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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3126-3150 out of 3531.

<< < 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 > >>

Public Release: 20-Jan-2014
Physicians awarded $4 million to study effects of fertility treatments and obstetric care
Two Cedars-Sinai physician-researchers have been awarded grants totaling $4 million from the National Institutes of Health to study how the environment -- both in the womb and in the hospital where the baby is born -- can affect the newborn and the mother.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Laura Coverson
laura.coverson@cshs.org
310-423-5215
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Jan-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Uninsured patients less likely to be transferred between hospitals, Pitt researchers find
Uninsured patients with a variety of common medical diagnoses are significantly less likely to be transferred between hospitals for treatment, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. They also found that women, insured or not, are less likely to be transferred between hospitals.
US Department of Veterans Affairs, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andrea Stanford
stanfordac@upmc.edu
412-647-6190
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
FAK helps tumor cells enter the bloodstream
Cancer cells have something that every prisoner longs for -- a master key that allows them to escape. A new study describes how a protein that promotes tumor growth also enables cancer cells to use this key and metastasize.
National Institutes of Health, Italian Association for Cancer Research, and others

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 20-Jan-2014
Pediatrics
Secondhand smoke exposure increases odds of hospital asthma readmission for children
A new study shows that exposure to secondhand smoke at home or in the car dramatically increases the odds of children being readmitted to the hospital within a year of being admitted for asthma.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Feuer
jim.feuer@cchmc.org
513-636-4656
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Jan-2014
Canadian Medical Association Journal
People who enjoy life maintain better physical function as they age
People who enjoy life maintain better physical function in daily activities and keep up faster walking speeds as they age, compared with people who enjoy life less, according to a new study in Canadian Medical Association Journal.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Kim Barnhardt
kim.barnhardt@cmaj.ca
613-520-7116 x2224
Canadian Medical Association Journal

Public Release: 19-Jan-2014
Nature Genetics
Decoded: DNA of blood-sucking worm that infects world's poor
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have decoded the genome of the hookworm, Necator americanus, finding clues to how it infects and survives in humans and to aid in development of new therapies to combat hookworm disease.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, Australian Research Council, National Health and Medical Research Council

Contact: Caroline Arbanas
arbanasc@wustl.edu
314-286-0109
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Jan-2014
Nature Medicine
Researchers discover how heart arrhythmia occurs
Researchers have discovered the fundamental biology of calcium waves in relation to heart arrhythmias. The findings published this month in the Jan. 19 edition of Nature Medicine outlines the discovery of this fundamental physiological process that researchers hope will one day help design molecularly tailored medications that correct the pathophysiology.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, National Institutes of Health, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Alberta, Canada Foundation for Innovation

Contact: Marta Cyperli
mcyperli@ucalgary.ca
403-210-3835
University of Calgary

Public Release: 19-Jan-2014
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
Overexpression of splicing protein in skin repair causes early changes seen in skin cancer
"Cancer resembles a state of chronic wound healing, in which the wound-healing program is erroneously activated and perpetuated," says Professor Adrian Krainer of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. In a paper published today in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, a team led by Dr. Krainer reports that a protein they show is normally involved in healing wounds and maintaining homeostasis in skin tissue is also, under certain conditions, a promoter of invasive and metastatic skin cancers.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Shared Resources Cancer Center Support Grant, Danish Cancer Society

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jan-2014
AACR-Prostate Cancer Foundation Conference on Advances in Prostate Cancer Research
Researchers identify possible explanation for link between exercise & improved prostate cancer outcomes
Men who walked at a fast pace prior to a prostate cancer diagnosis had more regularly shaped blood vessels in their prostate tumors compared with men who walked slowly, providing a potential explanation for why exercise is linked to improved outcomes for men with prostate cancer, according to results presented here at the AACR-Prostate Cancer Foundation Conference on Advances in Prostate Cancer Research, held Jan. 18-21.
National Institutes of Health, Prostate Cancer Foundation

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
Clever chemistry improves a new class of antibiotics
A new class of molecules called acyldepsipeptides -- ADEPs -- may provide a new way to attack bacteria that have developed resistance to antibiotics. Researchers at Brown and MIT have discovered a way to increase the potency of ADEPs by up to 1,200 times. Their findings appear in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
High volume of severe sepsis patients may result in better outcomes
A recent study led by Boston University School of Medicine shows that "practice may make perfect" when it comes to caring for patients with severe sepsis. The study showed that patients admitted to academic medical centers that care for more patients with severe sepsis have significantly lower mortality rates than patients cared for at academic medical centers with lower volumes of sepsis patients. Additionally, the superior outcomes at high volume centers were achieved at similar costs compared to the lower volume medical centers.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Penn researchers run successful HIV intervention project in S. Africa
A large-scale human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intervention/education effort aimed at helping South African men take a proactive role in the prevention of that disease has proven successful, an important development considering that country has the largest number of HIV infections in the world.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Joseph J. Diorio
jdiorio@asc.upenn.edu
215-746-1798
University of Pennsylvania Annenberg School for Communication

