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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3076-3100 out of 3389.

<< < 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 > >>

Public Release: 21-May-2013
New England Journal of Medicine
Researchers find genetic risk factor for pulmonary fibrosis
A paper recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine and co-written by physicians and scientists at the University of Colorado School of Medicine finds that an important genetic risk factor for pulmonary fibrosis can be used to identify individuals at risk for this deadly lung disease.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, US Veterans Administration

Contact: Mark Couch
mark.couch@ucdenver.edu
303-724-5377
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Drugs found to both prevent and treat Alzheimer's disease in mice
Researchers at USC have found that a class of pharmaceuticals can both prevent and treat Alzheimer's disease in mice.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 21-May-2013
eLife
Keeping stem cells strong
A team of researchers led by biologists at the California Institute of Technology has found that, in mouse models, the molecule microRNA-146a acts as a critical regulator and protector of blood-forming stem cells (called hematopoietic stem cells, or HSCs) during chronic inflammation, suggesting that a deficiency of miR-146a may be one important cause of blood cancers and bone marrow failure.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Obesity
'Doctor shopping' by obese patients negatively affects health
Overweight and obese patients are significantly more likely than their normal-weight counterparts to repeatedly switch primary care doctors, a practice that disrupts continuity of care and leads to more emergency room visits, new Johns Hopkins research suggests.
Health Resources and Service Administration, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Nano Letters
Single-cell transfection tool enables added control for biological studies
Northwestern researchers have developed a novel tool for single-cell transfection, in which they deliver molecules into targeted cells through temporary nanopores in the cell membrane created by a localized electric field.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 21-May-2013
American Thoracic Society 2013 International Conference
New England Journal of Medicine
Genetic marker associated with risk for pulmonary fibrosis
New research from Brigham and Women's Hospital finds that a genetic risk factor for pulmonary fibrosis, an uncommon but deadly lung disease, may be effective in identifying individuals at risk for this disease. These findings will be presented at the American Thoracic Society International Conference and publish online simultaneously at the New England Journal of Medicine on May 22 and will appear in the July 4, 2013 print edition.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, US Veterans Administration

Contact: Lori J. Schroth
ljschroth@partners.org
617-534-1604
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Nature Communications
UofL scientists uncover how grapefruits provide a secret weapon in medical drug delivery
University of Louisville researchers have uncovered how to create nanoparticles using natural lipids derived from grapefruit, and have discovered how to use them as drug delivery vehicles.
National Institutes of Health, Louisville Veterans Administration Medical Center, Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation

Contact: Julie Heflin
julie.heflin@louisville.edu
502-852-7987
University of Louisville

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Circulation
Evaluating a new way to open clogged arteries
A new study from MIT analyzes the potential usefulness of a new treatment that combines the benefits of angioplasty balloons and drug-releasing stents, but may pose fewer risks.
National Institutes of Health, Abbott Vascular

