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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3026-3050 out of 3538.

<< < 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 > >>

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
American Journal of Pathology
New clues may link hereditary cancer genes to increased risk of cancer from alcohol
In laboratory experiments conducted on human cell lines at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, scientists have shown that people carrying certain mutations in two hereditary cancer genes, BRCA2 and PALB2, may have a higher than usual susceptibility to DNA damage caused by a byproduct of alcohol, called acetaldehyde.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Everett and Marjorie Kovler Professorship in Pancreas Cancer Research

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Team to study control of malaria-related parasite growth with $2.1-million NIH grant
A University of South Florida team has been awarded a $2.1-million National Institutes of Health grant to study the "control room" that regulates cell replication in malaria-related parasites. The research may identify new factors promoting Toxoplasma growth and lead to new therapies to combat malaria.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Anne DeLotto Baier
abaier@health.usf.edu
813-974-3303
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
CWRU study finds depression symptoms and emotional support impact PTSD treatment progress
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University found that during PTSD treatments, rapid improvements in depression symptoms are associated with better outcomes.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Nature Chemical Biology
Johns Hopkins scientists identify a key to body's use of free calcium
Scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have figured out a key step in how "free" calcium -- the kind not contained in bones -- is managed in the body, a finding that could aid in the development of new treatments for a variety of neurological disorders that include Parkinson's disease.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.org
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
Moderate doses of radiation therapy to unaffected breast may prevent second breast cancers
Survivors of breast cancer have a one in six chance of developing breast cancer in the other breast. But a study conducted in mice suggests that survivors can dramatically reduce that risk through treatment with moderate doses of radiation to the unaffected breast at the same time that they receive radiation therapy to their affected breast. The treatment, if it works as well in humans as in mice, could prevent tens of thousands of second breast cancers.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research at Columbia University

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@columbia.edu
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
ACS Chemical Biology
Researchers discover potential drug targets for early onset glaucoma
Using a novel high-throughput screening process, scientists have for the first time identified molecules with the potential to block the accumulation of a toxic eye protein that can lead to early onset of glaucoma.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
More benefits emerging for one type of omega-3 fatty acid: DHA
A study of the metabolic effects of omega-3 fatty acids, especially DHA, concludes that these compounds may have an even wider range of biological impacts than previously considered. They could be of significant value in the prevention of fatty liver disease, but that may also be just the beginning.
National Institutes of Health and US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Donald Jump
Donald.jump@oregonstate.edu
541-737-4007
Oregon State University

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Journal of Physical Activity and Health
Physical activity significantly extends lives of cancer survivors
Physical activity significantly extends the lives of male cancer survivors, a new study of 1,021 men has found. During the period while the men were followed, those who expended more than 12,600 calories per week in physical activity were 48 percent less likely to die than those who burned fewer than 2,100 calories per week.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Better eating habits, not bad economy, stabilized obesity rates
A study from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill says that it wasn't the economic downturn that created a leveling of US obesity rates. Rather, it is likely a result of more information and efforts aimed at producing healthier food choices and eating habits.
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Pesci
dpesci@unc.edu
919-962-2600
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
2 proteins compete for 1 port on a growth factor; 1 promotes metastasis, the other blocks it
Consider two drivers, each with a key that fits the same car. Driver 1 wants simply to turn on the ignition and leave the vehicle idling, ready and waiting to roll. Driver 2 wants to take it on a destructive joy ride.
G. Harold and Leila Y Mathers Charitable Foundations, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott Merville
smerville@mdanderson.org
713-792-0661
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Interventions work to stem freshman drinking
A variety of interventions -- especially combinations of them -- have curtailed freshmen drinking on campuses across the country, according to a systematic review of more than 40 studies documenting 62 interventions. Given that efficacy, colleges should consider assessing alcohol risk among all new freshmen and providing multifaceted interventions for those who report drinking, the review's authors recommend.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tracing unique cells with mathematics
Stem cells can turn into heart cells. Skin cells can mutate to cancer cells; even cells of the same tissue type exhibit small heterogeneities. Scientists use single-cell analyses to investigate these heterogeneities. But the method is still laborious, and considerable inaccuracies conceal smaller effects. Scientists at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen, the Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen and the University of Virginia have now found a way to simplify and improve the analysis by mathematical methods.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, National Science Foundation, European Research Council, German Research Foundation, German Academic Exchange Service, Pew Scholars Program, and David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Science
New genes spring and spread from non-coding DNA
"Where do new genes come from?" is a long-standing question in genetics and evolutionary biology. A new study from researchers at UC Davis shows that new genes can spring from non-coding DNA more rapidly than expected.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Scientific Reports
Long-term spinal cord stimulation stalls symptoms of Parkinson's-like disease
Researchers at Duke Medicine have shown that continuing spinal cord stimulation appears to produce improvements in symptoms of Parkinson's disease, and may protect critical neurons from injury or deterioration.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Neuron
Brain uses serotonin to perpetuate chronic pain signals in local nerves
Setting the stage for possible advances in pain treatment, researchers at The Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland report they have pinpointed two molecules involved in perpetuating chronic pain in mice. The molecules, they say, also appear to have a role in the phenomenon that causes uninjured areas of the body to be more sensitive to pain when an area nearby has been hurt.
NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Johns Hopkins Brain Science Institute, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@alumni.nd.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Science
Watching molecules morph into memories
In two studies in the Jan. 24 issue of Science, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine used advanced imaging techniques to provide a window into how the brain makes memories. These insights into the molecular basis of memory were made possible by new technology: a mouse model developed at Einstein in which molecules crucial to making memories were given fluorescent "tags" so they could be observed traveling in real time in living brain cells.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Research Service Award

