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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 2976-3000 out of 3452.

<< < 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 > >>

Public Release: 8-Oct-2013
Nature
Non-specific and specific RNA binding proteins found to be fundamentally similar
Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have found unexpected similarities between proteins that were thought to be fundamentally different. The team published a new study in Nature showing that non-specific proteins actually do have the ability to be specific about where they bind to RNA -- seeking out and binding with particular sequences of nucleotides.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jessica Studeny
jessica.studeny@case.edu
216-368-4692
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 8-Oct-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Research uncovers new details about brain anatomy and language in young children
Researchers from Brown University and King's College London have uncovered new details about how brain anatomy influences language development in young kids. Using advanced MRI, they find that different parts of the brain appear to be important for language development at different ages. Surprisingly, anatomy did not predict language very well between the ages of 2 and 4, when language ability increases quickly. That underscores the importance of environment during this critical period.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 8-Oct-2013
Molecular Systems Biology
Growing bacteria keep time, know their place
Working with a synthetic gene circuit designed to coax bacteria to grow in a predictable ring pattern, Duke University scientists have revealed an under-appreciated contributor to natural pattern formation: Time.
Office of Naval Research, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, David and Lucille Packard Foundation, DuPont Fellows Forum

Contact: Minnie Glymph
minnie.glymph@duke.edu
919-660-8403
Duke University

Public Release: 8-Oct-2013
JAMA
Penn study shows the high costs of unnecessary radiation treatments for terminal cancer patients
For cancer patients dealing with the pain of tumors that have spread to their bones, doctors typically recommend palliative radiation. Though studies have demonstrated that patients with terminal cancer who receive a single session of radiotherapy get just as much pain relief as those who receive multiple treatments, this so-called single-fraction treatment has yet to be adopted in routine practice, according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, writing today in JAMA.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society

Contact: Holly Auer
holly.auer@uphs.upenn.edu
215-200-2313
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 8-Oct-2013
2013 American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress
Supplement to the Journal of the American College of Surgeons
Same-hospital readmission rate an unreliable predictor for all-hospital readmission rate
According to new research findings presented at the 2013 Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons, same-hospital readmission rates are an unreliable surrogate for predicting all-hospital readmissions rates.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Sally Garneski
pressinquiry@facs.org
312-202-5409
American College of Surgeons

Public Release: 8-Oct-2013
2013 American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress
Supplement to Journal of the American College of Surgeons
Researchers identify a protein that may predict who will have thyroid cancer recurrence
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, M.D., have taken the first steps to determine if a protein, called Programmed Death Ligand 1, can help to predict which thyroid cancer patients will most likely have a recurrence of the disease.
Center for Cancer Research, NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sally Garneski
pressinquiry@facs.org
312-202-5409
American College of Surgeons

Public Release: 8-Oct-2013
PLOS ONE
Climate change threatens Northern American turtle habitat
Although a turtle's home may be on its back, some North American turtles face an uncertain future as a warming climate threatens to reduce their suitable habitat.
NIH/National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis

Contact: Catherine Crawley
ccrawley@nimbios.org
865-974-9350
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS)

Public Release: 8-Oct-2013
Biological Psychiatry
UC Davis study finds biomarker differentiating the inattentive and combined subtypes of ADHD
Using a common test of brain functioning, UC Davis researchers have found differences in the brains of adolescents with the inattentive and combined subtypes of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and teens who do not have the condition, suggesting that the test may offer a potential biomarker for differentiating the types of the disorder.
NIH/National Institutes of Mental Health

Contact: Phyllis Brown
phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Couple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice
Abusive parenting may have a biological basis
Parents who physically abuse their children appear to have a physiological response that subsequently triggers more harsh parenting when they attempt parenting in warm, positive ways, according to new research.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Administration for Children and Families

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
LSUHSC awarded $3 million grant to study effect of HIV-related changes to oral bacteria
Dr. Paul Fidel, the Carl Baldridge Professor and associate dean for research at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans' School of Dentistry, is the lead principal investigator of a $2.76 million grant from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research over five years to study how HIV and antiretroviral therapy may change communities of bacteria in the mouth and what effects those changes may have on oral infections in HIV disease.
NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Contact: Leslie Capo
lcapo@lsuhsc.edu
504-568-4860
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Angewandte Chemie
Scientists invent a better way to make antibody-guided therapies
Chemists at the Scripps Research Institute have devised a new technique for connecting drug molecules to antibodies to make advanced therapies.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Health Affairs
Meals for more seniors could save some states money
Expanding programs like Meals on Wheels, because they help some Medicaid-receiving seniors stay out of nursing homes, would save 26 of 48 states money, in addition to allowing more seniors to stay in their own homes, according to a new study in Health Affairs.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Study shows how neurons enable us to know smells we like and dislike, whether to approach or retreat
What underlying biological mechanisms account for our seemingly instant, almost unconscious ability to determine how attractive (or repulsive) a particular smell is? New research reveals a set of cells in the fruit fly brain that respond specifically to food odors. The degree to which these neurons respond when the fly is presented different food odors predicts "incredibly well how much the flies will 'like' a given odor."
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Oncology
New research shows PET imaging effective in predicting lung cancer outcomes
Advanced imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) scan shows great promise in predicting which patients with inoperable lung cancer have more aggressive tumors and need additional treatment following standard chemotherapy/radiation therapy, according to new research recently published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The multi-site trial, led by study author and principal investigator Mitch Machtay, M.D., University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center, enrolled 250 patients at 60 cancer centers around the country.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Alicia Reale
alicia.reale@uhhospitals.org
216-844-5158
University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
American Journal of Cell Physiology
Rhode Island Hospital uncovers pathway linking heartburn and esophageal cancer
More than 60 million adults in the US have acid reflux, or heartburn, and approximately 10 percent are at risk for developing esophageal cancer, due in part to complications from Barrett's esophagus. But researchers at Rhode Island Hospital discovered a pathway they believe links Barrett's esophagus to the development of esophageal cancer. Their data suggest that blocking this pathway, such as with a proton pump inhibitor (e.g., omeprazole), may prevent the development of esophageal cancer.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ellen Slingsby
eslingsby@lifespan.org
401-444-6421
Lifespan

