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Department of Health and Human Services

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3051-3075 out of 3758.

<< < 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 > >>

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
ACS Nano
Microtubes create cozy space for neurons to grow, and grow fast
Tiny, thin microtubes could provide a scaffold for neuron cultures to grow so that researchers can study neural networks, their growth and repair, yielding insights into treatment for degenerative neurological conditions or restoring nerve connections after injury.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Menopause
When bone density is good, no repeat tests needed for younger postmenopausal women
After menopause and before age 65, women who have normal bone density have a very low risk of fracture, shows a new study from the Women's Health Initiative published online in Menopause, the journal of the North American Menopause Society. That means these women don't need another bone mass density test before age 65.
NIH/National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Eileen Petridis
epetridis@fallscommunications.com
216-696-0229
The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Journal of Pharmaceutical Research
Altered milk protein can deliver AIDS drug to infants
A novel method of altering a protein in milk to bind with an antiretroviral drug promises to greatly improve treatment for infants and young children suffering from HIV/AIDS, according to a researcher in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Nature
Supercomputing beyond genealogy reveals surprising European ancestors
Most Europeans today derive from three distinct populations, as evidenced by sequenced genomes of nine ancient remains and 2,345 contemporary humans. Genomic analysis of modern and ancient DNA, combined with archeological evidence is revealing new complexity in human history. Scientists used the NSF XSEDE Stampede supercomputer of the Texas Advanced Computing Center to model and compare genomic data of ancient and modern Europeans.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Faith Singer
faith@tacc.utexas.edu
512-232-5771
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Clinical Infectious Diseases
HIV-infected adults diagnosed with age-related diseases at similar ages as uninfected
New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that HIV-infected adults are at a higher risk for developing heart attacks, kidney failure and cancer. But, contrary to what many had believed, the researchers say these illnesses are occurring at similar ages as adults who are not infected with HIV.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, and more

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Study finds traditional healers contribute to HIV care delays
If you're a native of rural Mozambique who contracts HIV and becomes symptomatic, before seeking clinical testing and treatment, you'll likely consult a traditional healer.
US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
GigaScience
GigaScience publishes a virtual box of delights to aid the fight against heart disease
Early diagnosis of coronary heart disease is essential for prevention of most heart attacks, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a primary diagnostic tool. MRIs examine blood flow to the heart myocardium; however, compensation for the patient's breathing motion is needed. This requires complex image processing methods, but current methods are inadequate. A major way forward to drive testing, optimization and development of new methods is making large public MRI datasets available.
Spain's Ministry of Science and Innovation through INNPACTO, Comunidad de Madrid, European RegionalDevelopment Funds, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Intramural Research Program

Contact: Scott Edmunds
scott@gigasciencejournal.com
852-361-03531
GigaScience

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
JAMA
Patients who do not enroll in hospice are more likely to receive aggressive cancer care
More patients with cancer use hospice today than ever before, but there are indications that care intensity outside of hospice is increasing, and length of hospice stay decreasing. Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital examined how hospice affects health care utilization and costs and found that in a sample of elderly Medicare patients with advanced cancer, hospice care was associated with significantly lower rates of both health care utilization and total costs during the last year of life.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Elaine St. Peter
estpeter@partners.org
617-525-6375
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Molecular Psychiatry
Multiple models reveal new genetic links in autism
With the help of mouse models, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the 'tooth fairy,' researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have implicated a new gene in idiopathic or non-syndromic autism.
California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de Sao Paulo and Conselho Nacion

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
PLOS Medicine
Genes identify transplant rejection
Acute rejection after kidney transplantation occurs in about 15-20 percent of patients despite immunosuppressive therapy. In the Assessment of Acute Rejection in Renal Transplantation study published this week in PLOS Medicine, Minnie Sarwal (Department of Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America) and colleagues developed a 17-gene set to analyze patients' peripheral blood samples to determine which patients were at risk of acute rejection of their kidney transplants.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases , Mexican Federal Funds for Research, NIH, Spanish national public grant, European Commission Grant within the BIODRIM Consortium

Contact: Maya Sandler
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Cell Reports
The brain's 'inner GPS' gets dismantled
Imagine being able to recognize your car as your own but never being able to remember where you parked it. Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have induced this all-too-common human experience -- or a close version of it -- permanently in rats and from what is observed perhaps derive clues about why strokes and Alzheimer's disease can destroy a person's sense of direction.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Department of Veterans Affairs

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Smoking associated with elevated risk of developing a second smoking-related cancer
Results of a federally-funded pooled analysis of five prospective cohort studies indicate that cigarette smoking prior to the first diagnosis of lung (stage I), bladder, kidney or head and neck cancer increases risk of developing a second smoking-associated cancer. This is the largest study to date exploring risk of second cancers among current smokers.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Kate Blackburn
kate.blackburn@asco.org
571-483-1379
American Society of Clinical Oncology

