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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3051-3075 out of 3399.

<< < 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 > >>

Public Release: 4-Jun-2013
Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Rates of emergency bowel surgery vary wildly from state to state
Johns Hopkins researchers have documented huge and somewhat puzzling interstate variations in the percentage of emergency versus elective bowel surgeries. Figuring out precisely why the differences occur is critical, they say, because people forced to undergo emergency procedures are far more likely to die from their operations than those able to plan ahead for them.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 4-Jun-2013
Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Anxious? Activate your anterior cingulate cortex with a little meditation
Scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have succeeded in identifying the brain functions involved in meditation.
Mind and Life Institute/Francisco J. Varela Grant, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bonnie Davis
bdavis@wakehealth.edu
336-716-4977
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 4-Jun-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Seeing our errors keeps us on our toes
If people are unable to perceive their own errors as they complete a routine, simple task, their skill will decline over time, Johns Hopkins researchers have found -- but not for the reasons scientists assumed. The researchers report that the human brain does not passively forget our good techniques, but chooses to put aside what it has learned.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Human Frontier Science Program

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 4-Jun-2013
UC awarded $1.4 million grant to explore the links between movement and social interaction
Martial arts moves, rocking chairs and avatar competitions will help research the mysteries into autism, schizophrenia, robotics and other fields.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Dawn Fuller
dawn.fuller@uc.edu
513-556-1823
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 4-Jun-2013
American Journal of Psychiatry
Altered neural circuitry may lead to anorexia and bulimia
A landmark study, with first author Tyson Oberndorfer, M.D., and led by Walter H. Kaye, M.D., professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, suggests that the altered function of neural circuitry contributes to restricted eating in anorexia and overeating in bulimia. The research may offer a pathway to new and more effective treatments for these serious eating disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Price Foundation

Contact: Debra Kain
ddkain@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 4-Jun-2013
Lancet
Research teams find genetic variant that could improve warfarin dosing in African-Americans
In the first genome-wide association study to focus on warfarin dose requirement in African-Americans, a multi-institutional team of researchers has identified a common genetic variation that can help physicians estimate the correct dose of the widely used blood-thinning drug warfarin.
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, Wellcome Trust, Health Research, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 4-Jun-2013
Stem Cell Reports
Biomarker could help scientists choose the right cell line when conducting stem cell experiments
According to researchers at Boston Children's Hospital, stem cells that strongly express a gene called WNT3 are biased to develop into cells and tissues including pancreas, liver and bladder. This discovery suggests that other genes may serve as biomarkers for selecting stem cells with a preference for turning into different tissue types. Such markers would make it easier for stem cell scientists to choose the right cell line to start with when generating specific tissues for study.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, and more

Contact: Erin Tornatore
erin.tornatore@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3113
Boston Children's Hospital

Public Release: 4-Jun-2013
Journal of Visualized Experiments
Fear: A justified response or faulty wiring?
On June 3, 2013, a new article studying amygdala activity in human beings will be published as part of JoVE Behavior, a new section of the video journal that focuses on the behavioral sciences. The technique, developed by Dr. Fred Helmstetter and his research group at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, studies how the brain responds to anticipated painful stimuli, in this case an electric shock, in volunteer test subjects.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Rachel Greene
press@jove.com
617-250-8451
The Journal of Visualized Experiments

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Nature
Enhancer RNAs alter gene expression
In a pair of distinct but complementary papers, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and colleagues illuminate the functional importance of a relatively new class of RNA molecules. The work, published online this week in the journal Nature, suggests modulation of "enhancer-directed RNAs" or "eRNAs" could provide a new way to alter gene expression in living cells, perhaps affecting the development or pathology of many diseases.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Psychological Science
Blood vessels in the eye linked with IQ, cognitive function
The width of blood vessels in the retina, located at the back of the eye, may indicate brain health years before the onset of dementia and other deficits, according to a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, UK Medical Research Council, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jacobs Foundation

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Duke to co-lead NIH research network on antibacterial resistance
Investigators at Duke Medicine and UCSF have been selected to oversee a nationwide research program on antibacterial resistance, which includes a focus on the growing unmet challenges associated with MRSA and E. coli. The research team will direct the allocation of a federal grant from NIAID. Duke has been awarded $2 million in initial funding to launch the network; total funding for the award will reach at least $62 million through 2019.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Rachel Harrison
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Nature Cell Biology
Berkeley Lab researchers unlock mystery behind dormant breast tumor cells that become metastatic
Berkeley Lab researchers have identified the microenvironment surrounding microvasculature as a niche where dormant cancer cells may reside, and the sprouting of microvasculature blood vessels as the event that transforms dormant cancer cells into metastatic tumors.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, US Department of Defense

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
$1.76 million federal grant to support palliative care program at CWRU nursing school
Medical advancements that extend the lives of patients with cancer, heart failure and other serious chronic diseases have created another need: More clinicians skilled in specialized care for people with terminal illnesses. Acknowledging this need, Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing has received a five-year, $1.76 million grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research for a pre- and postdoctoral fellowship program in what is known as palliative care.
NIH/National Institute of Nursing Research

