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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 2951-2975 out of 3715.

<< < 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 > >>

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Strong state alcohol policies reduce likelihood of binge drinking
People living in states with stronger alcohol policy environments have a substantially lower likelihood of any binge drinking, frequent binge drinking, and high-intensity binge drinking, according to a new study by researchers at the Boston University School of Public Health and Boston Medical Center, published in the current issue of the American Journal of Public Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lisa Chedekel
Chedekel@bu.edu
617-571-6370
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cancer Research
Protein found to block benefits of vitamin A cancer therapy
Retinoic acid is a form of vitamin A that is used to treat and help prevent the recurrence of a variety of cancers, but for some patients the drug is not effective. The reason for this resistance was unclear until this week when researchers from Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center demonstrated that a protein known as AEG-1 blocks the effects of retinoic acid in leukemia and liver cancer.
National Institutes of Health, James S. McDonnel Foundation

Contact: Alaina Schneider
afschneider@vcu.edu
804-628-4578
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Antibodies, together with viral 'inducers,' found to control HIV in mice
A new strategy devised by researchers at Rockefeller University harnesses the power of broadly neutralizing antibodies, along with a combination of compounds that induce viral transcription, in order to attack latent reservoirs of HIV-infected cells in an approach termed 'shock and kill.'
National Institutes of Health, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Zach Veilleux
zveilleux@rockefeller.edu
212-327-8982
Rockefeller University

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Science
Harnessing the power of bacteria's sophisticated immune system
Bacteria's ability to destroy viruses has long puzzled scientists, but researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they now have a clear picture of the bacterial immune system and say its unique shape is likely why bacteria can so quickly recognize and destroy their assailants.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Researchers identify a mechanism that stops progression of abnormal cells into cancer
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine report that a tumor suppressor pathway, called the Hippo pathway, is responsible for sensing abnormal chromosome numbers in cells and triggering cell cycle arrest, thus preventing progression into cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Science
Memories of errors foster faster learning
Using a deceptively simple set of experiments, researchers at Johns Hopkins have learned why people learn an identical or similar task faster the second, third and subsequent time around. The reason: they are aided not only by memories of how to perform the task, but also by memories of the errors made the first time.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Tissue development 'roadmap' created to guide stem cell medicine
In a boon to stem cell research and regenerative medicine, scientists at Boston Children's Hospital, the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Boston University have created a computer algorithm called CellNet as a 'roadmap' for cell and tissue engineering, to ensure that cells engineered in the lab have the same favorable properties as cells in our own bodies.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Children's Hospital Stem Cell Program, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation

Contact: Kristen Dattoli
kristen.dattoli@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
Boston Children's Hospital

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cancer Research
NSAIDs benefit overweight breast cancer patients, study finds
Researchers have determined that postmenopausal overweight or obese breast cancer patients receiving hormone therapy as part of their treatment and who use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin or ibuprofen have significantly lower breast cancer recurrence rates and a sizable delay in time to cancer recurrence.
United States Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Kimberly Atkins
kimberly.atkins@austin.utexas.edu
512-471-3151
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Neuron
Common mutation successfully targeted in Lou Gehrig's disease and frontotemporal dementia
An international team led by scientists from the Florida campuses of the Scripps Research Institute and the Mayo Clinic have for the first time successfully designed a therapeutic strategy targeting a specific genetic mutation that causes a common form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as Lou Gehrig's disease, as well a type of frontotemporal dementia.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Services, Department of Defense, Italian Ministry of Health, Mayo

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cancer Research
NSAIDs may lower breast cancer recurrence rate in overweight and obese women
Recurrence of hormone-related breast cancer was cut by half in overweight and obese women who regularly used aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, according to data published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Department of Defense, Breast Cancer Research Program

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cancer Research
Aspirin may slow recurrence in breast cancer patients
New findings published in the journal Cancer Research reveal some postmenopausal overweight breast cancer patients who use anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin or ibuprofen have significantly lower breast cancer recurrence rates. Anti-inflammatory use reduced the recurrence of ERα positive breast cancer by 50 percent and extended patients' disease-free period by more than two years. Research was performed at the Cancer Therapy & Research Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio and University of Texas Austin.
US Department of Defense, Breast Cancer Research Program, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Catherine Duncan
duncancl@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2570
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Researchers identify a brain 'switchboard' important in attention and sleep
Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere, using a mouse model, have recorded the activity of individual nerve cells in a small part of the brain that works as a 'switchboard,' directing signals coming from the outside world or internal memories. Because human brain disorders such as schizophrenia, autism, and post-traumatic stress disorder typically show disturbances in that switchboard, the investigators say the work suggests new strategies in understanding and treating them.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation, Mathematical Biosciences Institute, NARSAD Young Investigators Grant

