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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3101-3125 out of 3498.

<< < 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 > >>

Public Release: 27-Oct-2013
Nature
Cell nucleus protein in brown fat cells governs daily control of body temperature
Body temperature follows a 24-hour rhythm, peaking during the day, low at night. The benefit might be the conservation of energy while sleeping. It is also critical to be able to adapt to changes in ambient temperature regardless of the time of day. A new mouse study shows how body temperature rhythms are synchronized while maintaining the ability to adapt to changes in environmental temperature day or night.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, JPB Foundation

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Enzyme restores function with diabetic kidney disease
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say that, while a prevailing theory suggests elevated cellular levels of glucose ultimately result in diabetic kidney disease, the truth may, in fact, be quite the opposite. The findings could fundamentally change understanding of how diabetes-related diseases develop -- and how they might be better treated.
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Veterans Administration

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Psycho-Oncology
New study shows positive personal growth following breast cancer diagnosis
Although being diagnosed with breast cancer is usually an extremely stressful experience for most women, a new study by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has found that there also can be unexpected benefits.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, US Department of Defense

Contact: Marguerite Beck
marbeck@wakehealth.edu
336-716-2415
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
BUSM researchers identify molecule that could aid lung cancer detection, treatment
Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine have discovered a molecule that could help lead to the non-invasive detection of lung cancer as well as its treatment.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Cell
IUPUI physicist collaborates in new study of the cell's 'shredder'
Steve Pressť, Ph.D., assistant professor of physics in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, collaborates as the theorist of a new University of California-Berkeley study that provides novel insight into how proteins function in cells.
Searle Scholars Program, National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis School of Science

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Oregon researchers say supplement cuts muscle loss in knee replacements
Twenty grams of essential amino acids taken twice daily for a week before and for two weeks after knee-replacement surgeries helped 16 patients, mean age 69, recover faster and with much less muscle atrophy than a control group ingesting a placebo.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
JAMA Psychiatry
New study shows promise for first effective medicine to treat cocaine dependence
New research published in JAMA Psychiatry reveals that topiramate, a drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat epilepsy and migraine headaches, also could be the first reliable medication to help treat cocaine dependence.
National Institutes of Health, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Contact: Christopher Hardwick
chardwick@som.umaryland.edu
410-706-5260
University of Maryland Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Science Translational Medicine
Lou Gehrig's disease: From patient stem cells to potential treatment strategy in one study
A study, led by researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute and published in Science Translational Medicine, is believed to be one of the first in which a specific form of Lou Gehrig's disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, was replicated in a dish, analyzed and "treated," suggesting a potential future therapy all in a single study.
National Institutes of Health, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and others

Contact: Sandy Van
sandy@prpacific.com
808-526-1708
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
Genetic variants associated with bronchodilator responsiveness
A new study from Brigham and Women's Hospital reveals several new gene variants that are associated with how people living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease respond to inhaled bronchodilators.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-534-2208
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Itch maintains regulatory T cell stability
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Yun-Cai Liu and colleagues at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch as a regulator of Tregs stability.
National Research Foundation of Korea, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Reduction of reactive oxygen species in diabetes-associated nephrology
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Kumar Sharma and colleagues at the University of California, San Diego determined that ROS production was actually reduced in kidneys of diabetic mice, and this decrease was associated with lowered activity of the major energy-sensing enzyme, AMPK.
National Institutes of Health, Christini Fund, Wright Foundation, Lennox Foundation

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Researchers track lethal prostate cancer to determine clonal origin
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Srinivasan Yegnasubramanian and colleagues at Johns Hopkins University track the development of lethal prostate cancer in a patient.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Prostate Cancer Foundation David Mazzone Challenge Award and Creativity Award, The V Found

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Ionizing radiation exposure promotes fusion oncogene formation
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, James Fagin and colleagues at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute, examined tissues from Ukrainian PTC patients that were children at the time of the Chernobly catastrophe and identified their cancer-driving mutations.
National Institutes of Health, Margot Rosenberg Pulitzer Foundation, Byrne Fund, Lefkofsky Family Foundation

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI early table of contents for Oct. 25, 2013
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, Oct. 25, 2013 in the JCI: Ionizing radiation exposure promotes fusion oncogene formation, Researchers track lethal prostate cancer to determine clonal origin, Reduction of reactive oxygen species in diabetes-associated nephrology, Synthetic vitamin D receptor ligands reduce murine kidney fibrosis, Itch maintains regulatory T cell stability, Essential amino acid supplementation in patients following total knee arthroplasty
National Institutes of Health, United Therapeutics Inc., Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, Fundación Ramón Areces, The Cardiova