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Cell Reports
Researchers identify genetic signature of deadly brain cancer
A multi-institutional team of researchers have pinpointed the genetic traits of the cells that give rise to gliomas -- the most common form of malignant brain cancer. The findings, which appear in the journal Cell Reports, provide scientists with rich new potential set of targets to treat the disease.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NYSTEM, Adelson Foundation, McDonnell Science Foundation, Sanofi-Aventis

Contact: Mark Michaud
mark_michaud@urmc.rochester.edu
585-273-4790
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
2013 ASCO Annual Meeting
Mutations in susceptibility genes common in younger African American women with breast cancer
A high percentage of African-American women with breast cancer who were evaluated at a university cancer-risk clinic were found to carry inherited genetic mutations that increase their risk for breast cancer. The finding suggests that inherited mutations may be more common than anticipated in this understudied group and may partially explain why African-Americans more often develop early onset and "triple-negative" breast cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Komen for the Cure, The Breast Cancer Research Foundation

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
SLEEP 2013
Sleep
Patients with type 2 diabetes or hypertension must be evaluated for sleep apnea
The American Academy of Sleep Medicine is advising anyone with type 2 diabetes or hypertension to be evaluated for sleep apnea by a board-certified sleep medicine physician. The recommendation comes as the group of international clinicians and researchers meets in Baltimore for SLEEP 2013, the foremost gathering of sleep experts annually.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katie Blyth
kblyth@lcwa.com
312-565-3900
American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
IU researchers focus on a brain protein and an antibiotic to block cocaine craving
A new study conducted by a team of Indiana University neuroscientists demonstrates that GLT1, a protein that clears glutamate from the brain, plays a critical role in the craving for cocaine that develops after only several days of cocaine use.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Liz Rosdeitcher
rosdeitc@indiana.edu
812-855-4507
Indiana University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
JAMA Internal Medicine
For some men, it's 'T' time -- test or no test
Prescriptions for testosterone therapy have increased significantly during the last 10 years, according to a study in the current issue of JAMA Internal Medicine conducted by researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Raul Reyes
rareyes@utmb.edu
409-747-0794
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New kind of antibiotic may be more effective at fighting tuberculosis, anthrax, and other diseases
Diseases such as tuberculosis, anthrax, and shigellosis -- a severe food-borne illness -- eventually could be treated with an entirely new and more-effective kind of antibiotic, say scientists who found 46 previously untested molecules that target and disrupt an important step in the process of protein synthesis in bacteria. These molecules render bacteria incapable of replicating.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
American Journal of Epidemiology
Evidence mounts that 4 lifestyle changes will protect heart, reduce your risk of death
A large, multi-center study led by Johns Hopkins researchers has found a significant link between lifestyle factors and heart health, adding even more evidence in support of regular exercise, eating a Mediterranean-style diet, keeping a normal weight and, most importantly, not smoking.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Ellen Beth Levitt
eblevitt@jhmi.edu
410-955-5307
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
JAMA Pediatrics
Early-life risk factors account for racial and ethnic disparities in childhood obesity
A new prospective study finds that the increased prevalence of obesity and overweight among black and Hispanic children can largely be explained by early-life risk factors such as rapid infant weight gain, early introduction of solid foods and a lack of exclusive breast feeding.
NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Contact: Kory Dodd Zhao
kzhao2@partners.org
617-726-0274
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Scientists develop new technique to selectively dampen harmful immune responses
A team from The Scripps Research Institute has demonstrated a new technique that may lead to a better way to selectively repress unwanted immune reactions without disabling the immune system as a whole.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Potential new way to suppress tumor growth discovered
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues at the University of Rochester Medical Center, have identified a new mechanism that appears to suppress tumor growth, opening the possibility of developing a new class of anti-cancer drugs.
National Institutes of Health, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
2013 ASCO Annual Meeting
EORTC study shows radiotherapy and surgery provide regional control for breast cancer patients
Final analysis of the EORTC 10981-22023 AMAROS (After Mapping of the Axilla: Radiotherapy Or Surgery?) trial has shown that both axillary lymph node dissection and axillary radiotherapy provide excellent regional control for breast cancer patients with a positive sentinel node biopsy. The AMAROS trial also found that axillary radiotherapy reduces the risk of short term and long-term lymphoedema as compared to axillary lymph node dissection.
European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Charitable Trust, KWF Kankerbestrijding, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: John Bean
john.bean@eortc.be
32-277-41671
European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Preventing an immune overreaction
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Dr. James Paulson and colleagues at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., used antigen-decorated nanoparticles to block the development of antibodies to a immune response-inducing antigens in mice.
German Academic Exchange Service, European Molecular Biology Organization, National Institutes of Health, Human Frontiers Scholarship Program

Contact: Jillian Hurst
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Showing releases 3051-3075 out of 3399.

<< < 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 > >>

     
   

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