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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 2976-3000 out of 3716.

<< < 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 > >>

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
New research offers hope for HIV vaccine development
In a scientific discovery that has significant implications for HIV vaccine development, collaborators at the Boston University School of Medicine and Duke University School of Medicine have uncovered novel properties of special HIV antibodies. The paper, published in Cell Host and Microbe, describes how some HIV antibodies experience an unusual type of mutation, a phenomenon that allows them to neutralize many different strains of HIV.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Stimuli-responsive drug delivery system prevents transplant rejection
A global collaboration including researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital; Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine in Bangalore, India; and University Hospital of Bern, Switzerland, have developed a way to deliver immunosupressant drugs locally and when prompted, with the use of a biomaterial that self-assembles into a hydrogel (jello-like) material. The novel system is able to deliver targeted, controlled release of medication where and when it is needed.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-534-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Treatment with lymph node cells controls dangerous sepsis in animal models
An immune-regulating cell present in lymph nodes may be able to halt severe cases of sepsis, an out-of-control inflammatory response that can lead to organ failure and death.
National Institutes of Health, Shriners Hospitals for Children

Contact: Sue McGreevey
smcgreevey@partners.org
617-724-2764
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Clinical Psychological Science
Passengers who survived terrifying Air Transat flight in 2001 help psychologists uncover new clues about post-traumatic stress vulnerability
An extraordinary opportunity to study memory and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a group of Air Transat passengers who experienced 30 minutes of unimaginable terror over the Atlantic Ocean in 2001 has resulted in the discovery of a potential risk factor that may help predict who is most vulnerable to PTSD.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Kelly Connelly
kconnelly@baycrest.org
416-785-2432
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
Gut flora influences HIV immune response
Normal microorganisms in the intestines appear to play a pivotal role in how the HIV virus foils a successful attack from the body's immune system, according to new research from Duke Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
University of Alaska Fairbanks awarded $18.8 million for biomedical research, education
The University of Alaska Fairbanks received an $18.8 million award from the National Institutes of Health to fund statewide biomedical research and student training focused on the interface of health, disease and the environment in people and animals. The five-year award continues support for an NIH Institutional Development Award Network of Biomedical Research Excellence linking university-based researchers and students from Alaska's main campuses to meet research and workforce needs of Alaska's cities and rural communities.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Marie Thoms
methoms@alaska.edu
907-474-7412
University of Alaska Fairbanks

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Annals of the American Thoracic Society
UTMB researchers develop model to predict COPD hospital readmission
Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have identified predictors of early rehospitalization among patients hospitalized for complications of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In a nationwide analysis of more than 8,000 commercially insured adult patients with COPD, UTMB researchers concluded that several modifiable factors, such as appropriate prescriptions upon discharge and early follow up after discharge from the hospital, were associated with lower likelihood of early readmission.
National Institutes of Health, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, University of Texas System

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
A gene linked to disease found to play a critical role in normal memory development
A study from The Scripps Research Institute's Florida campus and Columbia University shows the huntingtin gene plays a critical role in long-term memory.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health, Whitehall Foundation, State of Florida

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Kessler Foundation scientists identify predictors of prospective memory deficit post TBI
Kessler Foundation scientists have identified predictors of prospective memory impairment after traumatic brain injury. Findings were epublished on July 28 by the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. The article, 'Rule monitoring ability predicts event-based prospective memory performance in individuals with TBI,' is authored by Jessica Paxton, Ph.D., and Nancy Chiaravalloti, Ph.D., of Kessler Foundation. This is the first study to examine the role of rule monitoring, an executive function, post-TBI.
NIH/National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation Research

Contact: Carolann Murphy
cmurphy@kesslerfoundation.org
973-324-8382
Kessler Foundation

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
mBIO
Mouth bacteria can change its diet, supercomputers reveal
Mouth bacteria can change their metabolism in disease versus health. The Stampede and Lonestar supercomputers compared gene expression of 160,000 genes in healthy and diseased periodontal communities. Research paves way for biomarkers to predict illness from wide-ranging diseases such as periodontitis, diabetes, and Crohn's disease. The Stampede supercomputer is funded by the National Science Foundation through award ACI-1134872.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Faith Singer-Villalobos
faith@tacc.utexas.edu
512-663-7237
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Decline in daily functioning related to decreased brain activity in Alzheimer's
Decline in daily functioning associated with Alzheimer's disease is related to alterations in activity in certain regions of the brain, according to a study published in the August 2014 issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-534-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
NIH awards $20 million grant to Oak Crest Institute of Science
Researchers at the Oak Crest Institute of Science have been awarded a $20 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to systematically develop an intravaginal ring capable of delivering powerful antiretroviral drugs to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted HIV in women. This Program will allow researchers, for the first time, to rigorously test a large group of antiretroviral drugs in a systematic fashion so that they can determine the best-performing candidates in order to advance them rapidly into clinical trials.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Marc Baum
info@oak-crest.org
626-817-0883
Oak Crest Institute of Science

