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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3276-3300 out of 3514.

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Public Release: 17-Nov-2013
Nature Medicine
Drug shows early promise in treating seizures
A study out today in the journal Nature Medicine suggests a potential new treatment for the seizures that often plague children with genetic metabolic disorders and individuals undergoing liver failure. The discovery hinges on a new understanding of the complex molecular chain reaction that occurs when the brain is exposed to too much ammonia.
National Institutes of Health, Research Council of Norway, Nordic Center of Excellence Program, Letten Found, Fulbright Foundation

Contact: Mark Michaud
mark_michaud@urmc.rochester.edu
585-273-4790
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Nov-2013
2013 American Heart Association Scientific Session
'Virtual reality hands' may help stroke survivors recover hand function
Scientists used brain-computer interface technology to help stroke survivors use their minds to power "virtual reality hands" to help regain the use of their arms and hands. The technology offers hope of recovery to stroke survivors and others who have lost mobility and control of their arms and hands.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bridgette McNeill
bridgette.mcneill@heart.org
214-706-1135
American Heart Association

Public Release: 17-Nov-2013
2013 American Heart Association Scientific Session
Childhood cancer treatment takes toll on hearts of survivors
Childhood cancer survivors have changes in their arteries that may increase their risks of early heart disease and atherosclerosis. Monitoring these patients for heart disease and managing risk factors will be important following cancer treatment.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Center for Research Resources and General Clinical Research

Contact: Bridgette McNeill
bridgette.mcneill@heart.org
214-706-1135
American Heart Association

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
Journal of Cell Biology
Penn Dental Medicine team identifies molecule critical to healing wounds
Skin provides a first line of defense against viruses, bacteria and parasites that might otherwise make people ill. When an injury breaks that barrier, a systematic chain of molecular signaling launches to close the wound and re-establish the skin's layer of protection. A study led by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania's School of Dental Medicine now shows that the molecule FOX01 is critical to the wound-healing process.
NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
U of M researchers find HIV protein may impact neurocognitive impairment in infected patients
A protein shed by HIV-infected brain cells alters synaptic connections between networks of nerve cells, according to new research out of the University of Minnesota. The findings could explain why nearly half of all patients infected with the AIDS virus experience some level of neurocognitive impairment.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Caroline Marin
crmarin@umn.edu
612-624-5680
University of Minnesota Academic Health Center

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
Cancer
Drug offers promising approach to improve outcome for children with high-risk leukemia
Combining the drug gemtuzumab ozogamicin with conventional chemotherapy may improve the outcome of bone marrow transplantation for some children battling high-risk acute myeloid leukemia, according to a study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities

Contact: Summer Freeman
summer.freeman@stjude.org
901-595-3061
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
Mount Sinai's Arvin Dar, Ph.D., receives NIH New Innovator Award for drug development
Arvin Dar, PhD, structural and chemical biologist in oncological sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, is one of 41 national recipients of the prestigious National Institutes of Health Director's New Innovator Awards for High-Risk, High Reward Research.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mount Sinai Press Office
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
American Journal of Sociology
How teens choose their friends
A national study led by a Michigan State University scholar finds that the courses students take in high school have powerful effects on the friendships they make.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 62nd Annual Meeting
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Vivax malaria may be evolving around natural defense
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute have discovered recent genetic mutations in a parasite that causes over 100 million cases of malaria annually -- changes that may render tens of millions of Africans who had been considered resistant, susceptible to infection.
The Clinical and Translational Science Collaborative of Cleveland, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-368-4442
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
Obesity Week
Obesity
Mandatory calorie postings at fast-food chains often ignored or unseen, does not influence food choice
Posting the calorie content of menu items at major fast-food chains in Philadelphia, per federal law, does not change purchasing habits or decrease the number of calories that those customers consume, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center reported today at the Obesity Society's annual scientific meeting, held in Atlanta, Georgia.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lorinda Klein
lorindaann.klein@NYUMC.org
212-404-3533
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Persistent gene therapy in muscle may not require immunosuppression
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Christian Mueller and colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Medical School evaluated the persistence of rAAV-mediated expression the gene encoding M-type α-1 antitrypsin in patients that were AAT deficient
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, US Food and Drug Administration

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Tipping the balance between senescence and proliferation
p53 is produced as various isoforms as the result of alternative splicing and promoter usage. One isoform, p53-beta, accelerates cellular arrest, while another isoform, delta-133p53 represses replicative senescence in cultured cells. In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Abdul Mondal and colleagues at the National Cancer Institute evaluated the expression of these two p53 isoforms in T lymphocytes from healthy donors and donors with lung cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Grant Agency of the Czech Republic, Biospecimen Repository Service

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI early table of contents for Nov. 15, 2013
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, Nov. 15, 2013, in the JCI<:Whole-brain circuit dissection in free-moving animals reveals cell-specific mesocorticolimbic networks; Impaired periamygdaloid-cortex prodynorphin is characteristic of opiate addiction and depression; Systems pharmacology identifies drug targets for Stargardt disease-associated retinal degeneration; Balancing GRK2 and EPAC1 levels prevents and relieves chronic pain, and more.
National Institutes of Health, Dermatology Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and others

