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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3251-3275 out of 3718.

<< < 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 > >>

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Survivors of childhood eye cancer experience normal cognitive functioning as adults
Most long-term survivors of retinoblastoma, particularly those who had been diagnosed with tumors by their first birthdays, have normal cognitive function as adults, according to a St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study. The research, which appears in the current issue of the journal Cancer, found that the vast majority of survivors work full time, live independently and fulfill other milestones of adult life.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, ALSAC

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
JAX research team identifies new mechanism for misfolded proteins in heart disease
A Jackson Laboratory research team has found that the misfolded proteins implicated in several cardiac diseases could be the result not of a mutated gene, but of mistranslations during the 'editing' process of protein synthesis.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, aTyr Pharma Inc., National Foundation for Cancer Research, American Health Assistance Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Joyce Peterson
Jackson Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
ACS Nano
ASU, IBM move ultrafast, low-cost DNA sequencing technology a step closer to reality
A team of scientists from Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute and IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center have developed a prototype DNA reader that could make whole genome profiling an everyday practice in medicine. "Our goal is to put cheap, simple and powerful DNA and protein diagnostic devices into every single doctor's office," said Stuart Lindsay, an ASU physics professor and director of Biodesign's Center for Single Molecule Biophysics. Such technology could help usher in the age of personalized medicine.
Roche, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
Arizona State University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Wireless electronic implants stop staph, then dissolve
For the first time, researchers have demonstrated a resorbable electronic implant that eliminated bacterial infection in mice by delivering heat to infected tissue when triggered by a remote wireless signal. The silk and magnesium devices then harmlessly dissolved. This is an important step forward for future development of on-demand medical devices that can be turned on remotely to perform a therapeutic function, such as managing post-surgical infection, and then degrade in the body.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Thurler
Tufts University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Animals steal defenses from bacteria
Bacteria compete for resources in the environment by injecting deadly toxins into their rivals. Researcher have now discovered that many animals steal toxins from bacteria to fight unwanted microbes growing on them. Genes for these toxins have jumped from bacterial to animals. These genes are now permanently incorporated into the genomes of these animals. Deer ticks, which can carry Lyme disease, are one of the many diverse organisms in which toxin gene transfers from bacteria to animal has occurred.
National Institutes of Health, Defense Threat Reduction Agency,Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Leila Gray
University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Medicine
Masking HIV target cells prevents viral transmission in animal model
Cloaking immune cells with antibodies that block T cell trafficking to the gut can substantially reduce the risk of viral transmission in a non-human primate model of HIV infection, scientists report.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Quinn Eastman
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Mutant protein takes babies' breath away
Researchers had never shown exactly how cells in the brain stem detect carbon dioxide and regulate breathing in humans. After taking a mutation from a two-month-old baby and expressing it in human astrocytes, they did exactly that -- and the research may lead to an early warning system to save premature infants with breathing trouble.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Krieger
University of Connecticut

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Medicine
Excessive contact between cellular organelles disrupts metabolism in obesity
Researchers at Harvard School of Public Health have found a novel mechanism causing type 2 diabetes that could be targeted to prevent or treat the disease. The research highlights a previously unrecognized molecular pathway that contributes to the malfunction of liver cells in obesity, leading to insulin resistance and diabetes.
National Institutes of Health, Pew Charitable Trusts, Alfred Benzon Foundation

Contact: Marge Dwyer
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Healthy gut microbiota can prevent metabolic syndrome, researchers say
Promoting healthy gut microbiota, the bacteria that live in the intestine, can help treat or prevent metabolic syndrome, a combination of risk factors that increases a person's risk for heart disease, diabetes and stroke, according to researchers at Georgia State University and Cornell University. Their findings are published in the journal Gastroenterology.
National Institutes of Health, Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America

Contact: LaTina Emerson
Georgia State University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Motor coordination issues in autism are caused by abnormal neural connections
Abnormal connections between neurons are the likely cause of motor coordination issues seen in autism spectrum disorder. Using a mouse model of autism, scientists from the University of Chicago identified a malfunctioning neural circuit associated with reduced capacity for motor learning. This appears to arise from an inability to eliminate unneeded neural connections in the brain. They report their findings Nov. 24 in Nature Communications.
National Institutes of Health, Simons Foundation, Brain Research Foundation, Nancy Lurie Marks Foundation

