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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 2901-2925 out of 3461.

<< < 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 > >>

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
American Economic Review
Common bias known as the 'endowment effect' not present in hunter-gatherer societies
Psychology and behavioral economics have experimentally identified a laundry list of common biases that cause people to act against their own apparent interests. One of these biases -- the mere fact of possessing something raises its value to its owner -- is known as the "endowment effect." A new interdisciplinary study from the University of Pennsylvania has delved into whether this bias is truly universal, and whether it might have been present in humanity's evolutionary past.
John Templeton Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
Virology
Model virus structure shows why there's no cure for common cold
In a pair of landmark studies that exploit the genetic sequencing of the "missing link" cold virus, rhinovirus C, scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have constructed a three-dimensional model of the pathogen that shows why there is no cure yet for the common cold.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ann C. Palmenberg
acpalmen@wisc.edu
608-262-7519
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics
Child brides at funerals
Having children early and in rapid succession are major factors fueling high infant mortality rates in the South Asian countries of Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Pakistan where one in 14 births to young mothers ends with the death of the child within the first year, say researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes & Essential Fatty Acids
Excess omega-3 fatty acids could lead to negative health effects
A new review suggests that omega-3 fatty acids taken in excess could have unintended health consequences in certain situations, and that dietary standards based on the best available evidence need to be established.
National Institutes of Health, Canadian Diabetes Association

Contact: Norman Hord
norman.hord@oregonstate.edu
541-737-5923
Oregon State University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Reproductive biologists move in vitro fertilization knowledge forward
A "pill for men" may be a long way down the road, says Pablo Visconti, lead UMass Amherst author, but this new fundamental knowledge of how sperm acquire the ability to fertilize an egg, letting scientists either block or enhance the process, is at the heart of being able to control it.
National Institutes of Health, Akiyama Science Foundation, ANPCTA Argentina, University of Hawaii

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
Cancer Immunology Research
Researchers discover how cancer 'invisibility cloak' works
Researchers at National Jewish Health have discovered how a lipid secreted by cancer tumors prevents the immune system from mounting an immune response against it. When lysophosphatidic acid binds to killer T cells, it acts almost like an "invisibility cloak," preventing T cells from recognizing and attacking nascent tumors.
National Institutes of Health, Cancer League of Colorado, Cancer Research Institute

Contact: William Allstetter
allstetterw@njhealth.org
303-398-1002
National Jewish Health

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
JAMA Pediatrics
Nurturing may protect kids from brain changes linked to poverty
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have identified changes in the brains of children growing up in poverty. Those changes can lead to lifelong problems like depression, learning difficulties and limitations in the ability to cope with stress. But the study showed that the extent of those changes was influenced strongly by whether parents were attentive and nurturing.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
12th annual AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research
HPV strains affecting African-American women differ from vaccines
Two subtypes of human papillomavirus prevented by vaccines are half as likely to be found in African-American women as in white women with precancerous cervical lesions, according to researchers at Duke Medicine.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Oct-2013
ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting
Study identifies biomarker linked to poor outcomes in pregnant lupus patients
Pregnant women with lupus are at increased risk of preeclampsia and other pregnancy complications. Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery found a biomarker associated with an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robin Frank
frankr@hss.edu
516-773-0319
Hospital for Special Surgery

Public Release: 27-Oct-2013
Nature Medicine
Study finds new genetic error in some lung cancers
Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the University of Colorado Cancer Center report on a gene fusion that spurs the cells to divide rapidly. Treating the cells with a compound that blocks the protein caused the cells to die which may offer a targeted therapy in patients.
Colorado Bioscience Discovery Evaluation Grant Program, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robbin Ray
robbin_ray@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 27-Oct-2013
Nature Genetics
International collaboration finds 11 new Alzheimer's genes to target for drug discovery
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine researchers played a key role in the largest international Alzheimer's disease genetics collaboration to date, which identified 11 new regions of the genome that contribute to late-onset Alzheimer's disease, doubling the number of potential genetics-based therapeutic targets to investigate. Published Oct. 27 in Nature Genetics, the study gives a broader view of the genetic factors contributing to Alzheimer's and expands the understanding of the disease to new areas.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Alzheimer's Association

