013
Analytica Chimica Acta
Light and nanoprobes detect early signs of infection
Duke University biomedical engineers and genome researchers have developed a proof-of-principle approach using light to detect infections before patients show symptoms.
National Institutes of Health, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, US Department of Defense, Wallace H. Coulter Foundation

Contact: Richard Merritt
Richard.merritt@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

Public Release: 20-Jun-2013
Learning and Instruction
Student engagement more complex, changeable than thought
A student who shows up on time for school and listens respectfully in class might appear fully engaged to outside observers, including teachers. But other measures of student engagement, including the student's emotional and cognitive involvement with the course material, may tell a different story -- one that could help teachers recognize students who are becoming less invested in their studies, according to a new study coauthored by a University of Pittsburgh researcher.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Adam Reger
reger@pitt.edu
412-624-4238
University of Pittsburgh

Public Release: 20-Jun-2013
Temple researcher awarded $1.7-million NIH grant to study pediatric spinal cord injury
Most of the new cases of spinal cord injury that are diagnosed in the United States occur in people under age 30, and often the sufferer is a child. Smaller spinal cords in children and a lack of adequate imaging technology has created major problems in precisely locating the site of injury. Thanks to an NIH grant, Temple's Feroze B. Mohamed, Ph.D., is now poised to overcome the challenge of pediatric spinal cord imaging.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeremy Walter
Jeremy.Walter@tuhs.temple.edu
215-707-7882
Temple University Health System

Public Release: 20-Jun-2013
National Institutes of Health to fund research probing proteins linked to cancer, diabetes
Researchers from Polytechnic Institute of New York University and NYU have received a grant from the National Institutes of Health to further a novel approach to understanding the genetic underpinnings of diseases including cancer and diabetes. Jin Kim Montclare and Yingkai Zhang will study the functioning of one of the key proteins in human DNA, called histones, which are subject to modifications by enzymes that affect gene expression, both in health and disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
hamilton@poly.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Public Release: 20-Jun-2013
PLOS ONE
Elevated gluten antibodies found in children with autism but no link to celiac disease
Elevated antibodies to gluten proteins of wheat found in children with autism in comparison to those without autism. Results of a new study also indicated an association between the elevated antibodies and the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms in the affected children. They did not find any connection, however, between the elevated antibodies and celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder known to be triggered by gluten. The results were e-published in the journal PLOS ONE.
Autism Genetic Resource Exchange Consortium, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Department of Defense

Contact: Elizabeth Streich
eas2125@cumc.columbia.edu
212-305-3689
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Jun-2013
ACS Chemical Biology
Scientists design a potential drug compound that attacks Parkinson's disease on 2 fronts
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have found a compound that could counter Parkinson's disease in two ways at once. In a new study published recently online ahead of print by the journal ACS Chemical Biology, the scientists describe a "dual inhibitor"-- two compounds in a single molecule-- that attacks a pair of proteins closely associated with development of Parkinson's disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 20-Jun-2013
Neuro Oncology
Virus combination effective against deadly brain tumor, Moffitt Cancer Center study shows
A combination of the myxoma virus and the immune suppressant rapamycin can kill glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and deadliest malignant brain tumor, according to Moffitt Cancer Center research. Peter A. Forsyth, M.D., of Moffitt's Neuro-Oncology Program, says the combination has been shown to infect and kill both brain cancer stem cells and differentiated compartments of glioblastoma multiforme.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Polacek
kim.polacek@moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 20-Jun-2013
Cell
The link between circadian rhythms and aging
An MIT study finds that a gene associated with longevity also regulates the body's circadian clock.
National Institutes of Health, Glenn Foundation for Medical Research

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Showing releases 2876-2900 out of 3405.

<< < 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 > >>

     
   

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