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
Stroke
Experimental drug reduces brain damage, eliminates brain hemorrhaging in rodents afflicted by stroke
Developed by a team led by USC physician-scientist Berislav V. Zlokovic, the experimental drug 3K3A-APC shows promise as a stand-alone therapy for stroke or in combination with the FDA-approved clot-busting drug therapy tPA (tissue plasminogen activator).
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Alison Trinidad
alison.trinidad@usc.edu
323-442-3941
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
Stroke
Ultrasound device combined with clot-buster safe for stroke, say UTHealth researchers
A study led by researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston showed that a hands-free ultrasound device combined with a clot-busting drug was safe for ischemic stroke patients.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Deborah Lake
deborah.m.lake@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-3304
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
International Journal of Behavioral Development
Behavior problems in preschool and child care centers may be an issue of genes
A new study suggests that some children may be genetically predisposed to developing behavioral problems in child care and preschool settings. Previous research has found that some children develop behavior problems at child care centers and preschools, despite the benefit of academic gains. It was never known, however, why some youngsters struggle in these settings and others flourish. The new study indicates that some children may be acting out due to poor self-control and temperament problems that they inherited from their parents.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Shannon Lipscomb
shannon.lipscomb@osucascades.edu
541-322-3137
Oregon State University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
Journal of General Physiology
Identifying a mystery channel crucial for hearing
Our ability to hear relies on hair cells, sensory receptors that mechanically amplify low-level sound that enters the inner ear through a transduction channel. Although the transduction channel was characterized more than 30 years ago, researchers have been unable to identify its molecular components. A new study could help lead to a definitive identification of this mystery channel.
NIH/National Institutes on Deafness and other Communication Disorders

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
Science
What is it about your face?
Berkeley Lab researchers found thousands of gene enhancers -- regulatory sequences of DNA that act to turn-on or amplify the expression of a specific gene -- are involved in the development of the human face. These enhancers help explain why every human face is as unique as a fingerprint.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
PLOS Genetics
Genetic analysis reveals insights into the genetic architecture of OCD, Tourette syndrome
An international research consortium led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of Chicago has answered several questions about the genetic background of obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette syndrome, providing the first direct confirmation that both are highly heritable and also revealing major differences between the underlying genetic makeup of the disorders.
National Institutes of Health, Tourette Syndrome Association, David Judah Fund

Contact: Mike Morrison
mdmorrison@partners.org
617-724-6425
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
Cell Reports
Researchers apply brainpower to understanding neural stem cell differentiation
How do humans and other mammals get so brainy? In a paper that will be published in Cell Reports on October 24, USC researcher Wange Lu, Ph.D., and his colleagues explained how neural stem and progenitor cells differentiate into neurons and related cells called glia. Neural stem and progenitor cells offer tremendous promise as a future treatment for neurodegenerative disorders, and understanding their differentiation is the first step towards harnessing this therapeutic potential.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Cristy Lytal
lytal@med.usc.edu
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
Science
Yeast, human stem cells drive discovery of new Parkinson's disease drug targets
Using a discovery platform whose components range from yeast cells to human stem cells, Whitehead Institute scientists have identified a novel Parkinson's disease drug target and a compound capable of repairing neurons derived from Parkinson's patients.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, JPB Foundation, Eleanor Schwartz Charitable Foundation, Bachmann Strauss Dystonia & Parkinson Foundation

Contact: Matt Fearer
fearer@wi.mit.edu
617-452-4630
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
Researchers identify gene variant that raises risk for colorectal cancer from eating processed meat
A common genetic variant that affects one in three people significantly increases the risk of colorectal cancer from the consumption of red meat and processed meat.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Suzanne Wu
suzanne.wu@usc.edu
213-740-0252
University of Southern California

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
Cell
Researchers design global HIV vaccine that shows promise in monkeys
The considerable diversity of HIV worldwide represents a critical challenge for designing an effective HIV vaccine. Now a scientific team led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has shown that mosaic antigens could be useful in the design of a global HIV vaccine.
Military HIV Research Program, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association
Hands-free ultrasound device with clot-busting drug safe for stroke patients
A hands-free ultrasound device combined with clot buster was safe for ischemic stroke patients. The hands-free ultrasound device could help open up more arteries and improve patient outcomes.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Astle
karen.astle@heart.org
214-706-1392
American Heart Association

Showing releases 3101-3125 out of 3498.

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