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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 301-325 out of 3438.

<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>

Public Release: 24-Jun-2014
JAMA Ophthalmology
Trained evaluators can successfully screen for premie eye disease from miles away
Trained non-physician evaluators who studied retinal images transmitted to computer screens at a remote central reading center successfully identified newborn infants likely to require a specialized medical evaluation for retinopathy of prematurity, a leading cause of treatable blindness. Findings from a new multicenter study strengthen the case for using telemedicine to address unmet medical needs of preterm babies worldwide who cannot be initially evaluated by ophthalmologists.
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Natalie Virgilio
virgilion@email.chop.edu
267-426-6246
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 24-Jun-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Synthetic triterpenoids show promise in preventing colitis-associated colon cancer
Researchers from Case Western Reserve and Dartmouth universities have shown that a class of small antioxidant molecules carries enormous promise for suppressing colon cancer associated with colitis. These findings, published in an early June edition of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, offer hope that physicians ultimately will be able to reduce dramatically the number of sufferers of this inflammatory bowel disease who go on to develop colon cancer.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeannette Spalding
jeannette.spalding@case.edu
216-368-3004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 24-Jun-2014
Cancer Research
Mayo Clinic researchers say gene in brain linked to kidney cancer
A gene known to control brain growth and development is heavily involved in promoting clear cell renal cell carcinoma, the most common form of kidney cancer, researchers from Mayo Clinic in Florida are reporting.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Kevin Punsky
punsky.kevin@mayo.edu
904-953-0746
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 24-Jun-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
How aging can intensify damage of spinal cord injury
In the complex environment of a spinal cord injury, researchers have found that immune cells in the central nervous system of elderly mice fail to activate an important signaling pathway, dramatically lowering chances for repair after injury.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Jonathan Godbout
Jonathan.Godbout@osumc.edu
614-293-3456
Ohio State University

Public Release: 24-Jun-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Animal study unveils predictive marker for epilepsy development following febrile seizure
Within hours of a fever-induced seizure, magnetic resonance imaging may be able to detect brain changes that occur in those most likely to develop epilepsy later in life, according to an animal study published in the June 25 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Emily Ortman
media@sfn.org
202-962-4090
Society for Neuroscience

Public Release: 24-Jun-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Team explains how mutated X-linked mental retardation protein impairs neuron function
There are new clues about malfunctions in brain cells that contribute to intellectual disability and possibly other developmental brain disorders. A CSHL team has discovered how defects in an X-linked metnal retardation protein, OPHN1, can lead to impairments in the maturation and adjustment of synaptic strength of excitatory neurons in the brain.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Jun-2014
Crab and other crustacean shells may help prevent and treat inflammatory disease
Microparticles in crab, shrimp and lobster shells have anti-inflammatory mechanisims that could lead to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for those who suffer from IBD. Since these shells are abundant and a major waste in the seafood industry, they may provide an alternative to costly drugs that don't always work.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gisele Galoustian
ggaloust@fau.edu
561-297-2676
Florida Atlantic University

Public Release: 24-Jun-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Novel biomarker predicts febrile seizure-related epilepsy, UCI study finds
A newly discovered biomarker -- visible in brain scans for hours after febrile seizures -- predicts which individuals will subsequently develop epilepsy, according to UC Irvine researchers. This diagnostic ability could lead to improved use of preventive therapies for the disorder.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders & Stroke

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 24-Jun-2014
JAMA
3D mammography detects more invasive cancers and reduces call-back rates
Reporting in the June 25 issue of JAMA, researchers from Penn Medicine and other institutions found that 3D mammography -- known as digital breast tomosynthesis -- found significantly more invasive, or potentially lethal, cancers than a traditional mammogram alone and reduced call-backs for additional imaging.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Jun-2014
JAMA
Regional anesthesia cuts length of stay, mortality vs. general anesthesia in hip fracture surgery
Patients who received regional anesthesia during hip fracture surgery had moderately lower mortality and a significantly lower length of stay than those who received general anesthesia, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. In a related study published in JAMA Internal Medicine this week, the team also reported high rates of mortality and functional disability among nursing home residents treated for hip fracture.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lee-Ann Donegan
leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5660
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Jun-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Hidden origins of pulmonary hypertension revealed by network modeling
In a groundbreaking study, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital have identified a related family of molecules believed to be a major root cause of pulmonary hypertension, a deadly vascular disease with undefined origins. This is one of the first studies to leverage advanced computational network modeling to decipher the molecular secrets of this complex human disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-534-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Growing unknown microbes 1 by 1
Trillions of bacteria live in the human body, and although there's plenty of evidence that these microbes play a collective role in human health, we know very little about the individual bacterial species. Employing the use of a specially designed glass chip with tiny compartments, Caltech researchers provide a way to target and grow specific microbes from the gut -- a key step in understanding which bacteria are helpful to human health and which are harmful.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Fantastic voyage into the human lung
A team of investigators at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles has been awarded $4 million over five years by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute for LungMAP, an atlas of the developing human lung.
NIH/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Ellin Kavanagh
ekavanagh@chla.usc.edu
323-361-1812
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Learning and Memory
UCI study finds that learning by repetition impairs recall of details
UC Irvine neurobiologists Zachariah Reagh and Michael Yassa have found that while repetition enhances the factual content of memories, it can reduce the amount of detail stored with those memories. This means that with repeated recall, nuanced aspects may fade away.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, National Science Foundation Division of Graduate Education