Contact: Alexandra Bassil
a.bassil@miami.edu
305-284-1092
University of Miami

Public Release: 27-Oct-2013
Nature Genetics
11 new genetic susceptibility factors for AD discovered through the largest study
The largest international study ever conducted on Alzheimer's disease (AD), the I-GAP (International Genomics Alzheimer's Project) consortium has identified 11 new regions of the genome involved in the onset of this neurodegenerative disease. This study gives an overview of the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease, opening up to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of AD. These results detailed currently in Nature Genetics, could not have been obtained without this unique worldwide collaborative effort.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Oct-2013
Nature Genetics
International group finds 11 new Alzheimer's genes to target for drug discovery
The largest international Alzheimer's disease genetics collaboration to date has found 11 new genetic areas of interest that contribute to late onset Alzheimer's Disease, doubling the number of potential genetics-based therapeutic targets to interrogate. The study, published in Nature Genetics, provides a broader view of genetic factors contributing to the disease and expands the scope of disease understanding to include new areas including the immune system.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Alzheimer's Association

Contact: Kim Menard
kim.menard@uphs.upenn.edu
215-662-6183
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 27-Oct-2013
Nature
Cell nucleus protein in brown fat cells governs daily control of body temperature
Body temperature follows a 24-hour rhythm, peaking during the day, low at night. The benefit might be the conservation of energy while sleeping. It is also critical to be able to adapt to changes in ambient temperature regardless of the time of day. A new mouse study shows how body temperature rhythms are synchronized while maintaining the ability to adapt to changes in environmental temperature day or night.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, JPB Foundation

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Enzyme restores function with diabetic kidney disease
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say that, while a prevailing theory suggests elevated cellular levels of glucose ultimately result in diabetic kidney disease, the truth may, in fact, be quite the opposite. The findings could fundamentally change understanding of how diabetes-related diseases develop -- and how they might be better treated.
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Veterans Administration

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Psycho-Oncology
New study shows positive personal growth following breast cancer diagnosis
Although being diagnosed with breast cancer is usually an extremely stressful experience for most women, a new study by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has found that there also can be unexpected benefits.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, US Department of Defense

Contact: Marguerite Beck
marbeck@wakehealth.edu
336-716-2415
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
BUSM researchers identify molecule that could aid lung cancer detection, treatment
Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine have discovered a molecule that could help lead to the non-invasive detection of lung cancer as well as its treatment.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Cell
IUPUI physicist collaborates in new study of the cell's 'shredder'
Steve Pressť, Ph.D., assistant professor of physics in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, collaborates as the theorist of a new University of California-Berkeley study that provides novel insight into how proteins function in cells.
Searle Scholars Program, National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis School of Science

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Oregon researchers say supplement cuts muscle loss in knee replacements
Twenty grams of essential amino acids taken twice daily for a week before and for two weeks after knee-replacement surgeries helped 16 patients, mean age 69, recover faster and with much less muscle atrophy than a control group ingesting a placebo.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
JAMA Psychiatry
New study shows promise for first effective medicine to treat cocaine dependence
New research published in JAMA Psychiatry reveals that topiramate, a drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat epilepsy and migraine headaches, also could be the first reliable medication to help treat cocaine dependence.
National Institutes of Health, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Contact: Christopher Hardwick
chardwick@som.umaryland.edu
410-706-5260
University of Maryland Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Science Translational Medicine
Lou Gehrig's disease: From patient stem cells to potential treatment strategy in one study
A study, led by researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute and published in Science Translational Medicine, is believed to be one of the first in which a specific form of Lou Gehrig's disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, was replicated in a dish, analyzed and "treated," suggesting a potential future therapy all in a single study.
National Institutes of Health, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and others

Contact: Sandy Van
sandy@prpacific.com
808-526-1708
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
Genetic variants associated with bronchodilator responsiveness
A new study from Brigham and Women's Hospital reveals several new gene variants that are associated with how people living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease respond to inhaled bronchodilators.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-534-2208
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Itch maintains regulatory T cell stability
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Yun-Cai Liu and colleagues at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch as a regulator of Tregs stability.
National Research Foundation of Korea, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Reduction of reactive oxygen species in diabetes-associated nephrology
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Kumar Sharma and colleagues at the University of California, San Diego determined that ROS production was actually reduced in kidneys of diabetic mice, and this decrease was associated with lowered activity of the major energy-sensing enzyme, AMPK.
National Institutes of Health, Christini Fund, Wright Foundation, Lennox Foundation

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Researchers track lethal prostate cancer to determine clonal origin
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Srinivasan Yegnasubramanian and colleagues at Johns Hopkins University track the development of lethal prostate cancer in a patient.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Prostate Cancer Foundation David Mazzone Challenge Award and Creativity Award, The V Found

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Showing releases 2901-2925 out of 3461.

<< < 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 > >>

     
   

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