Contact: Lorinda Klein
lorindaann.klein@nyumc.org
212-404-3533
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Forcing chromosomes into loops may switch off sickle cell disease
Scientists have altered key biological events in red blood cells, causing the cells to produce a form of hemoglobin normally absent after the newborn period. Because this fetal hemoglobin is not affected by the inherited gene mutation that causes sickle cell disease, the cell culture findings may give rise to a new therapy for the debilitating blood disorder.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rachel Salis-Silverman
salis@email.chop.edu
267-426-6063
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Early antibiotic exposure leads to lifelong metabolic disturbances in mice
A new study published today in Cell suggests that antibiotic exposure during a critical window of early development disrupts the bacterial landscape of the gut, home to trillions of diverse microbes, and permanently reprograms the body's metabolism, setting up a predisposition to obesity. Moreover, the study shows that it is altered gut bacteria, rather than the antibiotics, driving the metabolic effects.
National Institutes of Health, Diane Belfer Program in Human Microbial Ecology, Knapp Family Foundation, Daniel Ziff Foundation

Contact: Lorinda Klein
lorindaann.klein@nyumc.org
212-404-3533
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Nano Letters
Novel chip-based platform could simplify measurements of single molecules
Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have developed a new approach for studying single molecules and nanoparticles by combining electrical and optical measurements on an integrated chip-based platform. In a paper published July 9 in Nano Letters, the researchers reported using the device to distinguish viruses from similarly sized nanoparticles with 100 percent fidelity.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Nature
New blood: Tracing the beginnings of hematopoietic stem cells
In a paper published online this week in Nature, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine elaborate upon a crucial signaling pathway and the role of key proteins, which may help clear the way to generate HSCs from human pluripotent precursors, similar to advances with other kinds of tissue stem cells.
California Institute of Regenerative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Statistical model predicts performance of hybrid rice
A research team led by plant geneticists at the University of California, Riverside and Huazhong Agricultural University, China, has used 'genomic prediction' to predict the performance of hybrid rice. Genomic prediction is a new technology that could potentially revolutionize hybrid breeding in agriculture. A statistical approach to predicting the value of an economically important trait in a plant, such as yield or disease resistance, the method works if the trait is heritable and reduces costs.
NIH/National Institute of Food and Agriculture, National Natural Science Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
From eons to seconds, proteins exploit the same forces
Energy landscapes for protein folding operate on evolutionary processes that take eons as well as folding that takes microseconds, according to new research at Rice University.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Center for Theoretical Biological Physics, the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, D.R. Bullard-Welch Chair at Rice

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
Ebola protein blocks early step in body's counterattack on virus
The newly published study explains for the first time how the production by the virus of a protein called Ebola Viral Protein 24 stops the interferon-based signals from ramping up immune defenses.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Greg Williams
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Emerging Microbes & Infections
Researchers uncover clues about how the most important TB drug attacks its target
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they have discovered a new clue to understanding how the most important medication for tuberculosis (TB) works to attack dormant TB bacteria in order to shorten treatment.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Major Project of the Twelfth Five-Year Plan, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Youth football study receives $3.8 million from National Institutes of Health
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has received a $3.8 million, five-year grant from the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health, to continue studying the effects of head impacts in youth league football.
NIH/National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Marguerite Beck
marbeck@gmail.com
336-716-2415
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Exercise associated with reduced risk of breast cancer in African-American women
Regular exercise, including brisk walking, is associated with a decrease in the incidence of breast cancer in African American women. In a recently published study in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, researchers from Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center found strong evidence linking physical exercise to a lower rate of breast cancer in African-American women, a group in which previous evidence has been lacking.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Annals of Emergency Medicine
Why seniors don't eat: It's complicated
More than half of older adults who visit emergency departments are either malnourished or at risk for malnutrition, but not because of lack of access to health care, critical illness or dementia. Despite clear signs of malnutrition or risk of malnutrition, more than three-quarters had never previously been diagnosed with malnutrition, according to the results of a study to be published online tomorrow in Annals of Emergency Medicine ('Malnutrition Among Cognitively Intact, Non-Critically Ill Older Adults in the Emergency Department').
NIH/National Institute on Aging, University of North Carolina's Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship

Contact: Julie Lloyd
jlloyd@acep.org
202-370-9292
American College of Emergency Physicians

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Annals of Neurology
Reduction of tau protein improves symptoms in model of severe childhood epilepsy
Researchers at the Gladstone Institutes have shown that reducing brain levels of the protein tau effectively blocks the development of disease in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome, a severe intractable form of childhood epilepsy.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, S.D. Bechtel Jr. Foundation

Contact: Dana Smith
dana.smith@gladstone.ucsf.edu
415-734-2532
Gladstone Institutes

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Poor sleep quality increases suicide risk for older adults, Stanford researcher finds
Older adults suffering from sleep disturbances are more likely to die by suicide than well-rested adults, according to a study led by a researcher at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation

Contact: Margarita Gallardo
mjgallardo@stanford.edu
650-723-7897
Stanford University Medical Center

Showing releases 2951-2975 out of 3715.

<< < 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 > >>

     
   

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