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
7-181-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Current Biology
Experiments show hypothesis of microtubule steering accurate
Tiny protein motors in cells can steer microtubules in the right direction through branching nerve cell structures, according to Penn State researchers who used laboratory experiments to test a model of how these cellular information highways stay organized in living cells.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Cell
Mother's high-fat diet alters metabolism in offspring, leading to higher obesity risk
The offspring of obese mothers consuming a high-fat diet during pregnancy are at a higher risk than the children of thin mothers for lifelong obesity and related metabolic disorders. The molecular and cellular basis for these differences are clarified in a new study published in the Jan. 23 issue of Cell by researchers at Yale School of Medicine and the University of Cologne.
National Institutes of Health, American Diabetes Association

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Neuron
Study identifies gene tied to motor neuron loss in ALS
Columbia University Medical Center researchers have identified a gene, called matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), that appears to play a major role in motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The findings, made in mice, explain why most but not all motor neurons are affected by the disease and identify a potential therapeutic target for this still-incurable neurodegenerative disease. The study was published today in the online edition of the journal Neuron.
P2ALS, Target ALS, Tow Foundation, SMA Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Science Foundation

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@columbia.edu
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Nature Communications
Study shows 1 in 5 women with ovarian cancer has inherited predisposition
A new study conservatively estimates that one in five women with ovarian cancer has inherited genetic mutations that increase the risk of the disease, according to research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Caroline Arbanas
arbanasc@wustl.edu
314-286-0109
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Societies
World's dangerous neighborhoods produce aggressive children
Across the globe, children growing up in dangerous neighborhoods exhibit more aggressive behavior, says a new Duke University study that is the first to examine the topic across a wide range of countries. The effect may be indirect: dangerous neighborhoods may influence parents' behavior, and harsh parenting practices may in turn promote aggressive behavior in children.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/Fogarty International Center

Contact: Alison Jones
alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Journal of Visualized Experiments
Scripps Florida scientists offer new insight into neuron changes brought about by aging
A new study from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute offers insights into how aging affects the brain's neural circuitry, in some cases significantly altering gene expression in single neurons. These discoveries could point the way toward a better understanding of how aging affects our cognitive ability and new therapeutic targets for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Drug discovery potential of natural microbial genomes
Scientists at the University of California, San Diego have developed a new genetic platform that allows efficient production of naturally occurring molecules, and have used it to produce a novel antibiotic compound. Their study, published this week in PNAS, may open new avenues for natural product discoveries and drug development.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Debra Kain
ddkain@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Obstetrics and Gynecology
Vulvar condition causing painful sex strikes twice as many Hispanic women
The prevalence and incidence rates of vulvodynia were substantial among all ethnic groups.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Beata Mostafavi
bmostafa@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Better protein capture a boon for drug manufacturers
Rice University scientists have created a way to fine tune a process critical to the pharmaceutical industry that could save time and money.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Welch Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Showing releases 3026-3050 out of 3538.

<< < 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 > >>

     
   

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