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Department of Health and Human Services

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Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3251-3275 out of 3499.

<< < 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 > >>

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
2013 American Heart Association Scientific Session
New England Journal of Medicine
Study may impact guidelines for mitral valve surgery for severe ischemic mitral regurgitation
Study reports for the first time evidence on whether or not there is any significant difference between the two current surgical approaches to treat patients with severe ischemic mitral regurgitation -- mitral valve repair and mitral valve replacement.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lauren Woods
lauren.woods@mountsinai.org
646-634-0869
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
2013 American Heart Association Scientific Session
LVAD patients benefit from heart injection with millions of powerful cells
End-stage heart failure patients who receive a surgically implanted left ventricular assist device heart pump may also benefit from a single dose of millions of powerful cells injected directly into their heart during surgery.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lauren Woods
lauren.woods@mountsinai.org
646-634-0869
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
2013 American Heart Association Scientific Session
New study reports on the high cost of cardiac surgery healthcare associated infections
After cardiac surgery, healthcare-associated infections are common complications associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and use of resources. New study findings reveal the substantial economic impact of HAIs following cardiac surgery and the importance of preventing these infections leading to re-hospitalizations.
National Institutes of Health, InHealth

Contact: Lauren Woods
Lauren.woods@mountsinai.org
646-634-0869
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
Frontiers in Neurology
Blood test accurately diagnoses concussion and predicts long term cognitive disability
A new blood biomarker correctly predicted which concussion victims went on to have white matter tract structural damage and persistent cognitive dysfunction following a mild traumatic brain injury. If validated in larger studies, this blood test could identify concussion patients at increased risk for persistent cognitive dysfunction or further brain damage and disability if returning to sports or military activities.
NIH/National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Kim Menard
kim.menard@uphs.upenn.edu
215-662-6183
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics
Phthalate exposure linked to preterm birth
The odds of preterm birth for women exposed to a commonly used class of chemicals known as phthalates are increased significantly, according to a new study from the University of Michigan School of Public Health and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Laurel Thomas Gnagey
ltgnagey@umich.edu
734-647-1841
University of Michigan

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
Chemistry of Materials
New technique controls dimensions of gold nanorods while manufacturing on a large scale
North Carolina State University researchers have a developed a technique for efficiently producing nanoscale gold rods in large quantities while simultaneously controlling the dimensions of the nanorods and their optical properties. The optical properties of gold nanorods make them desirable for use in biomedical applications ranging from imaging technologies to cancer treatment.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
Study to identify functions of hypothetical genes in 2 infectious disease pathogens
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has awarded the University of Chicago $4.4 million over five years to study genes of unknown function in bacteria that cause plague and brucellosis.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
Radiology
Age affects short-term quality of life after breast biopsy
Breast biopsies can adversely affect short-term quality-of-life, and the effects are more pronounced in younger patients, according to a new study.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
Radiology
Study finds altered brain connections in epilepsy patients
Patients with the most common form of focal epilepsy have widespread, abnormal connections in their brains that could provide clues toward diagnosis and treatment, according to a new study.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Recessionary woes lead to adverse alcohol outcomes for men and middle-aged Americans
Economic downturns can have adverse health-related consequences, including poorer mental health and higher rates of suicide. New research looks at different types of economic loss and associated alcohol consumption/ problems. The most adverse effects of severe economic loss on drunkenness and alcohol problems were concentrated among men and the middle-aged.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Nina Mulia, Ph.D.
nmulia@arg.org
510-597-3440
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
PLOS Medicine
AIDS guidelines for children may not improve death rates but may improve treatment access
Recent changes to World Health Organization guidelines for starting anti-AIDS drugs (antiretroviral therapy—ART) in young children are unlikely to improve death rates but may increase the numbers of children receiving ART by simplifying access to treatment, according to a study by international researchers published in this week's PLOS Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health, World Health Organization

Contact: Fiona Godwin
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
Development
Breakthrough in adult heart repair
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is responsible for approximately one-third of all deaths. A major problem with CVD is that adult hearts do not repair well after injury. Now, researchers have discovered a way to change that. By identifying and manipulating the normal signals that block heart repair, they were able to show complete functional heart recovery in adult mice after myocardial infarction, which mimics a human heart attack. This breakthrough brings new hope for treating CVD.
National Institutes of Health, Vivian L. Smith Foundation, Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas, American Heart Foundation

Contact: Caroline Hendry
c.hendry@biologists.com
44-122-342-0007
The Company of Biologists

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Adult survivors of childhood cancer at risk of becoming frail at an early age
Young adults who survived childhood cancer are more likely than their peers to be frail, according to a St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study, which reported the condition is more common among female survivors than women decades older.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities

