NIH Director Page NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIH Social Media and Outreach
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Videos
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 2876-2900 out of 3512.

<< < 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 > >>

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
JAMA
Study demonstrates need to change scoring system for heart disease
A study led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine shows that one of the most widely used systems for predicting risk of adverse heart events should be re-evaluated. A surprise finding was that coronary artery calcium (CAC) density may be protective against cardiovascular events. The study of CAC will be published in the Jan. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Jackie Carr
jcarr@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Weighing particles at the attogram scale
New device from MIT can measure masses as small as one millionth of a trillionth of a gram, in solution.
US Army Research Office, Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, Center for Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology, National Science Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
Nature Medicine
Researchers investigating how to make PET imaging even sweeter
An international research team led by Mount Sinai Heart at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is testing its novel sugar-based tracer contrast agent to be used with positron emission tomography imaging to help in the hunt for dangerous inflammation and high-risk vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque inside vessel walls that causes acute heart attacks and strokes.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lauren Woods
lauren.woods@mountsinai.org
212-241-2836
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
Journal of American Geriatrics Society
Benefits of cognitive training can last 10 years in older adults
Exercises meant to boost mental sharpness can benefit older adults as many as 10 years after they received the cognitive training.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Eric Schoch
eschoch@iu.edu
317-274-8205
Indiana University

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
Wistar receives funding to lead trial to diminish HIV-1 viral reservoir
Wistar has received a $6.2 million grant to lead a clinical trial that seeks to "drain the viral reservoir" in patients with HIV/AIDS. The study will treat patients currently on antiretroviral therapy with a form of interferon, an antiviral chemical produced by the human immune system. The trial represents the largest randomized clinical study ever designed to deplete the viral reservoir in patients, a necessary first step on the path to a cure.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Greg Lester
glester@wistar.org
215-898-3943
The Wistar Institute

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
Cancer Cell
Multiple myeloma study uncovers genetic diversity within tumors
The most comprehensive genetic study to date of the blood cancer multiple myeloma has revealed that the genetic landscape of the disease may be more complicated than previously thought. Through results published in Cancer Cell today, a team of Broad researchers has shown that an individual patient's tumor can harbor populations of cancer cells equipped with different mutations. These findings could have therapeutic implications for patients in the future.
Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Conquer Cancer Foundation

Contact: Haley Bridger
hbridger@broadinstitute.org
617-714-7968
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
Flu forecasting website posts first predictions
Infectious disease experts at Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health have launched a website that reports weekly predictions for rates of season influenza in 94 cities in the United States based on a scientifically validated system. The URL is cpid.iri.columbia.edu. Reporting the latest data from the week of Dec. 29, 2013, through Jan. 4, 2014, the website -- Columbia Prediction of Infectious Diseases: Influenza Forecasts, or CPID -- shows the following.
National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Homeland Security

Contact: Timothy S. Paul
tp2111@columbia.edu
212-305-2676
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
BU study: 1 question may gauge the severity of unhealthy drug and alcohol use
Primary care physicians seeking to determine whether a patient's drug or alcohol use is problematic often have to rely on lengthy questionnaires containing dozens of items with multiple response options. Primary care physicians seeking to determine whether a patient's drug or alcohol use is problematic often have to rely on lengthy questionnaires containing dozens of items with multiple response options. But a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health researcher suggests that a single screening question may not only identify unhealthy use, but can help to determine the level of alcohol and drug dependence just as well -- and sometimes better -- than longer screening tools.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Lisa Chedekel
chedekel@bu.edu
617-571-6370
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
2 players produce destructive cascade of diabetic retinopathy
The retina can be bombarded by reactive oxygen species in diabetes, prompting events that destroy healthy blood vessels, form leaky new ones and ruin vision.
US Department of Veterans Affairs, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Americans with and without children at home report similar life satisfaction but more positive and negative emotions
Americans aged 34 to 46 with children at home rate their life satisfaction at higher levels than those without children at home, according to a report by Princeton University and Stony Brook University. However, the researchers say that factors such as higher educational attainment, higher income, better health and religiosity all enhance life satisfaction and that, once these are taken into account, parents and nonparents have similar levels of life satisfaction.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, National Bureau of Economic Research, Gallup Organization

Contact: B. Rose Huber
brhuber@princeton.edu
609-258-0157
Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How fruit flies detect sweet foods
Using the common fruit fly, researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have performed a study that describes just how the fly's taste receptors detect sweet compounds. Even though these taste receptors were discovered more than a decade ago, how they recognize diverse chemicals remained an enigma and an unmet challenge -- until now. Understanding the mechanisms by which the fly tastes and ingests sweet substances may offer tools to control insect feeding, the researchers say.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Whitehall Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
Pediatrics
White parents more likely to use age-appropriate car seats than non-whites
White parents reported higher use of age-appropriate car seats for one- to seven-year-old children than non-white parents, according to a new University of Michigan study. The race of the parents is a significant predictor of whether a child is placed in the right safety seat for his or her age.
Michigan Center for Advancing Safe Transportation throughout the Lifespan, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mary Masson
mfmasson@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Chemical signaling simulates exercise in cartilage cells
Cartilage is notoriously difficult to repair or grow, but researchers at Duke Medicine have taken a step toward understanding how to regenerate the connective tissue. By adding a chemical to cartilage cells, the chemical signals spurred new cartilage growth, mimicking the effects of physical activity.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 12-Jan-2014
Nature
UNC researchers find new route for better brain disorder treatments
Solving a 40-year-old mystery, scientists at the UNC School of Medicine and the Scripps Research Institute have discovered how salt acts as a key regulator for drugs used to treat a variety of brain diseases including chronic pain, Parkinson's disease, and depression.
NIH/National Institute of Drug Abuse, NIH/National Cancer Institute, and others

