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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 2951-2975 out of 3429.

<< < 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 > >>

Public Release: 17-Sep-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Researchers gain insight into protective mechanisms for hearing loss
Researchers from the Eaton-Peabody Laboratories of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School have created a new mouse model in which by expressing a gene in the inner ear hair cells -- the sensory cells that detect sound and sense balance -- protects the mice from age-related hearing loss and noise-induced hearing loss, the two most common forms of deafness.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders

Contact: Mary Leach
mary_leach@meei.harvard.edu
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Public Release: 17-Sep-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Mental fog with tamoxifen is real; URMC finds possible antidote
A team from the University of Rochester Medical Center has shown scientifically what many women report anecdotally: that the breast cancer drug tamoxifen is toxic to cells of the brain and central nervous system, producing mental fogginess similar to "chemo brain."
US Department of Defense, National Institutes of Health, Susan Komen Race for the Cure, Carlson Stem Cell Fund

Contact: Leslie Orr
Leslie_Orr@urmc.rochester.edu
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
Journal of Comparative Neurology
10-year project redraws the map of bird brains
Pursuing their interests in using the brains of birds as a model for the human brain, an international team of researchers led by Duke neuroscientist Erich Jarvis and his collaborators Chun-Chun Chen and Kazuhiro Wada have just completed a mapping of the bird brain based on a 10-year exploration of the tiny cerebrums of eight species of birds.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Human Frontiers in Science, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
MicroRNA molecule found to be a potent tumor-suppressor in lung cancer
New research shows that microRNA-486 is a potent tumor-suppressor molecule in lung cancer, and that the it helps regulate the proliferation and migration of lung-cancer cells, and the induction of programmed cell death, or apoptosis, in those cells.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Immune system marker tied to improved bone marrow transplant outcomes
The risk of death following bone marrow transplantation can be reduced about 60 percent using a new technique to identify bone marrow donors who make the most potent cancer-fighting immune cells, according to research from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.
National Institutes of Health, Assisi Foundation of Memphis, American-Lebanese-Syrian Associated Charities

Contact: Summer Freeman
901-595-3061
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
Nature Genetics
Rare gene variant linked to macular degeneration
An international team of researchers, led by scientists at The Genome Institute at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Michigan School of Public Health in Ann Arbor, have identified a gene mutation linked to age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in Americans over age 50.
National Institutes of Health, Medical Research Council, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Alcon Research Institute

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
Journal of Cellular Biochemistry
'Vicious cycle' shields, spreads cancer cells
A "vicious cycle" produces mucus that protects uterine and pancreatic cancer cells and promotes their proliferation, according to research at Rice University.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Yale researchers see decline in hospitalizations for serious heart infection
Hospitalizations for endocarditis, a deadly heart infection that disproportionately affects older heart patients, have declined in recent years despite recommendations for limited use of antibiotics to prevent the illness. These findings were recently published by Yale School of Medicine researchers in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
NIH awards $2 million for engineering approach to understanding lymphedema
The National Institutes of Health has awarded Georgia Tech a $2 million research grant to unravel the mechanical forces at play in lymphedema, a poorly understood disease with no cure and little hope for sufferers.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
Brain injury studies aim for new treatment targets
The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences has awarded a five-year, $1.5 million grant extension to Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health to fund research into the function of a biomarker for brain injury called Translocator Protein 18 kDa, better known as TSPO, in order to better understand its function in brain injury and inflammation and discover targets for therapy.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Timothy S. Paul
tp2111@columbia.edu
212-305-2676
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters
Scientists create extremely potent and improved derivatives of successful anticancer drug
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute have found a way to make dramatic improvements to the cancer cell-killing power of vinblastine, one of the most successful chemotherapy drugs of the past few decades. The team's modified versions of vinblastine showed 10 to 200 times greater potency than the clinical drug.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
Journal of Hospital Medicine
Hospital study finds connection between dementia, delirium and declining health
More than half of all patients with pre-existing dementia will experience delirium while hospitalized. Failing to detect and treat their delirium early leads to a faster decline of both their physical and mental health, according to health researchers.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Victoria M. Indivero
vmi1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
Cell Host & Microbe
Tufts researchers identify how Yersinia spreads within infected organs
Researchers at Tufts have identified how one type of bacteria, Yersinia, immobilizes the immune system in order to grow in the organ tissues of mice. To do so, the researchers extended the use of a technique and suggest that it could be used to study other bacteria that use the same or similar means of infection.
NIH/National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Siobhan Gallagher
siobhan.gallagher@tufts.edu
617-636-6586
Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Biologists develop new method for discovering antibiotics
Biologists at the University of California, San Diego have developed a revolutionary new method for identifying and characterizing antibiotics, an advance that could lead to the discovery of new antibiotics to treat antibiotic resistant bacteria.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
Lancet Oncology
Lifestyle changes may lengthen telomeres, a measure of cell aging
A small pilot study shows for the first time that changes in diet, exercise, stress management and social support may result in longer telomeres, the parts of chromosomes that affect aging.
US Department of Defense, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Elizabeth Fernandez
elizabeth.fernandez@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
JAMA Internal Medicine
Exposure to pig farms and manure fertilizers associated with MRSA infections
For the first time researchers have found an association between living in proximity to high-density livestock production and community-acquired infections with MRSA. Their analysis concluded that approximately 11 percent of community-acquired MRSA and soft tissue infections in the study population could be attributed to crop fields fertilized with swine manure. The study is the first to examine the association between high-density livestock operations and manure-applied crop fields and MRSA infections in the community.
New York University-Geisinger Seed Grant Program, Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Tim Parsons
tmparson@jhsph.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Researchers identify a metabolite as a biomarker of diabetes risk
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Robert Gerszten and colleagues at Massachusetts General Hospital identify the metabolite 2-aminoadipic acid as a biomarker for T2D diabetes risk.
National Institutes of Health, Leducq Foundation, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, American Heart Association

