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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3076-3100 out of 3435.

<< < 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 > >>

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
Academy of Spinal Cord Injury Professionals Conference
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine publishes Sept. conference issue
The Sept. issue of the Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine focuses on, "The Changing Face of Spinal Cord Injury," the theme for the 2013 meeting of the Academy of Spinal Cord Injury Professionals. Research articles address topics in urology, neuroscience, rehab psychology, physiology, gastroenterology, and infectious disease.
NIH/National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

Contact: Carolann Murphy
cmurphy@kesslerfoundation.org
973-324-8382
Kessler Foundation

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
Preventing Chronic Disease
Ease of access improves fruit and vegetable consumption
A new study from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center shows that community-supported agriculture programs may be a feasible approach for providing fresh fruits and vegetables to under-resourced communities.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bonnie Davis
bdavis@wakehealth.edu
336-716-4977
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study examines ways to restore immunity to chronic hepatitis C infection
The hepatitis C virus hijacks the body's immune system, leaving T cells unable to function. A new study in animal models suggests that blocking a protein that helps the virus thrive could restore immune function, allowing the body to fight infection. The work, led by teams at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital and Emory University, was published online Aug. 26 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Gates Foundation, National Institutes of Health, New Iberia Research Center

Contact: Gina Bericchia
Gina.Bericchia@NationwideChildrens.org
614-355-0495
Nationwide Children's Hospital

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
ACS Synthetic Biology
An easier way to control genes
MIT researchers have shown that they can turn genes on or off inside yeast and human cells by controlling when DNA is copied into messenger RNA -- an advance that could allow scientists to better understand the function of those genes.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, NIH/New Innovator Award, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Brain wiring quiets the voice inside your head
Researchers have developed the first diagram of the brain circuitry that enables a complex interplay between the motor system and the auditory system to occur. The research, which appears Sept. 4 in The Journal of Neuroscience, could lend insight into schizophrenia and mood disorders that arise when this circuitry goes awry and individuals hear voices other people do not hear.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Death by asexuality: IU biologists uncover new path for mutations to arise
Ground-breaking new research from a team of evolutionary biologists at Indiana University shows for the first time how asexual lineages of a species are doomed not necessarily from a long, slow accumulation of new mutations, but rather from fast-paced gene conversion processes that simply unmask pre-existing deleterious recessive mutations.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steve Chaplin
stjchap@iu.edu
812-856-1896
Indiana University

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
BIDMC awarded NIH grant to study new treatment for spinal cord injuries
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has been awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health to investigate the use of a new noninvasive neurophysiologic intervention for the treatment of spinal cord injuries.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
Nature Communications
Size really does not matter when it comes to high blood pressure
Removing one of the tiniest organs in the body has shown to provide effective treatment for high blood pressure. The discovery, made by University of Bristol researchers and published in Nature Communications, could revolutionize treatment of the world's biggest silent killer.
British Heart Foundation, Cibiem, New York, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Caroline Clancy
caroline.clancy@bristol.ac.uk
44-011-792-88086
University of Bristol

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
eLife
Tissue loss triggers regeneration in planarian flatworms
By investigating regeneration in planarian flatworms, Whitehead Institute researchers have identified a mechanism -- involving the interplay of two wound-induced genes -- by which the animal can distinguish between wounds that require regeneration and those that do not. Because the genes identified in this study have homologs with conserved functions in most animals, this finding may provide insight into regeneration in other animals, including humans.
National Institutes of Health, Keck Foundation

Contact: Nicole Rura
rura@wi.mit.edu
617-258-6851
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
Journal of Adolescent Health
Friends' Facebook, Myspace photos affect risky behavior among teens
A longitudinal study of 1,563 10th-grade students in Los Angeles County found that teenagers were more likely to smoke or drink alcohol if their friends posted photos of smoking or drinking on online social networking sites like Facebook or Myspace.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Alison Trinidad
alison.trinidad@usc.edu
323-442-3941
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
Cell Metabolism
Aging really is 'in your head'
Among scientists, the role of proteins called sirtuins in enhancing longevity has been hotly debated, driven by contradictory results from many different scientists. But new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may settle the dispute.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Ellison Medical Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Judy Martin
martinju@wustl.edu
314-286-0105
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
Nature Communications
Potential epilepsy drug discovered using zebrafish
An antihistamine discovered in the 1950s to treat itching may also prevent seizures in an intractable form of childhood epilepsy, according to researchers at UC San Francisco who tested it in zebrafish bred to mimic the disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Laura Kurtzman
laura.kurtzman@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
Arthritis & Rheumatism
Researchers develop specific tests to identify cancer biomarkers in dermatomyositis
Researchers from major universities in the US have developed specific tests to identify cancer biomarkers in patients with dermatomyositis -- a systemic inflammatory disease associated with increased risk of malignancy. According to study findings published in the American College of Rheumatology journal, Arthritis & Rheumatism, the assays detect antibodies against anti-transcriptional intermediary factor-1 and nuclear matrix protein NXP-2.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Enhanced luminal breast tumor response to antiestrogen therapy
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Rebecca Cook and colleagues at Vanderbilt University, found that expression of an oncogene, ERBB3, was enhanced in luminal breast cancers compared to other breast cancer subtypes.
National Institutes of Health, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, American Cancer Society, Stand up to Cancer, and others

