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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 2876-2900 out of 3614.

<< < 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 > >>

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Genetics
UT Arlington scientists suggest 'Fragile Y Hypothesis' to explain chromosome loss
A new University of Texas at Arlington study in the journal Genetics suggests a 'fragile Y hypothesis' to explain why some species lose their Y chromosome and others, such as humans, keep it. They believe the size of an area where X and Y genetic information mingle or recombine can serve as a strong clue that a species is at risk of losing the Y chromosome during sperm production.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Traci Peterson
tpeterso@uta.edu
817-521-5494
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Stress hormone linked to short-term memory loss as we age
A new study at the University of Iowa reports a potential link between stress hormones and short-term memory loss in older adults. The study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, reveals that having high levels of cortisol -- a natural hormone in our body whose levels surge when we are stressed -- can lead to memory lapses as we age.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Amy Mattson
amy-mattson@uiowa.edu
319-384-0070
University of Iowa

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
A new twist on neuro disease: Discovery could aid people with dystonia, Parkinson's and more
New research in mice may finally open the door to solving long-standing mysteries about dystonia -- uncontrollable twisting and stiffening of neck and limb muscles -- and developing new options for patients who experience it alone or as a complication of conditions such as Parkinson's disease.
Bachmann-Strauss Dystonia and Parkinson Disease Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
American Journal of Psychiatry
Combining treatments boosts some smokers' ability to quit
Combining two smoking cessation therapies is more effective than using just one for male and highly nicotine-dependent smokers who weren't initially helped by the nicotine patch, according to researchers at Duke Medicine.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Philip Morris USA

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Molecular Psychiatry
Study links APC gene to learning and autistic-like disabilities
A new mouse model developed by researchers at Tufts University demonstrates that learning impairments and autistic-like behaviors can be caused by loss of the APC gene in the developing brain, demonstrating that APC regulates critical pathways that link to these disabilities.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Contact: Siobhan E. Gallagher
siobhan.gallagher@tufts.edu
617-636-6586
Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Heparin derivative suppresses neuroblastoma tumor growth
Researchers at Duke Medicine have identified a new strategy for treating neuroblastoma using a modified version of heparin, a century-old injectable drug that thins the blood to prevent clots from forming. The study, conducted in mice and published June 17, 2014, in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, found that when heparin is altered to remove its blood-thinning properties, it can suppress and shrink neuroblastoma tumors without causing severe bleeding.
National Institutes of Health, Alex's Lemonade Stand

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Translational Psychiatry
Single dose reverses autism-like symptoms in mice
In a further test of a novel theory that suggests autism is the consequence of abnormal cell communication, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that an almost century-old drug approved for treating sleeping sickness also restores normal cellular signaling in a mouse model of autism, reversing symptoms of the neurological disorder in animals that were the human biological age equivalent of 30 years old.
Jane Botsford Johnson Foundation, National Institutes of Health, University of California San Diego Christini Fund, Wright Family Foundation

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Radiology
MRI technique may help prevent ADHD misdiagnosis
Brain iron levels offer a potential biomarker in the diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and may help physicians and parents make better informed treatment decisions, according to new research.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Clinical Cancer Research
Low dose of targeted drug might improve cancer-killing virus therapy
Giving low doses of the targeted agent bortezomib with a cancer-killing virus might improve the effectiveness of the virus as a treatment for cancer with little added toxicity. The findings support the testing of this combination therapy in a clinical trial.
National Institutes of Health, Ohio State University Pelotonia Fellowship Program

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
Pathological gambling runs in families
A study by University of Iowa researchers confirms that pathological gambling runs in families and shows that first-degree relatives of pathological gamblers are eight times more likely to develop this problem in their lifetime than relatives of people without pathological gambling.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jennifer Brown
jennifer-l-brown@uiowa.edu
319-356-7124
University of Iowa Health Care

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Getting rid of old mitochondria
It's broadly assumed that cells degrade and recycle their own old or damaged organelles, but researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Kennedy Krieger Institute have discovered that some neurons transfer unwanted mitochondria -- the tiny power plants inside cells -- to supporting glial cells called astrocytes for disposal.
National Institutes of Health, International Retinal Research Foundation

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Pediatrics
Redesigning the well-child checkup
Researchers developed a new design for preventive health care for children from birth through age three from low-income communities.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Health Resources and Service Administration

Contact: Amy Albin
aalbin@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-8672
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
JAMA
No correlation between baby formulas and development of diabetes-associated autoantibodies
There is no correlation between the consumption of a cow's milk-based formula or hydrolyzed protein formula and the development of diabetes-associated autoantibodies in children younger than seven, according to a worldwide research study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Angela Go
ago@gsu.edu
404-413-1083
Georgia State University