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Antibiotic developed 50 years ago may be the key to fighting 'superbugs'
The aim of the project is to evaluate novel dosing regimens for polymyxin combinations to maximize antibacterial activity and to minimize the emergence of resistance and toxicity, says Tsuji, principal investigator on the grant.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sara R. Saldi
saldi@buffalo.edu
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
ICE/ENDO 2014
Bone loss persists 2 years after weight loss surgery
A new study shows that for at least two years after bariatric surgery, patients continue to lose bone, even after their weight stabilizes. The results -- in patients undergoing gastric bypass, the most common type of weight loss surgery -- were presented Monday at the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society: ICE/ENDO 2014 in Chicago.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Aaron Lohr
alohr@endocrine.org
202-971-3654
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Cancer chain in the membrane
Supercomputer simulations reveal clusters of a protein linked to cancer warp cell membranes -- findings could help design new anticancer drugs. Researchers at the UTHealth Medical School used XSEDE/TACC supercomputers Lonestar and Stampede to simulate molecular dynamics of Ras protein clusters at the cell membrane. Simulations give greater understanding of Ras protein role in cancer and provide models for further experimental tests.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Faith Singer-Villalobos
faith@tacc.utexas.edu
512-232-5771
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Pediatrics
Young indoor tanning increases early risk of skin cancer
Dartmouth researchers have found that early exposure to the ultraviolet radiation lamps used for indoor tanning is related to an increased risk of developing basal cell carcinomas at a young age. Their findings are reported in the July 2014 issue of Pediatrics. Since indoor tanning has become increasingly popular among adolescents and young adults, this research calls attention to the importance of counseling young people about the risk of indoor tanning.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute for Environmental Health, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Robin Dutcher
Robin.Dutcher@hitchcock.org
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
ICE/ENDO 2014
African American women more resistant anti-inflammatory effect aspirin than white women
African American women respond differently to the anti-inflammatory effect of aspirin than do white American women, new research finds. The results were presented Monday, June 23 at ICE/ENDO 2014, the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society in Chicago.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Aaron Lohr
alohr@endocrine.org
202-971-3654
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Delivering drugs on cue
Current drug-delivery systems used to administer chemotherapy to cancer patients typically release a constant dose of the drug over time -- but a new study challenges this 'slow and steady' approach and offers a novel way to locally deliver the drugs 'on demand,' as reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Harvard University, NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Contact: Kristen Kusek
kristen.kusek@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New analysis reveals previously 'hidden diversity' of mouth bacteria
A new computational method for analyzing bacterial communities has uncovered closely related, previously indistinguishable bacteria living in different parts of the human mouth. The technique, developed by Marine Biological Laboratory scientists, provides high taxonomic resolution of bacterial communities and has the capacity to improve the understanding of microbial communities in health and disease. The study will be published in PNAS Online Early Edition the week of June 23-27, 2014.
G. Unger Vetlesen Foundation, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Contact: Gina Hebert
ghebert@mbl.edu
508-289-7725
Marine Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Medical Care
Nearly 1 in 25 US babies are born too soon
An analysis of millions of US births over 15 years finds that many babies, nearly one in 25, are born earlier than medically justified, through elective cesarean sections and elective induced labor. The study reinforces long-standing recommendations by health experts against early-term deliveries without appropriate medical reasons.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Alison Fraser
FraserA1@email.chop.edu
267-426-6054
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
ICE/ENDO 2014
BPA stimulates growth of breast cancer cells, diminishes effect of treatment
Bisphenol A, a chemical commonly used in plastics, appears to increase the proliferation of breast cancer cells, according to Duke Medicine researchers presenting at an annual meeting of endocrine scientists.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Duke/Department of Surgery D.P. Bolognesi Award, Duke Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Study sheds light on racial disparity in colon cancer
African-Americans with colon cancer are half as likely as Caucasian patients to have a type of colon cancer that is linked to better outcomes. The finding may provide insight into why African-Americans are more likely to die of colon cancer than Caucasians with the same stage of disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
'Tom Sawyer' regulatory protein initiates gene transcription in a hit-and-run mechanism
A team of genome scientists has identified a 'hit-and-run' mechanism that allows regulatory proteins in the nucleus to adopt a 'Tom Sawyer' behavior when it comes to the work of initiating gene activation.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Showing releases 301-325 out of 3438.

<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>

     
   

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