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI early table of contents for Sept. 3, 2013
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, Sept. 3, 2013, in the JCI: ErbB3 downregulation enhances luminal breast tumor response to antiestrogens, Amelioration of ischemic brain damage by peritoneal dialysis, Epithelial stem cell mutations that promote squamous cell carcinoma metastasis, Kruppel-like factor 15 is critical for vascular inflammation, Accelerated neurodegeneration through chaperone-mediated oligomerization of tau, and more.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, German National Academic Foundation, Leukemia and Lymphoma society

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 2-Sep-2013
JAMA Internal Medicine
Study shows patient-centered medical home philosophy boosts patient, physician satisfaction
A study to be posted in JAMA Internal Medicine highlights a new joint program between the University of California, Los Angeles and the University of Southern California. The program demonstrates a way to mend the broken health care system with a new patient-centered program that is getting raves from patients, as well as the residents and nurses who provide their care.
UniHealth Foundation, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, US Department of Veterans Affairs, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Leslie Ridgeway
lridgewa@usc.edu
323-442-2823
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A fly's hearing
University of Iowa researchers say that the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is an ideal model to study hearing loss in humans caused by loud noise. The reason: The molecular underpinnings to its hearing are roughly the same as with people.
National Institutes of Health, University of Iowa/Iowa Center for Molecular Auditory Neuroscience

Contact: Gary Galluzzo
gary-galluzzo@uiowa.edu
319-384-0009
University of Iowa

Public Release: 2-Sep-2013
Pediatrics
Drug reduces hospitalizations and cost of treating young children with sickle cell anemia
A drug proven effective for treatment of adults and children with sickle cell anemia reduced hospitalizations and cut annual estimated medical costs by 21 percent for affected infants and toddlers, according to an analysis led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Summer Freeman
summer.freeman@stjude.org
901-595-3061
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 1-Sep-2013
Nature
Cracking bacteria's secrets may lead to new treatments
Scientists have found another chink in bacteria's armour, mapping for the first time the structure of a protein that plays an important role helping infection gain a foothold in the body.
National Institutes of Health, Australian Research Council

Contact: Emily Walker
emily.walker@monash.edu
61-399-034-844
Monash University

Public Release: 1-Sep-2013
Nature Genetics
Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Our African follower for over 70,000 years!
One of the deadliest infectious diseases of humankind emerged in Africa 70,000 years ago, a new genetic analysis of 259 Tuberculosis bacterial strains has shown. According to the study, TB bacteria migrated out of Africa hand-in-hand with the first anatomically modern humans. Today's deadly features of TB may be a result of the common migratory path and changes in human live-styles. These evolutionary findings may impact the future developments of new drugs and vaccines.
MRC UK, Swiss National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Christian Heuss
christian.heuss@unibas.ch
41-612-848-683
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute

Public Release: 1-Sep-2013
Nature
Scientists discover novel functions of platelets
A new understanding of novel functions of platelets could lead to new treatments to reduce bleeding in trauma and severe infections.
NIH/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, American Heart Association

Contact: Greg Elwell
greg-elwell@omrf.org
405-271-8955
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation

Public Release: 30-Aug-2013
Appetite
Study: Overweight and obese women are equally capable of the impulse control that lean women exhibit
Previous studies have shown that overweight and obese people have a harder time delaying gratification, so they are more likely to forego the healthy body later on in favor of eating more calorie-dense foods now. But University at Buffalo research published last month in the journal Appetite now shows that behavioral interventions that improve delay of gratification can work just as well with overweight and obese women as with lean women.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ellen Goldbaum
goldbaum@buffalo.edu
716-645-4605
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 30-Aug-2013
Genes and Development
Possible links: Epigenetics, aging, nucleus protein mutations to cancer, rare disorders
Cell senescence, an irreversible arrest of proliferation, is thought to be associated with normal aging and is protective against cancer. Penn researchers found that senescent cells undergo changes in their chromatin, similar to changes in cells that are prematurely aging. When the nuclear protein lamin B1 is deleted in senescent cells, large-scale changes in gene expression occurred. This loss of lamin B1 may cause changes in chromatin architecture and add to premature cell aging.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Ellison Medical Foundation

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 30-Aug-2013
Chemistry and Biology
UNC researchers find promising new angle for drugs to prevent stroke and heart attack
A new study -- the first to apply a new screening technique to human platelets -- netted a potential drug target for preventing dangerous blood clots in high-risk people.
American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tom Hughes
tahughes@unch.unc.edu
919-966-6047
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 29-Aug-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Penn study: Shutting off neurons helps bullied mice overcome symptoms of depression
A new drug target to treat depression and other mood disorders may lie in a group of GABA neurons shown to contribute to symptoms like social withdrawal and increased anxiety, Penn Medicine researchers report in a new study in the Journal of Neuroscience.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Showing releases 3076-3100 out of 3435.

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