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Department of Health and Human Services

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Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3276-3300 out of 3808.

<< < 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 | 136 > >>

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Science
World population to keep growing this century, hit 11 billion by 2100
The chance that world population in 2100 will be between 9.6 billion and 12.3 billion people is 80 percent, according to the first such United Nations forecast to incorporate modern statistical tools.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Neuron
Gambling with confidence: Are you sure about that?
Confidence determines much of our path through life, but what is it? Most people would describe it as an emotion or a feeling. In contrast, scientists at CSHL have found that confidence is actually a measurable quantity, and not reserved just for humans. The team, led by CSHL Associate Professor Adam Kepecs, has identified a brain region in rats whose function is required to for the animals to express confidence in their decisions.
Klingenstein, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Whitehall Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia

Contact: Jaclyn Jansen
jjansen@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Cancer Research
New non-invasive technique could revolutionize the imaging of metastatic cancer
In preclinical animal models of metastatic prostate cancer, scientists at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center, VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine and Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions have provided proof-of-principle of a new molecular imaging approach that could revolutionize doctors' ability to see tumors that have metastasized to other sites in the body, including the bones.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Prostate Cancer Foundation, Patrick C. Walsh Foundation, National Foundation for Cancer Research

Contact: John Wallace
wallacej@vcu.edu
804-628-1550
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Journal of the Americal Chemical Society
Scripps Research Institute chemists modify antibiotic to vanquish resistant bacteria
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have devised a new antibiotic based on vancomycin that is powerfully effective against vancomycin-resistant strains of MRSA and other disease-causing bacteria.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Madeline McCurry Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Development and Psychopathology
Fighting parents hurt children's ability to recognize and regulate emotions
Exposure to verbal and physical aggression between parents may hurt a child's ability to identify and control emotions, according to a longitudinal study led by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@nyu.edu
212-998-6797
New York University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Nature Genetics
Large study reveals new genetic variants that raise risk for prostate cancer
In an analysis of genetic information among more than 87,000 men, a global team of scientists says it has found 23 new genetic variants -- common differences in the genetic code -- that increase a man's risk for prostate cancer. The so-called 'meta-analysis,' believed to be the largest of its kind, has revealed once hidden mutations among men in a broad array of ethnic groups comprising men of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry.
US Department of Defense, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Cancer Research UK, Prostate Cancer UK, EU, Patrick Henry, P. Kevin Jaffe, and Peter Jay Sharpe Foundation

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Math model designed to replace invasive kidney biopsy for lupus patients
Mathematics might be able to reduce the need for invasive biopsies in patients suffering kidney damage related to the autoimmune disease lupus.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Avner Friedman
Friedman.158@osu.edu
614-292-5795
Ohio State University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Basic and Applied Social Psychology
Lack of facial expression leads to perceptions of unhappiness, new OSU research shows
People with facial paralysis are perceived as being less happy simply because they can't communicate in the universal language of facial expression, a new study from an Oregon State University psychology professor shows.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kathleen Bogart
Kathleen.bogart@oregonstate.edu
541-737-1357
Oregon State University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Nature
Chimpanzee lethal aggression a result of adaptation rather than human impacts
A new study using long-term data gathered on chimpanzee aggression is the first effort to test the human impact versus adaptive strategies hypothesis and finds that human impact is not the culprit.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ian Gilby
ian.gilby@asu.edu
480-965-3807
Arizona State University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Brain imaging research pinpoints neurobiological basis for key symptoms associated with post-traumatic stress disorder like listlessness and emotional detachment in trauma victims
In a novel brain-imaging study among trauma victims, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have linked an opioid receptor in the brain -- associated with emotions -- to a narrow cluster of trauma symptoms, including sadness, emotional detachment and listlessness. The study, published online today in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, holds important implications for targeted, personalized treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, a psychiatric condition affecting more than 8 million Americans that can cause a wide range of debilitating psychiatric symptoms.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Science, US Department of Veterans Affairs

Contact: Lorinda Klein
lorindaann.klein@nyumc.org
212-404-3533
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Nature
New branch added to European family tree
Previous work suggested that Europeans descended from two ancestral groups: indigenous hunter-gatherers and early European farmers. This new study shows that there was also a third ancestral group, the Ancient North Eurasians, who contributed genetic material to almost all present-day Europeans. The research also reveals an even older lineage, the Basal Eurasians.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Environmental Health Perspectives
Phthalates heighten risk for childhood asthma
Researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health at the Mailman School of Public Health are the first to demonstrate an association between childhood asthma and prenatal exposure to two phthalates used in a diverse array of household products. Results appear online in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Timothy Paul
tp2111@columbia.edu
212-305-2676
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
For some lung cancer patients, surgery may yield better long-term results
Patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer who are otherwise healthy fare better over time if they undergo conventional surgery versus less-invasive radiosurgery to remove their cancer, according to a Yale study. The findings are scheduled to be presented at the 56th annual conference of the American Society for Radiation Oncology in San Francisco.
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Science

