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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 2951-2975 out of 3621.

<< < 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 > >>

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
mBio
Fungal protein found to cross blood-brain barrier
In a remarkable series of experiments on a fungus that causes cryptococcal meningitis, a deadly infection of the membranes that cover the spinal cord and brain, investigators at UC Davis have isolated a protein that appears to be responsible for the fungus' ability to cross from the bloodstream into the brain.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Carole Gan
carole.gan@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9047
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Journal of Immunology
Infant immune systems learn fast, but have short memories
Forgetful immune systems leave infants particularly prone to infections, according to a new Cornell University study. Upending the common theory that weak immune cells are to blame, the study has found that infants' immune systems actually respond to infection with more speed and strength than adults, but the immunities they create fail to last.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
A key step toward a safer strep vaccine
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, have identified the genes encoding a molecule that famously defines Group A Streptococcus (strep), a pathogenic bacterial species responsible for more than 700 million infections worldwide each year.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
JAMA
Breakthrough study sheds new light on best medication for children with seizures
A recently published clinical study in the Journal of the American Medical Association has answered an urgent question that long puzzled ER pediatricians: Is the drug lorazepam really safer and more effective than diazepam -- the US Food and Drug Administration-approved medication as first line therapy most often used by emergency room doctors to control major epileptic seizures in children?
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Does dad matter? New study looks at his environmental exposure in reproductive success
Phthalates are compounds found in plastics and personal care products that are estimated to be detectable in nearly 100 percent of the U.S. population. The study will examine the possible influence of paternal phthalate exposure on sperm quality and embryo development and whether DNA methylation in sperm cells may be a pathway by which a father's exposure influences these endpoints.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Demography
Migrating north may trigger immediate health declines among Mexicans
Mexican immigrants who relocate to the United States are more likely to experience declines in health within a short time period compared with other Mexicans, according to a study led by Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Barriers faced by immigrants -- like poorly paying jobs, crowded housing and family separation, as well as the migration process itself -- may be cause of such health declines.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Sector Research Fund

Contact: B. Rose Huber
brhuber@princeton.edu
609-258-0157
Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Peer pressure is weaker for kids to quit smoking
Adolescents tend to be more powerful in influencing their friends to start smoking than in helping them to quit, according to sociologists.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Matt Swayne
mls29@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Science Signaling
Researchers identify regulation process of protein linked to bipolar disorder
Researchers from Tufts have gained new insight into a protein associated with bipolar disorder. The study, published in the June 3 issue of Science Signaling, reveals that calcium channels in resting neurons activate the breakdown of Sp4, which belongs to a class of proteins called transcription factors that regulate gene expression.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Siobhan Gallagher
siobhan.gallagher@tufts.edu
617-636-6586
Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
MGH/Ragon Institute study finds how protein blocks HIV life cycle in elite controllers
A research team has learned more about one way the immune systems of elite controllers - those rare individuals able to control HIV infection without drug treatment - block a key step in the virus's life cycle. They report finding that p21, a protein best known as a tumor suppressor, inhibits reverse transcription by blocking a human enzyme essential to the process.
National Institutes of Health, American Foundation for AIDS Research, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation

Contact: Sarah Dionne Sullivan
ssullivan38@partners.org
617-726-6126
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Frontiers in Neurology
Study finds cognitive performance can be improved in teens months, years after traumatic brain injury
Traumatic brain injuries from sports, recreational activities, falls or car accidents are the leading cause of death and disability in children and adolescents. While previously it was believed that the window for brain recovery was at most one year after injury, new research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas published online today in the open-access journal Frontiers in Neurology shows cognitive performance can be improved to significant degrees months, and even years, after injury, given targeted brain training.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Crystal Charity Ball Foundation

Contact: Shelly Kirkland
shelly.kirkland@utdallas.edu
972-883-3221
Center for BrainHealth

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Dormant viruses re-emerge in patients with lingering sepsis, signaling immune suppression
A provocative study links prolonged episodes of sepsis -- a life-threatening infection and leading cause of death in hospitals -- to the reactivation of otherwise dormant viruses in the body.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Caroline Arbanas
arbanasc@wustl.edu
314-286-0109
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Study IDs 'master' protein in pulmonary fibrosis
In Science Translational Medicine scientists reveal the key role that an ancient protein plays in the course of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The research offers more than an unprecedentedly detailed explanation of the disease's tragic course. It also points toward a new therapeutic strategy.
National Institutes of Health, American Thoracic Society, Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, Yale University