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Do men's and women's hearts burn fuel differently?
Gender differences in the heart's metabolic response to stress may shed light on heart disease.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Sharon Parmet
sparmet@uic.edu
312-413-2695
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Finding a family for a pair of orphan receptors in the brain
Researchers at Emory University have identified a protein that stimulates a pair of "orphan receptors" found in the brain, solving a long-standing biological puzzle and possibly leading to future treatments for neurological diseases.
NIH/National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Nature Communications
Study finds vitamin C can kill drug-resistant TB
In a striking, unexpected discovery, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have determined that vitamin C kills drug-resistant tuberculosis bacteria in laboratory culture. The finding suggests that vitamin C added to existing TB drugs could shorten TB therapy, and it highlights a new area for drug design. The study was published today in the online journal Nature Communications.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 21-May-2013
American Thoracic Society 2013 International Conference
New England Journal of Medicine
Better behavior after tonsil/adenoid surgery for kids with sleep breathing trouble?
Children with obstructive sleep apnea who had a common surgery to remove their tonsils and adenoids showed notable improvements in behavior, quality of life and other symptoms compared to those treated with "watchful waiting" and supportive care, according to a new study.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Biology Letters
Bird's playlist could signal mental strengths and weaknesses
Having the biggest playlist doesn't make a male songbird the brainiest of the bunch, a new study shows.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ashley Yeager
ashley.yeager@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Environmental Health Perspectives
Early-life traffic-related air pollution exposure linked to hyperactivity
Early-life exposure to traffic-related air pollution was significantly associated with higher hyperactivity scores at age 7, according to new research from the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Keith Herrell
Keith.Herrell@uc.edu
513-558-4559
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 21-May-2013
American Thoracic Society 2013 International Conference
New England Journal of Medicine
Early removal of adenoids and tonsils can help pediatric sleep apnea symptoms
A study led by Brigham and Women's Hospital finds early removal of adenoids and tonsils can improve behavior, sleep apnea symptoms and quality of life in children with sleep apnea. However, early removal fails to improve short term cognitive functioning.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tom Langford
tlangford@partners.org
617-534-1605
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 21-May-2013
American Thoracic Society 2013 International Conference
New England Journal of Medicine
Surgery on adenoid, tonsils improves outcomes in children with obstructive sleep apnea
Children with obstructive sleep apnea who had a common surgery to remove their adenoids and tonsils showed notable improvements in behavior, quality of life and other symptoms compared to those treated with "watchful waiting" and supportive care. However, there was no difference between both groups in attention and executive functioning, as measured by formal neuropsychological tests.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Ascenzi
ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Molecular Psychiatry
Genetic predictors of postpartum depression uncovered by Hopkins researchers
Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered specific chemical alterations in two genes that, when present during pregnancy, reliably predict whether a woman will develop postpartum depression.
Solomon & Rebecca Baker Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 21-May-2013
JAMA
Antidepressant reduces stress-induced heart condition
A drug commonly used to treat depression and anxiety may improve a stress-related heart condition in people with stable coronary heart disease, according to researchers at Duke Medicine.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 21-May-2013
PLOS Medicine
Integrating mental health care into HIV care
The integration of mental health interventions into HIV prevention and treatment platforms can reduce the opportunity costs of care and improve treatment outcomes, argues a new Policy Forum article published in this week's PLOS Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Fiona Godwin
fgodwin@plos.org
01-223-442-834
PLOS

Public Release: 21-May-2013
PLOS Medicine
H. pylori, smoking trends, and gastric cancer in US men
Trends in Helicobacter pylori and smoking explain a significant proportion of the decline of intestinal-type noncardia gastric adenocarcinoma incidence in US men between 1978 and 2008, and are estimated to continue to contribute to further declines between 2008 and 2040.
NIH/ National Cancer Institute

Contact: Fiona Godwin
fgodwin@plos.org
01-223-442-834
PLOS

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Reducing caloric intake delays nerve cell loss
Activating an enzyme known to play a role in the anti-aging benefits of calorie restriction delays the loss of brain cells and preserves cognitive function in mice, according to a study published in the May 22 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The findings could one day guide researchers to discover drug alternatives that slow the progress of age-associated impairments in the brain.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: Kat Snodgrass
ksnodgrass@sfn.org
202-962-4090
Society for Neuroscience

Public Release: 20-May-2013
Nature Genetics
U of M researchers develop model for better testing, targeting of MPNST
Researchers from the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, and the University's Brain Tumor Program, have developed a new mouse model of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) that allow them to discover new genes and gene pathways driving this type of cancer.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Children's Tumor Foundation, Margaret Harvey Schering Trust

Contact: Caroline Marin
crmarin@umn.edu
612-624-5680
University of Minnesota Academic Health Center

Public Release: 20-May-2013
Pain, pain, go away
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researchers have been awarded a five-year, $1.8 million grant by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to apply the techniques of gene therapy to the problem of neuropathic pain -- that is, pain that arises from a malfunction in the nervous system.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Jim Kelly
jpkelly@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 20-May-2013
Nano Letters
Researchers perform fastest measurements ever made of ion channel proteins
A team of researchers at Columbia Engineering has used miniaturized electronics to measure the activity of individual ion-channel proteins with temporal resolution as fine as one microsecond, producing the fastest recordings of single ion channels ever performed. They designed a custom integrated circuit to perform these measurements, in which an artificial cell membrane and ion channel are attached directly to the surface of the amplifier chip.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Holly Evarts
holly.evarts@columbia.edu
347-453-7408
Columbia University

Public Release: 20-May-2013
ACS Nano
Penn research makes advance in nanotech gene sequencing technique
The allure of personalized medicine has made new, more efficient ways of sequencing genes a top research priority. One promising technique involves reading DNA bases using changes in electrical current as they are threaded through a nanoscopic hole. Now, a team led by University of Pennsylvania physicists has used solid-state nanopores to differentiate single-stranded DNA molecules containing sequences of a single repeating base.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Showing releases 3076-3100 out of 3389.

<< < 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 > >>

     
   

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