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
ASN Kidney Week 2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Blocking signal-transmitting cellular pores may prevent damage to kidneys
A group of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has identified a molecule that plays a key role in the breakdown of the kidney filter, presenting a potential therapeutic target for stopping the damage before it becomes irreversible.
National Institutes of Health, American Society of Nephrology

Contact: Mike Morrison
mdmorrison@partners.org
617-724-6425
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
Toxicity database under development at Rutgers-Camden
A Rutgers–Camden professor is developing a comprehensive data system that can be used as a valuable computational tool for researchers by providing them with access to chemical toxicity information.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ed Moorhouse
ejmoor@camden.rutgers.edu
856-225-6759
Rutgers University

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
PLOS Pathogens
Evolution can select for evolvability, Penn biologists find
Evolution does not have foresight. But organisms with a greater capacity to evolve may fare better in changing environments. This raises the question: Does evolution favor characteristics that increase a species' ability to evolve? For several years, biologists have attempted to provide evidence that natural selection has acted on evolvability. Now a new paper by University of Pennsylvania researchers offers, for the first time, clear evidence that the answer is yes.
Burroughs Wellcome Fund, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
Nature Neuroscience
Mass. General study identifies genes uniquely expressed by the brain's immune cells
Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have used a new sequencing method to identify a group of genes used by the brain's immune cells -- called microglia -- to sense pathogenic organisms, toxins or damaged cells that require their response. Identifying these genes should lead to better understanding of the role of microglia both in normal brains and in neurodegenerative disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Sue McGreevey
smcgreevey@partners.org
617-724-2764
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
Cell Reports
Understanding a protein's role in familial Alzheimer's disease
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have used genetic engineering of human induced pluripotent stem cells to specifically and precisely parse the roles of a key mutated protein in causing familial Alzheimer's disease, discovering that simple loss-of-function does not contribute to the inherited form of the neurodegenerative disorder.
California Institute of Regenerative Medicine, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
Calcified Tissue International
New studies may explain fractures in some who take osteoporosis drugs
Research with baboons at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute in San Antonio may help explain why some people who take bone-strengthening drugs like bisphosphonates are at-risk for atypical fractures in the long bones in their legs.
Texas Biomedical Forum, Texas Biomed Founder's Council, San Antonio Area Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Joseph Carey
jcarey@txbiomed.org
210-258-9437
Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
PLOS Genetics
Protein interplay in muscle tied to life span
Brown University biologists have uncovered a complicated chain of molecular events that leads from insulin to protein degradation in muscles and significantly diminished life span in fruit flies. The new study in PLoS Genetics, which may have broad implications across species, identifies the fly version the mammalian protein activin as the central culprit in the process.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Ellison Medical Foundation

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Regenstrief and IU study: Older adults with severe mental illness challenge healthcare system
Although older adults with serious mental illness didn't have more recorded physical illness and had fewer outpatient visits to primary care physicians, they made more medical emergency department visits and had considerably longer medical hospitalizations than older adults without mental illness according to a study conducted by researchers from the Regenstrief Institute and the Indiana University Center for Aging Research.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
Journal of Sleep Research
Bradley Hospital researchers link lack of sleep in teens to higher risk of illness
Newly released findings from Bradley Hospital published in the Journal of Sleep Research have found that acute illnesses, such as colds, flu, and gastroenteritis were more common among healthy adolescents who got less sleep at night. Additionally, the regularity of teens' sleep schedules was found to impact their health. The study, titled "Sleep patterns are associated with common illness in adolescents," was led by Kathryn Orzech, Ph.D. of the Bradley Hospital Sleep Research Laboratory.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jill Reuter
jreuter@lifespan.org
401-444-6863
Lifespan

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
Cell, Host & Microbe
Bleeding symptom leads scientists to intracellular trafficker's role in virus propagation
Vermont researchers find a new important clue to how deadly rodent-borne viruses harness ERGIC-53 to ensure their reproductive success.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jennifer Nachbur
jennifer.nachbur@uvm.edu
802-656-7875
University of Vermont

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
Social Science and Medicine
State child restraint laws leave many unprotected, NYU study finds
Child restraint laws across many states have gaps that leave unprotected passengers highly vulnerable to vehicle-crash injuries, a study by New York University has found. The findings show that many child restraint laws lag behind existing research on vehicular safety and fail to follow guidelines adopted by medical experts.
National Institutes of Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
PLOS Medicine
Genetic signature identified for RSV, the leading cause of infant hospitalizations worldwide
Scientists from Nationwide Children's Hospital have identified the genetic signature of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the leading cause of infant hospitalizations around the world. The work is a key step toward a better understanding of the immune response to RSV, which will aid the development of a vaccine and a tool that could allow physicians to determine the severity of the infection when symptoms first develop.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, RGK Foundation

Contact: Gina Bericchia
Gina.Bericchia@NationwideChildrens.org
614-355-0495
Nationwide Children's Hospital

Showing releases 3276-3300 out of 3514.

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