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Department of Health and Human Services

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Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3226-3250 out of 3735.

<< < 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 > >>

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature
Age of puberty in girls influenced by which parent their genes are inherited from
The age at which girls reach sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes, a small sub-set of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent passes on that gene, according to new research published in the journal Nature.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Coriell Institute for Medical Research, National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, New South Wales Cancer Council, Victorian Health Promotion Foundation, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Craig Brierley
craig.brierley@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-66205
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature
New view of stomach cancer could hasten better therapies
In a massive effort to catalog the molecular causes of stomach cancer, scientists, including researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, have identified four subtypes of tumors based on shared mutations and other molecular abnormalities. They say the new classification promises to advance clinical research to develop improved therapies for the third-leading cancer killer worldwide.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Science Translational Medicine
UNC researchers find unsuspected characteristics of new CF drugs, offering potential paths to more effective therapies
Last month, the pharmaceutical company Vertex released results from a large phase 3 clinical trial for cystic fibrosis patients, showing that a combination of two new cystic fibrosis drugs modestly improved lung function and offered better health outcomes for some patients. Now, scientists at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and the University of North Carolina Marsico Lung Institute have shown that one of these drugs counteracts the intended beneficial molecular effect of the other.
National Institutes of Health, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Else Kröner-Fresenius Foundation

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unchealth.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Combination antiretroviral therapy helps treat HCV in patients co-infected with HIV
Treatment of HIV patients co-infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) with an anti-retroviral drug therapy not only tackles HIV, but also reduces HCV replication, according to a new study lead by a University of Cincinnati researcher.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NHI/National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, Department of Energy

Contact: Cedric Ricks
cedric.ricks@uc.edu
513-558-4657
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Oral Oncology
Anti-pain agent shrinks oral cancers, leaves healthy tissues alone
Oral cancers strike thousands of Americans annually, inflicting pain and shortening their lives. New research out of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio showed that an agent called capsazepine reduced the oral tumors in mice without damaging surrounding tissues. It's a hopeful start with more work to go.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Psychosomatic Research
In asthma, it's not just what you smell, but what you think you smell
New research from the Monell Center reveals that simply believing that an odor is potentially harmful can increase airway inflammation in asthmatics for at least 24 hours following exposure. The findings highlight the role that expectations can play in health-related outcomes.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Contact: Leslie Stein
stein@monell.org
267-519-4707
Monell Chemical Senses Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UI study finds potential genetic link between epilepsy and neurodegenerative disorders
A new University of Iowa study, published online July 14 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveals a potential link between epilepsy and neurodegenerative disorders.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gary Galluzzo
gary-galluzzo@uiowa.edu
319-384-0009
University of Iowa

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
The AAPS Journal
Researchers create vaccine for dust-mite allergies
University of Iowa researchers have created a vaccine for dust-mite allergies. In lab tests and animal trials, the nano-sized vaccine package was readily absorbed by immune cells and dramatically lowered allergic responses. Results appear in the The AAPS Journal.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society

Contact: Richard Lewis
richard-c-lewis@uiowa.edu
319-384-0012
University of Iowa

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Vanderbilt study shows therapeutic bacteria prevent obesity in mice
A probiotic that prevents obesity could be on the horizon. Bacteria that produce a therapeutic compound in the gut inhibit weight gain, insulin resistance and other adverse effects of a high-fat diet in mice, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Leigh MacMillan
leigh.macmillan@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
VCU receives grant to study molecular marks left by childhood adverse experiences
Virginia Commonwealth University has received a five-year, $3 million grant to study how adverse experiences such as severe illnesses, neglect and maltreatment during childhood leave molecular marks in DNA that predict health risks later in life.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Eric Peters
petersem@vcu.edu
804-828-0563
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Room for improvement in elementary school children's lunches and snacks from home
Open a child's lunch box and you're likely to find that the lunches and snacks inside fall short of federal guidelines, report researchers from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Boston Obesity Research Center