Contact: Kevin Jiang
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Ambulance risk
Patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated by basic life support ambulances have higher survival rates and better neurological outcomes than patients treated by advanced life support ambulances.
National Science Foundation, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Angela Alberti
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Obese children burdened by more than weight
High blood pressure and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are two emerging health problems related to the epidemic of childhood obesity. In a recent study, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine sought to determine the prevalence of high blood pressure in children with NAFLD, which places them at risk for premature cardiovascular disease.
NASH Clinical Research Network, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Michelle Brubaker
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
'The Transforming Horizon: A Flat World Perspective for Business Today"'
Drugs to block angiogenesis could provide new treatment for TB
Duke researchers have shown that tuberculosis bacteria escape the little pellets of immune system containment called granulomas with the help of new blood vessels that tunnel into the clusters to provide fresh oxygen and an escape route. They tested FDA-approved drugs that block this process -- known as angiogenesis -- and found they could effectively reduce the numbers of bacteria, limit their spread outside of granulomas, and increase the survival of infected laboratory animals.
National Institutes of Health, Australian Health and Medical Research Council, American Cancer Society, Malaysian Ministry of Science and Technology and Innovation, New Zealand Ministry of Science and Innovation, Mallinckrodt Scholar Awd, and others

Contact: Karl Bates
Duke University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Developing a noninvasive test for endometriosis
Researchers at UC San Francisco have identified patterns of genetic activity that can be used to diagnose endometriosis and its severity, a finding that may offer millions of women an alternative to surgery through a simple noninvasive procedure.
National Institutes of Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Specialized Cooperative Centers Program in Reproduction and Infertility, University of California, San Francisco Human En

Contact: Elizabeth Fernandez
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Clipping proteins that package genes may limit abnormal cell growth in tumors
Changes to the structure of the protein histone H3.3 may play a key role in silencing genes that regulate cancer cell growth.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, University of Cambridge, Cancer Research UK, Hutchinson Whampoa and the Human Frontier Science Program, Ellison Medical Foundation, Developmental Research Pilot Project Program at Mount Sinai

Contact: Lucia Lee
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Research shows anti-HIV medicines can cause damage to fetal hearts
Just-published findings in the journal AIDS raise concern about potential long-term harmful impact of 'antiretroviral therapy' on in-utero infants whose mothers are HIV-positive, but who are not infected with HIV themselves.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julie O'Connor
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Obesity-attributable absenteeism among US workers costs the nation more than $8 billion annually
Obesity costs the US $8.65 billion per year as a result of absenteeism in the workplace -- more than 9 percent of all absenteeism costs. The consequences of obesity among the working population go beyond healthcare and create a financial challenge not only for the nation but for individual states as well. The study is the first to provide state-level estimates of obesity-attributable costs of absenteeism among working adults in the US.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Stephanie Berger
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
More genetic clues found in a severe food allergy
Scientists have identified four new genes associated with the severe food allergy eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Because the genes appear to have roles in other allergic diseases and in inflammation, the findings may point toward potential new treatments for EoE.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Food Phight for Eosinophilic Esophagitis, Adele S. and Daniel S. Kubert Estate

Contact: John Ascenzi
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Life's extremists may be an untapped source of antibacterial drugs
Life's extremists, a family of microbes called Archaea, may be an untapped source of new antibacterial drugs. That conclusion arises from the discovery of the first antibacterial gene in this ancient lineage.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Researchers tease out glitches in immune system's self-recognition
In order to distinguish self from other, the immune system processes proteins from inside and outside the body in different ways. A new study revises understanding of how the process works and sheds light on autoimmune disease.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation

Contact: Shawna Williams
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Nail stem cells prove more versatile than press ons
There are plenty of body parts that don't grow back when you lose them. Nails are an exception, and a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science reveals some of the reasons why.
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Contact: Cristy Lytal
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
TSRI researchers find how mutant gene can cause deafness
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute have discovered how one gene is essential to hearing, uncovering a cause of deafness and suggesting new avenues for therapies.
National Institutes of Health, Dorris Neuroscience Center, Skaggs Insitute for Chemical Biology, Bundy Foundation

Contact: Madeline McCurry Schmidt
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
PLOS Computational Biology
Mass. General-developed system reveals how our brains and bodies change as we fall asleep
Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have developed a system to accurately track the dynamic process of falling asleep, something has not been possible with existing techniques. In their report in the October issue of the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology, the research team describes how combining key physiologic measurements with a behavioral task that does not interfere with sleep onset gives a better picture of the gradual process of falling asleep.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Terri Ogan
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Journal of American College of Cardiology
Study: Obesity fuels silent heart damage
Using an ultrasensitive blood test to detect the presence of a protein that heralds heart muscle injury, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that obese people without overt heart disease experience silent cardiac damage that fuels their risk for heart failure down the road.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Moffitt researchers use evolutionary principles to model cancer mutations
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are taking a unique approach to understanding and investigating cancer by utilizing evolutionary principles and computational modeling to examine the role of specific genetic mutations in the Darwinian struggle among tumor and normal cells during cancer growth.
Physical Sciences in Oncology Centers, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Kim Polacek
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Showing releases 3251-3275 out of 3718.

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