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 15-Sep-2013
Nature Methods
'Wildly heterogeneous genes'
Cancer tumors almost never share the exact same genetic mutations, a fact that has confounded scientific efforts to better categorize cancer types and develop more targeted, effective treatments. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego propose a new approach called network-based stratification, which identifies cancer subtypes not by the singular mutations of individual patients, but by how those mutations affect shared genetic networks or systems.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 13-Sep-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Pinpointing molecular path that makes antidepressants act quicker in mouse model
The reasons behind why it often takes people several weeks to feel the effect of newly prescribed antidepressants remains somewhat of a mystery -- and likely, a frustration to both patients and physicians. How an antidepressant works on the biochemistry and behavior in mice lets researchers tease out the relative influence of two brain proteins on the pharmacology of an antidepressant. They found increased nerve-cell generation in the hippocampus and a quicker response to the antidepressant.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Cooperative Drug Discovery Group for the Treatment of Mood Disorders

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 13-Sep-2013
Nature Reviews Immunology
Fish skin immune responses resemble those of the gut, Penn study finds
A study led by J. Oriol Sunyer's group at the University of Pennsylvania found that, not only does fish skin resemble the gut morphologically, but key components of skin immune responses are also akin to those of the gut.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
New grants fund LA BioMed research into obesity causes
While much of the obesity prevention efforts focus on diet and exercise, LA BioMed researchers are going even further back in time to explore what happens during development in the womb that could lead to overeating and obesity later in life.
National Institutes of Health, American Diabetes Association

Contact: Laura Mecoy
lmecoy@labiomed.org
310-546-5860
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed)

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
Contraception
Revised Medicaid policy could reduce unintended pregnancies, save millions in health costs
A revised Medicaid sterilization policy that removes logistical barriers, including a mandatory 30-day waiting period, could potentially honor women's reproductive decisions, reduce the number of unintended pregnancies and save $215 million in public health costs each year, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Their findings support growing evidence for the need to revisit a national policy that disproportionately affects low-income and minority women at high risk for unintended pregnancies.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Andrea Stanford
stanfordac@upmc.edu
412-522-3349
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
JAMA
Medicare Center of Excellence Policy may limit minority access to weight-loss surgery
New research indicates a decline in the number of minority patients with Medicare receiving bariatric surgery after the Medicare Center of Excellence Policy was implemented.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Contact: Natalie Wood-Wright
nwoodwri@jhsph.edu
443-703-8851
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
Cell Reports
Scripps Florida scientists pinpoint proteins vital to long-term memory
Scientists from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute have found a group of proteins essential to the formation of long-term memories. The proteins send signals from the outside to the inside of a cell, inducing a cellular response crucial for many aspects of embryonic development, including stem cell differentiation, as well as for normal functioning of the adult brain.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
New book from Harry P. Selker, M.D., M.S.P.H., offers fresh perspective on Affordable Care Act debate
A researcher's voice of reason entered the national debate on "Obamacare" today when Springer Science+Business Media released "The Affordable Care Act as a National Experiment: Health Policy Innovations and Lessons," edited by Harry P. Selker, M.D., M.S.P.H., and June S. Wasser, M.A. The book's fresh perspective asserts that health policy innovation is translational research directed at improving the public's health.
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: Amy West
awest@tuftsmedicalcenter.org
617-636-6025
Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute

Showing releases 2951-2975 out of 3429.

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