NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIA SeniorHealth.gov NIH Podcast
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Radio
  NIH Podcasts
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3026-3050 out of 3400.

<< < 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 > >>

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Duke to co-lead NIH research network on antibacterial resistance
Investigators at Duke Medicine and UCSF have been selected to oversee a nationwide research program on antibacterial resistance, which includes a focus on the growing unmet challenges associated with MRSA and E. coli. The research team will direct the allocation of a federal grant from NIAID. Duke has been awarded $2 million in initial funding to launch the network; total funding for the award will reach at least $62 million through 2019.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Rachel Harrison
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Nature Cell Biology
Berkeley Lab researchers unlock mystery behind dormant breast tumor cells that become metastatic
Berkeley Lab researchers have identified the microenvironment surrounding microvasculature as a niche where dormant cancer cells may reside, and the sprouting of microvasculature blood vessels as the event that transforms dormant cancer cells into metastatic tumors.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, US Department of Defense

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
$1.76 million federal grant to support palliative care program at CWRU nursing school
Medical advancements that extend the lives of patients with cancer, heart failure and other serious chronic diseases have created another need: More clinicians skilled in specialized care for people with terminal illnesses. Acknowledging this need, Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing has received a five-year, $1.76 million grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research for a pre- and postdoctoral fellowship program in what is known as palliative care.
NIH/National Institute of Nursing Research

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Cell Reports
Researchers identify genetic signature of deadly brain cancer
A multi-institutional team of researchers have pinpointed the genetic traits of the cells that give rise to gliomas -- the most common form of malignant brain cancer. The findings, which appear in the journal Cell Reports, provide scientists with rich new potential set of targets to treat the disease.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NYSTEM, Adelson Foundation, McDonnell Science Foundation, Sanofi-Aventis

Contact: Mark Michaud
mark_michaud@urmc.rochester.edu
585-273-4790
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
2013 ASCO Annual Meeting
Mutations in susceptibility genes common in younger African American women with breast cancer
A high percentage of African-American women with breast cancer who were evaluated at a university cancer-risk clinic were found to carry inherited genetic mutations that increase their risk for breast cancer. The finding suggests that inherited mutations may be more common than anticipated in this understudied group and may partially explain why African-Americans more often develop early onset and "triple-negative" breast cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Komen for the Cure, The Breast Cancer Research Foundation

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
SLEEP 2013
Sleep
Patients with type 2 diabetes or hypertension must be evaluated for sleep apnea
The American Academy of Sleep Medicine is advising anyone with type 2 diabetes or hypertension to be evaluated for sleep apnea by a board-certified sleep medicine physician. The recommendation comes as the group of international clinicians and researchers meets in Baltimore for SLEEP 2013, the foremost gathering of sleep experts annually.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katie Blyth
kblyth@lcwa.com
312-565-3900
American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
IU researchers focus on a brain protein and an antibiotic to block cocaine craving
A new study conducted by a team of Indiana University neuroscientists demonstrates that GLT1, a protein that clears glutamate from the brain, plays a critical role in the craving for cocaine that develops after only several days of cocaine use.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Liz Rosdeitcher
rosdeitc@indiana.edu
812-855-4507
Indiana University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
JAMA Internal Medicine
For some men, it's 'T' time -- test or no test
Prescriptions for testosterone therapy have increased significantly during the last 10 years, according to a study in the current issue of JAMA Internal Medicine conducted by researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Raul Reyes
rareyes@utmb.edu
409-747-0794
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New kind of antibiotic may be more effective at fighting tuberculosis, anthrax, and other diseases
Diseases such as tuberculosis, anthrax, and shigellosis -- a severe food-borne illness -- eventually could be treated with an entirely new and more-effective kind of antibiotic, say scientists who found 46 previously untested molecules that target and disrupt an important step in the process of protein synthesis in bacteria. These molecules render bacteria incapable of replicating.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
American Journal of Epidemiology
Evidence mounts that 4 lifestyle changes will protect heart, reduce your risk of death
A large, multi-center study led by Johns Hopkins researchers has found a significant link between lifestyle factors and heart health, adding even more evidence in support of regular exercise, eating a Mediterranean-style diet, keeping a normal weight and, most importantly, not smoking.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Ellen Beth Levitt
eblevitt@jhmi.edu
410-955-5307
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
JAMA Pediatrics
Early-life risk factors account for racial and ethnic disparities in childhood obesity
A new prospective study finds that the increased prevalence of obesity and overweight among black and Hispanic children can largely be explained by early-life risk factors such as rapid infant weight gain, early introduction of solid foods and a lack of exclusive breast feeding.
NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Contact: Kory Dodd Zhao
kzhao2@partners.org
617-726-0274
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Scientists develop new technique to selectively dampen harmful immune responses
A team from The Scripps Research Institute has demonstrated a new technique that may lead to a better way to selectively repress unwanted immune reactions without disabling the immune system as a whole.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Potential new way to suppress tumor growth discovered
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues at the University of Rochester Medical Center, have identified a new mechanism that appears to suppress tumor growth, opening the possibility of developing a new class of anti-cancer drugs.
National Institutes of Health, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
2013 ASCO Annual Meeting
EORTC study shows radiotherapy and surgery provide regional control for breast cancer patients
Final analysis of the EORTC 10981-22023 AMAROS (After Mapping of the Axilla: Radiotherapy Or Surgery?) trial has shown that both axillary lymph node dissection and axillary radiotherapy provide excellent regional control for breast cancer patients with a positive sentinel node biopsy. The AMAROS trial also found that axillary radiotherapy reduces the risk of short term and long-term lymphoedema as compared to axillary lymph node dissection.
European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Charitable Trust, KWF Kankerbestrijding, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: John Bean
john.bean@eortc.be
32-277-41671
European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Preventing an immune overreaction
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Dr. James Paulson and colleagues at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., used antigen-decorated nanoparticles to block the development of antibodies to a immune response-inducing antigens in mice.
German Academic Exchange Service, European Molecular Biology Organization, National Institutes of Health, Human Frontiers Scholarship Program