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Nature Biotechnology
Chemical strategy hints at better drugs for osteoporosis, diabetes
By swapping replacement parts into the backbone of a synthetic hormone, UW-Madison graduate student Ross Cheloha and his mentor, Sam Gellman, along with collaborators at Harvard Medical School, have built a version of a parathyroid hormone that resists degradation in laboratory mice. As a result, the altered hormone can stay around longer -- and at much higher concentration, says Gellman, professor of chemistry at the UW.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sam Gellman
gellman@chem.wisc.edu
608-262-3303
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Nature Materials
Tugging on the 'malignant' switch
A team of Harvard researchers have identified a possible mechanism by which normal cells turn malignant in mammary epithelial tissues, the tissues frequently involved in breast cancer.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and others

Contact: Caroline Perry
cperry@seas.harvard.edu
Harvard University

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Sleep quality and duration improve cognition in aging populations
Maybe turning to sleep gadgets -- wristbands, sound therapy and sleep-monitoring smartphone apps -- is a good idea. A new University of Oregon-led study of middle-aged or older people who get six to nine hours of sleep a night think better than those sleeping fewer or more hours.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
CWRU engineer to grow replacement tissue for torn rotator cuffs
A Case Western Reserve University engineer has won a $1.7 million National Institutes of Health grant to grow replacement rotator cuffs and other large tendon groups. His research team has already devised a technique to reconstitute collagen -- a building block of tendons -- into tough fibers and induce adult stem cells to grow into tendons on those fibers.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-368-4442
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Cancer Prevention Research
Broccoli sprout drink enhances detoxification of air pollutants in clinical trial in China
A clinical trial involving nearly 300 Chinese men and women residing in one of China's most polluted regions found that daily consumption of a half cup of broccoli sprout beverage produced rapid, significant and sustained higher levels of excretion of benzene, a known human carcinogen, and acrolein, a lung irritant.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Susan Sperry
ssperry1@jhu.edu
410-955-6919
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
BMC awarded NIH grant to train Ugandans in basic research on TB
Boston Medical Center was recently awarded a five-year, $861,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health's Fogarty International Center to train Ugandans in basic research involving tuberculosis and emerging infectious diseases at Boston University School of Medicine. The award was funded by Fogarty's Global Infectious Disease Research Training program, and seeks to build research capacity related to infectious diseases that are endemic in developing countries.
National Institutes of Health's Fogarty International Center

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Computation leads to better understanding of influenza virus replication
Computer simulations that reveal a key mechanism in the replication process of influenza A may help defend against future deadly pandemics.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steve Koppes
skoppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Study shows chikungunya mutation places several countries at risk of epidemic
For the first time, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researchers were able to predict further adaptations of the chikungunya virus that recently spread from Africa to several continents that will likely result in even more efficient transmission and infection of more people by this virus strain.
National Institutes of Health, Department of Biotechnology of the Indian Government

Contact: Donna Ramirez
d1ramire@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Your genes affect your betting behavior
People playing competitive games like betting engage two main areas of the brain: the medial prefrontal cortex and the striatum. Ming Hsu of UC Berkeley and Eric Set of the University of Illinois scanned 12 genes involved in dopamine regulation in these areas and found that some genetic variants affect how bettors deal with trial-and-error learning, while other variants affect belief learning, that is, how well they respond to the actions of others.
NIH/ National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Pediatrics
Caffeine affects boys and girls differently after puberty, study finds
Caffeine intake by children and adolescents has been rising for decades, due in large part to the popularity of caffeinated sodas and energy drinks, which now are marketed to children as young as four. Despite this, there is little research on the effects of caffeine on young people.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Patricia Donovan
pdonovan@buffalo.edu
716-645-4602
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
UK Superfund Research Center receives $12.2 million federal grant
The University of Kentucky has received a $12.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to continue its work to better understand and minimize negative health and environmental impacts from hazardous waste sites.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Laura Skillman
Laura.Skillman@uky.edu
859-323-4761
University of Kentucky

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Majority of older breast cancer patients use hormone treatment
Women 65 years of age and older comprise about half of patients with breast cancer. Some studies suggest this group initiates therapy less often and discontinues treatment more frequently than younger or middle aged women. 'We found a more positive picture of use,' says the study author. Only 14 percent of the 65- to 91-year-olds in the study didn't start treatment. Non-white women much more likely to not have therapy.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Showing releases 2876-2900 out of 3614.

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