NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIA SeniorHealth.gov NIH Podcast
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Radio
  NIH Podcasts
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3126-3150 out of 3396.

<< < 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 > >>

Public Release: 23-May-2013
Nature Communications
The secret lives, and deaths, of neurons
University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers uncover surprising insights about how nerve cells rewire themselves, shedding light on a process linked with neurodegenerative diseases and neurodevelopmental disorders like schizophrenia and autism.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Tom Hughes
tahughes@unch.unc.edu
919-966-6047
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 23-May-2013
Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association
Regenerating spinal cord fibers may be treatment for stroke-related disabilities
A study by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital found "substantial evidence" that a regenerative process involving damaged nerve fibers in the spinal cord could hold the key to better functional recovery by most stroke victims. The findings may offer new hope to those who suffer stroke, the leading cause of long-term disability in adults.
American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Dwight Angell
dwight.angell@hfhs.org
313-850-3471
Henry Ford Health System

Public Release: 23-May-2013
Journal of Academic Medicine
Future doctors unaware of their obesity bias
Two out of five medical students have an unconscious bias against obese people, according to a new study by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The study is published online ahead of print in the Journal of Academic Medicine.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Marguerite Beck
marbeck@wakehealth.edu
336-716-2415
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 23-May-2013
Science
Drug reverses Alzheimer's disease deficits in mice, Pitt research confirms
An anti-cancer drug reverses memory deficits in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health researchers confirm in the journal Science. The research, funded by the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association, reviewed previously published findings on the drug bexarotene, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in cutaneous T cell lymphoma.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 23-May-2013
Current Biology
Motion quotient
A brief visual task can predict IQ, according to a new study. This surprisingly simple exercise measures the brain's unconscious ability to filter out visual movement. The study shows that individuals whose brains are better at automatically suppressing background motion perform better on standard measures of intelligence.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Susan Hagen
susan.hagen@rochester.edu
585-576-4061
University of Rochester

Public Release: 22-May-2013
Psychological Science
Study shows people can be trained to be more compassionate
Until now, little was scientifically known about the human potential to cultivate compassion -- the emotional state of caring for people who are suffering in a way that motivates altruistic behavior. A new study by researchers at the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at the Waisman Center of the University of Wisconsin–Madison shows that adults can be trained to be more compassionate.
National Institutes of Health, Hertz Award, Fetzer Institute

Contact: Alison DeShaw Rowe
deshaw@wisc.edu
608-890-3074
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 22-May-2013
Psychological Science
Brain can be trained in compassion, study shows
A new study by researchers at the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at the Waisman Center of the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows that adults can be trained to be more compassionate. The report, published Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, investigates whether training adults in compassion can result in greater altruistic behavior and related changes in neural systems underlying compassion.
National Institutes of Health, John Templeton Foundation, Impact Foundation, J. W. Kluge Foundation, Mental Insight Foundation

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 22-May-2013
Journal of Controlled Release
Research offers promising new approach to treatment of lung cancer
Researchers have developed a new drug delivery system that allows inhalation of chemotherapeutic drugs to help treat lung cancer, and in laboratory and animal tests it appears to reduce the systemic damage done to other organs while significantly improving the treatment of lung tumors -- the tumors virtually disappeared.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Science Foundation, Department of Defense

Contact: Oleh Taratula
oleh.taratula@oregonstate.edu
541-737-3424
Oregon State University

Public Release: 22-May-2013
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Mosquito behavior may be immune response, not parasite manipulation
Malaria-carrying mosquitoes appear to be manipulated by the parasites they carry, but this manipulation may simply be part of the mosquitoes' immune response, according to Penn State entomologists.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 22-May-2013
SLEEP 2013, 27th Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies
Sleep
Study shows that insomnia may cause dysfunction in emotional brain circuitry
A new study provides neurobiological evidence for dysfunction in the neural circuitry underlying emotion regulation in people with insomnia, which may have implications for the risk relationship between insomnia and depression.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Celmer
lcelmer@aasmnet.org
630-737-9700
American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Public Release: 22-May-2013
Neuron
Researchers eliminate schizophrenia symptoms in an animal model
Overexpression of a gene associated with schizophrenia causes classic symptoms of the disorder that are reversed when gene expression returns to normal, scientists report. They genetically engineered mice so they could turn up levels of neuregulin-1 to mimic high levels found in some patients then return levels to normal, said Dr. Lin Mei, Director of the Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University.
National Institutes of Health, National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 22-May-2013
Nature
Penn study shows how immune system peacefully co-exists with 'good' bacteria
The human gut is loaded with helpful bacteria microbes, yet the immune system seemingly turns a blind eye. Now, researchers know how this friendly truce is kept intact. Innate lymphoid cells directly limit the response by inflammatory T cells to commensal bacteria in the gut of mice. Loss of this ILC function effectively puts the immune system on an extended war footing against the commensal bacteria a condition observed in multiple chronic inflammatory diseases.
National Institutes of Health, Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 22-May-2013
Neuron
Scientists uncover molecular roots of cocaine addiction in the brain
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have unraveled the molecular foundations of cocaine's effects on the brain, and identified a compound that blocks cravings for the drug in cocaine-addicted mice. The compound, already proven safe for humans, is undergoing further animal testing in preparation for possible clinical trials in cocaine addicts, the researchers say.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 21-May-2013
American Thoracic Society 2013 International Conference
JAMA
Researchers find genetic tie to improved survival time for pulmonary fibrosis
Research into genetic features of pulmonary fibrosis by physicians and scientists at the University of Colorado School of Medicine may lead to improved treatment of this deadly lung disease, according to a paper published online by JAMA.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Mark Couch
mark.couch@ucdenver.edu
303-724-5377
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Cancer Discovery
Changing cancer's environment to halt its spread
By studying the roles two proteins, thrombospondin-1 and prosaposin, play in discouraging cancer metastasis, a trans-Atlantic research team has identified a five-amino acid fragment of prosaposin that significantly reduces metastatic spread in mouse models of prostate, breast and lung cancer. The findings suggest that a prosaposin-based drug could potentially block metastasis in a variety of cancers.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Norwegian Cancer Society, Norwegian Research Council, and others

