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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 2901-2925 out of 3457.

<< < 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 > >>

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
How does aging affect cancer? Einstein awarded $2.8m grant to answer NCI 'provocative question'
Gene mutations increase as people age, which helps explain why cancer usually strikes older people. But what other consequences of aging promote cancer development or protect against it? This is one of the 24 "Provocative Questions" that the National Cancer Institute wants researchers to address. Now, a team of scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University has received a $2.8 million grant from NCI to investigate this question.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
Psychological Science
Learning new skills keeps an aging mind sharp
Older adults are often encouraged to stay active and engaged to keep their minds sharp, that they have to "use it or lose it." But new research indicates that only certain activities -- learning a mentally demanding skill like photography, for instance -- are likely to improve cognitive functioning. These findings, forthcoming in Psychological Science, reveal that less demanding activities, such as listening to classical music or completing word puzzles, probably won't bring noticeable benefits to an aging mind.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Breast milk protein may be key to protecting babies from HIV infection
A substance in breast milk that neutralizes HIV and may protect babies from acquiring HIV from their infected mothers has been identified for the first time by researchers at Duke Medicine.
Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Duke University School of Medicine, Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Major Alzheimer's risk factor linked to red wine target
The major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), present in about two-thirds of people who develop the disease, is ApoE4, the cholesterol-carrying protein that about a quarter of us are born with. But one of the unsolved mysteries of AD is how ApoE4 causes the risk for the disease. Researchers at the Buck Institute found a link between ApoE4 and SirT1, an "anti-aging protein" that is targeted by resveratrol, present in red wine.
National Institutes of Health, Joseph Drown Foundation, Stephen D. Bechtel Jr. Foundation

Contact: Kris Rebillot
krebillot@buckinstitute.org
415-209-2080
Buck Institute for Age Research

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
Nature Materials
Physical cues help mature cells revert into embryonic-like stem cells
UC Berkeley bioengineers have shown that physical cues can help reprogram mature cells back into pluripotent stem cells. The study demonstrates for the first time that biomaterials can help regulate the memory of a cell's identity.
California Institute of Regenerative Medicine, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@berkeley.edu
510-643-7741
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
Nature Immunology
Research offers new insight in quest for single vaccine against multiple influenza strains
A study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists highlights a new approach for developing a universal influenza vaccine that could protect against multiple flu strains, including deadly pandemic strains. The research appears today in the advance online edition of the scientific journal Nature Immunology.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health & Human Services, American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehlau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
Nature Neuroscience
Neuron 'claws' in the brain enable flies to distinguish 1 scent from another
Researchers at CSHL are using the fruit fly to discover how the brain integrates multiple signals to identify one unique smell. It's work that has broader implication for how flies -- and ultimately, people -- learn.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jaclyn Jansen
jjansen@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
Nature Genetics
Inherited gene variation tied to high-risk pediatric leukemia and greater risk of relapse
Research led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists has linked an inherited gene variation to a nearly four-fold increased risk of developing a pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia subtype that is associated with a poor outcome.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, ALSAC

Contact: Summer Freeman
media@stjude.org
901-595-3061
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
Nature Materials
Cells' 'molecular muscles' help them sense and respond to their environments
Johns Hopkins researchers used suction to learn that individual "molecular muscles" within cells respond to different types of force, a finding that may explain how cells "feel" the environment and appropriately adapt their shapes and activities. A computer model the researchers developed also lets them predict what a cell will do in response to altered levels of those "muscles," a common occurrence in a variety of cancers.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
Nature Neuroscience
Rats! Humans and rodents process their mistakes
What happens when the brain recognizes an error? A new study shows that the brains of humans and rats adapt in a similar way to errors by using low-frequency brainwaves in the medial frontal cortex to synchronize neurons in the motor cortex. The finding could be important in studies of mental illnesses such as obsessive compulsive disorder, ADHD, and Parkinson's disease.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
Nature Cell Biology
'Random' cell movement is directed from within
Johns Hopkins cell biologists have teased apart two integral components of the machinery that causes cells to move. Their discovery shows that cellular projections, which act as hands to help cells "crawl" both randomly and directionally, are apparently always initiated by message-relaying proteins inside the cell. It was already known that this occurred in directional movement but they now know that in random movement the messenger network is also causative because it can self-activate spontaneously.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
Nature
Flu virus wipes out immune system's first responders to establish infection
Revealing influenza's truly insidious nature, Whitehead Institute scientists have discovered that the virus is able to infect its host by first killing off the cells of the immune system that are actually best equipped to neutralize the virus.
Cancer Research Institute, Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, Human Frontiers Science Program, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Matt Fearer
fearer@wi.mit.edu
617-452-4630
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
New idea for targeting the common cancer protein KRAS
Patients with cancers driven by the protein KRAS, which are particularly hard to treat, may benefit from small molecules that attach to and disrupt the function of a KRAS-containing protein complex, according to results presented here at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, held Oct. 19-23.
Ann Melly Scholarship in Oncology, Vanderbilt University, National Institutes of Health, Lustgarten Foundation

