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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 301-325 out of 3716.

<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Nature Neuroscience
How to short circuit hunger
Researchers discover a brain circuit that both eliminates gnawing hunger pangs and leads to feelings of fullness, providing a promising new target for the development of weight-loss drugs.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Boston Area Diabetes Endocrinology Research Center, University of Edinburgh Chancellor's Fellowship, American Diabetes Association

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
JAMA Pediatrics
Musculoskeletal outcomes from study on adolescent bariatric surgery safety
Outcomes regarding musculoskeletal disease among severely obese adolescents participating in the 'Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery' (Teen-LABS) study were published this week in JAMA Pediatrics.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Gina Bericchia
gina.bericchia@nationwidechildrens.org
614-355-0487
Nationwide Children's Hospital

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting
Detection of critical heart disease before birth lags among poor
While prenatal ultrasounds are doing a good job of identifying critical congenital heart disease, those living in poor or rural communities are less likely to find out their baby has heart disease before birth than those in more affluent or urban communities, according to research to be presented Monday, April 27, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego.
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Debbie Jacobson
djacobson@aap.org
847-434-7084
American Academy of Pediatrics

Public Release: 26-Apr-2015
Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting
Electronic cigarettes gaining in popularity among teens
Teens no longer smoke just cigarettes. They have branched out to using alternative tobacco products such as electronic cigarettes, hookahs and little cigars. In fact, e-cigarette use is rising rapidly among both cigarette smokers and nonsmokers, according to a study to be presented Sunday, April 26, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Debbie Jacobson
djacobson@aap.org
847-434-7084
American Academy of Pediatrics

Public Release: 26-Apr-2015
Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting
We are family: Adult support reduces youths' risk of violence exposure
Adults can have a bigger influence on youths growing up in poor, violent neighborhoods than they may realize, according to a study to be presented Sunday, April 26 at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Debbie Jacobson
djacobson@aap.org
847-434-7084
American Academy of Pediatrics

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Journal of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Mental disorders don't predict future violence
Most psychiatric disorders -- including depression -- do not predict future violent behavior, reports a new longitudinal study of delinquent youth. The only exception is substance abuse and dependence.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
International Journal of Health Promotion and Education
Texas A&M study finds we think better on our feet, literally
A study from the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health finds students with standing desks are more attentive than their seated counterparts. In fact, preliminary results show 12 percent greater on-task engagement in classrooms with standing desks, which equates to an extra seven minutes per hour of engaged instruction time.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Debbie Field
field@tamhsc.edu
512-341-4935
Texas A&M University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
Study sheds new light on brain's source of power
New research published today in the journal Nature Communications represents a potentially fundamental shift in our understanding of how nerve cells in the brain generate the energy needed to function. The study shows neurons are more independent than previously believed and this research has implications for a range of neurological disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Novo Nordisk Foundation

Contact: Mark Michaud
mark_michaud@urmc.rochester.edu
585-273-4790
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Global Mental Health
Orphaned boys as vulnerable to abuse as girls
Orphaned children in low- and middle-income countries face a high risk of physical and sexual abuse and boys are as vulnerable as girls. Researchers from Duke and UNC-Chapel Hill found that physical and sexual abuse affects 12 percent of girls and 14 percent of boys in institution-based care and 19 percent of girls and 20 percent of boys in family-based care annually.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Susan Gallagher
susan.gallagher@duke.edu
919-681-7817
Duke University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Journal of Biological Chemistry
New insight into how brain makes memories
Vanderbilt researchers have identified the role that a key protein associated with autism and the co-occurrence of alcohol dependency and depression plays in forming the spines that create new connections in the brain.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Brain
Stem-cell-based therapy promising for treatment of breast cancer metastases in the brain
Harvard Stem Cell Institute researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have developed an imageable mouse model of brain-metastatic breast cancer and shown the potential of a stem-cell-based therapy to eliminate metastatic cells from the brain and prolong survival. The study published online in the journal Brain also describes a strategy of preventing the potential negative consequences of stem cell therapy.
National Institutes of Health, James McDonald Foundation

Contact: B. D. Colen
bd_colen@harvard.edu
617-413-1224
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Brain
Stem-cell-based therapy promising for treatment of breast cancer metastases in the brain
Investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have developed an imageable mouse model of brain-metastatic breast cancer and shown the potential of a stem-cell-based therapy to eliminate metastatic cells from the brain and prolong survival. The study published online in the journal Brain also describes a strategy of preventing the potential negative consequences of stem cell therapy.
National Institutes of Health, James McDonald Foundation