Contact: Keri Stedman
keri.stedman@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
Boston Children's Hospital

Public Release: 21-May-2013
New England Journal of Medicine
Researchers find genetic risk factor for pulmonary fibrosis
A paper recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine and co-written by physicians and scientists at the University of Colorado School of Medicine finds that an important genetic risk factor for pulmonary fibrosis can be used to identify individuals at risk for this deadly lung disease.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, US Veterans Administration

Contact: Mark Couch
mark.couch@ucdenver.edu
303-724-5377
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Drugs found to both prevent and treat Alzheimer's disease in mice
Researchers at USC have found that a class of pharmaceuticals can both prevent and treat Alzheimer's disease in mice.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 21-May-2013
eLife
Keeping stem cells strong
A team of researchers led by biologists at the California Institute of Technology has found that, in mouse models, the molecule microRNA-146a acts as a critical regulator and protector of blood-forming stem cells (called hematopoietic stem cells, or HSCs) during chronic inflammation, suggesting that a deficiency of miR-146a may be one important cause of blood cancers and bone marrow failure.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Obesity
'Doctor shopping' by obese patients negatively affects health
Overweight and obese patients are significantly more likely than their normal-weight counterparts to repeatedly switch primary care doctors, a practice that disrupts continuity of care and leads to more emergency room visits, new Johns Hopkins research suggests.
Health Resources and Service Administration, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Nano Letters
Single-cell transfection tool enables added control for biological studies
Northwestern researchers have developed a novel tool for single-cell transfection, in which they deliver molecules into targeted cells through temporary nanopores in the cell membrane created by a localized electric field.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 21-May-2013
American Thoracic Society 2013 International Conference
New England Journal of Medicine
Genetic marker associated with risk for pulmonary fibrosis
New research from Brigham and Women's Hospital finds that a genetic risk factor for pulmonary fibrosis, an uncommon but deadly lung disease, may be effective in identifying individuals at risk for this disease. These findings will be presented at the American Thoracic Society International Conference and publish online simultaneously at the New England Journal of Medicine on May 22 and will appear in the July 4, 2013 print edition.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, US Veterans Administration

Contact: Lori J. Schroth
ljschroth@partners.org
617-534-1604
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Nature Communications
UofL scientists uncover how grapefruits provide a secret weapon in medical drug delivery
University of Louisville researchers have uncovered how to create nanoparticles using natural lipids derived from grapefruit, and have discovered how to use them as drug delivery vehicles.
National Institutes of Health, Louisville Veterans Administration Medical Center, Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation

Contact: Julie Heflin
julie.heflin@louisville.edu
502-852-7987
University of Louisville

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Circulation
Evaluating a new way to open clogged arteries
A new study from MIT analyzes the potential usefulness of a new treatment that combines the benefits of angioplasty balloons and drug-releasing stents, but may pose fewer risks.
National Institutes of Health, Abbott Vascular

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Do men's and women's hearts burn fuel differently?
Gender differences in the heart's metabolic response to stress may shed light on heart disease.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Sharon Parmet
sparmet@uic.edu
312-413-2695
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Finding a family for a pair of orphan receptors in the brain
Researchers at Emory University have identified a protein that stimulates a pair of "orphan receptors" found in the brain, solving a long-standing biological puzzle and possibly leading to future treatments for neurological diseases.
NIH/National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Showing releases 3126-3150 out of 3396.

<< < 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 > >>

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2014 by AAAS, the science society.