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Department of Health and Human Services

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Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3176-3200 out of 3433.

<< < 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 > >>

Public Release: 28-Aug-2013
Nature Communications
Researchers aim to use light -- not electric jolts -- to restore healthy heartbeats
When a beating heart slips into an irregular, rhythm, the treatment is electric current from a pacemaker or defibrillator. But the electricity itself can cause pain, tissue damage and other side effects. Now, researchers want to replace jolts with a gentler remedy: light.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Phil Sneiderman
prs@jhu.edu
443-287-9960
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2013
Stem Cells
UC Davis team 'spikes' stem cells to generate myelin
Stem cell technology has long offered the hope of regenerating tissue to repair broken or damaged neural tissue.
National Institutes of Health, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Shriners Hospitals for Children

Contact: Charles Casey
charles.casey@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9048
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 28-Aug-2013
Journal of National Cancer Institute
School-age drinking increases breast cancer risk
Every daily drink a young woman takes increases her lifetime risk of breast cancer by 13 percent, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Goodwin
jgoodwin@wustl.edu
314-286-0166
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 28-Aug-2013
Science Signaling
Univ. of Maryland research could result in new approach to prevent diabetes-induced birth defects
A research team at the University of Maryland School of Medicine has identified a cell signaling pathway which plays a significant role in causing developmental defects of the fetal spinal cord and brain in babies of women with diabetes. Using an animal model of disease, the team's results point to a potential new therapeutic target for preventing these defects in pregnant women having preexisting diabetes. The results of this study are published in the Aug. 27th issue of Science Signaling.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Christopher Hardwick
chardwick@som.umaryland.edu
410-706-5260
University of Maryland Medical Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2013
Substance Use and Misuse
4 alcohol brands dominate popular music mentions
Four alcohol brands -- Patron tequila, Hennessy cognac, Grey Goose vodka, and Jack Daniel's whiskey -- accounted for more than half of alcohol brand mentions in the songs that mentioned alcohol use in Billboard's most popular song lists in 2009, 2010 and 2011, according to a new study from researchers at the Boston University School of Public Health and the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Tim Parsons
tmparson@jhsph.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 28-Aug-2013
Cerebral Cortex
Autistic children can outgrow difficulty understanding visual cues and sounds
Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have shown that high-functioning autism spectrum disorder children appear to outgrow a critical social communication disability. Younger children with ASD have trouble integrating the auditory and visual cues associated with speech, but the researchers found that the problem clears up in adolescence. The study was published today in the online edition of the journal Cerebral Cortex.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 28-Aug-2013
Science Translational Medicine
Blocking molecular pathway reverses pulmonary hypertension in rats, Stanford study finds
Pulmonary hypertension, a deadly form of high blood pressure that develops in the lungs, may be caused by an inflammation-producing molecular pathway that damages the inner lining of blood vessels, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Tracie White
traciew@stanford.edu
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2013
Science Translational Medicine
A major cause of age-related memory loss identified
A team of Columbia University Medical Center researchers, led by Nobel laureate Eric R. Kandel, MD, has found that deficiency of a protein called RbAp48 in the hippocampus is a significant contributor to age-related memory loss and that this form of memory loss is reversible. The study, conducted in postmortem human brain cells and in mice, also offers the strongest causal evidence that age-related memory loss and Alzheimer's disease are distinct conditions.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, James S. McDonnell Foundation, Broitman Foundation, Henry M. Jackson Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@columbia.edu
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Journal of Affective Disorders
Winter depression not as common as many think, OSU research shows
New research suggests that getting depressed when it's cold and dreary outside may not be as common as is often believed.
Oregon Health and Science University Medical Research Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Kerr
david.kerr@oregonstate.edu
541-737-1364
Oregon State University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
JAMA
Contagious savings
A commercial health insurer's large scale demonstration program designed to improve quality and lower costs for subscribers also lowered costs for Medicare patients who used the same health care providers but were not covered by the plan.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology
Calcium supplements may not prevent bone loss in women with breast cancer
New research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center finds that the recommended daily doses of calcium and vitamin D supplements may not prevent loss of bone mineral density in women with breast cancer.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Bonnie Davis
bdavis@wakehealth.edu
336-716-4977
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Journal of Adolescent Health
African-American women less likely to receive HPV vaccine than whites, Pitt study finds
Even with access to health care, African-American women are less likely to receive the vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV), which reduces the risk for cervical cancer, according to a study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The findings, published today in the Journal of Adolescent Health, suggest a need for health care providers to both bolster HPV vaccination recommendations and address negative attitudes toward the vaccine among this vulnerable patient population.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andrea Stanford
stanfordac@upmc.edu
412-647-6190
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Experimental Neurology
Stem cells may do best with a little help from their friends
Like volunteers handing out cups of energy drinks to marathon runners, specially engineered "helper cells" transplanted along with stem cells can dole out growth factors to increase the stem cells' endurance, at least briefly, Johns Hopkins researchers report. Their study, published in the September issue of Experimental Neurology, is believed to be the first to test the helper-cell tactic, which they hope will someday help to overcome a major barrier to successful stem cell transplants.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Anders Wall Foundation

