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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3251-3275 out of 3607.

<< < 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 > >>

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Health Affairs
Back to basics: Redesigning systems of care for older adults with Alzheimer's disease
In a paper published in the April issue of the peer-reviewed journal Health Affairs, Regenstrief Institute investigator Christopher M. Callahan, M.D., founding director of the Indiana University Center for Aging Research, reviews two new dementia care models that seek to decrease stress for caregivers, reduce health care costs and improve quality of care for older adults.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Good provider communication improves antidepressant adherence for diabetes patients
Adult patients with diabetes who trust their medical provider and feel included in treatment decisions are significantly more likely to take and maintain a newly prescribed antidepressant medication, according to a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Vincent Staupe
vstaupe@golinharris.com
415-318-4386
Kaiser Permanente

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Processing new information during sleep compromises memory
New research appearing in the April 9 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience highlights the important role sleep plays in strengthening and maintaining the accuracy of a memory and hints at why the brain shuts out sensory information during periods of deep sleep. The study found that introducing new odor information to an animal while it sleeps compromises its ability to remember the difference between new and previously encountered smells while awake.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Contact: Anne Nicholas
media@sfn.org
202-962-4086
Society for Neuroscience

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
National survey links teen binge drinking and alcohol-brand references in pop music
Binge drinking by teenagers and young adults is strongly associated with liking, owning and correctly identifying music that references alcohol by brand name, according to a study by the University of Pittsburgh and Norris Cotton Cancer Center. Based on a national, randomized survey of more than 2,500 people ages 15 to 23, the findings suggest that policy and educational interventions designed to limit the influence of alcohol-brand references in popular music could be important.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
UNC researchers find genetic trigger for RSV-induced infant hospitalizations
Researchers at UNC School of Medicine have pinpointed a viral protein that plays a major role in making respiratory syncytial virus the most common cause of hospitalization in children under one year of age.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unch.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Chronic smoking can diminish postural stability
Chronic cigarette smoking has a high co-occurrence with alcohol use disorders. Postural instability is also common among alcohol dependent individuals. New findings indicate that chronic cigarette use continues to impact the brain systems regulating postural stability even during abstinence from alcohol.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Thomas Paul Schmidt
thomas.schmidt@ucsf.edu
415-221-4810 x3254
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Crafty alcohol advertising directed at US adolescents through music and branding
Researchers investigate links between adolescents' involvement with music and their drinking-related behaviors. Results indicate strong associations between liking, owning, and correctly identifying music containing alcohol branding and two early problematic alcohol outcomes. Study authors suggest policy or educational interventions to reduce the impact of these exposures.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Brian A. Primack
bprimack@pitt.edu
412-586-9789
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Population Health Metrics
Penn researcher finds mortality risks of being overweight or obese are underestimated
New research by Andrew Stokes, a doctoral student in demography and sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania, suggests that many obesity studies substantially underestimate the mortality risks associated with excess weight in the United States.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Jacquie Posey
jposey@upenn.edu
215-898-6460
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Well-known cancer gene NRAS produces 5 variants, study finds
A new study shows that the NRAS gene, known to play a fundamental role in cancer development, produces five gene variants, or isoforms, rather than just one form, as thought. The study identified four previously unknown variants that the NRAS gene produces. The finding might help improve drugs for cancers in which NRAS plays a crucial role. It also suggests that NRAS might affect additional target molecules in cells.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Coleman Leukemia Research Foundation, Pelotonia Fellowship Program

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Antibiotic resistance enzyme caught in the act
NpmA is a mobile gene in bacteria that confers resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Structural biologists analyze the threat NpmA poses and reveal targets for drug development.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Disruption of VISTA plays an important role in regulating immune response
Researchers at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth have found that the body's immune system response was enhanced when they disrupted VISTA, a protein that prevents the immune system from overreacting. Understanding how checkpoint regulators like VISTA function is important to cancer researchers, who hope to use the immune system to attack tumors.
National Institutes of Health, Hitchcock Foundation, Melanoma Research Foundation, Wellcome Trust, Medical Research Council Centre for Transplantation and Biomedical Research Center at King's College London

