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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3226-3250 out of 3465.

<< < 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 > >>

Public Release: 16-Oct-2013
Neuron
'Individualized' therapy for the brain targets specific gene mutations causing dementia and ALS
Johns Hopkins scientists have developed new drugs that -- at least in a laboratory dish -- appear to halt the brain-destroying impact of a genetic mutation at work in some forms of two incurable diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and dementia.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, P2ALS, Muscular Dystrophy Association, ALS Association

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 16-Oct-2013
PLOS ONE
Elusive secret of HIV long-term immunity
Scientists have discovered a long sought, critical new clue about why some people are able to control the HIV virus long term without taking antiviral drugs. The finding may be useful in shortening drug treatment for everyone else with HIV. These rare individuals have an extra helping of an immune protein that blocks HIV from spreading within the body by turning it into an impotent wimp. Earlier treatment could protect reserves of the critical protein for everyone.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 16-Oct-2013
Neuron
Rare gene mutation sheds light on protein's role in brain development
Though worlds apart, four unrelated families have been united in a medical mystery over the source of a rare inherited disorder that results in their children being born with abnormal brain growth and severe functional impairments.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering
Restoring surgeons' sense of touch during minimally invasive surgeries
A team of engineers and doctors has developed a new wireless capsule that can give surgeons back their sense of touch when performing minimally invasive surgery.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
JAMA
More than 40 percent of men over 75 undergo PSA screening despite national recommendations
Many primary care doctors continue to administer the prostate-specific antigen test to even their oldest patients despite the fact that no medical organization recommends prostate cancer screening for men older than 75, according to new research from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. In a research letter published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, UTMB researchers found a high variability in standard PSA-ordering practice among primary care physicians.
Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas, National Institutes of Health, Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality, University of Texas Medical Branch

Contact: Molly Dannenmaier
mjdannen@utmb.edu
409-771-5105
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
UCLA, USC get $2M to develop stroke center network in Southland
A three-way partnership between the UCLA Stroke Center at the Ronald Reagan Medical Center, the University of Southern California (USC) Comprehensive Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center at Keck Medicine of USC, and UC Irvine has been awarded a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to address those three stroke priorities.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mark Wheeler
mwheeler@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2265
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Grant helps researchers study 'turbocharger effect' in skeletal muscle
University of Cincinnati researchers have been awarded a five-year, $2.1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study an isoform that plays a critical role in human resistance to fatigue.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Keith Herrell
keith.herrell@uc.edu
513-558-4559
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Research team wins grant to continue development of portable sensor
University of Cincinnati researchers have received a four-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to continue development of a portable sensor that will be used to measure metal levels in humans.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Keith Herrell
keith.herrell@uc.edu
513-558-4559
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Cancer Cell
Small bits of genetic material fight cancer's spread
Researchers at Princeton University have found that microRNAs -- small bits of genetic material capable of repressing the expression of certain genes -- may serve as both therapeutic targets and predictors of metastasis, or a cancer's spread from its initial site to other parts of the body.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Morgan Kelly
mgnkelly@princeton.edu
609-258-5729
Princeton University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
American Journal of Epidemiology
Johns Hopkins-led study shows increased life expectancy among family caregivers
Contradicting long-standing conventional wisdom, results of a Johns Hopkins-led analysis of data previously gathered on more than 3,000 family caregivers suggests that those who assist a chronically ill or disabled family member enjoy an 18 percent survival advantage compared to statistically matched non-caregivers.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Department of Health and Human Services

Contact: John Lazarou
jlazaro1@jhmi.edu
410-502-8902
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Einstein and Montefiore receive $25 million NIH grant to support clinical and translational research
Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Medical Center have received a $25 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for the Harold and Muriel Block Institute for Clinical and Translational Research at Einstein and Montefiore. The two institutions received their initial Clinical and Translational Science Award from the NIH in 2008 to launch this joint collaboration.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Journal of Infectious Diseases
Beyond antibiotics: 'PPMOs' offer new approach to bacterial infection, other diseases
Researchers today announced the successful use of a new type of antibacterial agent called a PPMO, which appears to function as well or better than an antibiotic, but may be more precise and also solve problems with antibiotic resistance. The new PPMOs offer a fundamentally different way to attack bacterial infection.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bruce Geller
gellerb@orst.edu
541-737-1845
Oregon State University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Journal of Infectious Diseases
UT Southwestern reports promising new approach to drug-resistant infections
A new type of antibiotic called a PPMO, which works by blocking genes essential for bacterial reproduction, successfully killed a multidrug-resistant germ common to health care settings, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Debbie Bolles
debbie.bolles@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Cell Reports
Halloween candy spooks aging digestive systems! Research in fruit flies helps explain why
Halloween candy spooks aging digestive systems! Research in fruit flies helps explain why.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Ellison Medical Foundation