Contact: Jillian Hurst
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 2-Jun-2013
SLEEP 2013
Sleep
Study suggests that night work may impair glucose tolerance
A new study suggests that night work may impair glucose tolerance, supporting a causal role of night work in the increased risk of type 2 diabetes among shift workers.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Lynn Celmer
lcelmer@aasmnet.org
American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Public Release: 2-Jun-2013
SLEEP 2013
Sleep
Study links workplace daylight exposure to sleep, activity and quality of life
A new study demonstrates a strong relationship between workplace daylight exposure and office workers' sleep, activity and quality of life.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Celmer
lcelmer@aasmnet.org
American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Public Release: 2-Jun-2013
2013 ASCO Annual Meeting
Addition of bevacizumab to initial treatment for brain tumors does not extend patients' lives
Results of a randomized Phase III clinical trial conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group determined that adding bevacizumab to initial treatment for glioblastoma did not improve patient overall survival or progression-free survival,. Results were reported June 2 during the plenary session of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2013 Annual Meeting.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Shawn Farley
PR@acr.org
703-648-8936
American College of Radiology

Public Release: 1-Jun-2013
2013 ASCO Annual Meeting
New England Journal of Medicine
MGH-led studies shed new light on targeted lung cancer therapy
Research teams led by Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center investigators are publishing two important studies regarding use of the targeted cancer drug crizotinib for treatment of advanced lung cancer driven by specific genetic mutations.
Pfizer, NIH/National Cancer Institute, V Foundation

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-314-3986
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 1-Jun-2013
Cancer Research
Cytomegalovirus might speed brain-cancer growth
Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infects most middle-aged Americans but usually remains dormant in the body. This study indicates that, in mice, a mouse CMV speeds the progression of an aggressive form of brain cancer when particular genes are shut off in tumor cells. The findings suggest that viruses might influence cancer progression, and that anti-viral therapy might improve the treatment of these aggressive brain tumors.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Dardinger Neuro-oncology Fund

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 31-May-2013
Cell Metabolism
Oncogene mutation hijacks splicing process to promote growth and survival
An international team of researchers -- led by principal investigator Paul S. Mischel, M.D., a member of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research and professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine -- has found that a singular gene mutation helps brain cancer cells to not just survive, but grow tumors rapidly by altering the splicing of genes that control cellular metabolism.
National Institutes of Health, Ben and Catherine Ivy Foundation

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 31-May-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Circadian rhythms control body's response to intestinal infections, UCI-led study finds
Circadian rhythms can boost the body's ability to fight intestinal bacterial infections, UC Irvine researchers have found.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Sirtris Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 31-May-2013
Schizophrenia Bulletin
Lead acts to trigger schizophrenia
Mice engineered with a human gene for schizophrenia and exposed to lead during early life exhibited behaviors and structural changes in their brains consistent with schizophrenia. Scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine say their findings suggest a synergistic effect between lead exposure and a genetic risk factor, and open an avenue to better understanding the complex gene-environment interactions that put people at risk for schizophrenia and other mental disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Timothy S. Paul
tp2111@columbia.edu
212-305-2676
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 30-May-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UCLA-led team may have found key to cause of Cushing disease
UCLA researchers and their colleagues have found that testicular orphan nuclear receptor 4 (TR4) is overexpressed in pituitary tumors that spark the excess production of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). The scientists discovered that by knocking down TR4 in lab mice, they were able to reverse tumor growth and excess ACTH production.
National Institutes of Health, Helmsley Charitable Trust, and others

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 30-May-2013
American Pediatrics
Minority children drink more sugary fruit juice than their white peers
While there has been a steep decline in kids' consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in California, African-American and Latino children may be replacing soda with 100 percent fruit juice while their white peers are not, according to a new study from UC San Francisco.
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: Juliana Bunim
juliana.bunim@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Showing releases 3026-3050 out of 3400.

<< < 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 > >>

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2014 by AAAS, the science society.