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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3151-3175 out of 3458.

<< < 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 > >>

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
Oncotarget
Johns Hopkins researchers erase human brain tumor cells in mice
Working with mice, Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered that weeks of treatment with a repurposed FDA-approved drug halted the growth of -- and ultimately left no detectable trace of -- brain tumor cells taken from adult human patients.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Center for Research Resources

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
ASTRO's 55th Annual Meeting
Protecting specific area of the brain during radiation therapy substantially reduces memory loss
Protecting the stem cells that reside in and around the hippocampus -- a C-shaped area in the temporal lobe on both sides of the brain associated with the ability to form and store memories -- substantially reduces the rate of cancer patients' memory loss during whole-brain radiotherapy without a significant risk of recurrence in that area of the brain, a new study shows. Results of the Phase II clinical trial are being presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology annual meeting.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Karen Warmkessel
kwarmkessel@umm.edu
410-328-8919
University of Maryland Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
Annals of Neurology
Breakthrough offers first direct measurement of spinal cord myelin in multiple sclerosis
Researchers have made an exciting breakthrough -- developing a first-of-its-kind imaging tool to examine myelin damage in multiple sclerosis. Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine scientists have developed a novel molecular probe detectable by positron emission tomography imaging. The new molecular marker, MeDAS, offers the first non-invasive visualization of myelin integrity of the entire spinal cord at the same time, as published today in an article in the Annals of Neurology.
Department of Defense, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jessica Studeny
jessica.studeny@case.edu
216-368-4692
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
Nature
It takes a(n academic) village to determine an enzyme's function
Scientists have sequenced the genomes of nearly 6,900 organisms, but they know the functions of only about half of the protein-coding genes thus far discovered. Now a multidisciplinary effort involving 15 scientists from three institutions has begun chipping away at this mystery -- in a big way. Their work to identify the function of one bacterial protein and the biochemical pathway in which it operates will also help identify the functions of hundreds of other proteins.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
JAMA Internal Medicine
Managed care reduces hospitalizations in nursing home residents with advanced dementia
Nursing home residents with advanced dementia commonly experience burdensome, costly interventions that do not improve their quality of life or extend their survival. Now a new study suggests that providing intensive primary care services may result in less burdensome and less costly care for these terminally ill residents.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Jennifer Davis
jdavis@hsl.harvard.edu
617-363-8282
Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
Researchers work to block kidney, lung damage and pain in sickle cell disease
Restoring a balance of the most powerful dilator and the most potent constrictor of blood vessels in the body could help patients with sickle cell disease avoid kidney and lung damage as well as pain, researchers say.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Protein explains increased asthma severity in children exposed to diesel exhaust from traffic
A new study shows that exposure to diesel exhaust particles from traffic pollution leads to increased asthma severity in children. Moreover, the study finds that this is due to increased blood levels of IL-17A, a protein associated with several chronic inflammatory diseases, in children with high diesel exposure.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH/ National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Jim Feuer
jim.feuer@cchmc.org
513-636-4656
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Siberian hamsters show what helps make seasonal clocks tick
Many animals, including humans, have internal clocks and calendars to help them regulate behavior, physiological functions and biological processes. Although scientists have extensively studied the timekeeping mechanisms that inform daily functions (circadian rhythms), they know very little about the timekeeping mechanisms that inform seasonal functions.
National Center for Research Resources, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steve Koppes
skoppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences
Hunger pains
Binge-eating disorder, only recently designated as a diagnosis by the American Psychiatric Association in its official diagnostic manual of mental conditions, is associated with lifelong impairments comparable to those of bulimia nervosa, a long-established eating disorder with more dramatic symptoms.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Mental Health Burden Study, Shire Pharmaceuticals

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cancer-killing cells controlled by epigenetic process, new study shows
Natural killer cells are white blood cells that can kill and contain cancer and infectious diseases. USC scientists have identified a specific enzyme that controls the development of natural killer cells in the body. Understanding how that enzyme affects the natural killer cell may help focus future drug development in the fight against cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

Contact: Alison Trinidad
alison.trinidad@usc.edu
323-442-3941
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UMass Amherst study finds daytime naps enhance learning in preschool children
"Essentially we are the first to report evidence that naps are important for preschool children," Spencer says. "Our study shows that naps help the kids better remember what they are learning in preschool." Results appear in the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, UMass Amherst Commonwealth Honors College

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
ASTRO's 55th Annual Meeting
Simple, 2-question survery accurately screens cancer patients for depression
Cancer patients can be accurately screened for major depression with a simple two-question survey, according to a study at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 55th Annual Meeting. The two-question screening test proved to be as accurate as a nine-question test.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
Pediatrics
Breastfeeding fraught with early challenges for many first-time mothers
A new study shows that new moms who report early concerns or problems with breastfeeding are nearly 10 times more likely to abandon breastfeeding within two months.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Feuer
jim.feuer@cchmc.org
513-636-4656
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Sep-2013
Nature Chemical Biology
Propofol discovery may aid development of new anesthetics
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Imperial College London are the first to identify the site where the widely used anesthetic drug propofol binds to receptors in the brain to sedate patients during surgery.
Medical Research Council, National Institutes of Health, Austrian Ministry of Science and Research

