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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3126-3150 out of 3671.

<< < 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 > >>

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
ICE/ENDO 2014
African American women more resistant anti-inflammatory effect aspirin than white women
African American women respond differently to the anti-inflammatory effect of aspirin than do white American women, new research finds. The results were presented Monday, June 23 at ICE/ENDO 2014, the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society in Chicago.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Aaron Lohr
alohr@endocrine.org
202-971-3654
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Delivering drugs on cue
Current drug-delivery systems used to administer chemotherapy to cancer patients typically release a constant dose of the drug over time -- but a new study challenges this 'slow and steady' approach and offers a novel way to locally deliver the drugs 'on demand,' as reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Harvard University, NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Contact: Kristen Kusek
kristen.kusek@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New analysis reveals previously 'hidden diversity' of mouth bacteria
A new computational method for analyzing bacterial communities has uncovered closely related, previously indistinguishable bacteria living in different parts of the human mouth. The technique, developed by Marine Biological Laboratory scientists, provides high taxonomic resolution of bacterial communities and has the capacity to improve the understanding of microbial communities in health and disease. The study will be published in PNAS Online Early Edition the week of June 23-27, 2014.
G. Unger Vetlesen Foundation, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Contact: Gina Hebert
ghebert@mbl.edu
508-289-7725
Marine Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Medical Care
Nearly 1 in 25 US babies are born too soon
An analysis of millions of US births over 15 years finds that many babies, nearly one in 25, are born earlier than medically justified, through elective cesarean sections and elective induced labor. The study reinforces long-standing recommendations by health experts against early-term deliveries without appropriate medical reasons.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Alison Fraser
FraserA1@email.chop.edu
267-426-6054
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
ICE/ENDO 2014
BPA stimulates growth of breast cancer cells, diminishes effect of treatment
Bisphenol A, a chemical commonly used in plastics, appears to increase the proliferation of breast cancer cells, according to Duke Medicine researchers presenting at an annual meeting of endocrine scientists.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Duke/Department of Surgery D.P. Bolognesi Award, Duke Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Study sheds light on racial disparity in colon cancer
African-Americans with colon cancer are half as likely as Caucasian patients to have a type of colon cancer that is linked to better outcomes. The finding may provide insight into why African-Americans are more likely to die of colon cancer than Caucasians with the same stage of disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
'Tom Sawyer' regulatory protein initiates gene transcription in a hit-and-run mechanism
A team of genome scientists has identified a 'hit-and-run' mechanism that allows regulatory proteins in the nucleus to adopt a 'Tom Sawyer' behavior when it comes to the work of initiating gene activation.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Environmental Health Perspectives
Study finds association between maternal exposure to agricultural pesticides
Pregnant women who lived in close proximity to fields and farms where chemical pesticides were applied experienced a two-thirds increased risk of having a child with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental delay, a study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Phyllis Brown
phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 22-Jun-2014
ICE/ENDO 2014
Testosterone replacement may help older men improve and maintain aerobic capacity
Testosterone replacement therapy may help older men who have limited mobility and low testosterone improve their aerobic capacity and lessen its decline with age, new research finds. The results were presented in a poster Sunday, June 22, at ICE/ENDO 2014, the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society in Chicago.
NIH/National Institutes on Aging, Boston Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center

Contact: Aaron Lohr
alohr@endocrine.org
202-971-3654
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 22-Jun-2014
ICE/ENDO 2014
Cold exposure stimulates beneficial brown fat growth
Long-term mild cold exposure can stimulate brown fat growth and activity in humans and may benefit glucose and energy metabolism, a new study finds. The results were presented in a poster Sunday, June 22 at ICE/ENDO 2014, the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society in Chicago.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH/National Institutes of Health Clinical Center

Contact: Aaron Lohr
alohr@endocrine.org
202-971-3654
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 22-Jun-2014
ICE/ENDO 2014
High blood sugar causes brain changes that raise depression risk
Researchers have found a possible biological reason why people with diabetes are prone to depression. A new study shows that high blood glucose (sugar) levels in patients with type 1 diabetes increase the levels of a brain neurotransmitter associated with depression, and alter the connections between regions of the brain that control emotions. The results will be presented Sunday at the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society: ICE/ENDO 2014 in Chicago.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Aaron Lohr
alohr@endocrine.org
202-971-3654
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 22-Jun-2014
Nature
Protons power protein portal to push zinc out of cells
Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University report they have deciphered the inner workings of a protein called YiiP that prevents the lethal buildup of zinc inside bacteria. They say understanding YiiP's movements will help in the design of drugs aimed at modifying the behavior of ZnT proteins, eight human proteins that are similar to YiiP, which play important roles in hormone secretion and in signaling between neurons.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, US Department of Energy

