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News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3201-3225 out of 3445.

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Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism.
New, 'robust' treatment for stroke uses genetic material from bone marrow
In the latest in a series of experiments testing the use of stem cells to treat neurological disease, researchers at Henry Ford Hospital have shown for the first time that microscopic material in the cells offers a "robust" treatment for crippling stroke. "In this study we pioneered a totally new treatment for stroke, and possibly for all neurological disease," says Michael Chopp, Ph.D., scientific director of the Henry Ford Neuroscience Institute.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Dwight Angell
dwight.angell@hfhs.org
313-850-3471
Henry Ford Health System

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Nature
UCI, UCLA study reveals new approach to remedying childhood visual disorders
By discovering the role of key neurons that mediate an important part of vision development, UC Irvine and UCLA neurobiologists have revealed a new approach to correcting visual disorders in children who suffer from early cataracts or amblyopia, also known as lazy eye.
NIH/National Eye Institute, NIH/National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Cathy Lawhon
clawhon@uci.edu
949-824-1511
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Nature Genetics
Skin cell defect is surprising allergy trigger
A structural defect in skin cells can contribute to allergy development, including skin and food allergies, traditionally thought primarily to be a dysfunction of the immune system.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Rice, MD Anderson researchers win NIH grant to study protein networks
Researchers at Rice University and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have received a $1.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to create processes that will look more deeply than ever into the protein networks that drive cells.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Cancer
CA-125 change over time shows promise as screening tool for early detection of ovarian cancer
Evaluating the change in CA-125 over time shows promise as a screening tool for early-stage disease, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Foundation for Cancer Research

Contact: Laura Sussman
lsussman@mdanderson.org
713-745-2457
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
PLOS ONE
Oxygen-generating compound shows promise for saving tissue after severe injury
The same compound in a common household clothes detergent shows promise as a treatment to preserve muscle tissue after severe injury. Researchers at the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's Institute for Regenerative Medicine hope the oxygen-generating compound could one day aid in saving and repairing limbs and tissue.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Richardson
krchrdsn@wakehealth.edu
336-716-4453
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Even mild stress can make it difficult to control your emotions, NYU researchers find
Even mild stress can thwart therapeutic measures to control emotions, a team of neuroscientists at New York University has found. Their findings point to the limits of clinical techniques while also shedding new light on the barriers that must be overcome in addressing afflictions such as fear or anxiety.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Researchers from Mount Sinai receive NIH grant to study promising treatment for Autism subtype
Scientists at the Seaver Autism Center at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have received a grant from the National Institutes of Health to study Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1, a promising treatment for a subtype of autism called Phelan McDermid Syndrome.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Press Office
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Touch and movement neurons shape the brain's internal image of the body
The brain's tactile and motor neurons, which perceive touch and control movement, may also respond to visual cues, according to researchers at Duke Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Press Office
lynn.garner@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Pediatrics
Pediatric readmission rates aren't indicator of hospital performance
Readmission rates of adult patients to the same hospital within 30 days are an area of national focus and a potential indicator of clinical failure and unnecessary expenditures. 
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Juliana Bunim
juliana.bunim@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Immune system, skin microbiome 'complement' one another, finds Penn Medicine study
Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania demonstrate for the first time that the immune system influences the skin microbiome. A new study found that the skin microbiome -- a collection of microorganisms inhabiting the human body -- is governed, at least in part, by an ancient branch of the immune system called complement.
National Institutes of Health, University of Pennsylvania Skin Disease Research Center

Contact: Kim Menard
kim.menard@uphs.upenn.edu
215-662-6183
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Disabling enzyme reduces tumor growth, cripples cancer cells, finds new study
UC Berkeley researchers have found that knocking out an enzyme needed to make lipids can dramatically cripple the ability of aggressive cancer cells to spread and grow tumors. The discovery points to a promising new target for treatment of aggressive cancers.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@berkeley.edu
510-643-7741
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
JAMA Internal Medicine
Thyroid cancer biopsy guidelines should be simplified, researchers say
A team led by UC San Francisco researchers has called for simplified guidelines on when to biopsy thyroid nodules for cancer, which they say would result in fewer unnecessary biopsies.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, University of California, San Francisco Department of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering

Contact: Jeffrey Norris
jeff.norris@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 25-Aug-2013
Nature Genetics
Study provides strongest clues to date for causes of schizophrenia
A new genome-wide association study estimates the number of different places in the human genome that are involved in schizophrenia. In particular, the study identifies 22 locations, including 13 that are newly discovered, that are believed to play a role in causing schizophrenia.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Sylvan Herman Foundation, Karolinska Institutet