Contact: Andrea Grossman
andrea.grossman@tufts.edu
617-636-3728
Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Nature
LSUHSC contributes to work identifying new DNA regions associated with schizophrenia
Nancy Buccola, assistant professor of clinical nursing at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Nursing, contributed samples used in a study reporting new locations of genetic material associated with schizophrenia and also suggesting a possible link between the immune system and schizophrenia.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Leslie Capo
lcapo@lsuhsc.edu
504-568-4806
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Social Problems
African-American homeownership increasingly less stable and more risky
A new study from sociologists at Rice University and Cornell University found that African-Americans are 45 percent more likely than whites to switch from owning their homes to renting them.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Pediatrics
Low-income students in charter high schools less likely to engage in risky behavior
Low-income minority adolescents who were admitted to high-performing public charter high schools in Los Angeles were significantly less likely to engage in risky health behaviors than their peers who were not admitted to those schools. These students also scored significantly better on California state standardized math and English tests.
NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nano Letters
Penn study: Understanding graphene's electrical properties on an atomic level
For the first time, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have used a cutting-edge microscope to study the relationship between the atomic geometry of a ribbon of graphene and its electrical properties.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy, Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique, South Korea's Ministry of Education, Science and Technology and National Research Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Parents rank their obese children as 'very healthy'
A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine-led study suggests that parents of obese children often do not recognize the potentially serious health consequences of childhood weight gain or the importance of daily physical activity in helping their child reach a healthy weight.
Hasbro Children's Hospital Research Award, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Molecular Psychiatry
UCI researchers find epigenetic tie to neuropsychiatric disorders
Dysfunction in dopamine signaling profoundly changes the activity level of about 2,000 genes in the brain's prefrontal cortex and may be an underlying cause of certain complex neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, according to UC Irvine scientists.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Studying estrogens made by the brain may offer new insights in learning and memory
New studies being launched by neurobiologist Luke Remage-Healey at the University of Massachusetts Amherst will investigate how estrogens produced in the brains of young birds enhance their ability to learn songs during a critical window during development. This period has a parallel to universal language development in human children.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Try, try again? Study says no
MIT neuroscientists find that trying harder makes it more difficult to learn some aspects of language.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Pediatrics
Mothers of children with autism benefit from peer-led intervention
Peer-led interventions that target parental well-being can significantly reduce stress, depression and anxiety in mothers of children with disabilities, according to new findings released today in the journal Pediatrics.
NIH/National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Jennifer Wetzel
Jennifer.Wetzel@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nature
Vanderbilt discovery may advance colorectal cancer diagnosis and treatment
A Vanderbilt University-led research team has identified protein 'signatures' of genetic mutations that drive colorectal cancer, the nation's second leading cause of cancer deaths after lung cancer.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
JAMA Ophthalmology
Iodine may alleviate swelling in retinitis pigmentosa patients' retinas
Researchers from the Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School, and Boston University School of Medicine tested whether the extent of retinal swelling due to cystoid macular edema was inversely related to dietary iodine intake in patients with retinitis pigmentosa and found that it was. This finding raises the possibility that an iodine supplement could help limit or reduce central foveal swelling in retinitis pigmentosa patients with cystoid macular edema.
NIH/National Eye Institute, Massachusetts Lions Eye Research Fund, Inc., Foundation Fighting Blindness

Contact: Mary Leach
Mary_Leach@meei.harvard.edu
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Large twin study suggests that language delay due more to nature than nurture
A study of 473 sets of twins followed since birth found twins have twice the rate of language delay as do single-born children. Moreover, identical twins have greater rates of language delay than do non-identical twins, strengthening the case for the heritability of language.
NIH/National Institute for Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Contact: Karen Salisbury Henry
kahenry@ku.edu
785-864-0756
University of Kansas

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
When temperatures get cold, newly discovered process helps fruit flies cope
Cold-blooded animals cannot regulate their body temperature, so their cells are stressed when facing temperature extremes. Worse still, even at slightly colder temperatures, some biological processes in the cell are slowed down more than others, which should throw the cells' delicate chemical balance out of whack. Yet those cells manage to keep their biological processes coordinated. Now researchers from the University of Rochester and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory have found out how they do that.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Peter Iglinski/LeonorSierra
peter.iglinski@rochester.edu
585-275-4118
University of Rochester

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mycobacteria metabolism discovery may pave way for new TB drugs
The mystery of why mycobacteria -- a family that includes the microbe that causes TB -- are extraordinarily hardy organisms is being unravelled by University of Otago, New Zealand, research that offers new hope for developing a revolutionary class of antibiotics to tackle TB.
Royal Society of New Zealand's Marsden Fund, James Cook Research Fellowship, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Greg Cook
greg.cook@otago.ac.nz
University of Otago

Showing releases 3226-3250 out of 3735.

<< < 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 > >>

     
   

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