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Journal of Bone and Mineral Research
Oxidative stress is significant predictor for hip fracture, research shows
Oxidative stress is a significant predictor for hip fracture in postmenopausal women, according to new research led by University of Cincinnati epidemiologists.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, American Heart Association, NIH/National Cancer Institute University of California Center for Environmental Genetics

Contact: Keith Herrell
keith.herrell@uc.edu
513-558-4559
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Analyst
New analysis reveals tumor weaknesses
Epigenetic markers in cancer cells could improve patient treatment.
National Science Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, NIH/National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, James H. Ferry Fund for Innovation

Contact: Andrew Carleen
acarleen@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UMN and NYBC research finds potential MERS transmission mechanism between bats and humans
Researchers have identified the mechanism used by the deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome virus to transmit from bats to humans. Bats are a native reservoir for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome and the finding could be critical for understanding the animal origins of the virus, as well as preventing and controlling the spread of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome and related viruses in humans.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Caroline Marin
crmarin@umn.edu
612-624-5680
University of Minnesota Academic Health Center

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Journal of Family Psychology
Transgender relationships undermined by stigma
A study that looked at the effect of stressors such as poverty, discrimination and the stigma of transgender relationships, found that they weigh heavily on transgender women and their male partners. Stigma can even undermine the relationship itself. The findings have implications not only for mental health but also for the spread of HIV, the researchers said.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Neoplasia
Hijacking the brain's blood supply: Tumor discovery could aid treatment
Dangerous brain tumors hijack the brain's existing blood supply throughout their progression, by growing only within narrow potential spaces between and along the brain's thousands of small blood vessels, new research shows for the first time.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
WSU researcher sees survival story in Antarctic fly's small genome
The Antarctic midge -- an extremophile that develops over two brutal winters -- has the smallest insect genome sequenced so far.
National Institutes of Health National Research Service Award

Contact: Joanna Kelley
joanna.l.kelley@wsu.edu
509-335-0037
Washington State University

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
No excess baggage: Antarctic insect's genome, newly sequenced, is smallest to date
Scientists who sequenced the genome of the Antarctic midge suspect the genome's small size -- the smallest in insects described to date -- can probably be explained by the midge's adaptation to its extreme living environment.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Denlinger
denlinger.1@osu.edu
614-292-6425
Ohio State University

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
UChicago Medicine and Advocate Health Care receive $1.8M NIH grant for diabetes research
The grant will establish the first Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet Clinical Center in Chicago. TrialNet, a long-term, international collaboration managed by the NIH's National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, identifies people at risk or in the early stages of type 1 diabetes. Once identified, researchers offer individuals the chance to participate in studies that introduce prevention or treatment tactics that may have an impact on the progression of the disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Matt Wood
matthew.wood@uchospitals.edu
773-702-5894
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
Annals of Epidemiology
Kessler Foundation scientists link environment & inclusion in adults with disabilities
Kessler Foundation researchers have identified an association between the built environment and disability-related outcomes for adults with physical impairments. 'Disability and the built environment: an investigation of community and neighborhood land uses and participation for physically impaired adults' was published in Annals of Epidemiology. These findings focus attention on the environment as an important factor in disability-related outcomes.
NIH/National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation Research, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Development

Contact: Carolann Murphy
cmurphy@kesslerfoundation.org
973-324-8382
Kessler Foundation

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
Nature Methods
An easier way to manipulate malaria genes
A new approach to knocking out parasite's genes could make it easier to identify drug targets.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Science Foundation, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
Beaumont awarded research grant from National Cancer Institute
Metro Detroit area residents with cancer, and those throughout Michigan, will have access to federally-funded cancer research studies thanks to a five-year grant recently awarded to the Beaumont Cancer Institute. Beaumont Health System is one of 34 community sites participating in the National Cancer Institute's Community Oncology Research Program, also known as NCORP.
NIH/National Cancer

Contact: Angela Blazevski
angela.blazevski@beaumont.edu
248-551-0445
Beaumont Health System

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
GW researcher receives grant to develop genetic tools to study parasitic infections
John Hawdon, Ph.D., associate professor of microbiology, immunology, and tropical medicine at the George Washington University, was recently awarded $430,722 from the National Institutes of Health to develop a model system to study parasitic nematode infection, which will lead to greater understanding of the infective process and the host's immune response to infection.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lisa Anderson
lisama2@gwu.edu
202-994-3121
George Washington University

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
Environmental Health Perspectives
Penn-led expert panel calls for public health research on natural gas drilling
A group of environmental health researchers, led by Penn's Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology published recommendations for public health research associated with unconventional natural gas drilling operations.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Showing releases 2976-3000 out of 3716.

<< < 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 > >>

     
   

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