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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3176-3200 out of 3396.

<< < 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 > >>

Public Release: 18-May-2013
Digestive Disease Week
Consuming coffee linked to lower risk of detrimental liver disease, Mayo Clinic finds
Regular consumption of coffee is associated with a reduced risk of primary sclerosing cholangitis, an autoimmune liver disease, Mayo Clinic research shows. The findings were being presented at the Digestive Disease Week 2013 conference in Orlando, FL.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Brian Kilen
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 17-May-2013
Journal of the American College of Surgeons
More than one-third of Texas women still receive unnecessary breast biopsy surgery
Many women in Texas who are found to have an abnormality on routine mammogram or discover a lump in one of their breasts end up having an old-fashioned surgical biopsy to find out whether the breast abnormality is malignant. Since 2001, national expert panels have recommended that the first course of action for women with breast lumps or masses should be minimally invasive biopsy.
National Institutes of Health, Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas

Contact: Molly J. Dannenmaier
mjdannen@utmb.edu
409-771-5105
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 17-May-2013
EMBO Molecular Medicine
Study identifies new approach to improving treatment for MS and other conditions
Working with lab mice models of multiple sclerosis (MS), UC Davis scientists have detected a novel molecular target for the design of drugs that could be safer and more effective than current FDA-approved medications against MS.
National Institutes of Health, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Feldstein Medical Foundation

Contact: Charles Casey
charles.casey@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9048
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 17-May-2013
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Annual Meeting
Study: Peer-referral programs can increase HIV-testing in emergency departments
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have found that incorporating a peer-referral program for HIV testing into emergency departments can reach new groups of high-risk patients and brings more patients into the health care system for testing.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Katy Cosse
kcosse@gmail.com
513-558-0207
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 17-May-2013
Underrepresented minority students receive fellowships in digestive disease and nutrition research
Illustrating a commitment to the support of underrepresented minority researchers, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Research Foundation has announced the inaugural AGA Investing in the Future Student Research Fellowship Award recipients. Supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, this new award helps underrepresented minority students to further their research careers in digestive disease and nutrition research.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Rachel Steigerwald
newsroom@gastro.org
301-272-1603
American Gastroenterological Association

Public Release: 17-May-2013
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Beer-industry advertising guidelines: Rating panels may help industry assess itself
The alcohol industry has developed and regulates its own guidelines regarding advertising. A new study has investigated the ability of panels to find consensus around code violations. Results indicate that a modified Delphi Technique may enhance the ability of regulatory agencies to monitor the content of alcohol-beverage advertising.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Thomas F. Babor, Ph.D.
babor@nso.uchc.edu
860-679-5485
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 17-May-2013
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
College women exceed NIAAA drinking guidelines more frequently than college men
In 1990, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism issued guidelines that define low-risk drinking, which differ for men and women. New research shows that female college student drinkers exceed NIAAA guidelines for weekly drinking more frequently than their male counterparts.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Bettina B. Hoeppner, Ph.D.
bhoeppner@partners.org
617-643-1988
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 17-May-2013
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Individuals who drink heavily and smoke may show 'early aging' of the brain
Alcohol treatment interventions work best when patients understand and are actively involved in the process. A first-of-its-kind study looks at the interactive effects of smoking status and age on neurocognition in one-month-abstinent alcohol dependent (AD) individuals in treatment. Results show that AD individuals who currently smoke have more problems with memory, ability to think quickly and efficiently, and problem-solving skills than those who do not smoke, effects which seem to become greater with increasing age.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Timothy C. Durazzo, Ph.D.
timothy.durazzo@ucsf.edu
415-221-4810 x4157
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 16-May-2013
Science
Gene involved in neurodegeneration keeps clock running
Northwestern University scientists have shown a gene involved in neurodegenerative disease also plays a critical role in the proper function of the circadian clock. In a study of the common fruit fly, the researchers found the gene, called Ataxin-2, keeps the clock responsible for sleeping and waking on a 24-hour rhythm. Without the gene, the rhythm of the fruit fly's sleep-wake cycle is disturbed, making waking up on a regular schedule difficult for the fly.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 16-May-2013
Journal of Cell Biology
Endothelium, heal thyself
Investigators from the Center for Vascular Biology Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center publish new findings showing that the endothelium's efficient barrier function relies on an enormous self-restorative capacity.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 16-May-2013
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology
Sanford-Burnham researchers identify target to prevent hardening of arteries
The gene Dkk1 encodes a protein that plays a key role in increasing the population of connective-tissue cells during wound repair, but prolonged Dkk1 signaling in cells lining blood vessels can lead to fibrosis and a stiffening of artery walls.
National Institutes of Health, Barnes-Jewish Hospital Foundation

Contact: Deborah Robison
drobison@sanfordburnham.org
407-615-0072
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute

Public Release: 16-May-2013
Journal of Adolescent Health
Students' diet and physical activity improve with parent communications
College students eat more fruits and vegetables and exercise more on days when they communicate more with their parents, according to researchers at Penn State.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sara LaJeunesse
sdl13@psu.edu
814-863-4325
Penn State

Public Release: 16-May-2013
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Vicious cycle: Obesity sustained by changes in brain biochemistry
In a new discovery reported in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Brown University and Lifespan researchers show that in the brain cells of rats, obesity impedes the production of a hormone that curbs appetite and inspires calorie burning. The root cause appears to be a breakdown in the protein-processing mechanism of the cells. In the lab, the researchers showed they could fix the breakdown with drugs.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 16-May-2013
American Journal of Public Health
Change in cycle track policy needed to boost ridership, public health
Bicycle engineering guidelines often used by state regulators to design bicycle facilities need to be overhauled to reflect current cyclists' preferences and safety data, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health researchers. They say that US guidelines should be expanded to offer cyclists more riding options and call for endorsing cycle tracks -- physically separated, bicycle-exclusive paths adjacent to sidewalks -- to encourage more people of all ages to ride bicycles.
NIH/Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award, Helen and William Mazer Foundation