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Journal of Interpersonal Violence
Dating violence impedes victims' earnings
Dating violence in adolescence not only takes a physical and emotional toll on young women, it also leads to less education and lower earnings later in life, according to a first-of-its-kind study led by a Michigan State University researcher.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Cell Research
Novel approach to gene regulation can activate multiple genes simultaneously
By creating a powerful new gene regulation system called CRISPR-on, Whitehead Institute researchers now have the ability to increase the expression of multiple genes simultaneously and precisely manipulate each gene's expression level. The system is effective in both mouse and human cells as well as in mouse embryos.
Croucher Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nicole Rura
rura@wi.mit.edu
617-258-6851
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Journal of the American Medical Association
Genetic variant identified that may increase heart disease risk among people with type 2 diabetes
A newly discovered genetic variant may increase the risk of heart disease in people with type 2 diabetes by more than a third, according to a study led by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health and Joslin Diabetes Center.
Boston Obesity Nutrition Research Center, Joslin Diabetes Center, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Todd Datz
tdatz@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8413
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association
Joslin scientists identify genetic variant associated with coronary heart disease in type 2 diabetes
Joslin scientists, in collaboration with researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health and Italian research institutes, have identified a previously unknown genetic variant associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease in type 2 diabetic patients.
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, Italian Ministry of Health, Fondazion Roma

Contact: Jeffrey Bright
jeffrey.bright@joslin.harvard.edu
617-309-1957
Joslin Diabetes Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Study identifies molecular process behind form of non-syndromic deafness
Researchers identify an underlying molecular process that causes a genetic form of non-syndromic deafness in a new study that also suggests affected families may be at risk of damage to other organs. A multi-national research team led by scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center report their findings in a study posted online Aug. 27 by the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders, Deafness Research Foundation

Contact: Nick Miller
nicholas.miller@cchmc.org
513-803-6035
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Study finds tumor suppressor may actually fuel aggressive leukemia
New research in the Journal of Clinical Investigation suggests that blocking a protein normally credited with suppressing leukemia may be a promising therapeutic strategy for an aggressive form of the disease called acute myeloid leukemia. The protein scientists targeted is a transcription factor known as RUNX1, which also plays an important role in helping regulate the normal development of blood cells.
National Institutes of Health, US Public Health Service, CancerFreeKids

Contact: Nick Miller
nicholas.miller@cchmc.org
513-803-6035
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Scientists prevent preterm birth caused by gene-environment interactions
New research in the Journal of Clinical Investigation provides evidence that gene-environment interactions are a major contributor to preterm birth and that using a combinatory treatment strategy can prevent preterm delivery in a mouse model. In findings posted online Aug. 27, scientists from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center say their study provides important new insights into a major global health problem -- one that remains stubbornly persistent in the United States.
National Institutes of Health, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, March of Dimes

Contact: Nick Miller
nicholas.miller@cchmc.org
513-803-6035
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Origin of a hereditary east Texas bleeding disorder
Genomic sequencing revealed a mutation in the gene encoding coagulation factor 5 (FV), but it was not considered to contribute to disease, since clotting assays were normal. In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Björn Dahlbäck and colleagues at Lund University reveal that this mutation results in a truncated form of FV.
Doris Duke Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Swedish Research Council

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Protease inhibitor resistance involves multiple stages of the HIV-1 life cycle
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Robert Silcano and colleagues at Johns Hopkins University identify the effects of protease inhibitors on different stages of viral replication.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Hearing loss associated with a lack of cell-cell junctions
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Saima Riazuddin and colleagues at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital, identify a role for the tricellular tight junction protein, TRIC, in cochlear hair cell preservation.
National Institutes of Health, Deafness Research Foundation

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI early table of contents for Aug. 27, 2013
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, Aug. 27, 2013, in the JCI: Hearing loss associated with a lack of cell-cell junctions, Cancerous cells from donor kidney linked to recipient skin cancer, A strategy for combating drug-resistant cancers, Protease inhibitor resistance involves multiple stages of the HIV-1 life cycle, Origin of a hereditary east Texas bleeding disorder, and more.
National Institutes of Health, Région Ile de France, Deafness Research Foundation, NRPB, National Security Council, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Nucleic Acids Research
Scripps Research Institute scientists report breakthrough in DNA editing technology
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute have found a way to apply a powerful new DNA-editing technology more broadly than ever before. "This is one of the hottest tools in biology, and we've now found a way to target it to any DNA sequence," said Carlos F. Barbas III, the Janet and Keith Kellogg II Chair in Molecular Biology and professor in the department of chemistry at TSRI.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute

Showing releases 3176-3200 out of 3433.

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