Contact: Kris Rebillot
krebillot@buckinstitute.org
415-209-2080
Buck Institute for Age Research

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Scientists unravel mechanisms in chronic itching
New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that chronic itching, which can occur in many medical conditions, is different from the urge to scratch a mosquito bite. Chronic itching appears to incorporate more than just the nerve cells that normally transmit itch signals. In chronic itching, neurons that send itch signals also co-opt pain neurons to intensify the itch sensation.
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH/National Eye Institute, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
PLOS ONE
Penn researchers take first step toward a macular dystrophy gene therapy
With a new study, University of Pennsylvania researchers report "encouraging" findings that mark the first clear step in developing a gene therapy that could prevent vision loss or event restore vision in individuals suffering from vision-robbing conditions called bestrophinopathies.
Foundation Fighting Blindness, Macula Vision Research Foundation, NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Cancer Research
New imaging technique can identify breast cancer subtypes and early treatment response
An optical imaging technique that measures metabolic activity in cancer cells can accurately differentiate breast cancer subtypes, and it can detect responses to treatment as early as two days after therapy administration, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, US Deppartment of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, Vanderbilt University

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Sound preconditioning prevents ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss in mice
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Lisa Cunningham and colleagues at the National Institutes of Health developed a sound preconditioning protocol in mice that did not damage hearing, but induced HSP expression in the ear.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI early table of contents for Oct. 15, 2013
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, Oct. 15, 2013, in the JCI: Type III TGF-beta receptor promotes FGF2-mediated neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma, Induction of myelodysplasia by myeloid-derived suppressor cells, Hirschsprung-like disease is exacerbated by reduced de novo GMP synthesis, Allogeneic T-cell responses are regulated by a specific miRNA-mRNA network, Chronic itch development in sensory neurons requires BRAF signaling pathways, and more.
National Institutes of Health, US Army Medical Research, Children's Discovery Institute of Washington University

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Crystal methamphetamine use by street youth increases risk of injecting drugs
The use of crystal methamphetamine by street-involved youth is linked to an increased risk of injecting drugs, with crystal methamphetamine being the drug most commonly used at the time of first injection, found a study published in CMAJ.
National Institutes of Health, Canadian Institutes for Health Research

Contact: Kim Barnhardt
kim.barnhardt@cmaj.ca
613-520-7116 x2224
Canadian Medical Association Journal

Public Release: 14-Oct-2013
Nature
Genetic identification of a neural circuit that suppresses appetite
Scientists at the University of Washington have used genetic engineering to identify a population of neurons that tell the brain to shut off appetite. Their study, "Genetic identification of a neural circuit that suppresses appetite," was published Oct. 13 in Nature.
Davis Foundation, Klarman Family Foundation, Howard Hughes Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Elizabeth Hunter
elh415@uw.edu
206-616-3192
University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

Public Release: 14-Oct-2013
Case Western Reserve School of Medicine wins prestigious NCI sponsored Provocative Questions grant
The National Cancer Institute's new Provocative Questions research funding program has awarded a prestigious grant to researchers at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University's Schools of Medicine and Engineering to study tumor detection at the earliest stages of growth.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Christine Somosi
Christine.Somosi@case.edu
216-368-6287
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 14-Oct-2013
Ecological Monographs
Climate change creates complicated consequences for North America's forests
Climate change affects forests across North America -- in some cases permitting insect outbreaks, plant diseases, wildfires and other problems -- but Dartmouth researchers say warmer temperatures are also making many forests grow faster and some less susceptible to pests, which could boost forest health and acreage, timber harvests, carbon storage, water recycling and other forest benefits in some areas.
NIH/National Institute of Food and Agriculture, US Forest Service, US Geological Survey

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 14-Oct-2013
Cell Host & Microbe
Mammalian body cells lack ancient viral defense mechanism, find UT scientists
The first positive evidence that RNA interference does not play a role as an antiviral in most body, or "somatic," cells in mammals has been provided by a team led by Chris Sullivan at The University of Texas at Austin.
National Science Foundation Career, National Institutes of Health, Burroughs Wellcome Pathogenesis of Infectious Diseases Award

Contact: Chris Sullivan
chris_sullivan@mail.utexas.edu
512-471-5391
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 14-Oct-2013
Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology
Adult stem cells help build human blood vessels in engineered tissues
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified a protein expressed by human bone marrow stem cells that guides and stimulates the formation of blood vessels. Their findings, which could help improve the vascularization of engineered tissues, were reported online on October 12 in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology.
National Institutes of Health, Heart Research Foundation

Contact: Sharon Parmet
sparmet@uic.edu
312-413-2695
University of Illinois at Chicago

Showing releases 3226-3250 out of 3465.

<< < 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 > >>

     
   

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