Contact: Lauren Riley
lauren.riley@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 18-Oct-2013
NIH awards UT Southwestern $28.6 million Clinical and Translational Science Award
UT Southwestern Medical Center has received a new $28.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to promote rapid translation of basic laboratory findings into patient care.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Russell Rian
russell.rian@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Oct-2013
Cancer Discovery
How 'phenotype switching' can make melanoma become metastatic and resistant to drugs
One of the challenges of understanding cancer is trying to determine the mechanisms that drive metastasis, or the process by which tumor cells are able to spread throughout the body. Wistar researchers describe how melanoma tumors use "phenotype switching" -- changing their outward appearance -- can result in melanoma cells that are highly invasive and more resistant to therapy.
NIH/National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program, Pennsylvania Department of Health

Contact: Ben Leach
bleach@wistar.org
215-495-6800
The Wistar Institute

Public Release: 17-Oct-2013
National Institute on Aging renews funding for UCI's 90+ Study
UC Irvine's trailblazing 90+ Study, launched in 2003 to learn more about the "oldest old," the fastest-growing age group in the US, will continue for at least another five years, thanks to a $9.5 million renewal grant from the National Institute on Aging.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 17-Oct-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
LSUHSC bird study finds key info about human speech-language development
A study led by Xiaoching Li, Ph.D., at the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence, has shown for the first time how two tiny molecules regulate a gene implicated in speech and language impairments as well as autism disorders, and that social context of vocal behavior governs their function.
National Institutes of Health, Brain Behavior Research Foundation

Contact: Leslie Capo
lcapo@lsuhsc.edu
504-568-4806
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Public Release: 17-Oct-2013
Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association
CHOP's Harvest toolkit offers innovative data discovery resource for biomedical researchers
A team of informatics experts and biomedical researchers introduced a new software toolkit to help researchers explore complex data sets without having to become database technicians themselves. Harvest is an open-source, highly interactive framework designed by CHOP's Center for Biomedical Informatics.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Ascenzi
ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 17-Oct-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
LSUHSC bird study finds key info about human speech-language development
A study led by Xiaoching Li, Ph.D., at the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence, has shown for the first time how two tiny molecules regulate a gene implicated in speech and language impairments as well as autism disorders, and that social context of vocal behavior governs their function.
National Institutes of Health, Brain Behavior Research Foundation

Contact: Leslie Capo
lcapo@lsuhsc.edu
504-568-4806
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Public Release: 17-Oct-2013
Psychological Science
The cost of racial bias in economic decisions
When financial gain depends on cooperation, we might expect that people would put aside their differences and focus on the bottom line. But new research suggests that people's racial biases make them more likely to leave money on the table when a windfall is not split evenly between groups. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 17-Oct-2013
Science
Gene regulation differences between humans and chimpanzees more complex than thought
Changes in gene regulation have been used to study the evolutionary chasm that exists between humans and chimpanzees despite their largely identical DNA. However, scientists from the University of Chicago have discovered that mRNA expression levels, long considered a barometer for differences in gene regulation, often do not reflect differences in protein expression -- and, therefore, biological function -- between humans and chimpanzees. The work was published Oct. 17 in Science.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Oct-2013
American Journal of Public Health
Death from drugs like oxycodone linked to disadvantaged neighborhoods, fragmented families
Death from analgesic overdose, including the painkillers oxycodone and codeine, is more concentrated in economically disadvantaged neighborhoods with a prevalence of high divorce, single-parent homes than deaths from unintentional causes. Yet, compared to heroin overdose deaths, analgesic overdoses were found to occur in higher-income neighborhoods. This study is among the first to provide a framework that helps explain the geographical distribution of analgesic overdose in urban areas.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 17-Oct-2013
American Journal of Human Genetics
Complex diseases traced to gene copy numbers
Duke researchers have connected very rare and precise duplications and deletions in the human genome to their complex disease consequences by duplicating them in zebrafish.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Development

Contact: Kendall Morgan
kendall.morgan@duke.edu
919-684-2850
Duke University

Public Release: 17-Oct-2013
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Physical activity in parks can be boosted by modest marketing
A new study finds that physical activity in parks can be increased significantly by making modest investments in marketing, such as improve signage. The strategy included working with park users and neighbors to develop a coherent plan.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Warren Robak
robak@rand.org
310-451-6913
RAND Corporation

Public Release: 17-Oct-2013
Journal of Pediatrics
All probiotics are not the same in protecting premature infants from common, life-threatening illness
Treating premature infants with probiotics, the dietary supplements containing live bacteria that many adults take to help maintain their natural intestinal balance, may be effective for preventing a common and life-threatening bowel disease among premature infants, researchers at UC Davis Children's Hospital have found.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and others

Contact: Phyllis Brown
phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis Health System

Showing releases 2901-2925 out of 3457.

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