Contact: Tom Hughes
tahughes@unch.unc.edu
919-966-6047
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 25-Aug-2013
Nature
Researchers discover how inhibitory neurons behave during critical periods of learning
We've all heard the saying "you can't teach an old dog new tricks." For years, neuroscientists have struggled to understand how the microcircuitry of the brain makes learning easier for the young, and more difficult for the old. New findings published in the journal Nature by Carnegie Mellon, the UCLA and the UC-Irvine show how one component of the brain's circuitry -- inhibitory neurons -- behave during critical periods of learning.
NIH/National Eye Institute, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-9982
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2013
Nature Genetics
Scientists pinpoint 105 additional genetic errors that cause cystic fibrosis
Of the over 1,900 errors already reported in the gene responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF), it is unclear how many of them actually contribute to the inherited disease. Now a team of researchers reports significant headway in figuring out which mutations are benign and which are deleterious. In so doing, they have increased the number of known CF-causing mutations from 22 to 127, accounting for 95 percent of the variations found in patients with CF.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 25-Aug-2013
Nature Neuroscience
Researchers uncover new biological target for combating Parkinson's disease
Researchers at Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have brought new clarity to the picture of what goes awry in the brain during Parkinson's disease and identified a compound that eases the disease's symptoms in mice. Their discoveries, described in a paper published online in Nature Neuroscience on August 25, also overturn established ideas about the role of a protein considered key to the disease's progress.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, JPB Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 23-Aug-2013
Kessler Foundation fellow receives grant from National Institutes of Health
Rakesh Pilkar, Ph.D., post-doctoral fellow in Human Performance and Engineering Research at Kessler Foundation, was awarded a R03, $153,000 grant by the National Institutes of Health to study the response levels to function electrical stimulation (FES) interventions in walking patterns during the rehabilitation of stroke patients with hemiplegic gait. He will look for the association of the responders' gait characteristics while determining proper FES intervention parameters. Dr. Pilkar's fellowship is funded by NIDRR's ARRT program.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lauren Scrivo
LScrivo@KesslerFoundation.org
973-324-8382
Kessler Foundation

Public Release: 23-Aug-2013
Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology
LSUHSC study reports racial/ethnic differences in young people with cancer
Mei-Chin Hsieh, MSPH, CTR, of LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Public Health's Louisiana Tumor Registry, is the lead author of a study that reports racial and ethnic differences in the incidence of soft tissue sarcomas in adolescents and young adults. The research, conducted at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Public Health, is published online in the Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology.
LSU Health Sciences Center, Centers for Disease Contral and Prevention, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Leslie Capo
lcapo@lsuhsc.edu
504-568-4806
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Public Release: 22-Aug-2013
EMBO Molecular Medicine
Scientists pinpoint a new molecular mechanism tied to pancreatic cancer
New research led by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and Baylor College of Medicine could aid efforts to diagnose and treat one of the most lethal and hard-to-treat types of cancer.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Cahill
Robert.Cahill@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-3030
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Public Release: 22-Aug-2013
Demography
Princeton researchers use mobile phones to measure happiness
Researchers at Princeton University are developing ways to use mobile phones to explore how one's environment influences one's sense of well-being.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Catherine Zandonella
czandone@princeton.edu
Princeton University

Public Release: 22-Aug-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
The stress and cancer link: 'Master switch' stress gene enables cancer's spread
In an unexpected finding, scientists have linked the activation of a stress gene in immune-system cells to the spread of breast cancer to other parts of the body.
National Institutes of Health, Pelotonia Idea Grant

Contact: Tsonwin Hai
Hai.2@osu.edu
614-292-2910
Ohio State University

Public Release: 22-Aug-2013
Stem Cell Reports
Harvard Stem Cell researchers create cells that line blood vessels
In a scientific first, Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists have successfully grown the cells that line the blood vessels -- called vascular endothelial cells -- from human induced pluripotent stem cells, revealing new details about how these cells function.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: B. D. Colen
bd_colen@harvard.edu
617-413-1224
Harvard University

Public Release: 22-Aug-2013
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Study adds lung damage to harmful effects of arsenic
A new study confirms that exposure to low to moderate amounts of arsenic in drinking water can impair lung function. Doses of about 120 parts per billion of arsenic in well water produced lung damage comparable to decades of smoking tobacco. This is the first population-based study to clearly demonstrate significant impairment of lung function, in some cases extensive lung damage, associated with low to moderate arsenic exposure.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Aug-2013
mBio
UCI-led study reveals how SARS virus hijacks host cells
UC Irvine infectious disease researchers have uncovered components of the SARS coronavirus -- which triggered a major outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in 2002-03 -- that allow it to take over host cells in order to replicate.
National Institutes of Health, California Center for Antiviral Drug Discovery

Contact: Andrea Burgess
andrea.burgess@uci.edu
949-824-6282
University of California - Irvine

Showing releases 3201-3225 out of 3445.

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