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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3176-3200 out of 3459.

<< < 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 > >>

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
Nature Methods
Search tool for gene expression databases could uncover therapeutic targets, biological processes
A new computational tool developed by US and Israeli scientists will help scientists exploit the massive databases of gene expression experimental results that have been created over the past decade. Researchers say it could uncover new links between diseases and treatments and provide new insights into biological processes.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
LSUHSC'S OCHOA 1 of 10 chosen by NIH director for Transformative Research Award
LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans' Dr. Augusto Ochoa is one of ten recipients nationally of the National Institutes of Health Transformative Research Award. The award comes with a $2.5 million grant to support the development of new treatments for severe viral diseases, including herpes infections, pandemic influenza and cancers caused viruses, by manipulating how the immune system responds to severe viral and inflammatory infections.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Leslie Capo
lcapo@lsuhsc.edu
504-568-4806
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Clinician observations of preschoolers' behavior help to predict ADHD at school age
Don't rely on one source of information about your preschoolers' inattention or hyperactivity. Rather, consider how your child behaves at home as well as information from his or her teacher and a clinician. This advice is found in Springer's Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. A study there examines how well parent, teacher, and clinician ratings of preschoolers' behavior are able to predict severity and diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder at age six.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
BMJ
Study led by NYU Langone researchers finds the association between a high body mass index and the risk of death due to cardiovascular disease is stronger among east Asians than south Asians
A study led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has found that the association between body fat and mortality due to cardiovascular disease differs between south and east Asians, a finding that has important implications for global health recommendations.
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, National Institutes of Health, and others

Contact: Lorinda Klein
lorindaann.klein@nyumc.org
212-404-3533
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Decoding sound's source: Mass. Eye and Ear researchers unravel part of the mystery
Researchers from the Eaton-Peabody Laboratories of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School, and Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology have gained new insight into how localized hearing works in the brain.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Contact: Mary Leach
Mary_Leach@meei.harvard.edu
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
PLOS Medicine
Likelihood of childhood obesity is linked to weight gained by mother during pregnancy
Women who gain excessive weight in pregnancy are more likely to have overweight and obese children, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine. A study by David Ludwig from Boston Children's Hospital in the USA and colleagues has concluded that even after making allowances for differences in birthweight, the likelihood of a child becoming obese is linked to the amount of weight that the mother gained in pregnancy.
NIH/National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Fiona Godwin
fgodwin@plos.org
01-223-442-834
PLOS

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
A link between type 2 diabetes and mitochondrial function
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, C. Ronald Kahn and colleagues at Harvard Medical School evaluated mitochondrial involvement in insulin resistance.
National Institutes of Health, German Research Foundation

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Hemin and sickle cell disease-associated acute chest syndrome development
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Solomon Fiifi Ofori-Acquah and colleagues at Emory University asked if hemin, a product released by red blood cells during lysis, triggers ACS in a mouse model of sickle cell disease.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, American Heart Association

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI early table of contents for Oct. 1, 2013
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, Oct. 1, 2013 in the JCI: Hemin and sickle cell disease-associated acute chest syndrome development, A link between type 2 diabetes and mitochondrial function, Divergence of IL-1, IL-18 and cell death in NLRP3 inflammasomopathies, MicroRNA-223 controls susceptibility to tuberculosis by regulating lung neutrophil recruitment, NF-κB–mediated Pax7 dysregulation in the muscle microenvironment promotes cancer cachexia, and more...
National Institutes of Health, Arthritis National Research Foundation, European Union's Seventh Framework Programme

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
Scripps Research Institute study finds new moves in protein's evolution
Highlighting an important but unexplored area of evolution, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found evidence that, over hundreds of millions of years, an essential protein has evolved chiefly by changing how it moves, rather than by changing its basic molecular structure. The work has implications not only for the understanding of protein evolution, but also for the design of antibiotics and other drugs that target the protein in question.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Skaggs Institute of Chemical Biology, and others

Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
Shock
New findings on combined radiation injury from nuclear disaster
A nuclear bomb or nuclear reactor accident can produce a deadly combination of radiation exposure and injuries such as burns and trauma. Now the first study of its kind in 50 years is providing new insights into this phenomenon, called combined radiation injury.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
University of Utah researchers receive NIH Director's New Innovator Award
Adam Frost, M.D., Ph.D., a professor of biochemistry, and Ryan O'Connell, Ph.D., an assistant professor of pathology, were selected to receive the NIH Director's New Innovator Award from a competitive, national field of researchers.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Melinda Rogers
melinda.rogers@hsc.utah.edu
801-608-9888
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
Asthma attack prevention proposal awarded NIH New Innovator grant
Research on an aerosol that jump-starts a rapid immune response to stifle viral respiratory infections before they can provoke asthma attacks has earned major funding from the National Institutes of Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott Merville
smerville@mdanderson.org
713-792-0661
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
Cell Reports
New map of insulin pathway could lead to better diabetes drugs
A team led by scientists at the Scripps Research Institute has created the first comprehensive roadmap of the protein interactions that enable cells in the pancreas to produce, store and secrete the hormone insulin. The finding makes possible a deeper scientific understanding of the insulin secretion process -- and how it fails in insulin disorders such as Type 2 diabetes.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
Nature Communications
Short-term hearing loss can cause long-term problem
Short-term hearing loss during childhood may lead to persistent hearing deficits, long after basic auditory sensitivity has returned to normal. The processing of sound in the brain is shaped by early experience.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mary Leach
Mary_Leach@meei.harvard.edu
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
Scripps Florida scientist wins prestigious NIH New Innovator Award
Scott Hansen, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular Therapeutics on the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute has won a prestigious New Innovator Award from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of the National Institutes of Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New insights into DNA repair process may spur better cancer therapies
By detailing a process required for repairing DNA breakage, scientists at the Duke Cancer Institute have gained a better understanding of how cells deal with the barrage of damage that can contribute to cancer and other diseases.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
Dartmouth researchers receive $5.9 million grant from NIH for lung research
The NIH has awarded a $5.9 million grant to support an Institutional Development Award Lung Biology Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. For the past 10 years, COBRE funding has supported the Center's work, which has contributed not only to our understanding of cystic fibrosis and to the development of patented and patent-pending therapeutic approaches for treating the disease, but to other chronic lung diseases.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Derik Hertel
kenneth.d.hertel@dartmouth.edu
603-650-1211
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
Nature Cell Biology
When cells 'eat' their own power plants; Pitt scientists solve mystery of cellular process
A team of University of Pittsburgh scientists reports in the Oct. 1 issue of Nature Cell Biology that they have solved the mystery of a basic biological function essential to cellular health. By discovering a mechanism by which mitochondria signal that they need to be eliminated, the Pitt team has opened the door to potential research into cures for disorders such as Parkinson's disease that are believed to be caused by dysfunctional mitochondria in neurons.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
UCI achieves rare trifecta: 3 scientists receive New Innovator Awards
UC Irvine scientists Aaron Esser-Kahn, Sunil Gandhi and Ali Mortazavi have been named recipients of the prestigious 2013 National Institutes of Health Director's New Innovator Awards.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Cathy Lawhon
clawhon@uci.edu
949-824-1151
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
Environmental Science & Technology
Biochar quiets microbes, including some plant pathogens
In the first study of its kind, Rice University scientists have used synthetic biology to study how a popular soil amendment called biochar can interfere with the chemical signals that some plant pathogens use to coordinate their attacks. The new study, published online this month in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, is the first to examine how biochar affects the chemical signaling that's routinely used by soil microorganisms that interact with plants.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Hamill Foundation, Welch Foundation, Taiwan Ministry of Education

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
NIH awards Wang highly competitive Transformative Research Award
Lihong Wang, Ph.D., of Washington University in St. Louis, has received a 2013 Transformative Research Award from the National Institutes of Health. He was one of only 10 recipients of the award, given to scientists proposing highly innovative approaches to major contemporary challenges in biomedical research.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Neil Schoenherr
nschoenherr@wustl.edu
314-935-5235
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
Nature Communications
Researchers ferret out function of autism gene
Researchers say it's clear that some cases of autism are hereditary, but have struggled to draw direct links between the condition and particular genes. Researchers at Johns Hopkins have found that mutations in one autism-linked gene, dubbed NHE9, which is involved in transporting substances in and out of structures within the cell, causes communication problems among brain cells that likely contribute to autism.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, American Heart Association, American Physiological Society, Israeli Centers of Research Excellence Program

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
JAMA Pediatrics
Baby bed-sharing on the rise, but healthcare providers can help reverse trend
The number of infants sharing a bed with their caregivers increased between 1993 and 2010, especially among black and Hispanic families, but this unhealthy trend could be reversed with education from healthcare providers, according to Yale School of Medicine researchers. Their findings are published in the Sept. 30 issue of JAMA Pediatrics, a JAMA Network publication.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
With increased age comes decreased risk-taking in decision-making
When faced with uncertain situations, people are less able to make decisions as they age, according to a new study by researchers at Yale School of Medicine. Published in the Sept. 30 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study also found that older people are more risk-averse than their midlife counterparts when choosing between possible gains, but more risk-seeking when choosing between losses.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Showing releases 3176-3200 out of 3459.

<< < 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 > >>

     
   

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