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Lung cancer screening with low-dose CT could be cost effective says Dartmouth study
Dartmouth researchers say lung cancer screening in the National Lung Screening Trial meets a commonly accepted standard for cost effectiveness as reported in the Nov. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. This relatively new screening test uses annual low-dose CT scans to spot lung tumors early in individuals facing the highest risks of lung cancer due to age and smoking history.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Rick Adams
Clarence.R.Adams@hitchcock.org
603-653-1910
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Record grant will continue inner-city asthma research
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health a seven-year, $70 million grant for its continuing work on the Inner-City Asthma Consortium -- a nationwide clinical research network to evaluate and develop promising new immune-based treatments. The goal of the work is to reduce the severity of asthma in inner-city children.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Gian Galassi
ggalassi@uwhealth.org
608-263-5561
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
The cat's meow: Genome reveals clues to domestication
Cats and humans have shared the same households for at least 9,000 years, but we still know very little about how our feline friends became domesticated. An analysis of the cat genome by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis reveals some surprising clues. The research appears Nov. 10 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute , National Science Foundation, Morris Animal Foundation, European Research Council, Government of Spain, National Center for Resarch Resources, Winn Feline Foundation

Contact: Diane Duke Williams
williamsdia@wustl.edu
314-286-0111
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Personal Relationships
Is your relationship moving toward marriage? If it isn't, you probably can't admit it
Dating couples who have moved toward marriage over the course of their relationship remember accurately what was going on at each stage of their deepening commitment. But couples whose commitment to each other has stagnated or regressed are far less accurate in their memories of their relationships, says a new University of Illinois study.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Phyllis Picklesimer
p-pickle@illinois.edu
217-244-2827
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Scientists uncover a role for carbon monoxide in battling bacterial infections
New findings support the possibility that, in the future, small non-toxic doses of CO could provide the immune system with an infection-fighting advantage.
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Associtation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Playing action video games can boost learning
A new study shows for the first time that playing action video games improves not just the skills taught in the game, but learning capabilities more generally.
US Office of Naval Research-Multi University Research Initiative, National Institutes of Health, Swiss National Foundation, Human Frontier Science Program, Swiss National Fund, NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Monique Patenaude
monique.patenaude@rochester.edu
585-276-3693
University of Rochester

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
American Journal of Pathology
Major blood vessel constrictor contributes to vision loss in premies
A gene known to play a major role in constricting blood vessels also appears to be a major player in the aberrant blood vessel growth that can destroy the vision of premature babies, according to research at the Medical College of Georgia.
NIH/National Eye Institute, US Department of Veterans Affairs, American Heart Association

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
'Darting' mice may hold clues to ADHD, autism and bipolar disorder
A darting mouse may hold an important clue in the development of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism and bipolar disorder, according to a study by a Vanderbilt University-led research team recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Statins reverse learning disabilities caused by genetic disorder
UCLA neuroscientists discovered that statins, a popular class of cholesterol drugs, reverse the learning deficits caused by a mutation linked to a common genetic cause of learning disabilities. Published in the Nov. 10 advance online edition of Nature Neuroscience, the findings were studied in mice genetically engineered to develop the disease, called Noonan syndrome.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Elaine Schmidt
eschmidt@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2272
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Nature
Thousands of never-before-seen human genome variations uncovered
Thousands of never-before-seen genetic variants in the human genome have been uncovered using a new genome sequencing technology. These discoveries close many human genome mapping gaps that have long resisted sequencing. The technique, called single-molecule, real-time DNA sequencing, may now make it possible for researchers to identify potential genetic mutations behind many conditions whose genetic causes have long eluded scientists.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Michael McCarthy
leilag@uw.edu
206-543-3620
University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Cancer Discovery
Mayo Clinic researchers identify first steps in formation of pancreatic cancer
Researchers at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville say they have identified first steps in the origin of pancreatic cancer and that their findings suggest preventive strategies to explore.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Punsky
punsky.kevin@mayo.edu
904-953-0746
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Nature Genetics
Re-learning how to read a genome
There are roughly 20,000 genes and thousands of other regulatory 'elements' stored within our DNA. Somehow all of this coded information needs to be read and transcribed into messages that can be used by cells. New research has revealed that the initial steps of the reading process are actually remarkably similar at both genes and regulatory elements. The main differences seem to occur after the initial step, in the length and stability of the messages.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jaclyn Jansen
jjansen@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Some neurons can multitask, raising questions about the importance of specialization
The brain is constantly processing sensory information while supporting a dizzying array of behaviors. For decades, biologists have assumed that specialized classes of neurons process all this information at once. But a team of scientists at CSHL has found a population of neurons in the rat brain that support multiple behaviors at once. These neurons cannot be individually classified by specialization, challenging assumptions about how information is encoded in the brain.
National Institutes of Health, John Merck Fund, McKnight Foundation, Marie Robertson Memorial Fund of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Swartz Foundation Fellowship

Contact: Jaclyn Jansen
jjansen@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Showing releases 3051-3075 out of 3758.

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