Contact: Vicky Agnew
vicky.agnew@yale.edu
843-697-6208
Yale University

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Counting fish teeth reveals regulatory DNA changes behind rapid evolution, adaptation
Threespine sticklebacks, small fish found around the globe, undergo rapid evolutionary change when they move from the ocean to freshwater lakes, losing their armor and gaining more teeth in as little as 10 years. UC Berkeley biologist Craig Miller shows that this rapid change results not from mutations in functional genes, but changes in regulatory DNA. He pinpoints a gene that could be responsible for teeth, bone or jaw deformities in humans, including cleft palate.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Lancet Oncology
Improved risk identification will aid fertility preservation in young male cancer patients
A study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators has found the chemotherapy dose threshold below which male childhood cancer survivors are likely to have normal sperm production. The study appears in Sept. 17 edition of the journal Lancet Oncology.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehlau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Nature
Slimy fish and the origins of brain development
Lamprey -- slimy, eel-like parasitic fish with tooth-riddled, jawless sucking mouths -- are rather disgusting to look at, but thanks to their important position on the vertebrate family tree, they can offer important insights about the evolutionary history of our own brain development, suggests a recent study done at Caltech.
National Institutes of Health, Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Medical Internet Research
Do wearable lifestyle activity monitors really work?
Wearable electronic activity monitors hold great promise in helping people to reach their wellness goals. These increasingly sophisticated devices help the wearers improve their wellness by constantly monitoring their activities and bodily responses through companion computer programs and mobile apps. Given the large market for these devices, researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston analyzed 13 of these devices to compare how the devices and their apps work to motivate the wearer.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Education, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, American Heart Association

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
BioMed Central Biology
Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses
The same viruses that make us sick can take up residence in and on the human body without provoking a sneeze, cough or other troublesome symptom, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Caroline Arbanas
arbanasc@wustl.edu
314-286-0109
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Researchers studying improving physician opioid prescribing
Boston University School of Medicine researcher Dr. Jeffrey Samet and Dr. Carlos Del Rio from Emory University were recently awarded a five year, $5 million grant from the National Institute of Drug Abuse for their project titled: Improving Physician Opioid Prescribing for Chronic Pain in HIV-infected Persons.
NIH/National Institute of Drug Abuse

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Wistar and Penn Medicine collaborate on $12.1 million SPORE grant in melanoma
The Wistar Institute's Meenhard Herlyn, D.V.M., D.Sc., is the principal investigator on a $12.1 million Special Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) grant, a prestigious National Cancer Institute collaborative grant that brings together researchers at Wistar and the University of Pennsylvania to develop new melanoma therapies. The goal of this SPORE is to translate fundamental laboratory discoveries into new therapeutics that will benefit patients of melanoma and other skin cancers.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Greg Lester
glester@wistar.org
215-898-3943
The Wistar Institute

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Hey1 and Hey2 ensure inner ear 'hair cells' are made at the right time, in the right place
Two Johns Hopkins neuroscientists have discovered the 'molecular brakes' that time the generation of important cells in the inner ear cochleas of mice. These 'hair cells' translate sound waves into electrical signals that are carried to the brain and are interpreted as sounds. If the arrangement of the cells is disordered, hearing is impaired.
Whitehall Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-440-1929
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Rehabilitation Psychology
Kessler Foundation scientists link slowed processing speed with executive deficits in MS
Kessler Foundation researchers have published a study supporting the role of slowed processing speed in the executive deficits found in individuals with multiple sclerosis. 'Does slowed processing speed account for executive deficits in multiple sclerosis? Evidence from neuropsychological performance and structural neuroimaging,' was published online ahead of print on Aug. 18 by Rehabilitation Psychology. MS cognitive research should focus on two key domains -- processing speed and memory.
NIH/National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation Research, National Institutes of Health, National MS Society

Contact: Carolann Murphy
cmurphy@kesslerfoundation.org
973-324-8382
Kessler Foundation

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Cell Stem Cell
Scientists create therapy-grade stem cells using new cocktail to reprogram adult cells
Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have developed a new cocktail that coaxes adult cells to become pluripotent stem cells of a high enough quality to be used in therapeutic applications. Their research showed that using a different combination of reprogramming factors can produce a much higher quality result, delivering fewer colonies of iPSCs of which 80 percent passed the toughest pluripotency test.
Israeli Centers of Research Excellence Program, Kirschstein National Research Service Award, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Chapman Foundation, Florence Brill Graduate Student Fellowship

Contact: Dov Smith
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82844
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Lactation linked to reduced estrogen receptor-negative, triple-negative breast cancer risk
Women who have had children (parous women) appear to have an increased risk of developing estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer, the subtype that carries a higher mortality rate and is more common in women of African ancestry. A similar relationship was found for triple-negative breast cancer. However, the association between childbearing and increased risk of estrogen receptor-negative and triple-negative breast cancer was largely confined to the women who had never breastfed.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Prostate cancer patients who receive hypofractionated RT report consistent QoL
Prostate cancer patients who received hypofractionated radiation therapy reported that their quality of life, as well as bladder and bowel function were at similar levels before and after radiation therapy, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Showing releases 3276-3300 out of 3808.

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