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 16-May-2013
Quality of Care and Outcomes Research 2013 Scientific Sessions
Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes
Risk of death, hospital readmission prolonged after heart attack, heart failure
Heart attack or heart failure patients may have a high risk of death or re-admission for a month or longer after leaving the hospital. The standard practice of tracking deaths and readmissions for only 30 days after discharge misses those longer periods of increased risk when people may need special care. After discharge, people should be vigilant about their health and contact a healthcare professional right away if they feel ill, researchers said.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Cathy Lewis
cathy.lewis@heart.org
214-706-1324
American Heart Association

Public Release: 16-May-2013
Quality of Care and Outcomes Research 2013 Scientific Sessions
Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes
Patients fare better at hospitals using Get With The Guidelines-Stroke
People with strokes caused by blood clots fared better in hospitals participating in the Get With the Guidelines®-Stroke program than in those not involved in the program. People treated in Get With The Guidelines-Stroke hospitals were more likely to go home from the hospital and less likely to die 30 days to a year after discharge.
American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Cathy Lewis
cathy.lewis@heart.org
214-706-1324
American Heart Association

Public Release: 16-May-2013
Quality of Care and Outcomes Research 2013 Scientific Sessions
Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes
Massachusetts' health care reform didn't raise hospital use, costs
Health care reform in Massachusetts didn't result in substantially more hospitalizations, longer stays or higher costs. There were no significant differences in post-reform hospital use in Massachusetts versus to three other states without reform. There was also no significant increase in use of safety-net hospitals in Massachusetts.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Cathy Lewis
cathy.lewis@heart.org
214-706-1324
American Heart Association

Public Release: 15-May-2013
2013 ASCO Annual Meeting
Mayo Clinic: Scheduled imaging studies provide little help detecting relapse of aggressive lymphoma
Imaging scans following treatment for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma do little to help detect a relapse, a Mayo Clinic study has found. The overwhelming majority of patients with this aggressive lymphoma already have symptoms, an abnormal physical exam or an abnormal blood test at the time of relapse, the researchers say. The findings will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting May 31-June 4 in Chicago.
National Institutes of Health, Mayo Clinic Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery

Contact: Joe Dangor
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 15-May-2013
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology
Jekyll into Hyde: Breathing auto emissions turns HDL cholesterol from 'good' to 'bad'
Academic researchers have found that breathing motor vehicle emissions triggers a change in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, altering its cardiovascular protective qualities so that it actually contributes to clogged arteries. The finding, shown in mice, reveals how car emissions activate the early cell and tissue damage called oxidation that causes inflammation leading to hardening of the arteries and HDL cholesterol may play a key role.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Rachel Champeau
rchampeau@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2270
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 15-May-2013
Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Cholesterol-lowering drug may reduce exercise benefits for obese adults, MU study finds
University of Missouri researchers found that simvastatin, a generic type of drug typically prescribed to lower cholesterol and prevent heart disease, hindered the positive effects of exercise for obese and overweight adults.
National Institutes of Health, Veterans Affairs' Career Development, MU Research Board

Contact: Jesslyn Chew
ChewJ@missouri.edu
573-882-8353
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 15-May-2013
Journal of Lipid Research
4 genes indentified that influence levels of 'bad' cholesterol
Scientists at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute in San Antonio have identified four genes in baboons that influence levels of "bad" cholesterol. This discovery could lead to the development of new drugs to reduce the risk of heart disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Joseph Carey
jcarey@txbiomed.org
210-258-9437
Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Public Release: 15-May-2013
Psychological Science
Political motivations may have evolutionary links to physical strength
Men's upper-body strength predicts their political opinions on economic redistribution, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
Danish Research Council, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 15-May-2013
2013 ASCO Annual Meeting
Experts to present data addressing patient and physician barriers to clinical trials
Researchers from University Hospitals Case Medical Center's Seidman Cancer Center will present findings from two studies evaluating new technologies designed to address common barriers to enrollment in clinical trials. Results from a large-scale, trial demonstrated that the use of tailored, web-based videos delivering educational information to patients before an oncologist visit can significantly improve knowledge and reduce attitudinal barriers that impact enrollment.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: Alicia Reale
alicia.reale@uhhospitals.org
216-844-5158
University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Public Release: 15-May-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Pitt transplant experts challenge assumption, describe pathway that leads to organ rejection
Transplant researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine challenge a long-held assumption about how biologic pathways trigger immune system rejection of donor organs in a report published online today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. Their study, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, suggests that a different paradigm is needed to develop better anti-rejection therapies.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
SrikamAV@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 15-May-2013
Health Affairs
Cancer diagnosis puts people at greater risk for bankruptcy
People diagnosed with cancer are more than two-and-a-half times more likely to declare bankruptcy than those without cancer, according to a new study from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Researchers also found that younger cancer patients had two- to five-fold higher bankruptcy rates compared to older patients, and that overall bankruptcy filings increased as time passed following diagnosis.
NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Contact: Dean Forbes
dforbes@fhcrc.org
206-667-2896
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Showing releases 3176-3200 out of 3396.

<< < 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 > >>

     
   

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