Contact: Summer Freeman
summer.freeman@stjude.org
901-595-3061
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
2013 American Heart Association Scientific Session
New England Journal of Medicine
Study finds similar outcomes for repair or replacement of damaged heart valves
New research presented today at the 2013 Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found no difference in outcomes at one-year between two recommended surgical options for treating ischemic mitral regurgitation -- repair of the leaky valve or its replacement with an artificial valve.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Jessica Mikulski
jessica.mikulski@uphs.upenn.edu
215-796-4829
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
Neuroscience Letters
Stress reduction through meditation may aid in slowing the progression of Alzheimer's disease
A new pilot study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center suggests that the brain changes associated with meditation and stress reduction may play an important role in slowing the progression of age-related cognitive disorders like Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.
Harvard Medical School Osher Research Center, NIH/National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Contact: Kelly Lawman
klawman@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7305
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
Analytical Chemistry
SlipChip counts molecules with chemistry and a cell phone
Limited access to expensive equipment and trained professionals can impede the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Qualitative tests that provide a "yes" or "no" answer (like at-home pregnancy tests) have been optimized for resource-limited settings, but most quantitative tests -- needed to determine precise concentrations, like viral loads -- are still done in a laboratory. Using a lab-on-a-chip device and a smartphone, Caltech researchers developed a method to determine the concentration of HIV RNA in a sample.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
mr@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
Cancer Prevention Research
Men with prostate cancer who ate a low-fat fish oil diet showed changes in their cancer tissue
Men with prostate cancer who ate a low-fat diet and took fish oil supplements had lower levels of pro-inflammatory substances in their blood and a lower cell cycle progression score, a measure used to predict cancer recurrence, than men who ate a typical Western diet, UCLA researchers found.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Irwin
kirwin@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2262
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
2013 American Heart Association Scientific Session
Circulation: Heart Failure
New study shows spironolactone reduces heart failure hospitalizations, but not mortality
A late-breaking clinical trial, known as the Treatment of Preserved Cardiac Function Heart Failure with an Aldosterone Antagonist trial, to be presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, Nov. 18, 2013, demonstrates that spironolactone did not reduce the primary outcome of cardiovascular death, heart failure hospitalization, nor surviving a cardiac arrest in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (pump function). However, spironolactone did reduce the major burden faced by these patients -- the risk of repeated hospitalizations for heart failure.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-525-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
Medical Care
Better outcomes reported from high-volume providers of complex endoscopic procedure
Patients who seek treatment from physicians who more frequently perform a high-risk endoscopic procedure are less likely to be admitted to the hospital or require a repeat procedure. Unfortunately, 90 percent of physicians performing these procedures do very few of them.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Mary Hardin
mhardin@iu.edu
317-274-5456
Indiana University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
2013 American Heart Association Scientific Session
JAMA
Mayo Clinic-led study: 2 drugs do not improve kidney function in acute heart failure patients
Two drugs tested in a larger trial did not improve kidney function in acute heart failure patients, contrary to results of smaller studies. The results were presented today at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2013 in Dallas and simultaneously published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH/Heart Failure Clinical Research Network, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Contact: Traci Klein
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-990-1182
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
Women & Infants earns $3 million grant from National Institutes of Health
Women & Infants Hospital has earned a five-year, $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to determine the efficacy of a neurobehavioral exam that may help to identify which infants are at greatest risk for developmental impairment.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Amy Blustein
ablustein@wihri.org
401-681-2822
Women & Infants Hospital

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
Psychiatric Services
Most teen mental health problems go untreated
More than half of adolescents with psychiatric disorders receive no treatment of any sort, says a new study by E. Jane Costello, a Duke University professor of psychology and epidemiology and associate director of the Duke Center for Child and Family Policy. When treatment does occur, the providers are rarely mental health specialists.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Alison Jones
alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
ACS Nano
Penn produces graphene nanoribbons with nanopores for fast DNA sequencing
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have made an advance towards realizing a new gene sequencing technique based on threading DNA through a tiny hole in a layer of graphene. Earlier versions of the technique only made use of graphene's unbeatable thinness, but the Penn team's research shows how the material's unique electrical properties may be employed to make faster and more sensitive sequencing devices.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
Clinical Psychological Science
Teens who drink alone more likely to develop alcohol problems as young adults
Most teenagers who drink alcohol do so with their friends in social settings, but a new study by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh reveals that a significant number of adolescents consume alcohol while they are alone. Furthermore, solitary teenage drinkers are more likely to develop alcohol use disorders in early adulthood.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Mental Health

Contact: Shilo Rea
shilo@cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
2013 American Heart Association Scientific Session
New England Journal of Medicine
National study finds renal stenting does not improve outcomes for renal artery stenosis patients
According to the findings from a national research trial, people who suffer from a narrowing of the arteries that lead to the kidneys, or renal artery stenosis, do not experience better outcomes when renal stenting is used. Instead, a comprehensive regimen of drug and medical therapies works just as well.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Ellen Slingsby
eslingsby@lifespan.org
401-444-6421
Lifespan

Showing releases 3251-3275 out of 3499.

<< < 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 > >>

     
   

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