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 22-Sep-2013
Nature Chemical Biology
Propofol discovery may help lead to development of new anesthetics
New research on the most commonly used anesthetic drug could help to unravel a long-standing mystery about how it induces a pain-free, sleep-like state. Following years of research, scientists have identified exactly how propofol acts at a molecular level. Having a more detailed picture of exactly how it works in the brain may help scientists to design new versions that reduce the risks involved in surgery. Propofol was linked to the death of Michael Jackson.
Medical Research Council, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Austrian Ministry of Science and Research, European Seventh Framework Program

Contact: Simon Levey
s.levey@imperial.ac.uk
44-020-759-46702
Imperial College London

Public Release: 22-Sep-2013
Nature Cell Biology
USC scientists ID protein that regulates cellular trafficking, potential for anti-cancer therapy
USC scientists have identified a new regulator for the intracellular trafficking of proteins between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, which is a crucial process for maintaining homeostasis and prevention of human disease. The study provides a new avenue to investigate anti-cancer agents that target the regulatory protein UVRAG and/or intracellular trafficking process.
American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Alison Trinidad
alison.trinidad@usc.edu
323-442-3941
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 22-Sep-2013
Nature Neuroscience
Calming fear during sleep
A fear memory was reduced in people by exposing them to the memory over and over again while they slept. It's the first time that emotional memory has been manipulated during sleep, report scientists. The finding potentially offers a new way to enhance the typical daytime treatment of phobias through exposure therapy by adding a nighttime component. A common treatment for phobias is gradual exposure to the feared object until the fear is extinguished.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
Marla-Paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 20-Sep-2013
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Prostacyclin analogs and PDE 5 inhibitors synergistically stimulate ATP release from human RBCs
Prostacyclin (PGI2) and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors are vasodilators used in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Although these drugs stimulate vascular dilation directly, erythrocytes also express the PGI2 receptor (IPR) and contain PDE5. We determined that PDE5 inhibitors potentiate IPR-mediated release of the potent vasodilator, adenosine triphosphate from erythrocytes. These results demonstrate a novel synergism between IPR agonists and PDE5 inhibitors that could provide a new rationale for the treatment of PAH.
American Diabetes Association, National Institutes of Health, United Therapeutics

Contact: Stephanie M. Knebel
knebelsm@slu.edu
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 20-Sep-2013
Cell Reports
Researchers identify a switch that controls growth of most aggressive brain tumor cells
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a cellular switch that potentially can be turned off and on to slow down, and eventually inhibit the growth of the most commonly diagnosed and aggressive malignant brain tumor.
National Institutes of Health, NASA, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Contact: Remekca Owens
remekca.owens@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Sep-2013
Milbank Quarterly
Personality a key factor in health care use
Psychiatrists and psychologists have long understood that an individual's personality can define how he or she views the world around them, reacts to situations, and interacts with others. It now appears that personality traits can be linked to the frequency with which older adults use expensive health care services.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Mark Michaud
mark_michaud@urmc.rochester.edu
585-273-4790
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Sep-2013
Nature Neuroscience
Building the best brain: U-M researchers show how brain cell connections get cemented early in life
When we're born, our brains aren't very organized, but as we grow and learn, things get a bit more stable. How and why does this happen -- and what happens when it doesn't go normally? Researchers have made a major stride in understanding this process, called synapse maturation.
Klingenstein Fund, Mallinckrodt Foundation, March of Dimes Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 20-Sep-2013
Journal of Immunology
Scripps Research Institute study explores barriers to HIV vaccine response
Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute discovered that an antibody that binds and neutralizes HIV likely also targets the body's own "self" proteins. This finding could complicate the development of HIV vaccines designed to elicit this protective antibody, called 4E10, and others like it, as doing so might be dangerous or inefficient.
National Institutes of Health, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative Neutralizing Antibody Center, Ragon Institute

Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 20-Sep-2013
Journal of Pediatrics
Imaging technique detects pediatric liver disease without need for needle biopsy
A new, non-invasive imaging technique, magnetic resonance elastography, can now help physicians accurately detect fibrosis (scarring) in children with chronic liver disease -- a growing problem due in part to increasing obesity rates.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Feuer
jim.feuer@cchmc.org
513-636-4656
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Journal of Adolescent Health
Higher calorie diets increase weight gain, shorten hospital stays for teens with anorexia
Higher calorie diets produce twice the rate of weight gain compared to the lower calorie diets that currently are recommended for adolescents hospitalized with anorexia nervosa, according to a study by researchers at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital.
University of California, San Francisco/Clinical and Translational Science Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Juliana Bunim
juliana.bunim@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
UCSF awarded $20 million federal grant on tobacco regulatory science
UC San Francisco will receive a five-year, $20 million grant as part of a first-of-its-kind tobacco science regulatory program by the US Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health.
US Food and Drug Administration, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Elizabeth Fernandez
elizabeth.fernandez@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Showing releases 3151-3175 out of 3458.

<< < 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 > >>

     
   

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