Contact: Robin Dutcher
robin.Dutcher@hitchcock.org
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
$1.7 million NIH grant to Wayne State to discover treatments for methamphetamine-abuse
A Wayne State University professor recently received a nearly $1.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health to explore whether proteasome and parkin -- two components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system -- are potential pharmaceutical drug targets that can be manipulated to promote survival and recovery of dopaminergic terminals after binge and chronic administration of toxic doses of methamphetamine.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Psychological Science
Exploring the genetics of 'I'll do it tomorrow'
Procrastination and impulsivity are genetically linked, suggesting that the two traits stem from similar evolutionary origins, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research indicates that the traits are related to our ability to successfully pursue and juggle goals.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Environmental Health
US schoolchildren exposed to arsenic in well water have lower IQ scores
A study by researchers at Columbia University reports that schoolchildren from three school districts in Maine exposed to arsenic in drinking water experienced declines in child intelligence. While earlier studies conducted by the researchers in South Asia, and Bangladesh in particular, showed that exposure to arsenic in drinking water is negatively associated with child intelligence, this is the first study to examine intelligence against individual water arsenic exposures in the US.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genes increase the stress of social disadvantage for some children
Genes amplify the stress of harsh environments for some children, and magnify the advantage of supportive environments for other children, according to a study that's one of the first to document how genes interacting with social environments affect biomarkers of stress.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Diane Swanbrow
swanbrow@umich.edu
734-647-9069
University of Michigan

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Pediatrics
Educational interventions at Early Head Start led to decline in pediatric emergency visits
Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center found that integrating an educational intervention regarding upper respiratory infections into Early Head Start programs led to a significant decrease in pediatric emergency visits and adverse care practices among predominantly Latino families, who have been shown to be at high risk for limited health literacy.
NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Health Affairs
Cognitive impairment common among community and nursing-home resident elderly
More than 70 percent of elderly Medicare beneficiaries experience cognitive impairment or severe dementia near the end-of-life and may need surrogate decision makers for healthcare decisions. Advance care planning for older adults with dementia may be particularly important for individuals who do not reside in a nursing home or a long-term care facility, according to an article published in the April issue of Health Affairs.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Susan Murrow
smurrow@jhsph.edu
410-955-7624
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists uncover startlingly new functional details of common anti-diabetic drugs
Scientists thought they basically knew how the most common drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes worked, but a new study from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute reveals unexpected new aspects of the process. These findings could eventually lead to more potent anti-diabetic drugs with fewer serious side effects.
Florida Department of Health, National Institutes of Health, James and Esther King Biomedical Research Program, State of Florida

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Nature Immunology
La Jolla Institute discovers new mechanism for unleashing immune system against cancer
A major discovery that brings a new drug target to the increasingly exciting landscape of cancer immunotherapy was published yesterday by researchers from La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology and their collaborators from other institutes.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bonnie Ward
contact@liai.org
619-303-3160
La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Health Affairs
Doctor's specialty predicts feeding tube use
Subspecialists are much more likely than hospitalists or generalists to insert a feeding tube in hospitalized elderly patients with advanced dementia, according to a new study in Health Affairs. The study helps to explain why the practice persists, in such frail, terminal patients.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Health Affairs
Alzheimer's disease may be more prevalent and manifests itself differently among African-Americans
A new study by researchers at Rush University Medical Center reviews research that suggests that the risk for developing Alzheimer's disease among older African-Americans may be two to three times greater than in the non-Hispanic white population and that they differ from the non-Hispanic white population in risk factors and disease manifestation. The study results will be published in the April 7 issue of Health Affairs.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Illinois Department of Public Health

Contact: Nancy DiFiore
nancy_difiore@rush.edu
312-942-5159
Rush University Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genetic predisposition to liking amphetamine reduces risk of schizophrenia and ADHD
Genetic variants associated with enjoying the effects of d-amphetamine -- the active ingredient in Adderall -- are also associated with a reduced risk for developing schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, report scientists from the University of Chicago in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on April 7. The results support a long-standing hypothesis that dopamine, the neurotransmitter connected with the euphoric effects of amphetamine, is related to schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
Nature Genetics
Gene sequencing project discovers mutations tied to deadly brain tumors in young children
The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital-Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project has identified new mutations in pediatric brain tumors known as high-grade gliomas, which most often occur in the youngest patients. The research appears today as an advance online publication in the scientific journal Nature Genetics.
Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, Kay Jewelers, National Institutes of Health, Cure Starts Now Found, Smile for Sophie Forever Found

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
Nature
Columbia scientists identify key cells in touch sensation
In a study published in the April 6 online edition of the journal Nature, a team of Columbia University Medical Center researchers led by Ellen Lumpkin, Ph.D., associate professor of somatosensory biology, solve an age-old mystery of touch: how cells just beneath the skin surface enable us to feel fine details and textures.
National Institutes of Health, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Research Fellowship for Young Scientists

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
Nature Genetics
Scientists find potential drug targets in deadly pediatric brain tumors
Researchers studying a rare, always fatal brain tumor in children have found several molecular alterations that drive the cancer, according to a new study from scientists at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and McGill University. The findings identify potential new targets for drug treatments. The new research -- published April 6 in Nature Genetics -- could help physicians choose targeted agents with a better chance of combating pediatric high-grade astrocytomas.
National Institutes of Health, others

Contact: Irene Sege
irene.sege@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-7379
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Showing releases 3251-3275 out of 3607.

<< < 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 > >>

     
   

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