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Weight loss critical to reducing cardiovascular risk in obese OSA patients
New research from a multidisciplinary team at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania now reveals that the single most important factor for improving cardiovascular health in obese obstructive sleep apnea patients is weight loss.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: LeeAnn Donegan
leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5660
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
CPAP superior to supplemental oxygen for BP reduction in obstructive sleep apnea
Continuous positive airway pressure, the most widely prescribed therapy for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, resulted in significantly lower blood pressure compared to either nocturnal supplemental oxygen or an educational control treatment, according to a new study from Brigham and Women's Hospital.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-534-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Journal of the American Heart Association
Poor cardiovascular health linked to memory, learning deficits
People with poor cardiovascular health have a substantially higher incidence of cognitive impairment. Better cardiovascular health was more common in men and among people with higher education and higher income. The incidence of mental impairment was found more commonly in those with a lower income, who lived in the 'stroke belt' or had cardiovascular disease.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Carrie Thacker
carrie.thacker@heart.org
214-706-1665
American Heart Association

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Herpes infected humans before they were human
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified the evolutionary origins of human herpes simplex virus -1 and -2, reporting that the former infected hominids before their evolutionary split from chimpanzees 6 million years ago while the latter jumped from ancient chimpanzees to ancestors of modern humans -- Homo erectus -- approximately 1.6 million years ago.
University of California Laboratory Fees Research Program, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
International Migration Review
Dangerous, underpaid work for the undocumented
Illegal immigrants don't hold the most dangerous jobs in America. That kind of work pays a decent wage for the risk to life and limb, and undocumented workers are barred from those jobs. Yet there is plenty of hazard, risk and occupational injury for the uncounted millions of illegal immigrants doing the 'merely dangerous' work no one else wants -- without a pay premium from employers who take advantage of that labor pool, a Cornell University-Penn State University study reveals.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Joe Schwartz
Joe.Schwartz@cornell.edu
607-254-6235
Cornell University

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
National Eye Institute awards more than half a million dollars to NSU College of Optometry
The National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health has awarded up to $556,532 to investigators at Nova Southeastern University's College of Optometry to study the relationship between the vision condition, convergence insufficiency, and reading performance and attention. The grant will fund the Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial -- Attention and Reading Trial, a national multi-center clinical trial that involves optometry, ophthalmology, psychiatry and education in determining how this eye-teaming problem impacts a child's attention and reading performance.
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Jeremy Katzman
mc2740@nova.edu
Nova Southeastern University

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
NYU and UCSF researchers develop a framework for monitoring oral cancer
The findings published online in the journal PLOS ONE begin to develop a framework for exploiting the oral microbiome for monitoring oral cancer development, progression and recurrence.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Miriam Hospital study shows how to make statewide health campaigns more effective
Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have found that adding evidence-based weight loss strategies to a statewide wellness campaign improves weight loss outcomes among participants. The study and its findings are published online in advance of print in the American Journal of Public Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Elena Falcone-Relvas
efalconerelvas@lifespan.org
401-793-7484
Lifespan

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Limiting carbs could reduce breast cancer recurrence in women with positive IGF1 receptor
Dartmouth researchers have found that reducing carbohydrate intake could reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence among women whose tumor tissue is positive for the IGF-1 receptor. The study, 'Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence Associated with Carbohydrate Intake and Tissue Expression of IGFI Receptor,' will appear in the July issue of Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Walton Family Foundation, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Robin Dutcher
Robin.Dutcher@hitchcock.org
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
$2.3 million NIH grant to UCF will help improve critical patient care
Intubating and placing patients on ventilators saves lives, but it also comes with risks especially for people who are critically ill. UCF College of Nursing Interim Dean and Orlando Health Distinguished Professor Mary Lou Sole hopes to change the odds for patients by improving the way nurses manage their patients' care when they need a ventilator.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Nursing Research

Contact: Zenaida Gonzalez Kotala
zenaida.kotala@ucf.edu
407-823-6120
University of Central Florida

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Researchers use human stem cells to create light-sensitive retina in a dish
Using a type of human stem cell, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have created a three-dimensional complement of human retinal tissue in the laboratory, which notably includes functioning photoreceptor cells capable of responding to light, the first step in the process of converting it into visual images.
Maryland Stem Cell Research Fund, NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Lauren Nelson
lnelso35@jhmi.edu
410-955-8725
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists wipe out malaria-carrying mosquitoes in the lab by creating male-only offspring
Scientists have modified mosquitoes to produce sperm that will only create males, pioneering a fresh approach to eradicating malaria.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gail Wilson
gail.wilson@imperial.ac.uk
44-020-759-46702
Imperial College London

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
'Trust hormone' oxytocin helps old muscle work like new, study finds
UC Berkeley researchers have discovered that oxytocin -- a hormone associated with maternal nurturing, social attachments, childbirth and sex -- plays a critical role in healthy muscle maintenance and repair. It is the latest target for development as a potential treatment for age-related muscle wasting.
SENS Research Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Aging, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@berkeley.edu
510-643-7741
University of California - Berkeley

Showing releases 2951-2975 out of 3621.

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