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Ophthalmology
Rise in spring allergens linked to increased dry eye cases
New ophthalmology research from the University of Miami shows that dry eye strikes most often in spring, just as airborne allergens are surging. The study marks the first time that researchers have discovered a direct correlation between seasonal allergens and dry eye, with both pollen and dry eye cases reaching a yearly peak in the month of April.
Department of Veterans Affairs, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research to Prevent Blindness, US Department of Defense

Contact: Shirley Dang
sdang@aao.org
415-561-8534
American Academy of Ophthalmology

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
UTMB investigates use of oxygen therapy among COPD patients
A new study about the use of oxygen to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston found that the majority of patients receiving oxygen therapy were low-income, non-Hispanic white females about 75 years old with two or more other health conditions. The UTMB study is the first to describe the current use of oxygen therapy among COPD patients in a large, nationally representative sample of US patients.
Agency for Healthcare and Quality, Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Carbon
Researchers add a new wrinkle to cell culture
Using a technique that introduces tiny wrinkles into sheets of graphene, researchers from Brown University have developed new textured surfaces for culturing cells in the lab that better mimic the complex surroundings in which cells grow in the body.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Cell
Zeroing in on a silent killer
Researchers have solved the molecular structure of an important regulator for blood pressure in the human body -- which could lead to better treatments for high blood pressure.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Oncogene
'Humanized' mice will lead to better testing of cancer immunotherapies
New model reported in Oncogene, XactMice, uses human blood stem cells to grow a 'humanized' mouse immune system prior to tumor transplantation, allowing anti-cancer therapies to be tested in a much more human-like environment.
US Department of Defense, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Cell Reports
Penn study identifies molecular link between DNA damage and premature aging
University of Pennsylvania researchers found that inactivating interferon signaling in a mouse model of progeria, or premature aging, extended the animals' lives. These mice were more fertile, had less gray hair and were larger and more robust than animals in which the interferon pathway was still active.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Neuron
University of Oregon team glimpses how the brain transforms sound
When people hear the sound of footsteps or the drilling of a woodpecker, the rhythmic structure of the sounds is striking, says Michael Wehr of the University of Oregon. How such sounds are processed is now better understood, based on a new study in Wehr's lab.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andrew Stiefel
stiefel@uoregon.edu
541-346-3157
University of Oregon

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Trial of statin therapy to reduce HIV-associated cardiovascular risk open for enrollment
The first clinical trial to investigate whether treatment with a statin drug can reduce the increased cardiovascular disease risk in people infected with HIV has begun enrolling patients. Based at Massachusetts General Hospital, the six-year, $40 million REPRIEVE (Randomized Study to Prevent Vascular Events in HIV) trial will be conducted at around 100 sites in the US, Canada, Puerto Rico and Thailand.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Kowa Pharmaceuticals

Contact: Cassandra Aviles
cmaviles@partners.org
617-724-6433
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
Human tape worm drug shows promise against MRSA in lab
Researchers based at Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital show in a new study that a drug already approved to fight tapeworms in people, effectively treated MRSA superbugs in lab cultures and in infected nematode worms. The scientists are pursuing further testing with hope that the findings will lead to new treatments for deadly MRSA infections.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Journal of Public Health
When is a child too sick for daycare? Study explores parents' decision-making
It's a common dilemma faced by many working parents: your child has a cough or a cold, do you send them to nursery?
NIH/National Institute for Health Research

Contact: Caroline Clancy
caroline.clancy@bristol.ac.uk
01-179-288-086
University of Bristol

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Cell Metabolism
Fat signals control energy levels in the brain
An enzyme secreted by the body's fat tissue controls energy levels in the brain, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings, in mice, underscore a role for the body's fat tissue in controlling the brain's response to food scarcity, and suggest there is an optimal amount of body fat for maximizing health and longevity.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Ellison Medical Foundation

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Cell
Rare mutation causes vitamin A deficiency and eye deformities
Researchers at the University of Michigan and UC Davis have solved a genetic mystery that has afflicted three unrelated families, and possibly others, for generations. These families have been plagued by a variety of congenital eye malformations, including small eyes with poor vision and the complete absence of eyes. But until now, no one could figure out the genetic basis for these conditions.
National Institutes of Health, Midwest Eye Bank and Transplantation Center, UM Centers for Rare Disease and Genetics in Health and Medicine

Contact: Carole Gan
cfgan@ucdavis.edu
916-765-2304
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
PLOS Computational Biology
Finding new life for first-line antibiotics
Researchers have identified a single, simple measure -- recovery time -- to guide antibiotic dosing that could bring an entire arsenal of first-line antibiotics back into the fight against drug-resistant pathogens.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, DuPont Young Professorship Award, David and Lucile Packard Fellowship, National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, Howard G. Clark Fellowship

Contact: Ken Kingery
ken.kingery@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

Showing releases 301-325 out of 3716.

<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>

     
   

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