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
Nature Communications
Study finds chimps can use gestures to communicate in hunt for food
Chimpanzees are capable of using gestures to communicate as they pursue specific goals, such as finding a hidden piece of food, according to a new Georgia State University research study.
Leakey Foundation, Wenner-Gren Foundation, National Institutes of Health, British Academy

Contact: Ann Claycombe
claycombe@gsu.edu
404-413-5047
Georgia State University

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Cell
Fighting flies
According to the latest studies from the fly laboratory of California Institute of Technology (Caltech) biologist David Anderson, male Drosophilae, commonly known as fruit flies, fight more than their female counterparts because they have special cells in their brains that promote fighting. These cells appear to be absent in the brains of female fruit flies.
National Institutes of Health, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
$1.6 million grant will use nanotechnology to fight prostate cancer
Nanotechnology for diagnosing and treating prostate cancer will be the focus of a five-year, $1.58 million grant by the National Institutes of Health to Penn State and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-5544
Penn State

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
Same cell death pathway involved in three forms of blindness, Penn team finds
A Penn Vet team used canine disease models to closely examine how retinal gene activity varied during the progression of three different forms of inherited vision disease. Their results turned up an unexpected commonality: Early on in each of the diseases, genes involved in the same specific pathway of cell death appeared to be activated. These findings point to possible interventions that could curb vision loss across a variety of inherited retinal diseases.
Foundation Fighting Blindness, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Silencing inhibitor of cell replication spurs beta cells to reproduce
Researchers replicated human pancreatic beta cells -- which produce insulin -- in a mouse model in which donor cells were transplanted. The newly replicated cells retained features of mature beta cells and showed a physiological response to glucose. The results of this proof-of-principle experiment have implications for helping both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Journal of Abnormal Psychology
Study finds troubling relationship between drinking and PTSD symptoms in college students
The estimated 9 percent of college students who have symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are likely to drink more alcohol than peers without the psychological condition. In turn, heavy alcohol consumption exacerbates their PTSD symptoms over time, prolonging a vicious cycle. These are the conclusions of the first empirical study to examine the bidirectional influences of the two phenomena, influences that had been theorized but never tested.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Patricia Donovan
pdonovan@buffalo.edu
716-645-4602
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
AIDS
BUSM study associates pro-inflammatory molecules with early death in HIV patients
A study led by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine provides new insight into the impact that pro-inflammatory molecules have on early death in HIV patients who abuse alcohol. The findings, published in the journal AIDS, pinpoint the inflammatory markers most associated with early death and may help explain why some patients die earlier than others even when all of these patients are on antiretroviral therapy.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
New, 'designer' fiber may help address fiber intolerance and ease IBS symptoms
A newly-developed, "designer" dietary fiber with an added potential prebiotic effect may eliminate the side effects of current treatment for irritable bowel syndrome which affects 10-20 percent of the population, disproportionately women.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nancy DiFiore
nancy_difiore@rush.edu
312-942-5159
Rush University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
Cleveland Clinic, CWRU School of Medicine team discovers key mechanisms to inhibit
A team of researchers from the Cleveland Clinic and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine have identified critical complex mechanisms involved in the metastasis of deadly "triple negative" breast cancers (TNBC). These tumors are extremely difficult to treat, frequently return after remission, and are the most aggressive form of breast cancer in women. The discovery of this critical interaction of mechanisms could be used to develop new life saving treatments to kill metastatic tumors in TNBC.
National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense

Contact: Christine A. Somosi
christine.somosi@case.edu
216-368-6287
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
How vision captures sound now somewhat uncertain
Contrary to previous research, Duke University researchers have found that neurons in a particular brain region respond differently, not similarly, based on whether the stimuli is visual or auditory. The finding, which posted Jan. 15 in the journal PLOS ONE, provides insight into how vision captures the location of perceived sound.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steve Hartsoe
steve.hartsoe@duke.edu
919-681-4515
Duke University

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Immunity
Findings bolster fiber's role in colon health
Scientists have more reasons for you to eat fiber and not abuse antibiotics.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Immunity
Immune cells may heal an injured heart
The immune system plays an important role in the heart's response to injury. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that two major pools of immune cells are at work in the heart. Both belong to a class of cells known as macrophages. One appears to promote healing, while the other likely drives inflammation, which is detrimental to long-term heart function.
American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics
In the blink of an eye
MIT neuroscientists find the brain can identify images seen for as little as 13 milliseconds.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Showing releases 3126-3150 out of 3531.

<< < 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 > >>

     
   

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