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 22-Jun-2014
Genes & Development
Biologists find 'missing link' in the production of protein factories in cells
Biologists at UC San Diego have found the 'missing link' in the chemical system that enables animal cells to produce ribosomes -- the thousands of protein 'factories' contained within each cell that manufacture all of the proteins needed to build tissue and sustain life.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 22-Jun-2014
Nature
Family of proteins plays key role in cellular pump dynamics
Case Western Reserve University scientists have discovered how a family of proteins -- cation diffusion facilitators -- regulates an important cellular cycle where a cell's energy generated is converted to necessary cellular functions. The finding has the potential to inform future research aimed at identifying ways to ensure the process works as designed and, if successful, could lead to significant breakthroughs in the treatment of Parkinson's, chronic liver disease and heart disease.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jeannette Spalding
jeannette.spalding@case.edu
216-368-3004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 22-Jun-2014
ICE/ENDO 2014
Diabetes
The ICEMAN study -- How keeping cool could spur metabolic benefits
A new study being presented today at ICE/ENDO 2014, the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society in Chicago, demonstrates that ambient temperatures can influence the growth or loss of brown fat in people. Cool environments stimulate growth, warm environments loss. The study results, which clearly show the 'plasticity' of brown fat in humans, are published online today in the journal Diabetes to coincide with the ICE/ENDO meeting.
National Institutes of Health, Royal Australasian College of Physicians Foundation

Contact: Alison Heather
a.heather@garvan.org.au
61-292-958-128
Garvan Institute of Medical Research

Public Release: 20-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Researchers find gene critical for development of brain motor center
In Nature Communications, an Ottawa-led team describes a gene called Snf2h, which is found in our brain's neural stem cells and functions as a master regulator. When they removed this gene early on in a mouse's development, its cerebellum only grew to one-third the normal size. It also had difficulty walking, balancing and coordinating its movements, something called cerebellar ataxia that is a component of many neurodegenerative diseases.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Paddy Moore
padmoore@ohri.ca
613-737-8899 x73687
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute

Public Release: 20-Jun-2014
Cancer
For cancer patients, new tool predicts financial pain
Cancer care has a new side effect. Patients now have to deal with 'financial toxicity,' the expense, anxiety and loss of confidence confronting those who face large, unpredictable costs, often compounded by decreased ability to work. A team of cancer specialists describe COST, the first tool to measure a patient's risk for, and ability to tolerate, financial stress.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Easton
John.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Jun-2014
JAMA
Drug shows promise for the first time against metastatic melanoma of the eye
For the first time, a therapy has been found that can delay progression of metastatic uveal melanoma, a rare and deadly form of melanoma of the eye.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
Ket2116@columbia.edu
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Jun-2014
Cell
Mechanism discovered for attaching an 'on' switch that helps cells accessorize proteins
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have discovered how an important 'on' switch is attached to the machinery that cells rely on to adapt thousands of proteins to meet changing conditions. The research appears in the current issue of the journal Cell.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, ALSAC

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehlau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 19-Jun-2014
Tracking how breast cancer spreads: Einstein receives $10M NIH grant
The National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded a $10 million grant to researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University to fund research into how breast cancer cells move and spread in the body, and how to predict which breast cancer tumors will metastasize.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Jun-2014
Gynecologic Oncology
Finding the Achilles' Heel of ovarian tumor growth
A team of scientists, led by principal investigator David D. Schlaepfer, PhD, professor in the Department of Reproductive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that small molecule inhibitors to a protein called focal adhesion kinase selectively prevent the growth of ovarian cancer cells as tumor spheroids.
National Institutes of Health, Nine Girls Ask?

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 19-Jun-2014
Cell
Scientists identify additional challenges in KRAS-driven cancers
Scientists have redoubled efforts to disable the mutated cancer gene KRAS, which confers an especially poor prognosis and has proved extraordinarily difficult to target. New research reported in the journal Cell has identified an additional hurdle: inhibiting KRAS can activate a backup pathway in cancer cells that enables them to survive and thrive in the oncogene's absence.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Koch Institute

Contact: Teresa M Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-5653
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 19-Jun-2014
Science
UCI researchers learn how botulism-causing toxin enters bloodstream
UC Irvine School of Medicine researchers have discovered the mechanism by which bacterial toxins that cause food-borne botulism are absorbed through the intestinal lining and into the bloodstream. Their study, which appears in the June 20 issue of Science, points to new approaches to blocking this poisonous substance.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 19-Jun-2014
Cell
Computer-designed protein triggers self-destruction of Epstein-Barr-infected cancer cells
A protein molecule, BINDI, has been built to trigger self-destruction of cancer cells infected with the Epstein-Barr virus.
National Institutes of Health, Washington Life Sciences Discovery Fund, US Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and others

Contact: Elizabeth Hunter
elh415@uw.edu
206-616-3192
University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

Public Release: 19-Jun-2014
Nature Protocols
Seeing the inner workings of the brain made easier by new technique from Stanford
Bio-X scientists have improved on their original technique for peering into the intact brain, making it more reliable and safer. The results could help scientists unravel the inner connections of how thoughts, memories or diseases arise.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Simons Foundation

Contact: Amy Adams
amyadams@stanford.edu
650-796-3695
Stanford University

Showing releases 3126-3150 out of 3671.

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