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Preventing Chronic Disease
Research shows 'advergames' promote unhealthy foods for kids
Not only do some online video games promote a less-than-active lifestyle for children, the content of some of these games also may be contributing to unhealthy diets. A team of Michigan State University researchers took a closer look at what are called advergames and found they have a tendency to promote foods that are chock full of fat, sugar and sodium.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tom Oswald
tom.oswald@cabs.msu.edu
517-432-0920
Michigan State University

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Journal of Biological Chemistry
USC study: Unlocking biology with math
Scientists at USC have created a mathematical model that explains and predicts the biological process that creates antibody diversity -- the phenomenon that keeps us healthy by generating robust immune systems through hypermutation.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Journal of Virology
How JC Polyomavirus invades cells
A new study in the Journal of Virology identifies the means by which the JC Polyomavirus enters host cells. It's a particular subset of serotonin receptors.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Biological Psychology
How do stress hormones during pregnancy predict adult nicotine addiction?
Adult women whose mothers had increased levels of stress hormones while they were pregnant are at greater risk of becoming addicted to nicotine, according to a new study led by a Miriam Hospital researcher.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jessica Collins Grimes
jgrimes2@lifespan.org
Lifespan

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Budnik gets EUREKA grant to study communication between nucleus and cytoplasm
University of Massachusetts Medical School Professor and Vice Chair of Neurobiology Vivian Budnik, Ph.D., has received a four-year, $1.3 million EUREKA (Exceptional Unconventional Research Enabling Knowledge Acceleration) grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to explore a novel mechanism of communication between the cytoplasm and the nucleus, called nuclear envelope budding, that may lead to new understandings for various tissue dystrophies and aging disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Jim Fessenden
james.fessenden@umassmed.edu
508-856-2000
University of Massachusetts Medical School

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Study identifies essential molecule in formation of differentiated blood cells
New research in the Journal of Experimental Medicine identifies a protein that controls the formation of different types of mature blood cells -- a finding that could be important to developing new treatments for blood diseases and helping realize the potential of regenerative medicine. Reporting their results online Oct. 7, the authors focus on a protein that serves as a molecular switch in the cytoplasm of cells to control cell function.
National Institutes of Health, Medical Research Council, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Alcon Research Institute

Contact: Nick Miller
nicholas.miller@cchmc.org
513-803-6035
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Neuroscience
Stress steroid mediated withdrawal anxiety in dependent rats reversible by flumazenil
SUNY Downstate Medical Center announced today that Sheryl Smith, Ph.D., professor of physiology and pharmacology, has published new findings demonstrating a reproducible pathology that may help shed light on anxiety and mood volatility in methamphetamine dependence.
National Institutes of Health, Hythiam, Inc.

Contact: Sheryl Smith, Ph.D.
sheryl.smith@downstate.edu
516-353-4714
SUNY Downstate Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Neurology
Study identifies possible biomarker for Parkinson's disease
Investigators from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center find that elevated levels of alpha-synuclein protein can be detected in the skin of Parkinson's disease patients.
National Institutes of Health, Langer Family Foundation, RJG Foundation

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
3-D printed microscopic cages confine bacteria in tiny zoos for the study of infections
University of Texas at Austin researchers have used a novel 3-D printing technology to build homes for bacteria at a microscopic level. Their method uses a laser to construct protein "cages" around bacteria in gelatin. The resulting structures can be of almost any shape or size, and can be moved around in relationship to other structures containing bacterial microcommunities.
National Institutes of Health, Robert A. Welch Foundation

Contact: Jason Shear
jshear@mail.utexas.edu
512-232-1454
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Pediatrics
Air pollution and psychological distress during pregnancy
Maternal psychological distress combined with exposure to air pollution during pregnancy have an adverse impact on children's behavioral development. The study shows that maternal demoralization, a measure of psychological distress that can affect a mother's ability to cope with stressful situations, was linked with several behavioral problems, including anxiety, depression, and attention problems. Effects of demoralization were greatest among children with higher levels of prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in air pollution.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Showing releases 2976-3000 out of 3452.

<< < 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 > >>

     
   

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