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unch.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 12-Jan-2014
Nature Medicine
Tweaking MRI to track creatine may spot heart problems earlier, Penn Medicine study suggests
A new MRI method to map creatine at higher resolutions in the heart may help clinicians and scientists find abnormalities and disorders earlier than traditional diagnostic methods, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania suggest in a new study published online today in Nature Medicine.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 12-Jan-2014
Nature Methods
Designer 'swiss-army-knife' molecule captures RNA in single cells in their natural tissue environment
A multi-disciplinary team from the University of Pennsylvania have published in Nature Methods a first-of-its-kind way to isolate RNA from live cells in their natural tissue microenvironment without damaging nearby cells. This allows the researchers to analyze how cell-to-cell chemical connections influence individual cell function and overall protein production.
National Institutes of Health, McKnight Foundation

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 12-Jan-2014
Nature Neuroscience
It's all coming back to me now: Researchers find caffeine enhances memory
Caffeine is the energy boost of choice for millions. Now, however, researchers have found another use for the stimulant: memory enhancer.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, National Science Foundation, Johns Hopkins University

Contact: Latarsha Gatlin
lgatlin1@jhu.edu
443-997-9909
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 12-Jan-2014
Nature
Scientists solve 40-year mystery of how sodium controls opioid brain signaling
Scientists have discovered how the element sodium influences the signaling of a major class of brain cell receptors, known as opioid receptors. The discovery, from the Scripps Research Institute and the University of North Carolina, suggests new therapeutic approaches to a host of brain-related medical conditions.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute for General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 12-Jan-2014
Nature Medicine
Study identifies population of stem-like cells where HIV persists in spite of treatment
Now investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard may have found where HIV persists in the bodyin spite of antiviral treatment -- in a small group of recently identified T cells with stem-cell-like properties.
American Foundation for AIDS Research, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Dionne Sullivan
ssullivan38@partners.org
617-726-6126
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 11-Jan-2014
Journal of Behavioral and Developmental Pediatrics
Complementary medicine in wide use to treat children with autism, developmental delay
In a study of the range of treatments being employed for young children with autism and other developmental delays, UC Davis MIND Institute researchers have found that families often use complementary and alternative medicine treatments and that the most frequent users of both conventional and complementary approaches are those with higher levels of parental education and income.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Phyllis Brown
phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 10-Jan-2014
Nature Cell Biology
Study: Autophagy predicts which cancer cells live and die when faced with anti-cancer drugs
When a tumor is treated with an anti-cancer drug, some cells die and, unfortunately, some cells tend to live. A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the journal Nature Cell Biology details a possible difference between the susceptible and resistant cells: the rate at which cells are able to cleanse themselves via the process known as autophagy.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 9-Jan-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Researchers develop tool to determine individual risk of prostate cancer overdiagnosis
Studies have found that prostate cancer is overdiagnosed in up to 42 percent of cases, prompting men to receive unnecessary treatment that can cause devastating side effects, including impotence and incontinence. Now, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington have developed a personalized tool that can predict the likelihood of prostate cancer overdiagnosis.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contact: Deborah Bach
media@fredhutch.org
206-667-2210
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Public Release: 9-Jan-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Novel biomarker approach suggests new avenues to improve schizophrenia disease management
Environmental effects of events such as oxygen deprivation and infections may be preserved as markers in blood that are associated to schizophrenia, according to an international study led by the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy's Center for Biomarker Research and Personalized Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Eric Peters
petersem@vcu.edu
804-828-0563
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 9-Jan-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Antipsychotic drug exhibits cancer-fighting properties
In a prime example of finding new uses for older drugs, studies in zebrafish show that a 50-year-old antipsychotic medication called perphenazine can actively combat the cells of a difficult-to-treat form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The drug works by turning on a cancer-suppressing enzyme called PP2A and causing malignant tumor cells to self-destruct.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, and others

Contact: Irene Sege
irene.sege@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 9-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Some motor proteins cooperate better than others
A study at Rice University analyzes how teams of molecular motor proteins cooperate as they move cargoes around living cells.
Welch Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeff Falk
jfalk@rice.edu
713-348-6775
Rice University

Showing releases 2876-2900 out of 3512.

<< < 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 > >>

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2014 by AAAS, the science society.